Author Archives: lindaseccaspina

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

Did you Know this About the Perth Cannons?

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This is where some of your ancestors ended up if they broke the law. Perth Court and Jail

Perth Gaol, 11th May, 1876.

I inspected the gaol to-day and found it throughout in very good order, but not quite so tidy looking as it usually is found partly owing to cleaning going on in some parts of it. The yards were in a welt-kept state. In providing a tank for the soft water the undersigned would recommend an iron one as being cheaper in the long run, and not so subject to leak. The jailor complains of the want of a dark punishment cell, in consequence of which he is unable to control unruly prisoners.

A part of the bucket-room in the north-east comer might be used in the meantime. The knowledge that such a place exists in the jail will a deterrent upon such characters. The gaol clothing is reported to be sufficient for the wants of the prison. There were eleven persons found in custody on this occasion, among them three insane women— Mrs. Nesbitt. Mrs. Jennings, and Ellen Patterson,—who have been so long in custody. The last named idiot will be removed to the asylum as soon as it is ready for the accommodation of that class— about the 15th of June.

Bridget Derring is evidently a case of acute insanity, although of long standing. If the gaol surgeon thinks that she would be benefited by asylum treatment a place in some of the asylums will be found-for her at an early day. I am glad to note a reduction in the number of old resident vagrant lodgers, and I hope no more will be committed. The books were found  in good order.

J Langmuir inspector

February 2 1890-Almonte Gazette

The Perth gaol has been pretty foul of tramps and paupers this winter. Several were liberated a few days ago by the order of the Ontario Attorney. We need to accept employment on the doable track- and a contract between Gananoque and Belleville. This shows the necessity of some change in the mode of dealing with paupers or tramps.

The gaol is not the proper place for them, for two reasons : In the first place, some of these men may comr from misfortune, and not from evil habits,  and have been compelled to seek the shelter and food to be found in the gaol. It is scarcely fair, and certainly not wise, to compel them to associate with criminals of all grades and degrees of wickedness.

In the second place if the county provided a poorhouse, many kinds of light labour could be supplied for feeble paupers, by which means they could earn at least a part of their support. The Brockville town council lately tried in vain to induce the Leeds and Grenville county council to join with them in erecting such a place for the poor, and the Recorder points out that the county pays out yearly for the relief of its poor. The Ontario Government is likely to deal at an early day, if not this session, with this question.

August 1924- Almonte Gazette

James Bros, have completed rebuilding of the old cannon In’ front of tfie court house, PferGL These guns have been the property of the town for many years. The history of the guns is told as follows: by a neatly painted poster. Manufactured in ‘Belguim in 1775; used by Americans in-war 1812; captured by the British at Chrysler Farm; then presented to Perth for military service; rebuilt in 1924 by. James Bros., Perth, Ont.

PERTH’s VERBRUGGEN GUNS
and
The Legend of Crysler’s Farm

1


“Artillery adds dignity, to what would otherwise be an ugly brawl”



The purported history of the cannons guarding Lanark County’s Court House in Perth has,
for two centuries, been an often recounted tall-tale of uncertain origin.In its most familiar form, the story contends that the guns were originally manufactured in Holland or Belgium for the French army. Captured by the Duke of York during the Flanders campaign.


They were sent with a British army to Quebec and saw action in the American
Revolutionary War, but were surrendered to the rebel Continental Army at Saratoga.
Then, nearly 40 years later, during the War of 1812, the guns were re-captured by the British at the
Battle of Crysler’s Farm and sent to Perth for purposes of saluting high holidays, where they were
later mounted on the grounds of the Court House as memorials to Perth’s military heritage.


This account of the much-travelled guns was alluded to in print at least as early as July 5,
1867 when the Perth Courier reported that the salute to Perth’s first Dominion Day was fired by
“two cannon captured from the Americans during the 1812-15 war”. The first detailed version of
the story in print seems to appear in the Ottawa Daily Citizen, of November 5, 1877, as part of a
profile of Bathurst Township resident John Manion (1804-1893). Manion was the son of soldiersettler Sergeant Thomas Manion (1779-1860) and claimed to have been an eye-witness to the battle at Crysler’s Farm where his father fought in the British line with the 49th Regiment of Foot. Read the rest here.. CLICK

ULTIMATE PENALTY OF THE LAW
The Death Penalty at Early Perth by Ron Shaw

During its first decades, while British law prevailed at the Perth Settlement, the ultimate
penalty of death applied to a list of 230 crimes ranging from the theft of vegetables or a cow to
murder and treason. Over the course of its history, however, only three men were ever executed
at the Bathurst District and Lanark County Jail in Perth. Read here..

Related reading

The Perth Gaol 1876 Almonte Gazette– Names Names Names..:)

Gypsy’s Tramps and Thieves–Are We Turning Thieves and Jailbirds into Role Models?

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” in Lanark County

Jailhouse Rock in Lanark County Part 2

Throw the Whole Family in Jail!

