Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 14

Standard
Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 14

224-226 Bridge Street Carleton Place

mch1 (1).jpg

Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

mch2

224-226 Bridge Street Carleton Place-1840, 1855, 1880

 

The brothers Robert and James Bell prominent Carleton Place businessmen built the
building at 224 Bridge Street at the time. It was owned and operated for seventeen
years by Carleton Place’s premier hotelier and was the setting for some of the
municipal council meetings of the 1840s and 1850s.

Image result for leland hotel carleton place

 

Like the Mississippi Hotel the Leland Hotel had Lavallee’s imprint on its operation.
Lavallee was the owner from its opening in 1846 until 1870 excluding 1852-3 when
he was in California and Australia. The hotel during Lavallee’s ownership was the
Carleton Hotel. Lavallee purchased the new large stone structure from Robert Bell.
George Cornell bought the Carleton House in 1870 and for thirty years thereafter the
hotel had a serious of owners. Peter P. Salter bought the hotel in 1900 and renamed
it the Leland Hotel. In 1904 the hotel was bought and renovated by Michael Doyle
who operated it until his death in 1916. Michael’s son Leo took over control and
operated the Leland until 1954. Leo’s staff consisted of an Irish lady named Bridget Duggan and her niece, Brydie Byme. There was usually a Chinese cook in the kitchen. Leo and Eddie Neron worked at Nichol’s Planing Mill and Marshall Stanley a mechanic at McGregor’s Garage.

 

volks23

 

Neil McGregor and his wife Irma Hunsberger ran the garage on the corner and Orville J. Stanley sold Chev cars from there. The office over the years was Merle Houston and Tillie (Kennedy) Bigras. When Mr. McGregor retired his top mechanic took over and the building was operated as  a garage until Bennett Motors moved to Townline,

Victor Bennett of Bennett Motors bought the hotel and renovated it for use of shops and apartments. The stone structure has been used in this capacity since. There was an alleyway between the Lodge building and the Leland Hotel.

 

Jules “Julie” Pilon of the Leland Hotel– Weather Man

Leo Doyle of the Leland Hotel in Carleton Place –Calling All Doyles

The Leland and Rathwell Hotels on Bridge Street

When was the First Car Fatality in Carleton Place?

 

Screenshot 2018-01-10 at 15.jpg

228-230 Bridge Street Carleton Place Ontario

British Hotel-1850s-1860s

The property was originally acquired by Edmond Morphy, the original settler of
Carleton Place as a grant from the Crown. The property passed from Morphy
through the hands of several owners before evidence show a building on the site.
Wallings 1863 Lanark and Renfrew County map shows the site occupied by a
blacksmith shop. Mr. Lavallee’s hotel is located to the southeast. This is during
William Kelly’s ownership of the land. William Kelly (1828-1910) operated the
British Hotel in the 1860s and 1870s. Between 1863 and 1869 Mr. Kelly erected a
new building or renovated the existing structure as his hotel.

 

benne (1).jpg

Bennett’s Chevrolet in the old Leland Hotel – Photo- Carleton Place Canadian Files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

A public archives plate of 1869 shows William Kelly’s hotel. It was named the British
Hotel. A brick structure was added to the back of the building 1870’s ca. After
Kelly’s ownership the hotel was bought and sold several times. During John A.
McLaren’s ownership and Patrick Faughnam’s management in the early 1900s it was
known as the Revere House. In 1922 it was acquired by Forbes and Neil McGregor
and operated as an auto shop and rental unit. Victor Bennett purchased it and in
1944 he added the concrete block section to the rear and used it along with the
Leland Hotel as an auto showroom and repair shop. It was also housed different enterprises which one was the Canadian outlet of the American Co. Sloppy Joes.
Records show that there is a possibility that this site was Robert Burns Tavern owned
it in 1851 by Robert McLaren and later became the British Lion Hotel operated by
William Kelly. In 1890 the hotel was renamed Revere House.

 

Death from Corrosive Sublimate —Carleton Place’s Revere House

Death from Corrosive Sublimate —Carleton Place’s Revere House

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

 

relatedreading

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Comments Comments Comments–Documenting History

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12

Dr. Johnson Downing and Ferril I Presume? Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12 a

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign–Dr. Winters 154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place –Jaan Kolk Files

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 13

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

One response »

  1. Interesting to see the Vic Bennett Motors 1964 advert. I remember my father deliberating whether to buy the 1964 Corvair or the Chevy II. The debate went on for days. He eventually bought the Chevy II. Of course, as a 10 year old who was smitten by all things automotive, i spent quite a bit of time in the dealership while this was going on. My vote was for the Nassua blue 1964 Corvette that was in the showroom…. but that idea never had a chance!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s