Tag Archives: History

Perth 1912 – The Whole Community Lives Happily Together

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Perth 1912 – The Whole Community Lives Happily Together

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Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Journal,
    2. 07 Dec 1912, Sat,
    3. Page 19

historicalnotes

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STUDENTS AT THE ORIGINAL ST. JOHN’S SCHOOL, PERTH, 1912

Front row, left to right; Johnnie Byrne, Michael Furlong, Joe Farry, Johnnie Dowdall, Ralph Hanlon, Leo Mulholland, Norbert Doyle, Collingwood Smith, Jim Williams, Leo Dowdall, Frank Daughin, Jim Horan, Isadore Kane, Johnnie McGlade, tom Brady. Second row, left to right; Aileen Kane, Rebecca Jackman, Edna Crawford, Isabel Fenwick, Sadie Quinn, Vera Crawford, Marie McCarthy, Wilma Kane, Mary White, Helen Young, Kathleen Kane, Winnifred Lee, Kathleen McGuggan, Nellie Cooper, Victoria Brown, Emline Courtney, Anna Badour. Back row, left to right; Bernice DeWitt, Annie Nonan Brankin, Gertrude Hudson, Gladys Crawford.

The old wooden school building had four classrooms on the ground floor with another 4 rooms on the second floor. It was taken down and replaced with the present St. John’s School in 1926. During the rebuilding period, classes were held in St. John’s Hall (McMartin House).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

  2. DeBunking The Biggest Nose in Perth Story

  3. The First Train to Perth–and I Don’t Know if I’m Ever Coming Home! Seriously!

  4. Perth fair Winners 1949 and The Perth Fair Story

 

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Update on the House on Thomas Street

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Update on the House on Thomas Street

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Kathy McAuley– photo– The train passing by the house on Thomas St and may have been the last time ever. Spring 2012. My late dog, Baillie, in the foreground watching in awe.

 

If you ever have anything you are looking for I can get it out there and hopefully we can solve the mystery. Contact me Linda at sav_77@yahoo.com — this is where it began: The House on Thomas Street — Can You Help?

Kathy McAuley gave us an update today on last week’s article:

Hi Linda Seccaspina,

Just wanted to thank you for posting and to let you know that last Thursday, because of your post, I received a PM which resulted in a phone call from the granddaughter of precious owners of my house on Thomas Street.

Her grandparents (the Washburn’s) owned the property from 1902 until 1956, the longest standing owners since before 1870 until today and her grandfather worked at Rosamond Mill #1 on Coleman Island. He would row over to work in a boat that he kept launched just below the tracks. Her uncle lived just a few houses down (Cameron St) along the rail tracks and was the fire chief in Almonte during the granddaughter’s childhood. She has fond memories of taking the train from her home in the North Bay area to come visit her grandparents in Almonte. She remembers them waving to her as the passenger train passed by the house before its stop at the train station in town.

She also remembered her grandfather building a porch upstairs as a room for her aunt who had tuberculosis. She remembers her grandparents meticulously kept gardens, especially the gladioli, and the glassed in porch with the flagstone walkways. She remembers to this day the smell of the kitchen and the wood cook stove. She remembers how her dad loved looking out the kitchen window towards the views of the river gushing over the falls near Mill #1.

We had a wonderful conversation and plan on meeting in person in the future. This morning I was pleasantly surprised to open my inbox to find 4 photos of her grandparents gardens and the exterior of the house. It is my hope to restore some of the features back to the way they once were.
Thanks once again Linda for creating a page that allows us to reflect on Almonte’s history.

Kathy MacAuley

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I cannot do the Facebook pages Lanark County Genealogical Society, Tales of Carleton Place and Tales of Almonte alone. Thank you for sending in your photos, ideas and stories. Please keep doing it so we can keep our Lanark County Community history alive.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

The House on Thomas Street — Can You Help?