Newsies — Jailed at Nine Years Old

Run Pig Run–Shake it Off! Convictions of 1870

Throwing a Snowball is Going to Cost you $1- Your Convictions of 1898

To Steal a Barge on Ebb’s Bay— Your Convictions of 1897

Step Right Up- Here are Your Family Convictions-September, 1894

Breach of the Town Bylaws and Other Convictions.. Sept. 11 1888

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–July 17, 1885

Assault Abusive Language and Bridget McNee

The Notorious Bridget McGee of Perth

Down at the Old Perth Gaol

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–Dec. 13, 1898-Who Do You Know?

Auctionering Without a License and Pigs on the Loose

Going to the Chapel –Drummond Whalen and Johnson of Carleton Place

The Drunken Desperados of Carleton Place

The Young Offenders of Lanark County

Documenting Howard Little — Barber of Carleton Place

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Documenting Howard Little — Barber of Carleton Place

Photo- Martin McNabb

Jim Antonakas had previously purchased the building 2.5 years before that fateful day. Antonakas had originally operated a restaurant in the Byward Market in Ottawa. Everything in the restaurant and garage was destroyed but the firemen aided by the residents of Carleton Place were able to save almost all of the equipment in the barber shop. Later Mr. Little rented space in Ernie Foote’s building on Bridge Street and was expected to move in shortly. In a wonderful small-town gesture Bill Miller, owner of the Queen’s Hotel supplied breakfast free of charge to all the Carleton Place and Almonte firemen. During the fire coffee was served to the fire fighters by Dorothy Burns Snack Bar, the Queen’s Hotel and nearby neighbours.

Author’s note– I had no idea until Lynn Hastie Card told me this morning that Harold Little was the great great grandfather of my granddaughter Tenley Card Seccaspina.

Julia Waugh GuthrieWe had this chair at the cottage for years. Many a time Roge Timmins( grandson of Howard McNeely) and Bruce Guthrie ( grandson of Howard Little) would have shave offs with straight razors.Not sure who won, maybe Teddy Hurdis can tell us….Ohh and I believe they all might have had a bevie or two.

Steve TimmonsJulia Waugh Guthrie Think Dave D got a close shave one nite lol

Ted HurdisJulia Waugh Guthrie we won’t talk about Dave’s close cut. I will say there was no stubble left and a little blood lost but it’s all good !!!

Lynn Hastie-Card to Linda Seccaspina— Howard Little is my grandfather, my Mom’s dad and my cousin I believe still has the chair.

Norma Ford— My brother Jim Dorman helped some guys get the barbershop chair out of the shop, I wonder what ever happened to that chair. I remember he was quite proud of helping.

Joan Stoddart– Mr Little had a horse seat he put over the arms of the chair so little guys would be taller . I remember my brother’s first hair cut from Mr. Little

Jim LockhartHad a number of haircuts in Howard Little’s chair.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Dec 1898, Thu  •  Page 2

Bill BrownThanks for this – my grandfather Harvey Campbell was good friends with Howard Little and were apparently on the same baseball team as I just found out!! ❤️

Ray PaquetteThe last hair cut I got from Howard was in September 1968. I was home on leave and during my time at sea, I had grown a beard. My fiancee (and late wife) was not too enamoured with the thought of me in a beard and so in addition to the haircut, Howard got to shave me! This was at his shop which is the site of the Black Tartan..

Julia Waugh GuthrieMy husband has his straight razor and a few other things from his barber shop.

Diane Lackey JohnsonMy Dad, Gordon Lackey, spent a lot of time with his good friend Howard Little in that barber shop.♥️

The picture is of Howard Little courtesy of Julia Waugh Guthrie- thank Julia!
Julia Waugh Guthrie
January 13, 2020  · 

Found these cards of Bruce’s two Grandfathers. Howard Little , Carleton Place Barber and Norman Guthrie from Almonte who did sign painting.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Mar 1946, Wed  •  Page 20
Julia Waugh Guthrie
July 6, 2020  · 

Just got this little seat back. It was placed on Howard Littles barber chair for little boys to get their brush cuts. Mrs Little then passed it on to Cora Nolan to use.
Beside Bruce and Bob Houston can anyone else remember this pony chair ?

