Tag Archives: bridge street

Clippings and a Letter from Sadie Coleman –Robert Keith Duffett Coleman

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Clippings and a Letter from Sadie Coleman –Robert Keith Duffett Coleman
June 1976-From: Robert Keith Duffett Coleman
From: Robert Keith Duffett Coleman
From: Robert Keith Duffett Coleman
Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Read-Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Rob Coleman just posted this in the comments about men’s beards.. “Looks like my great great grandfather’s style. Here he is with my attempt at recreating it. He was from Bruce county. not sure if it counts. My great great grandfather Coleman (from Carleton Place) had pretty awesome facial hair but I have not tried to recreate it. Keep sending those photos in we love them.,
Mayor Coleman said Carleton Place was an important market town with Bridge Street sees a parade of farm vehicles and animals on their way to market. Cattle had a hard enough time moving down to the CPR station in those days–I can’t even imagine if that happened now.
Aug 8 1913
Fifteen head of cattle were killed on the C.P.R. Track about a mile south of Carleton Place after being struck by a train at an early hour this morning. A herd of 175 cattle had been driven into town by the Willow brothers yesterday and placed in the stock pen for shipment. Some time after midnight cattle broke through the fence ad proceeded to travel down different track routes.
A freight train traveling near the 10th and 11 th concessions of Beckwith struck the largest herd and before the locomotive could slow down fifteen cattle were killed or so maimed they had to be destroyed. Two head were also killed on the line west and three east of the station making for a total of 20.
In 1946 George Coleman was Carleton Place’s mayor and the population was just a tad over 4,300. Coleman’s Grandfather operated one of the first grist mills and almost won free land and water for the mill by entering in a competition which required the grinding of one bushel of grain in a given length of time. His Grandfather was unsuccessful and according to the mayor, he was the first Coleman to ever fail, so George said his Grandfather ended up buying the land and water rights.
Once upon a time an elderly Scotsman by the name of John Fraser who used to walk around our fair town brandishing a large sword. When asked if sword play was one of the off season sports of Carleton Place he answered,

“Not at all,” John said, “I’ve got this sword from England. The other one I recieved a short time ago I made into tow fine butcher knives, and this one will go the same way.”
Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Rob Coleman with Carleton Place roots‎ sent this to me at the Lanark County Genealogical Society this morning.Oldest picture I have. Great great great grandparents. Born around 1780 in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Settled in Quebec’s Eastern Townships.

Darla Fisher Giles added the above picture- Thanks Darla!!
This is a picture of my house and Dalton Coleman, where he grew up in Carleton Place. It was taken during Home Week in 1924

This photo of 283 William Street, Carleton Place, was taken in 1923. This was the childhood home of Dalton Corrie Coleman.Coleman worked as private secretary to Senator George Cox in 1897 and as editor of the Belleville Intelligencer before joining the CPR in 1899. He advanced rapidly and before turning 40 was put in charge of CPR’s western lines. In 1934 Coleman became Vice President of CPR, and, as the health of president Sir Edward Beatty deteriorated, increasingly took over his duties. Coleman was appointed president in 1942 and chairman in 1943. The company was then engaged not only in railway work but in war production, shipping and air traffic. Under Coleman, Canadian Pacific Airlines was organized. He retired in 1947. Coleman Street in Carleton Place, site of our CPR railway station, was named in his honour. http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx…

Coleman Family History–Just for Your Records

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

What did you Buy at The Dairy?

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Angie BallantyneMy grandparents Naomi Loton and Gordon Langtry used to run that dairy and lived upstairs. I have an old milk bottle! 😊

The question was: Go back in time.. What are you going to buy at the Dairy today on Bridge Street?

Kevin St JeanI believe paul dulmages dog shopped there

Jo-Anne Drader NelsonWas the dog a black lab ? I remember seeing him all over town when I was young. He just went wherever he wanted. Very nice dog.

Terry LathamCould have been Duke he used to wander all over town. Stop in for a visit at some places. All I had to do is stop and ask if he wanted a drive home and he would jump in my truck if he did. Or just walk away if not.

Cathy DulmageHe stopped there every day for a treat from Mr Veenstra. Also he stopped at the bottom of Argyle St to drink from the stream every day and many other places

Paul HodginsI remember Duke in the water going after orange balls that sank but he would dive down and get them every time Amazing dog Duke was ❤🐕

Gail Sheen-MacDonaldMilkshake for my bother, sister and me, an ice cream cone for my mom and a quart of buttermilk (uggh!) for my dad.

Brian Giffin5 cent ice cream cone after church

Sandy HudsonIce cream

Leslie Garagan.25 would get me a big bag of mixed candies.

Bj LayComic books, video games, !!! Thanks Fred!!!

Janine McDonald AzzouzCandy on route to the movie at the Town Hall.

Lorraine NephinMilkshake.

Kathy DevlinA bag of penny candy or maybe be a popsicle

Mark Pyegrade 7 Carambeck,walk down and buy sweet tarts…

Linda; from Gord CrossMore Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy–Ray Paquette2 hours
A lot of your younger followers would probably be unable to identify the people pictured on the steps, I can only name three: Ray Morrell, Isobel (Nesbit) Bryce and Joann (Waugh) Cullen….

Jo-Anne Drader NelsonIn line on a Friday night to buy a bag of mixed candy. Fred must of had a lot of patience. Every kid picking out each candy. 4 mojos ,2 blue whales etc …. Lol

Ruth Anne SchnuppDefinately an ice cream cone !

Toby RandellGrowing up, as soon as you walked in on the right was a wall of penny candies. That was the go to, but a close second would have been an ice cream cone.

Toby RandellTotally forgot the giant freezies.

Bill ConallThree-scoop ice cream cone. Fifteen cents

Shannon ToshIce cream cones

Norma JacksonTiger tail ice cream

Sonya SpurwayIce cream !!!!