Eye Opening Conditions of the Carleton Place Mills– also update to Cardy Miller Story

Did you Know? Update on 18 Emily Street Carleton Place

This Week’s Updates to Stories

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

G. H. Ansley Perth Shoe Company Obituary

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G. H. Ansley Perth Shoe Company Obituary

 - G. H. Ansley Perth Shoe Co. Ch'airman Die...

 

 

Perth Remembered

The Factory began its life as a shoe manufacturing plant, thereby continuing a long tradition of shoemaking excellence in the town of Perth. Constructed for the Brown Shoe Company (Canada) it was considered the most modern facility of it’s kind when it opened it’s doors in November 1960.

For over forty years the Factory provided employment to hundreds of local people who produced countless numbers of shoes (most notably well known Buster Brown children’s shoes) which were sold at home and abroad.

 

EmployeesPerthShoeCo

1918- Perth Remembered

During this time the Brown Shoe Company developed strong ties to the community through its commitment to corporate and social responsibility. So it was with great sadness that The Factory closed its doors in 2003 and while efforts were made to revive shoe manufacturing at this location, it was not to be. The Factory

 

1960- In the Perth plant, 19,200 shoes were in process each day of the week. In the U.S. at the time there were fifty planes, including tanneries and other factories manufacturing the various component parts. Perth Remembered

 

A Timeline of Brown Shoes Click here..

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Perth Remembered

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I Knew it Wasn’t Petticoat Junction!– Eastern Townships History

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I Knew it Wasn’t Petticoat Junction!– Eastern Townships History

 

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I not only write history about Lanark County but I dabble from time to time in Eastern Townships history, as that is where I grew up. There are a lot of ex-Quebecers in Lanark County– actually more than I ever imagined, so I am sharing this photo with you. I search non stop for odd photos and found this great one labeled “A train crossing in the Eastern townships, Quebec Date[1914]” so I put it on the People from Eastern Townships page looking for a location.

Neil Herring replied:Linda, this is a terrific picture. Several things come to mind. First, this is not a simple crossing. There’s a major water stop on the track. There were only a few of them and they were located near sources of water, typically springs on a hill nearby in order to get gravity feed to the water tower. There was a water tower at the bottom of the hill in front of Fairview Farm, fed by the springs behind the sugar bush, used until the 1940s, I believe.

Second, there are hills in the background. This would lead me to believe that the location is to the east, perhaps on the Megantic Line coming west into Lennoxville or to the west, on the Montreal-Sherbrooke line, heading east.

It’s unlikely this is on the run coming north from Stanstead.

Finally, we have no photos from the day hay was loaded loose like this and carted off to the hayloft as the Herring family couldn’t afford to have a photographer take pictures of such unimportant activity. A true find. Thanks for sharing”.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Linda’s Nickel Opinions — Blasts From the Past — Part 6

Linda’s Nickel Opinions — Blasts From the Past — Part 4

Sometimes You Need to Just Walk Your Potatoe

Hobos, Apple Pie, and the Depression–Tales from 569 South Street

Ashes to Ashes and Spins of the Washing Machine

The Days of Smocking and Spanish Bar Cake

Been Caught Stealing– Bank of Montreal

Angry Mobs, Wolves and Bloodsuckers –Selby Lake

Memories of UFO’s Earthquake Lights and Gale Pond

Misty Glen Mountain Snow Bunny Hop

Music in the 60s- Memories of Herman’s Hermits

Back to The Future — Twisting Your Dignity Away

Groovy Hints on How to Catch and Keep a Boy – 60’s style

The Dreams of a Sugar Plum Fairy

I Was A Free Range Child

Scrapbook Photos of Cowansville

6 Seconds of Cowansville High School – Our Miss Phelps

The Benefits of Having a Large Human Chassis for Traction

 

 

The Condo Ephemera of Boulton Brown Mill

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The Condo Ephemera of Boulton Brown Mill

 