I know how Rena Little Hastie got her name now– From her Dad’s late sister.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada05 Apr 1943, Mon  •  Page 10

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Dec 1937, Tue  •  Page 27
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Oct 1949, Sat  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Feb 1937, Sat  •  Page 11

Leonard Little of Almonte has gone to Carleton Place, where he has taken over a barber shop on Bridge street und will conduct business for himself. Mr. Little learned his trade in Brockville and was therefor eight years. He was in Montreal’ for a year and laterwas with IV. B. James of Almonte. He is an excellent barber and a popular, young man who leaves many friends in his home town November 1930

related reading

As the Carleton Place Barber Pole Spins

Meet The Towne Barber of Bridge Street

Howard McNeely Mary Cook Clippings

More Indian Relics Found Almonte 1930

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More  Indian Relics Found Almonte 1930
Almonte Gazetta 1930

More Native items in the Almonte area.. read

The Sadler Farm on Highway 44– Nancy Anderson

Looking for Information on the Native Fort Farm of Fred Sadler of Almonte

Related reading

The John Dunlop Burial Site Almonte

The Homestead – a John Dunn story

The Old Union Hall Cheese Factory By Berenice McKay

Donna Cameron Moon Photo– 1945– Balderson– Donna McFarlane

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Donna Cameron Moon Photo– 1945– Balderson– Donna McFarlane
This calender has picture of Donna Cameron Moon and her brother Ken children of Donald Cameron and Anna Mcdougald of Balderson calender is intact and is 1945- Donna McFarlane

CAMERON, Kenneth John

Kenneth John Cameron beloved husband of Linda Marilyn Smith died sudden­ly at home on October 4th 1975. Ken, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Cam­eron, Balderson, Ont., was born on August 8th, 1936 He attended public school in McDonald’s Corners and high school in Lanark. After leaving school, Ken farmed with his father at Balderson. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Cameron, Balderson, two brothers, Doug of Balderson and Brian of Napanee, and his sister Donna (Mrs. Edward Moon), of Crosby. Ken and Linda were married in St. Paul’s United Church, Perth, on July 13 1963. They happily resided a Balderson for five years and then bought their home a 99 Dufferin Road when they resided for the next seven years. They were blessed with two children, Philip and Kelly Ann. Ken was a foreman at the Heritage Silversmiths. He was also building inspector and bylaw enforcement officer for Drummond Township. He was active in the Balderson United Church and participated with the cubs of St. Paul’s United Church. The funeral service was held from Morrow’s Funeral Home on Tuesday, Oct 7 at 2 p.m. Rev. Murray Jos? and Dr. John Stewart conducted a comforting service The pallbearers were Roger Howes of Amherstvies Al Faux, John Robertson Monty Riopelle, Paul Ber?rim and R. W. Blair, all Perth. Ken was such a devoted family man, conscientious employee and dependable friend and neighbors that he will be truly missed. The many floral tributes, donations to the Heart Fund and kindnesses shown to Ken’s family shows the high esteem in which he was held.

CAMERON, T. Donald

In hospital, Kingston on Wednesday, February 25, 1998, T. Donald Cameron, in his 87th year. Beloved husband of Anna McDougall. Loved father of Donna (Ed) Moon of Toledo and Brian (Judy) of Napanee. Predeceased by sons Douglas and Kenneth. Brother of Margaret Lowe of Carleton Place. Predeceased by sisters Catherine Duncan and Agnes McFarlane and brother Keith. Also survived by 9 grandchildren and daughter-in-law Linda Armstrong of Perth. Friends may call at the Blair & Son Funeral Home, Perth, from 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Friday. Funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Saturday, February 28th, at 11 a.m. Interment Elmwood Cemetery. In remembrance, donations to the Great War Memorial Hospital Fund or Balderson United Church would be appreciated.

In Loving Memory of

Donald Cameron

Born July 15th, 1911

McDonalds Corners, Ontario

Passed Away February 25th, 1998 Kingston, Ontario

Services Saturday February 28th, 1998 at 11:00

Blair & Son Funeral Chapel, Perth

Clergy Dr. John Montgomery

Interment Elmwood Cemetery

Blair & Son Funeral Home

CAMERON, Douglas Donald

Peacefully in hospital, Ottawa, on Wednesday, October 8th, 1997 Douglas Donald Cameron, loved father of Prudence Cameron of Peterborough and Timothy Donald Cameron of Ottawa. Beloved son of Donald and Anna Cameron of Balderson. Dear brother of Donna (Ed) Moon of Toledo, Brian Cameron of Napanee and was predeceased by brother Kenneth Cameron. Douglas will be sadly missed by nieces nephews and friends. Friends may call at the Blair & Son Funeral Home, Perth. Friday, October 10th from 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service will be conducted in Balderson United Church, Balderson, and Saturday at 11 a.m. Interment Highland Line Cemetery. In remembrance, contributions to the I.C.U. of the Ottawa General Hospital or the Highland Line Cemetery Memorial Fund would be appreciated

Life Before the Remote……Linda Knight Seccaspina

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Life Before the Remote……Linda Knight Seccaspina

Life Before the Remote……Linda Knight Seccaspina

The first TV program I remember watching as a child was the Mantovani Show, and not only was it boring, but it was in black and white. Because we lived 14 miles from the Vermont border in Quebec we were lucky to be able to receive some American television, and not just the staple Canadian three.

Cartoon Corner and Howdy Doody were favourites of mine back in the day on CBC. I also remembered having to unplug the TV when a thunderstorm occurred as my Mother said it was “going to blow the house up if one of those bolts wrapped around the venetian blinds”. Of course, I still think of that when it’s storming outside sitting in my lazy boy chair that’s pointed at the television along with every other piece in the room, and still with decorative venetian blinds.