Sandi Shaw

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Ted HurdisPenny candy and ice cream

Donna Griersonmilkshake

Brianna Ryan1 cent candies😍

Kate HurdisCandy, marbles and pogs

Cathy PatersonPop candy ice cream

Amanda WaterfieldRenting videos games is what I remember doing

Mel StanzelI had a milkshake after finshing my paper route . milk shake made by the eldest Nesbitt girl

Tom MontreuilOrange sherbet cone and milk shake cups for drinking whiskey

nna LeMaistreChocolate milkshake 25 cents

Phil HallahanThose maple toffee cones

Jane ChurchillPenny candy and chocolate milkshakes; picking up smokes and Coca Cola for my mom when I was only about 5 or six years old 🙂

Karen Frances RintoulJane Churchill I remember going and getting Velveeta mac & cheese and the popcorn you shake on top of the stove and then going to your place. I don’t even know how old I was.

Kimberly Townend-WillettsI loved the smell, I can still remember it even though I was 2 years old.

Heather DormanFuzzy peaches from the 5cent candies because I’m a high roller 😂I once tried to buy candies with my moms silver dollar and he called my mom 😅

Yvonne RobillardOmg, moved here 1983 but visited from 1980,didn’t recognize the dairy, but did get ice cream there from fred veenstra!

Phyllis BensonIce cream cone

Joanna LucianoPre-scoop tools; remember the cylindrical shaped ice cream portion set in the cone??

Jeff RobertsonVideo games. Bigfoot candies and always shooting the shit with the owners!

Bonnie AdamsI could always get a Saturday Citizen there on Sunday

Angela BigrasIce cream

Sandra DakersYou’d be surprised what a big bag of candy you could get for 10 cents

Beth NolanMy grandparents lived o Heriotte Street..my grandfather and I went to the Dairy after supper and got ice cream cones for each of us, for my grandmother and Uncle Allan….I use to run down to buy milk if my grandmother needed some…..then I’d go to Millers stable on the back street to see the horses

Carly DrummondWe used to rent Super Nintendo games from here & get their cheap candies!

Adam DowdallI would buy marbles there

Keith DrummondI grew up living a block away from the Dairy since I was 2 (1965). I don’t recall seeing all of you there 😃 but Fred was the only owner I knew of. Twenty five cents did go a long way back then.

Keith Drummond hey neighbour, I saw you there and at my house many times!! 😉Jane Churchill

Dave WhiteIce Cream

Danielle TreffA banana and chocolate popsicle, and an N64 game for the weekend

Larry DelargeIce cream

Wesley ParsonsFlavored toothpicks and 10cent chocolate popsicles

Rebecca ChampagneAs a child I would go here countless amount of times. I remember buying Garbage Pail Kids cards. They all came with a stick of gum. I would also rent Nintendo games there as well.

Pam McCauleyCandy

Elizabeth SmithGiant licorices. One time, my friends and I convinced Fred to sell us a full bag of the penny candy. 800 gummy bears

Kaylea White100 sweetish berries

Thelma SavardIce cream you would go with a bowl and it would be filled up for supper dessert can you imagine now going with a bowl?

Marjorie GawThelma Savard awesome

Megan KerryCandy on the way to swim practice

Alana FlintMaple Walnut Ice Cream and Salt ‘n Vinegar Chips for dipping in the ice cream!

Cody Smithson$1.00 pepperoni stick and a $1.00 can of pizza pringles. Fred never charged me tax and would always have a fresh news paper for me to take back to my grandfather.

Lyann LockhartAny candies that were 2 for 1cent and 3 for 1 cent. Mojos , green leaves , gum balls and caramels but they were 2 cents.

Allison VaughanDidn’t go there often but recall getting candies there

Laurie Stearns-SmithA little brown bag filled with as many candies as a quarter would get me. It was surprising how much you could buy.

Bill LemayMy dad smoked Buckingham cigarette s choke a horse

Amanda KatFill a paper bag with 5 cent candies 

Bill BrownHot summer days as a kid – ice cream – candy

Andrea McCoyGood stuff. 15 cents bought enough

So what has happened to the Dairy?

Zoe Whitney-HandI used to buy .25 cent candies and milk for my parents, it was recently renovated into two newer apartments on the bottom where the store was and the original two up top

Related stories

More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Robbery at Sinclairs 1886

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Robbery at Sinclairs 1886
Photo: Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage MuseumLost Buildings–Sinclair Brothers Tailor Shop

The Herald says:

On Monday morning, about 2 o’clock, Mr. F. Hollingsworth waa disturbed by some unusual noise, and on getting up and lookout of his window observed a man standing in the passage way between his place and the tailor shop of Mr. Colin Sinclair. The stranger hearing the rustle moved off, and Mr. Hollingsworth retired again, thinking nothing more of it at the time, but on the store of Mr. Sinclair being opened in the morning it was soon evident that strangers had been there.

They effected an entrance through a back staircase into a room where Mr. Sinclair keeps a heater for his irons in the summer season. Here they cut hole beside the lock in the door leading to the workshop, and opened it from the inside, the key being in the lock. From the workshop they descended to the front store and repeated the same operation again, for the door at the foot of the staira was also bolted from the other side.

The burglars here appropriated a suit of clothes, two pieces of cloth, all the silk handkerchiefs they could find, some ties, and nearly all the cuff buttons and shirt studs, also a hat, and possibly more articles not yet missed. They retired by the same way they entered. There is no clue or suspicion as to the daring thieves. This now is the third burglary within as many weeks within our quiet town, and it is about time some action was being taken in the matter. The brace used in this instance was identified by Mr. Graham as his. It.was stolen from his shop, an entrance being effected by a back window.

1886-07-23-01

Sinclair store is now Sinclair Park where the Roy Brown statue is.

Photo: Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Related reading

Lost Buildings–Sinclair Brothers Tailor Shop

The Sinclair Family Cemetery–Photos by Lawrie Sweet with Sinclair Genealogy Notes

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 13

Clake’s Grocery Store Carleton Place — Looking for Info

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Clake’s Grocery Store Carleton Place — Looking for Info
Adin Daigle

I had never heard this name before and as I checked out out Ancestry this business was in the late 1940s in the Levine/Comba Building ( across from the Post office) and was owned by Reginald Clake.