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Photo –Horace Brown took this photo of his friend on top of his family’s flour mill on Mill Street in 1913. It’s the former Boulton Brown mill, on Mill Street, that is now converted into condominiums. Note that he is hanging onto that ladder for dear life – and the next time you drive down Mill street, note just how high that ladder really is! That is the Bates and Innes (MacArthur) Mill in the distance.  from  Jumpin’ Around in Carleton Place — Local Urban Acrobats

 

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Found online

he local grist and oatmeal mills were bought by Henry Bredin from Hugh Boulton Jr.  They continued to be operated by James Greig (1806-1884), who ran these mills from 1862 to 1868 after the death of Hugh Boulton Sr., founder of this first industry of the community.

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The Hugh Bolton Grist Mill at 35 Mill street and the Brown Flour Mill next door date from the late 1823. The five story addition was added in 1885 to accommodate a roller press mill. This mill actually operated until the 1960’s until a fire destroyed the interior. In the 1980’s it was converted into condominiums. The original millstone was found during the renovations and put across the street.  Hugh had ordered one from Scotland but it never arrived. (wonder what the shipping was on that one) So Hugh went up the river and got some made granite from up the river and carved his own.

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When William Hill was head miller at H. Brown & Sons his brother in law Radford was also employed there. The two men presented a contrast in appearance with the former a small frail man while Radford a huge man. The larger sibling sometimes liked to astound onlookers by grasping the top of a 100 pound bag of Sunlight Flour in his teeth and swinging it onto his shoulder without using his hands.

 

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Mary Peden with a background of the Carleton Place town hall and mills on Mill Street

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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Down by the Old Mill Stream — Carleton Place

The Brown Flour Mill Stories

One of the Many Hauntings of Mill Street

Coleman Family History–Just for Your Records

Jumpin’ Around in Carleton Place — Local Urban Acrobats

A Cross for the Irish who Perished on the St. Lawrence Shores

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A Cross for the Irish who Perished on the St. Lawrence Shores

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Kebeca1690 – DeviantArt

In 1909 they erected a monument, a cross for the Irish Immigrants, who perished of the plague on the shores of the St. Lawrence in 1847-1848. This particular page of Canada’s history dealing with that sad event is a black and terrible one. They were dark years, ones for all Ireland, as well as for those Irishmen who had come to Canada’s hospitable shores only to die horribly of plague, as the potato famine raged in Ireland. Irishmen left their native soil by shiploads hoping to find plenty and a more happy life in Canada. But the cholera or ship fever, or whatever the dread disease was called broke out, and the poor immigrants whose constitutions had been reduced by hunger and trouble at home, fell easy victims.

Death’s scythe mowed the poor people down by thousands both on shipboard and at the quarantine station at Grosse lsle, 27 miles below Quebec. They died literally by hundreds, and some were buried before they were even dead in a great trench on the Island. Terror stalked abroad; the story of the great plague of London was repeated on Canada’s shores. It was told that 12,000 men women and children were buried in one great last resting place. In those days men travelled in sailing vessels and the journey to Canada took three months, so it can be seen how easy it was for the seeds of the plague to sprout and grow in the packed and unsanitary vessels of those days.

The young children came through the plague generally speaking better than their parents. After the ravages had ceased, hundreds of orphans drew the sympathy and protection of the French settlers of Quebec, and that is why all through the lower part of the province in the 1920’s to 1930’s you would find O’Flahertys, Donovans, McCools, Flynns, and Gilhoolys who could not speak a word of English.

The powers to be decided that the grave of these Irish Immigrants, for it is one great grave, was to have a headstone. As the result of the activity of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, a heroic Celtic cross seven feet high was placed on a commanding spot on Grosse Isle and told of the terrible tragedy that was enacted at the quarantine station years ago.