Every night at 5 in 1961 I would watch the CBC TV show Razzle Dazzle hosted by Suzanne Somer’s husband, Alan Hamel. I had entered a writing contest and was eagerly waiting to hear if I won a pen with my “meatless meat pie” essay. A few weeks later I found out that I had indeed won a Razzle Dazzle pen for my story along with a photo of Howard the Turtle.

One day in the 60’s my father went to Keith Lachasseur’s Appliance store on the Main Street in Cowansville and came home with a colour TV. I didn’t really care one way or the other as I was actually used to the rainbow hues of “the plastic sheet” on the front of the television. It ‘simulated’ full colour along with rabbit ears covered in tinfoil to stimulate even better viewing. Of course it was sold as a cheap alternative to buying an expensive colour TV and its promise had sucked my father in. I think he immediately knew he had the wool pulled over his eyes, but never knowingly admitting a mistake, he insisted that it was ‘just as good’ as the real thing.

In our family he was the only person allowed to touch the new TV and he was always up on the roof adjusting the antenna to get the best

picture. After seeing everything in black and white while we simultaneously hunted dinosaurs in those days my world had now progressed to technicolor with a new neighbour coming in every night to see ‘the TV.’ Some of the highlights were: ‘Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Colour’ when Tinkerbell would splash colour on the screen and of course the burning map on the TV show Bonanza was priceless.

One night my father went out to a Lodge meeting and my friend Sheila came over to watch The Man from U.N.C.L.E. David McCallum, who played  “Ilelya Kuryakin” on the show, had been dubbed the “British James Dean” and was the only reason I watched that show. The fact that I had always seen him cast as a delinquent was a bonus for me since there is nothing like a bad boy. Sheila and I sat down and got ready to watch. The NBC Peacock came on and it remained in black and white. Where was the colour?.

Was my father really not at  the Lodge meeting and adjusting the roof antenna so I could not enjoy the show? The Man from U.N.C.L.E began and I started fidgeting around with the buttons. Instead of black and white the show suddenly turned red and then blue and I wondered if the rainbow plastic sheet had found its way inside the TV. Was I doomed?  After fidgeting some more the picture started skipping and I had to play around with the “horizontal hold” button. I think all of you remember that particular button with joy and happiness.

Illya still stared at me in glorious black and white, and I stopped playing with the buttons. Fifteen minutes before the show ended my father came in and tweaked his magic and it turned from black and white to colour.

Once you had colour TV you never went back to black and white- you just went to “upgrade”. Some of my friends in the late 60’s used LSD instead, and their whole lives became Technicolor — without television. My family just continued to ‘upgrade’ and in lieu of Don Messer’s Jubilee we watched Tommy Hunter on Friday nights. Who knew a

Hoedown, Tommy Hunter and Brenda Lee could all exist in colour together?

McLuhan once said,“The medium is in the message”– or was that ‘the massage’.   But now we are confronted with all sorts of media so pardon me while I check my Facebook Twitter and Instagram and watch a season of something on Netflix real quick. Just remember if someone had not invented the TV we’d still be eating frozen radio dinners.

Sock it to me!

Snippets of Ashton-Blacksmiths — Foundry MacFarlane- Donna McFarlane

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Snippets of Ashton-Blacksmiths — Foundry MacFarlane- Donna McFarlane

photo from Tweedsmuir Book on Stittsville – Donna McFarlane

Archie Blair died 1894. Mary his wife died 1915. If she was living there as the history said fire would have been between those years.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Nov 1896, Wed  •  Page 3
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Feb 1900, Sat  •  Page 7

photo from Tweedsmuir Book on Stittsville – Donna McFarlane

also read-The Fleming House –Ashton — Seth Hamilton

Looking for Photos of ‘The Castle’ in Ashton

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Jan 1893, Mon  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Jan 1893, Mon  •  Page 4

Jimmy Sweeney Bag Boy at Cliff and Muriel Black’s Grocery Store – Beth Sweeney

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Jimmy Sweeney Bag Boy at Cliff and Muriel Black’s Grocery Store – Beth Sweeney

All photos Beth Sweeney with thanks

Memories and pics…back in the day…
When I was a child I used to walk to Cliff and Muriel Blacks grocery store on the Townline

They were great people. My brother Jimmy Sweeney used to be a bag boy, pumped gas. I am sure there were a lot of local teens who worked there over the years. Cliff and Muriel also owned a cottage beside the one my dad built on the Mississippi Lake. Great memories! The establisment was taken over by a Mr. Livingston and in later years…a couple of great brothers took it over!

Pic of my Dad’s cottage. I was so proud of his carpentry!