He and his wife Ada lived in Moore Street in Carleton Place.

So if you look at the photo he lived in this general area below

Ed Giffin–My brother Terry played with Bernie Costello for many years around CP whenever there was a dance particularly at the Legion. Terry played the drums. I recall that Bernie lived in an apartment above or close by where your Dad had his dry cleaning business. I remember visiting that apartment and seeing an upright piano there. I had no idea at the time that Bernie had started playing because none of us kids ever took music lessons. Bernie always played road hockey on Beckwith Street with us. He always liked to play goal.

I kind of lost track of Bernie in school, I guess because they constantly moved me back and forth across town to Victoria or Prince of Wales from Central School. I don’t recall Bernie ever being in high school. I just seemed to have lost track of him by then.

I remember Charlie, his dad, worked in Clake’s Grocery store. It was located at the corner of Bridge and Albert across the street from our lunch bar.

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

The A & S Leach Grocery Store Carleton Place January- October 1898

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The A & S Leach Grocery Store Carleton Place January- October 1898
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Oct 1898, Thu  •  Page 7

So who owned this business A & S Leach in Carleton Place and where was it? It was run by Abner and his oldest sister Sophia Leach who was 15 years older than him.. Their father was a widow ( his wife was Alice Salter Leach and died in 1871)and the two siblings ran the store. In 1891 Sophia Leach was 30 and unmarried probably because she looked after the rest of the family as she was the oldest. She died in 1898 at the age of 37 and that is probably why the store closed. The whole family is buried in the Franktown Cemetery.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Jan 1898, Tue  •  Page 2

The Leach siblings took over the Peden Grocery business in January of 1898 which is where Hastie and Tatlock used to be on Bridge Street, which some call the wrong side of the street. ( don’t ask).Peden also made carbonated drinks there.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Oct 1898, Fri  •  Page 3

Seven months later in October Abner Leache filed for bankruptcy ( Sophia died August 1898) and Lang & Company from Ottawa bought their stock. Lang & Co were basically in the pork business and London House was briefly a clearing house where they bought bankrupt stock and resold it. It was located on Wellington Street in Ottawa.

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Oct 1897, Tue  •  Page 8

London House in turn went bankrupt in 1901 and the Larose Dept store on Rideau and Sussex bought the lot and sold them at their stores.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Jan 1901, Fri  •  Page 8

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Jan 1901, Fri  •  Page 8

1891 Census of Canada

DetailRelatedSource

NameAbnor A Leach
GenderMale
Marital StatusSingle
Age15
Birth Year1876
Birth PlaceOntario
Residence Date1891
Residence PlaceCarleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Relation to HeadSon
Religionengl church
OccupationDry Good Clerk
Can ReadYes
Can WriteYes
French CanadianNo
Father’s NameHenery Leach
Father’s Birth PlaceOntario
Mother’s Birth PlaceOntario
NeighboursView others on page
Household Members6
Enumeration District84

1891 Census of Canada

Name:Sophia Leach
Gender:Female
Marital Status:Single
Age:30
Birth Year:abt 1861
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1891
Residence Place:Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Relation to Head:Daughter
Religion:engl church
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
French Canadian:No
Father’s Name:Henery Leach
Father’s Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Birth Place:Ontario
Name:Sophia A. Leach
Birth Date:12 Sep 1860
Death Date:19 Aug 1898
Cemetery:Franktown Public Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:Franktown, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:N
Father:Henry Leach
Mother:Alice Leach
URL:https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/199393025/sophia-a.-leach
W. J. Hughes — The Rexall Drugstore on the Corner

Memories of Mulvey’s Candy Store and Joie Bond — Larry Clark

The Carleton Lunch Bar- Carleton Place Tourism of the Past — Keith Giffin

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 10–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12Dr. Johnson Downing and Ferril I Presume? Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12 a

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 13

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign–Dr. Winters 154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place –Jaan Kolk Files

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 14

Mitchell & Cram — History of The Summit Store 1898-1902 –Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 15

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series–Volume 16– Newman’s Hall

More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy

Youths Fired a Shot in Carleton Place Street Caused a Sunday Sensation in the Year 1867

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Youths Fired a Shot in Carleton Place Street Caused a Sunday Sensation in the Year 1867

1867, Carleton Place

This to Carleton Place readers, should be of general interest showing that wild doings were enacted in the old times as well as at present. Who would expect a revolver to be fired off in the streets of Carleton Place at the present day? The item is from a copy of the ( Carleton Place Herald) of 1867:

“Shooting Affray in Carleton Place”

On Sunday last in the sober little village of Carleton Place there was almost enacted a tragedy on the highway that would have out-rivalled in boldness that of any deed that has been committed by any of the notorious Dick Turpin stripe. Two young men scarcely out of their teens, were driving furiously through the village, when some person took upon himself the responsibility of bringing them to order, when one of them drew from his pocket a loaded pistol and fired it at the person who was trying to bring them to, but without effect.

The scamps made off as fast as they could, and we understand, the person who fired the shot has since made himself scarce in this neighbourhood. But why, in the name of Justice, should young men in these townships go armed with pistols, or any such dangerous weapon, we know not. He hopes that the ‘state of affairs’ in our neighbouring villages has not necessitated any such preparation on the part of strangers, as to go armed with such a deadly weapon as a loaded pistol or revolver. But we sincerely trust that such conduct as above described may meet with that rigid punishment of which such a treacherous act deserves.

Trivia- Who was Dick Turpin?

Turpin was executed for stealing horses in 1739 at York and he would have been forgotten to history had it not been for Harrison Ainsworth’s popular 1834 novel Rookwood. In it he describes Turpin galloping north in the dark: “His blood spins through his veins; winds round his heart; mounts to his brain. Away! Away! He is wild with joy.” The highwayman character etched in Rookwood, as well as local narratives, poems, and ballads that sprung from it, granted Turpin a notorious posthumous status.