 

 - IHli CKHKMOMKS. On fiunia, August U. the great...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 19 Jul 1909, Mon,
  3. Page 4

 

File:Cimetiere de l'est Grosse Ile 2.jpgGrave, eastern cemetery, Grosse Isle, Quebec. “Heinrich Neuman, age 6 years, Ex. S.S. Palanza, Died dec. 20. 1912”

 

 

 

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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The Norwegian Bride– Not Your Ordinary Bride

How Many Women Does it Take to Replace a Team of Horses?The Doukhobors

What Was Smiths Falls Perth and Port Elmsley like to Joseph and Jane Weekes?

What Did British Immigrants Spend When They First Came to Canada?

The Man Without a Country

Lanark County 101 — It Began with Rocks, Trees, and Swamps

Rock the Boat! Lanark County or Bust! Part 1

It Wasn’t the Sloop John B — Do’s and Don’t in an Immigrant Ship -Part 2

Riders on the Storm– Journey to Lanark County — Part 3

ROCKIN’ Cholera On the Trek to the New World — Part 4

Rolling down the Rapids –Journey to Lanark Part 5

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

 

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There are about 6 huge pages about Innisville written by Thomas Alfred Code so I will do this in parts. This is 4b— the  1860s and 1870s.

 

Reverting to the 1860s and 1870s was the prosperity in the village of Innisville. We had two woolen mills (I will refer to that later) and a tannery in addition to the Innis Mills already referred to. The latter was operated by James Jackson. It was a primitive institution, but it served the wants of the people at the time. The people sent the hides, which they might get back six months later. We had our local shoemakers: boots and shoes were made up in the homes by itinerant shoemakers: likewise tailoring. This form of service was called:”Whipping the Cat”.

The carding mill was on the south side of the river and was operated by A& G Code making carded rolls for spinning. In many cases a woman went from house to house at 2 S. 6 d a day, sometimes spending weeks at one home. The hand loom-weaver who wove the yarn into drugget– which consisted of a No. 10 cotton warp, wool filling– was to be found in every section of the locality. Coarse flannels were made into fancy striped patterns, and proud were the wives when the piece came home. All the friends came to see it and pass their opinion, or express their appreciation. This was worn next to the skin, which would be somewhat ticklish for the people of today, but we never saw knitted underwear or rubber footwear in those days.

We had our cooper– William Churchill— who with an assistant turned out pork barrels. I may here mention that the hog product in the shape of pork was packed in barrels and branded by the district inspector as mess, or prime mess etc. for shipment to the lumber shanties. The old dash churn was another product, and there are many who can remember churning was quite a task, especially for the small boys who wanted to join their chums at play, or go fishing. Another product of the cooper was a firkin for butter, a small barrel which would contain as I remember, one hundred pounds, and was marketed in the autumn in Carleton Place, or in Perth at Meighen’s, Shaw’s, Henderson’s, Hicks’ and other stores.

The locality was what might be called self contained– that is, the people produced most of their requirements with the exceptions of groceries. Those were obtained during the year at the places named, and paid for in the autumn with produce: butter, wheat, oats and pork, etc. Potash was another product of the early days.

Wash-tubs and wooden buckets completed the cooper’s list of manufactured articles. But, with the trend of time, and the coming of more modern utensils, the village cooper became extinct. The same applies to Perth: when the writer came to Perth to attend school in 1874, Perth had five cooperages and 81 shoemakers on the bench.

In the village was to be found a foundry where plows and plow points were turned out. In addition there was a thriving blacksmith shop, established by the Hughes family and continued by Robert Jr. Blacksmithing is still something carried on in the same building (1929) which must date back about 90 years. Horse-shoeing, and the ironing of vehicles for a brother who works next door, was the principal work carried on. Two men were employed.

Two shoemakers, two stores, the village tailor and two hotels made up the list. Meals were to be had at 25 cents, and lodging for the night free to the wayfarer who partook of the good fare of the stopping-house.

Tomorrow- The Innisville’s doctor, Henry York, and the country school

 

historicalnotes

Photo- Perth Remembered

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

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In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

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How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed.

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon- see bio below–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?