Related reading

Documenting the Roadmasters Road Club? Beth Sweeney

When You Needed “Variety” You Went to Art’s or the Wayside Inn 1940s — Photos

2702 Words of History About Grieg’s School Ramsay–Miss Ruby Wilson

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2702 Words of History About Grieg’s School Ramsay–Miss Ruby Wilson

Below is published an interesting story of Greig’s School, Eighth line of Ramsay, written by Miss Ruby Wilson, who has been the teacher there for the last eight years. Miss Wilson is retiring and the following tribute has been paid to her by the people of the section and the trustees, through the Board secretary: “Under Miss Wilson’s guidance the school has continued to be a real community centre for the people of the section who from time to time have found entertainment there. “Miss Wilson leaves with the goodwill and best wishes of the people of the section, who will miss her leadership in the social as well as the educational life of the community ”

In choosing a topic for this evening’s talk we wished to find one that would be of interest to all of us, old and young. The people of No. 14, Ramsay, have always taken a keen interest in the school, so what could be more interesting than a story of our school. In it are wrapped up the lives of its pupils, who have become, or will become, the men and women. Some are long since moved away to carry on their duties in far places, some have settled in this section here, to play their part in the plan of life. 

Some have won fame and fortune, while others have followed in a more humble way the daily round of common tasks; but over all, the school has shed her influence. Few of us who are grown up can remember our history, geography or grammar lessons, but all unaware we were learning in these lessons some things that were far more lasting, and from our contact with our fellow pupils, and our teachers, were learning how to live with our fellowman. Isn’t that, after all, the great object of education? 

The subjects studied in school are all a means to this end. Let us journey back to 1826. School was then held in a log building on the corner of Rea’s, very close to the road. Early teachers had a house where the lilacs still bloom, in Greig’s field, near where the Greig house stands. The first teachers were mostly superannuated men. There at one time a Mr. Haggard lived for three years. About 1854 Mr. Joseph Rea still kept school in this log building But in 1859 a need was felt for a new building. So the present site was chosen—one quarter acre, commencing on the 8th Concession line, the distance of 21 chains, from the post between lots 9 and 10. This land was purchased from Mr. James Greig for the magnificent sum of $4. A contract was given for a frame building, -the old log school was not moved. 

This new school was opened in I8­60. With what feeling of justifiable pride we opened school in the new building, under the capable guidance of Mr. James Dunlop, at a salary of  $176.50. For that year the credit was $361.35 and debts amounted to $366.31. Many teachers were to follow his footsteps, and each to play some part in building the history of this community. Time permits us but to mention as we pass the names of these and some of the highlights in the history. Mr. Joshua Tennant followed Mr. Dunlop, with a salary of $192 per annum for three years. 

At this time the section boasted 161, old and young, of which the following were the active ones at the first I annual meeting. George Donahoc chairman; John Cannon, secretary; George O’Brien, James Greig, George Drynan, John (McIntyre, David Watson, John Mc Arton and Joseph Rea. It was quite allowable then to have a lengthy meeting, for 11 1-2 cords of wood, cost only $17 in those days.

Sunday School was held at No. 14 with Mr. James Yuill, Superintendent: John Paul, John Cummings and Miss Agnes Paul as teachers. We cannot estimate the good that was done by these Sunday meetings. They had prayer meetings also once every week. What tales the older people could tell of the weekly event, “Singing School.” Old and young in the countryside attended. Mr. Robert Watchorn was the teacher, and later Mr. Donald Robertson. How they must have enjoyed those nights, for it did serve as a fine meeting place for the youth of yesterday. 

Our next teacher in 1864, was John McYule. In 1865-67 Patrick Foley kept the white school in order. During his time $5 was given for prize books. The inspector at this time was Rev. McMoran, minister at the stone church. Mr. Thomas McDermott who was teacher in 1868-69 had his own times with ninety on the roll, in winter. However salaries were some better, $240. Needless to say with such a number on the roll, he earned his money. Helen Me Arton, the present Mrs. Houston, Tyvan, Sask. writes:

“Lessons weren’t much bother and sums weren’t hard either. We had lots of time to play tic, tac, toe. We didn’t like when a map was rolled out, we learned plenty then. But, I tell you we were scared when we saw the inspector coming along.” Mr. George Thompson of Almonte, relates many interesting tales of playing “Fenian Raids” on Shipman’s Pond to the anxiety of teachers and raiders. These ended with the sad result of one boy being “knocked out.” 

Games were often played in an old barn near the school. Here Mr. Jno. McArton, while crimping straws in the cogs of an old fanning machine, took an end off his thumb. In 1870 Mr. Robert Thomson was our master. During his regime new steps were built for the school. Next came Francis Haney and in 1872 Miss Anderson. It was then that the woodshed was built, the lumber was obtained from John McArton and W. Cannon. During these years the late Dr. R. Tait McKenzie’s father was an inspector. By 1874 this had become a popular and much sought after school, for there were 12 applications. Miss Janette Lindsay was  chosen. 