Related reading

CARLETON PLACE MYSTERY— Moulder’s Body Found With Bullet in Chest 1905 Part 2

Just Like a Clue Game –“Who Dun it” in Beckwith?

Did You Know that Carleton Place had an Affiliation with Peg-Leg Brown?

The Man of the Walking Dead of Maberly

Local Man’s Dad Was Leader of The Stopwatch Gang

Missing You.. 44 Years Ago in Carleton Place

More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy

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More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy
Linda; from Gord Cross


Merrill Fisher, a good friend then and now, sent me these pictures of the dairy.
Can anyone name all those on the steps of the dairy in 1955?
Joann Voyce

Isabel Nesbitt Bryce, Joann Waugh Elva Ford Ray Morrell possibly a Giffin

Julia Waugh GuthrieJoann Voyce , just seen this picture and noticed Aunt JoAnn right away. I love these pictures
.
Carol KwissaYes my aunt Joanne Waugh -Cullen on Isobel’s left shoulder and I also recognized Elva Ford

Susan Thompsonthe woman on the left hand side looks like my aunt Maryanna Giles Dunlop
Sylvia GilesYes Maryanna Giles-Dunlop front row left and her friend Isobel Bryce next to
Her!!!
Sherri IonaLook at the sign above the door! Smoking advertisements were so prevalent.

Larry ClarkI knew the 2 guys in the doorway (not the one holding the cone) Dave Splane comes to mind for the one on the left but probably not right!

Anne CramptonBubba look how beautiful your mom was.

1967– 6 cents of whipping cream–October 15, 2020 · Wendy LeBlanc

I have so many memories of ‘The Dairy’ as we kids of the 1950s called it; it was around the corner from our home on James Street and we either shopped there or at least walked by it every day. The following are some random memories as they come to me:When Dad first came home from WWII, he didn’t go immediately to the promised job at Findlay’s Foundry, but worked delivering milk for the dairy for some months. Our milk was delivered daily from The Dairy, but occasionally Mum would send us over to buy a quart of milk; I clearly remember carrying the empty glass bottle with 2 dimes and a penny in it to buy the milk, which at that time was not homogenized. Mum either poured the cream off the top for another use or vigourously shook it to give us wonderfully rich whole milk.On Sundays following attending Church at Memorial Park United, we stopped off at The Dairy to buy a brick of Neapolitan ice cream, our staple dessert on Sunday noon. Very occasionally, we would walk over to The Dairy with a bowl and come home with it full of scoops of dipped ice cream for a special treat (we had only an icebox, so couldn’t store ice cream).In the 1960s, my sister Kathryn worked at The Dairy and brother Wayne and I expected extra large ice cream cones from her, and I am sure she gave them to us in fear – not of losing her job, but of us. Peggy Mace and I stopped at The Dairy almost daily on our way back to school after lunch to buy penny candy; Mrs. Saunders was working there and was very patient with us as we carefully and slowly selected our treats. While we were there, a well-dressed man (I think I know who it was but hesitate to say as I am not certain – but definitely a town business man) came into The Dairy every day and drank down a glass of Alka Seltzer; now that must have been some kind of a lunch he went home to! Our childhood neighbourhood territory was small, but our lives were enriched with businesses like The Dairy and the people who owned and worked there.Dale Costello Great memories, and stories of Maple Leaf Dairy. We were big time in CP with two dairies. Many a chocolate shake hand made by Ray Morrels mom. My Uncle, Lorne Aitken delivered bottled milk, and I helped on Saturdays– You can get Wendy’s book at the Carleton Place museum

Ruth Anne SchnuppI remember they had the biggest cones for 10 cents !

Kathy DevlinI remember taking empty pop bottles in to cash out for a bag of penny candy, pixie stix, licorice , mojos, green leaves

Jim McKittrickGreat summer jobs for 3 years 1 in the dairy and 2 summers delivering milk for Bill R ( 1965 66 and 67 )

Sherri IonaNana would send us off with a 25 cents . . . . Popsicles, ice cream, milkshakes. . . . What memories!

R.D. LackeyAmazing place as kids loved going there rent games 5cent candy’s a place like this need to come back

Carol McDonaldI worked after school and weekends and some summer days when Mrs Saunders would take holidays for Bill and Ethel Rintoul and babysat their kids some evenings. Buttermilk was served by the glass , big ice cream cones were served to a line up of people especially on Sundays and many milkshakes all different flavours, penny candy, very busy most days!

Jan McCarten SansomDoug B. McCarten ..I remember ice cream cones and milkshakes, and especially time spent with my best friend Katherine Langtry, watching cartoons Saturday mornings in their home upstairs .. wonderful memories !

Doug B. McCartenJan McCarten Sansom in addition to all that I remember a Sealtest sign with feet LOL

John ArmourI got my milkshakes everyday (even through winter). Mrs. Nephin made the best ones.

Sandy FredetteDon’t know when it was originally built, but do know it’s being renovated now… my grandson is helping out on the project.

Jane CarnegieWent there daily on my way back to school for penny candy…would ho back after school with pop bottles to cash in for chips and more candy!

Derek Bowker

I remember walking home and stopping in for penny candies! Got BUSTED shoplifting when I was just a little kid! Parents got called and I had to go back and apologize! Life lesson!!!Renting Nintendo machines and games for the weekend! That place was LEGENDARY!!!

Meghan PookThe Dairy! We’d sneak off of Carambeck’s yard during lunch and buy 5¢ candies. I remember the heavy fridge door made of wood with latch style handle. That’s where the small cartons of chocolate milk were. The older gentleman who worked there usually reminded me of a cross between Mr. Dress-Up & Mr. Rogers in appearance but always struck me as stern. Probably b/c he was dealing with a gaggle of random school kids streaming through buying less then $1 worth of product. I loved the miniature brown paper bags we used for the candy. I loved the way the bell sounded when you entered. I loved the way it smelled in there – like dust and tobacco and something sweet. Good times.