That year money was borrowed at 8 percent interest. Miss Carley stayed four months, followed by Alicia Thomas. It was then we got our first visitor’s book, and general register. The trustees, Peter McRostie, John McArton and Richard Thompson visited the school frequently, as did Mr. Slack, the Inspector. By this time the school boasted a small flagpole, Many times has the good old Union Jack, proudly flying, proclaimed to all that here was a small group of Canada’s loyal sons and daughters, learning to be better citizens of our fair Dominion and Empire. Miss Jane Houston who came in 1877 must have had quite a time with an average of 49. Many of these sat around on sticks of wood. 

On the 23rd of Nov., 1878, the grounds were enlarged 1-4 acre. The land bought from Andrew Greig, was to be fenced by the section. R. Patterson, Almonte, was the lawyer. During Miss Houston’s time, by Inspector’s request, a well was bored by A. Stephenson, for $90. While Miss Kate Snedden was here in 1879, a log fence was put around the school with boards along. the front. At the annual meeting the trustees all voted against Township School Boards. Who says this is now a new idea. The Inspector at this time was Mr. Michell. During Bella Scott’s regime a new ash floor was laid. Next came Annie Baird, who owing to a sprained ankle had her sister Ellen, teach for three months. Miss Barbara Drynan who came

in 1887, left behind a lasting memory During her term she planted the spruce and some of the cedars along the front of the grounds. 

The many scholars who have come here since, have had much reason to be grateful for these beautiful trees, which give us shade in summer and had helped to make our grounds more attractive. Wood was then $2.90 a cord. For the next three years 1890-91- 92, Miss Mary Wilson was our teacher. In this time we got a new gate and front fence and also the numeral frame. Several other names we pass over each with its own associations, many happy, some not so happy. When we remember the minutes of mortification we spent in the corner, or the tingling sensation of the hands after the application of a bit of rubber—wasn’t it the pride that was hurt most? 

Miss Mama Fraser, Miss Moffat, Miss Clara Sadler, Miss Jessie Lindsay. For five years from 1896, Miss Lindsay guided the lives of Greig’s youth. A teacher’s chair, and window screens were important additions. The list of teachers grows, Miss Steele, Miss McKechnie, Miss Ethel Robertson, Hattie Caswell. By this time some of the school’s own pupils had graduated as teachers and Miss Daisy Eea returned in 1905 to guide the footsteps of her younger neighbors, at a salary of $250. In this year a new porch was built on the school by Mr. John Donaldson.

During a short absence of Miss Rea her sister Miss Bessie, supplied. Miss Buckingham, who came to us in 1907, remained only one year. Perhaps she found the barren field too cold, for outside windows were put on. Hats off to Miss Buckingham, we agree the drifts do pile high. In 1908 Miss N. McCrea had 12 on the roll, quite a difference in 40 years. Miss Addie Blackburn followed. 

At the annual meeting in 1910 it was moved by Joseph Chapman, seconded by Wesley Rea, that the school be moved; and made comfortable. The contract for this was awarded to D. McCrea for $275. Miss Daisy Rea returned for another term. School problems must have been easily discussed, for in 1913 the annual meeting closed with Auld Lang Syne. Next came Lila Smith and Gertrude Ormrod. At the meeting in 1914, it was moved by Andrew Yuill and seconded by Joseph Chapman that the trustees have the grounds fenced with wire. This was done by W. C Gilmour.

 No one will deny that this should be plenty of room for scholars to work off their superfluous energy, but just as soon as the fence was up the boys began to feel it would be far more fun playing “tag” or “deer” in Thompson’s bush, or skating on Ford’s pond. So to the present day some brave little soul is elected to go to the teacher and say “Please Miss may we go outside to play.” 

How can a teacher refuse such a plea? People were beginning to fake a greater interest in. No. 14 as this was the first year of any mention, regarding School Fair Prize Money. . 

“Greig’s’ ‘ still continued to send her sons and daughters to the High Schools and under Miss Annie Neilson, many passed. Mr. Froats was then Inspector. Miss C. E. Gardner came to us in 1917 and remained two years, during which time, window screens were procured, a very valuable piece of “furniture” especially in mosquito time.

In June 1918 the school was saddened by the loss of a much loved pupil, Sandy Chapman. Again a former pupil, Miss Marion Chapman, returned to guide 22 little souls along. Just to show how conditions had improved by that time, or how the cost of living had increased, Miss Waddell, who came for two years, received a $1,000 salary. While Miss Gardner was our teacher, under Mr. Spence as Inspector, a hardwood floor was laid, bought from A. F. Campbell, Arnprior, and laid by James Smith. At the same time an organ was bought from Mrs. Camelon. In 1924 Miss Kathleen Graham came to us, staying four years: Hot lunch had its real beginning then, a new coal oil stove with a warming oven being bought. 

Hardwood prices had then reached $8 a cord with soft and cedar at $6, New equipment for school is surely a sign of progress, and if this is so we, of this section’ may rightly claim our share. New desks were installed in 1930 while Miss Elizabeth Martin was our teacher. They are still here in excellent condition. One or two of the lads managed to carve their names on the surface of the old ones, as a lasting reminder that they had a sharp jack knife, and a keen desire never to be forgotten. In the last few years our school has boasted of many improvements, including window’ boxes, free exercise books for all pupils and our wood shed made into a compact building, with a sliding door. 