Meghan PookThe Dairy! We’d sneak off of Carambeck’s yard during lunch and buy 5¢ candies. I remember the heavy fridge door made of wood with latch style handle. That’s where the small cartons of chocolate milk were. The older gentleman who worked there usually reminded me of a cross between Mr. Dress-Up & Mr. Rogers in appearance but always struck me as stern. Probably b/c he was dealing with a gaggle of random school kids streaming through buying less then $1 worth of product. I loved the miniature brown paper bags we used for the candy. I loved the way the bell sounded when you entered. I loved the way it smelled in there – like dust and tobacco and something sweet. Good times.

Brian Giffin5 cent ice cream after church

Related reading…

The Duff Dairy Diphtheria Scare

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Clippings and History of Mill and Bridge Street Almonte

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Clippings and History of Mill and Bridge Street Almonte

almonte.com

Photo thanks to Brent Eades of Almonte.com

On the corner of Bridge and Mill Street once sat The People’s Store and the McAdams store– read-McAdams Store Almonte— It burned down and became The Orpheum, then the O’Brien and nowThe Hub. read-Mary Delaney Caught Stealing at The People’s Store

There was a fire in 1911 and that whole corner burned down as it began in the back of People’s store

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1911, Tue  •  Page 1
Thanks to Brent Eades

Almonte and district suffered no great damage as a result of Saturday’s wind of hurricane proportions. The O’Brien Theatre was the only casualty and about one quarter of its roof was torn off.There was also some damage to the ventilators in the building. The matinee was cancelled but Mr. H. R. Davey was able to make temporary repairs and the night show was held as usual — May 1950 Almonte Gazette

may 1960 almonte gazette

Almonte and district suffered no great damage as a result of Saturday’s wind of hurricane proportions. The O’Brien Theatre was the only casualty and about one quarter of its roof was torn off. There was also some damage to the ventilators in the building. The matinee was cancelled but Mr. H. R. Davey was able to make temporary repairs and the night show was held as usual. 

Motoring was most unpleasant and in some sections telephone poles were torn down. The fire brigade responded to four fires on Saturday, three of which were in less than an hour. One was a chimney fire at the home of Mr. James Waddell in New England. Another was a grass fire at the end of Ann St.; the next was at the residence of Mr. Archie Levitan where leaves caught fire in some unexplained way and the fourth was at the home of Mr. Edgar Lowry, corner of Country and Church Streets. This one started from a fire that had been set out several days before and the embers were fanned into life by the high wind.

May 1950

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Jun 1930, Sat  •  Page 21

May 1930 Almonte Gazette

Everything is just about ready for the reopening of the Orpheum Theatre here and the first official showing will be on Monday afternoon and evening next, June 30th. The first picture to be shown will be the First National beautiful, all technicolor, musical comedy story “Sally,” which both on the stage and through the sound screen has proven very popular and entertaining. The management have made a special effort to secure a positive atmosphere with courtesy and pleasure and a sucessful production for presentation.

Mr.  Bruck is general manager and an excellent picture has been procured for the opening day. The new theatre is one of the best in the Ottawa Valley and no doubt will be a great drawing card for Almonte. 

The picture “Sally” will be shown on both Monday and Tuesday of next week, and will be followed by dramatic and musical attractions that will amuse and entertain the large audiences which it is expected  to patronize the new theatre. The program also of the management is to show only features of a high standard which will be superior in quality and of a calibre that will insure a successful entertainment. The advertising pages of the Gazette will from time to time announce the various sound pictures that have been booked for showing here. The new O’Brien Theatre is a commercial enterprise, but it is more. 

This new theatre in Almonte is a testimony to the man whose name ‘it bears; expense has not entered into the construction and equipping of the O’Brien Theatre; only the best in each of the various lines necessary to the building and equipping of the O’­ Brien Theatre was allowed into the architects’ specifications. The result is that Almonte now has a beautiful Movitone and Vitaplione motion picture building, very modern in design, acoustically perfect, and absolutely fireproof. 

The new O’Brien. Theatre is a distinct asset to the town. In addition, the furnishings and the equipment are of the most advanced and approved designs that the world’s markets had to offer, and everything has been laid out to ensure public approval. The old Orpheum Theatre has been entirely remodelled and built; the canopy over the main entrance and the immense electrical sign present an imposing and attractive appearance; there are three entrance doors from Main street into the lobby. In addition there are two exit doors which open on to Bridge street, and these two exits will enable the theatre to be emptied at any time very rapidly. The main theatre building is of brick and concrete and the floors are covered with fresh cement which is a sound deadener. A very modern ventilation system has been installed so as to provide for the free circulation of fresh air continuously. Entering the theatre one goes from the lobby to the main part of the house. The lighting effects in the lobby are modernistic. Particularly artistic photo frame and mirrors decorate both the lobby and foyer. 

These lend a very attractive appearance to this section of the entrance. Going from the lobby one enters the main part of the theatre, with its wide aisles and beautiful, comfortable, upholstered opera chairs, with leather air cushions and upholstered backs finished in wine color. 

Indirect lighting of the aisles is a very up-to-date touch which will no doubt be appreciated by the patrons coming in during the performance. On the stage is a large Vocalite sound   screen equipped with an automatic screen modifier, also electrically operated and controlled. This screen and modifier is one of the new real WS features of the Q’Brien Theatre. The stage back of the Vocalite sound screen has been draped with heavy and artistically finished velour hangings, and the scenic effect will compare with any of the theatres in the larger cities of Canada and the United States. 

The owners of the O’Brien Theatre gave a great deal of time and attention to the question of sound equipment, and after investigating many different styles and makes of machines decided to install the high class Northern Electric sound equipment for both Movitone and Vitaphone in addition to new Simplex projection machines. This newest sound equipment will enable the proper presentation of the bigger and best of the talkies and where feasible the screen will give life size reproduction. 