How glad we were a week ago, when rain came dripping through, that some thoughtful men had roofed at least half of our building with tin. Someone has said “It is false economy not to keep a building in proper repair.” As in a feast we have left the best of our last eight years, to the end. Every Wednesday morning Mr. Hector Dallimore very ably takes the class to pleasant “Songland.”

 How delighted the pupils are, as you may judge from their earnest efforts this evening. In an account of this sort it is inevitable that much of interest must be omitted and perhaps some important events unrecorded. We beg of you all to forgive these omissions and mistakes, and we would be grateful for any additions from anyone for future references. We hope you have enjoyed these memories which this brief history has brought back. From messages we have received from early teachers we quote— “I shall never forget my pleasant days at Greig’s. Everyone was so willing and kind.” and again from Miss Rea, “After 25 years’ teaching in Ottawa. I have only happy, grateful memories of my old Ramsay home, I and of the old neighbors, among whom I lived and worked so long. “It is the spirit of co-operation and kindliness which has done so much to make this school the success it . is. Let us keep alive our love of this school, and be true to her message This is the word that year by year, While in her place the school is set Everyone of her sons must hear, And none that hears it dares forget This they all with a joyful mind, Bear through life life a torch in flame. And falling, fling to the host behind Play up! Play up! and play the game. 

This is a list of teachers— 1860—James Dunlop, $176.50. 1861-63—Joshua Tennant, $192. 1864—John Yule. 1865-67—Patrick Folev. ‘ 1368-69—’Thomas McDermott, $240. 1870—Richard Thomson. 1871—Francis Haney. 1372-73—Miss Anderson. 1.374—Miss Janethe Lindsay. 1875-76—Miss Carley and Miss Alicia Thomas. 1877-79—Miss Jane Houston. 1380-82—Kate Snedden. 1883—Bella Scott. 1884-86—Annie Baird.

1887-89—Barbara Drynan. 1890-92—Mary Wilson. 1893—Martha Fraser. 1894—Kate Moffat. ‘895—Clara Sadler. 1896-1900—Jessie Lindsay. 1901-02—Edith McKechnie. 1903-04—Hattie. Caswell. 1905-07—Daisy Rea and Bessie Rea. 1907—Mildred Buckingham. 1908—Nora McCrea. 1909—10—Addie Blackburn. 1911-13—Daisy Rea. 1913-14—Lila Smith and Gertrude Ormrod. 1915-Gertrude Metcalfe and Mabel Smith. 1916-17—A. E. Neilson. 1917-20—C. E. Gardner. 1920-Marion Chapman. 1921-22—Bella Waddell, $1,000. 1922-24—C. E. Gardner. 1924-28—Kathleen Graham. 1928-30—Elizabeth Martin. 1930-38—Ruby Wilson. 

The following are the secretaries: 1860-73—John Cannon. 1874—Joseph Rea. 1874-86—Peter McRostie. 1.887-94—John Watson. 1395-08—John Rea. 1903-16—Jacob Matthews. 1917-20—Robt. Tosh. 1921-38—Alton Matthews.

 RAMSAY S.S. 11 Senior Room— i To Grade V III—Kenneth iFee, Muriel Fee H, Mack James H, Henry Collie. To Grade V II—Agnes Cavers, Arthur Dowdall, Lome Neilson H, Leo O’Brien, Pat O ’Brien H, Leonard Spinks, Nelson Syme. —Anna. M. Turner, Principal. Junior Room— -, To Grade VI—John Edwards, [Helen Fee K, Joyce Gladish, Carman ifames, Jean Kellough H. Doris Lowe,, Shirley Lowe, Keith Salisbury. I To Grade V—Maisie Edwards, May James H. To Grade III—Florence Kelloqgh H, Murray Webber. To Gradel II—Fred Edwards, Melville Fee, Margaret Hodgkinson, Elsie Lowe. —Iva M. Crawford, Teacher. 

S. S. NO. 3 FITZROY Grade IX-Grade X —John Coady, John Hugh Lunney, Grade VII-Grade V III—Rita Coady. Grade VI-Grade VII—Mary Brown, Tommy ‘Lunney, Grant Greene, Cyril Greene. Grade V-Grade VI—Agnes Stewart, Monica Coady, Reuben Brown. Ina Stewart. Grade IV-Grade V—Donald Stewart, Edward Lunney, Ethel Stewart. Grade III-Grade IV— Maryalice Colton, Bernice Coady. Grade II-Grade III—Mary Lunney. Grade I-Grade II — Kenneth Greene, Betty Stewart, Olive Greene. Primer-Grade I—Willie Stewart* Jr. Primer-Sr. Primer— Edna Young, Jack Lalonde. Number on roll—23. Average attendance—22.2. —A. E. Moreton, Teacher.