The main contract for the construction of the new O’Brien Theatre was awarded on a tender basis to M. Sullivan & Son, Arnprior. The architects were Messrs. Richards and Abra of Ottawa, and local firms whose work has assisted in the completion of this fine new building were: Taylor Bros., The proscenium curtains, valances, draperies, carpels and furniture for the O ’Brien Theatre here, and also those in Renfrew, Arnprior and Pembroke, were made and installed by A. J. Frieman, Ottawa. 

Broadloom Axminster carpets, reversible gold French velours, black silk velours and figure silk damasks, all richly trimmed, together with highest grade available. The main contract for the construction of the new O’Brien Theatre was awarded on a tender basis to M. Sullivan & Son, Arnprior. The architects , were Messrs. Richards and Abra of Ottawa, and local firms whose work has assisted in the completion of this fine new building were: Taylor Bros., The proscenium curtains, valances, draperies, carpels and furniture for the O ’Brien Theatre here, and also those in Renfrew, Arnprior and Pembroke, were made and installed by A. J. Frieman, Ottawa. 

photo almonte.com

The theatre was owned and operated by Ottawa Valley Amusements, owned by Renfrew entrepreneur M. J. O’Brien. The Renfrew Theatre was part of a chain that included theatres in Arnprior (now once again associated with Renfrew), and Pembroke, Almonte and Carleton Place.

Marilyn Miller 1929 in Sally which was playing at the O’ Brien

Source: North Lanark Regional Museum
When the Rosamond Hospital in Almonte quickly filled on the night of the accident, the O’Brien Theatre opened their doors rather reluctantly.  When confronted, the owner of the theatre protested opening his doors, claiming he didn’t have any authorization. Nevertheless the doors were removed, and used as stretches for the dead and wounded.
Converted into a temporary hospital and morgue, it is unclear whether the theatre had re-opened by December 31 as advertised in the Almonte Gazette.

Photo Allan Stanley— read-Lottie Barr’s Chips Almonte –Thanks to Allan Stanley

Almonte1925 Gazette

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Dec 1942, Mon  •  Page 12

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Jun 1930, Sat  •  Page 24
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Jun 1930, Sat  •  Page 24
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Aug 1969, Tue  •  Page 37
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Feb 1957, Sat  •  Page 3

Thanks to Brent Eaded

Our pushing young merchants, Messrs. Riddell & McAdam,
have purchased the •People’s Store• property from Mrs. J.T~
Brown, and will shortly remove to their new stand. The price
paid was $5,550. At the sale on Saturday afternoon .Mr. Wm.
Curry, blacksmith, bought the Cowie pump factory and the
residence adjoining, paying therefor.$950. Sept 1890 Almonte Gazette–https://lindaseccaspina.wordpress.com/…/mary-delaney…/

Related reading….

Almonte at Night — 1946

Lottie Barr’s Chips Almonte –Thanks to Allan Stanley

Seeds of Love–Almonte Cinema – Then and Now

Les Portes Tournantes Film Almonte 1987

The People’s Store McAdams Building Fire 1911

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The People’s Store McAdams Building Fire 1911

Corner Bridge and Mill Street now the Hub

Almonte, May 18, 1911

One of the most disastrous fire In the history of the town broke out in the early hours of this morning in the business block and before it was gotten under control had entailed a loss estimated at nearly $76,000, only partly covered by insurance. The conflagration is a most serious, one for the town s the portion destroyed is right in the centre of the business section. In about an hour after the fire broke out the large block of half a dozen buildings which fell a prey to the flames had been consumed with practically all of their contents. Carleton Place sent its engine on a special train but the fire was under control when it arrived. The principal buildings destroyed are those of A. J. McAdam, Sirs. J. S. Patterson, Mrs. D. H. Davis, these three being of brick; W. McMunn, H. Conn and J. Francis, the latter being frame; T. R. White’s coat shed with a large stock of coal; W. N. Acton’s lumber storehouse, well filled with dressed lumber, and L. James’ ash house.

The fire when first discovered was well advanced and had apparently broken out in the rear of the People’s Store attire. By the time the fire company was on the scene and the engine In action the flames had spread to ths frame structure at the rear of the Mock. All the upper part of Mr. W. J’cMunn’s building, formerly the old Music hall and now used as a storehouse for buggies and machinery, was a mass of flames.

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To show what a narrow escape Mr.  Robertson’s store had from destruction during the big blaze, one only has to look at the eave of the roof, which is burned and charred- in several places. The terrific heat from across the street was the cause and only a thorough drenching kept the building from falling prey to the flames. The attention of the firemen was devoted principally to preventing the fire from spreading to the adjoining blocks. The substantial store building of Mr. F. W. Robertson was instrumental in shutting off the advance of the lire down Mill street, although the edge of the roof was on fire repeatedly. The chief danger was that the fire might cross High street to the lavls house, a large three-storey frame building, as the wind was blowing in that direction, but there was little wind and this enabled the firemen to get a chance to fight it. The pressure on some of the lines of hose was poor and the water could not be ithrown to the top of the Davis house. It was. however, saved by a party of volunteers under Mr. L. W. Shipman and Mr. Avery, a teacher. The roof had become ignited from embers and Mr. Shipman succeeded after some delay in getting a hand pump to work on the roof. Mr. Avery also made his way along the roof in a daring manner and applied water to the fast in creasing blaze. The daring work ot the two men undoubtedly saved the hotel.

The saving of the Davis house also prevented the destruction of a large part of the town which would certainly have been destroyed if it had gone. There was a hard struggle to prevent the fire from crossing to the Davis house sheds, when Acton’s lumber shed was on fire, the heat being so intense that It almost drove the firemen out of range. Carleton Place generously sent their fire engine down on a special train but the fire was under control before it arrived and was detrained. The loss will be well up near the $100.000 mark, as there were three large brick buildings. A. J. McAdams building shows the most loss ( People’s Store)

The brick wall of the McAdam building on Bridge street is still standing, but owing to its dangerous condition the street has been fenced off. Monday evening about six o’clock, during the high wind, a portion of the upper part was blown off. The wall will probably be taken down to the second story, and the lower portion rebuilt. The walls at the back of the McAdam and Patterson buildings are also standing, but the rest of the burned area is nearly all levelled to the ground.