S.S. No. 14 Ramsay – Greig’s School

In 1826, a long builting was found on Rea’s lot. Early teachers, Mr. Huggart and Joseph Rea, lived in a house in Greig’s field. James Greig sold one quarter acre on the eighth line, Lot 10, Concession 7, Ramsay for $4.00 and  a frame building was put up. Andrew Greig sold another quarter acre of land in 1878 to enlarge the school grounds. Mrs. Pearl McCann created history when she became the first married female teacher in 1942. When S.S. No. 5 only had 5 pupils, the Board decided to amalgamate the two schools from 1945-1947. In 1963, the school was destroyed by fire and students had to temporarily attend S.S. No. 2 Ramsay. On June 30, 1960, many former students and teachers celebrated the 100th anniversary of the school. In 1970, pupils from S.S. No. 14 moved to Naismith Memorial in Almonte and the school property was sold to Edgar Finlayson for $4,500.

Related Reading

The Grieg School– The Fire and Mrs. Pearl McCann

Greig Family — Carleton Place and Ramsay Lanark County

An Article About the Lanark Schools — Mr. Joseph Tennant

http://www.northlanarkregionalmuseum.com/NLRM_Oral_Histories.html

Documenting and Reusing Old Doors Jenny Doyle

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Documenting and Reusing Old Doors Jenny Doyle

Photo doors- Jenny Doyle

Hi Linda,

Thought you’d be interested in these French screen doors that we found up in our barn.

This shows the before and after – I single handedly stripped them with a heat gun, and then repainted them.

They still needing screen and molding…and will go on our new sunporch.

(We have the original hinges, cleaned and ready to go as well. They are powerful and swing both ways, and we have 2 old enamel push bars advertising Five Roses Flour and Robin Hood Flour that we found up there as well, which we’ll add. )

Jenny Doyle

Riddell— H B Montgomery House History For Sale

What Happened to the Riddell/ Montgomery Doors? Three years later…  Sherri Iona (Lashley)

Reusing the Past of Carleton Place — The Morphy’s and the McCann’s)

Found in the Floors of my Summer Kitchen — Amy Thom

My Old House — Part 2- Amy Thom

Knitters of Lanark County

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IN TORONTO TOMORROW, flying squads of Red Cross volunteers will conduct a blitz of the downtown area. Shown here are Tanya Patterson, Kay Gilmour and Eileen Comba, who display a placard telling of planned efforts of 350 fund-raise

The regular monthly meeting of the Almonte War Aid was held in the Council Chamber, Sept. 19 a t 8 p.m., with the president, Mrs. G. Comba presiding. Mrs. M. Pilkey read the minutes of the last meeting which were adopted as read. 

The treasurer’s report was read by Mrs. H. Kirkland. Ms. J. D. McCallum reported for the knitting for the month as follows, 29 pairs of socks, 6 scarves, 4 prs. mitts, 1 tuck-in, 7 caps and 7 sweaters. Mrs. N. Washburn reported shipping the following to the Red Cross Society, Toronto, 10 pr. socks, 50 caps, 23 scarves, 18 sweaters, 5 tuck-ins, 5 pair mitts and 3 individual parcels. f Mrs. P. A. Grieg reported the sewing as follows, 4 skirts, 1 long coat and 1 pr. bloomers, 2 prs. pyjamas and 6 jumpers and 1 quilt from the C. W. L. Mrs. A. C. Wylie reported shipping to the I. O. D. E., Toronto, the following, 5 short cloth coats, value $20.00; 2 long coats, value $20.00 ; 7 jumpers $25.00 ; 6 skirts, $25.00; 1 pr, bloomers. 50 cents 2 quilts, $8.00. Total, $110.50. 

Also shipped to the I. O. D. E. were the following articles donated by the Almonte Handicraft Club, 12 baby comforters, value, $18.00; 16 baby jackets, $19.50; 8 pr. pyjamas, $12.00; 1 night shirt, 75c; 2 toys, $1.00. Total $51.25. lit was moved that the War Aid donate $100 to the Mrs. Churchill Fund. Cigarettes were ordered to be sent to the local soldiers overseas for Christmas. Mrs. Comba moved a vote of thanks to the Handicraft Club for the donation of comforts . 

Special thanks and appreciation were expressed for the efforts of Mrs. David Sutherland who has completed 600 pairs of socks since the society was organized on Sept. 18, 1939. All who have ditty bags to fill were asked to hand them in a t the Clerk’s office, Town Hall, not later than October 21.

Sept 21,1944

Knitted Mittens for the Dionne Quintuplets–Mary McIntyre

The Union Hall Knitter — John Morrow

The Story of Eliza Smith Lanark 1898

Did You Wear Wool Socks to Bed? From Dublin to Drummond- Mahon Family Reunion — The Series Part 8

George Orwell Ponders- Are Knitters Really Felons?