McAdams occupied the first flat of his building as a general store and lost his complete stock. The second flat was occupied by the Misses Beaton as a dressmaking shop and partly by McAdams’ stock of carpets. etc. The third story was occupied by the Citizens’ band. Mrs. J. Patterson’s shop was occupied by J. H. Proctor, harness maker, and Messrs. Rooney and Hogan barbers, on the first flat, the Bell Telephone central and Mrs. Patterson’s residence in the second flat, and the upper flat was the hall of the Sons of Temperance.

The lower flat of Mrs. Davis’ building was occupied by T. Hogan’s pool room and tobacco shop and the Union Express office and the second flat by Mrs. Davis as her residence. George Robertson, occupied the barber shop at the rear of the Peoples’ store, near which the fire originated There is a fair amount of Insurance on some of the goods but the loss will still be heavy.

1911 Almonte Gazette May

Some of the losses in detail, with amount of Insurance, are: Mrs. J. S. Patterson, loss on buildings $4,000; occupants, J. H. Proctor, harness, loss $2,000: Rooney and Hogan, barbers, $500; telephone central office, loss $4,000. Mrs. D. H. Davis, loss on buildings, $250, on furniture $1,000; occupants of stores under her dwelling, Thos. Hopkins. tobacco and pool, $2,000;

Dominion Express company office, $500. A. J. McAdams, drygoods and general store, loss on building, $7,000; on stock $30,000; other occupants of McAdam block, the Misses Beaton, milliners and dressmakers, $500; Citizens’ band loss on instruments, $500; Geo. Robinson, barber shop, $500. Wm. McMunn block, lose on buildings. $2,000; on stock of flour, feed and implements, $3,000. M. Unger, vacant dwelling and shop, loss $1,500. John France, frame dwelling, loss on building and contents, $1,000. T. R. White, coal sheds, loss on building $1,000; on contents $1,000. W. N. Acton, dressed lumber and office, loss on building and contents, $3,000. Mrs. E. Greig. loss on furniture in McMunn block. $1,000. The burned section is bounded by Mill, Bridge and High streets and the C. P. R. tracks. Chester Avery, the young school teacher who was in instrumental in saving the Davis house and thus checking the fire was slightly injured.

May 1911 Ottawa Citizen

Related reading

Mary Delaney Caught Stealing at The People’s Store

McAdams Store Almonte

Robertsons Keepsake Building Memories and Comments

The Mayhew Sisters Business Women of Carleton Place — Schwerdtfeger Genealogy

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The Mayhew Sisters Business Women of Carleton Place — Schwerdtfeger Genealogy

Miss Bertha Mayhew ran her own millinery shop on the main street of Carleton Place in the late 1800’s. She had learned the trade from her older sisters who ran “The Misses Mayhew” hat and dress shop in Pakenham.

After falling in love with and marrying the shopkeeper next door, barber and tobacconist Henry Schwerdtfeger, she closed her shop and Henry took over the entire main floor for his businesses. The couple continued to live upstairs with their daughters Gladys and Hazel before buying a large red brick home on Lake Avenue West. 

Bertha continued to work out of her home, and years later, when daughter Hazel died in 1988, executors discovered boxes and boxes of hats and millinery supplies in the attic. Many taxidermy birds, lace, netting, beadwork, chenille flowers and buttons are still in their original packaging. With great foresight, this collection was donated to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum by the Hazel Schwerdtfeger Estate. Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum 2014

Miss M. A. Mayhew, who has been in poor health for several months, passed away somewhat unexpectedly Monday afternoon. Her trouble was a heart failure. Miss Mayhew was a daughter of the late Ephriam Mayhew of Athens, Ont., and was 65 years of age. She came to Carleton Place with her sister Sophia in 1879, the two embarking in business here as milliners and dressmakers. Sophia died in 1887, and Adeline continued the business until three years ago, when she retired. They were successful, and built the block known by their name on Bridge street. May 8th 1903 Almonte Gazette

As Good as New and Good Food Company now on Bridge Street-

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Bertha Mayhew was 20 years younger than her sister Mary Adeline and 23 years younger than her sister Sophia. In 1879 the sisters moved to Carleton Place from Pakenham and set up shop on Bridge Street, as noted in the Carleton Place Directory listing: “Mayhew, Miss Adeline (S. & A. Mayhew)”. ((Sophia and Mary Adeline)

In the late 1800’s Bertha ( Bertie) Opa Mayhew of Carleton Place,Ontario was running her sister’s milliner on Bridge Street right next to dashing Henry Schwerdtfeger who ran the local tobacco store. The two sisters had been listed as Milliners & Dressmakers in Pakenham, Ontario, but it looks like the oldest Mary Adeline came to Carleton Place and set up the business first.

Sophia was listed as living in Pakenham and spending most of her time in Carleton Place. read-Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

Name
Bertha O Mayhew
Birth
10 August 1865
Death
5 November 1939-

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Name:
Bertha Mayhew
Marriage Date:
29 Jan 1890
Marriage Place:
Canada, Carleton Place, Ontario–

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Bertha looks like she was a late child of the Mayhew family and was sent to live with her sister in Carleton Place and learn the business. Mary Adeline owned the building with Sophia and as the sisters died off it was gradually passed down to Bertha upon the death of Mary in 1903. Henry Schwerdtfeger ran the local tobacco store where the Good Food Co was and after he married her, she closed down the business and expanded his tobacco business in there and likely took care of her affairs which included being the proprietor of the building. The Schwerdtfeger ‘s had two daughters: Hazel and Gladys.

mill2

In the 1891 census the newlyweds are living with Mary and I imagine they were still all living together until Mary died.

Mary A Mayhew52Head
Henry A Schmondfeger27Lodger
Bertha Schmondfeger27Lodger

After their parents Henry and Bertha died, sisters Hazel and Gladysl, (who never married) lived together in the old family home on Lake Ave West. Hazel became a registered nurse and the sisters lovingly kept all their mother’s millinery sundries and later donated the collection to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. A large portion of Hazel’s estate was willed to the Victorian Order of Nurses in Carleton Place, and as a tribute, the former V.O.N. building on Campbell Street was named Hazel House with a portrait  of her and her sister hung in the foyer

Patti LennoxThe VON building was built because of a generous bequest from the Schwerdtfeger sisters. Until the building sold last year, their pictures (along with a plaque commemorating the building opening) hung in our reception area.

Henry Schwerdtfeger had left his daughters a monthly stipend, but as the cost of living got higher it just was not enough to live on. Once in awhile when money ran low they used to go buy furniture at Home Hardware on their late fathers account and then return the merchandise for cash the next day. No one ever said anything about their habits as they were extremely loyal customers.

According to the late resident Carmen Lalonde who worked for EADES Home Hardware on Bridge Street; he remembered the two sisters very well. Some considered the two quite odd, with one sister always leading the way at a quick gait, and the other one huffing and puffing behind her.

One summer day a man attempted to enter the Schwerdtfeger sisters home through a basement window and alarmed the sisters. Soon the locking of doors and windows became routine, and when repairmen entered they found themselves locked inside the house with the sisters until the job was done. The daughters of milliner Bertha Mayhew Schwerdtfeger will always be fondly known by their pillbox hats–one wore red, and the other one blue.

Gladys and Hazel Schwerdtfeger at St. John’s Lutheran Church, Riverside Heights (1972)







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This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 28e29769-fb74-4dde-8530-cec9c1b3080a.jpg
Henry Norman Schwerdtfeger 
Bertha Mayhew 
Gladys Adeline Schwerdtfeger 
Hazel Mae Schwerdtfeger 

United (Pine Grove, Maple Wood, St. Fillan’s), Lanark, Ontario



Name:Bertha Schwerdtfeger
Birth Date:10 Aug 1865
Death Date:5 Nov 1939
Cemetery:United Cemeteries
Burial or Cremation Place:Beckwith, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:N
Spouse:Henry Norman Schwerdtfeger
Children:Infant Son SchwerdtfegerGladys Adeline SchwerdtfegerHazel Mae Schwerdtfeger
Name:Bertha Mayhew
Gender:Female
Origin:Scottish (Scotish)
Age:7
Birth Date:1864
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Place:Pakenham, Lanark North, Ontario
District Number:80
Subdistrict:c
Division:02
Religion:Methodist
Occupation:Clerk
Neighbours:View others on page
Household MembersAgeSophia Mayhew30Adeline Mayhew27Walter Mayhew17Bertha Mayhew7

1871 Census

1911 Census

Name:Bertha Schwerdfeger[Bertha Schwerdtfeger]
Gender:Female
Racial or Tribal Origin:Canadian
Nationality:Canada
Marital Status:Married
Age:56
Birth Year:abt 1865
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1 Jun 1921
House Number:90
Residence Street or Township:Lake Ave
Residence City, Town or Village:Town of Carleton Place
Residence District:Lanark
Residence Province or Territory:OntarioOntario
Residence Country:Canada
Relation to Head of House:Wife
Spouse’s Name:Henry Schwerdfeger
Father Birth Place:Ontario
Mother Birth Place:Ontario
Can Speak English?:Yes
Can Speak French?:No
Religion:Methodist
Can Read?:Yes
Can Write?:Yes
Municipality:Carleton Place
Enumeration District:97
Sub-District:Carleton Place (Town)
Sub-District Number:51
Enumerator:Norman Williamson
District Description:Polling Division No. 6 – Comprising that part of the town south of the 12th concession line and west of Rochester street and Franktown Road
Neighbours:View others on page
Line Number:10
Family Number:92
Household MembersAgeRelationshipHenry Schwerdfeger56HeadBertha Schwerdfeger56WifeGladys Schwerdfeger19DaughterHazel Schwerdfeger17Daughter

Mayhew family

Inscription

Inscription: [Edit]
In Memory Of
Ephraim Mayhew
Who Died
Nov. 19, 1884
at 77 Years

In Memory Of
Polly Middleton
Wife Of
Ephraim Mayhew
Who Died
Feb. 12, 1869
at 59 Years.

In Memory Of
Mary Adeline Mayhew
Who Died
May 4, 1903
At 55 Years.

In Memory Of
Sophia Mayhew
Who Died
June 13, 1887
At 54 Years,
5 Mon. & 9 Da.

Gravesite Details This Stone is in it’s own fenced in Plot on the Eastern side of the Lyndhurst (Abandoned) Cemetery.

Lyndhurst CemeteryLyndhurst, Leeds and Grenville United Counties, Ontario, Canada

Name:Mary A Mahen[Mary A Mayhew]
Gender:Female
Marital Status:Single
Age:52
Birth Year:abt 1839
Birth Place:United States
Residence Date:1891
Residence Place:Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Relation to Head:Head
Religion:Methodist
Occupation:Milliner
Number of Employees:7
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
French Canadian:No
Father’s Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Birth Place:Ontario
Neighbours:View others on page
Household MembersAgeRelationshipMary A Mahen52HeadHenry A Schmondfeger27LodgerBertha Schmondfeger27Lodger

1891 Census

Film No 186296 Vol 18 – 21Ephraim Mayhew 64 Edwardsburg Lewis / Sarah Anne Livingstone 62 Edwardsburg Henry Gale / Polly June 19, 1872 Yonge 348

Related reading

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

The Unusual Schwerdtfegers — Genealogy

Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

A Letter from a Local Student Nurse 1930s

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling