Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

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122 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Photo-Steve Flint

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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122 Bridge Street Carleton Place

The long narrow outlet was Nat McAllister’s bike repair shop and later became a candy shop. The building at 122 Bridge was more than likely affected by the 1923 fire at The Golden Lion store next door, so it has either been rebuilt on account of that and since then has remained virtually unchanged except for the windows on the second storey and the addition of the area between 120 and 122 Bridge Street.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 02 Jul 1953, Thu, Page 35

Originally this building was the site of a cooperage operated by Mr. Burke and eventually
became the property of William McDiarmid. Murray O’Dell moved to town and set up an appliance shop in the larger building. Bob Flint became his second in command and he took over the business when O’Dell married Doris Munshaw and left town. Onna Culberton Archdeacon who had been an employee moved the business of O’Dell’s to 73 Bridge Street where The Eating Place is today.

Bob Flint’s store was the first to sell televisions in Carleton Place. and Bruce Sadler put up all the aerials in Carleton Place. Bob Flint’s son continued the business under the same name and years later they moved to the other side of Bridge Street closer to the Town Hall.

 

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The Carleton Place area photo posted is from the Porteous family collection. It was one that Pat Allan’s Mom, Muriel (nee Porteous) James, took when she was stationed near Ottawa while in RCAF (WWII) Pat Allan.. Looking for names.. Downtown Carleton Place–I see the Philco sign of Flints and the Billiards sign and the Keyes building

Related reading

Bob Flint’s TV Tips

The Danger Zone —TV Technicians in Carleton Place

The Anchor on Lake Ave East???? Land Ahoy!!! Mike Flint

 

124 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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124 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

Before Williams operated his butcher store at 124 Bridge Street, a tea store was
housed in this building. McDonald’s tea store sold a great variety and selection of
teas. In 1897, B.Y. Williams moved his butcher shop from the opera hall block to the
Burke building next to the old Duncan McDiarmid store. In 1898, Moore Knowles bought out Williams. In 1899, Olmstead and Stanzel bought Moore Knowles butcher shop. In the same year Williams opened his shop next to Mitchell and Cram.

 

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In 1918, Williams returned to 124 Bridge Street to conduct his butcher shop business. Later it was run by his son C.Y. Buzz Williams. Some of the employees were: Maurice Pommerville, Willis Armour, Mervin Devlin, Susie Rothwell as well as John and Peter Williams. Buzz and his wife took over the store for some time but later Joe Kleibor and Mr. Bernicky of Smiths Falls ran the butcher business for a period of time.

124 Bridge Street remained in the Williams Family until 1971 when the building was sold to Ken Young. In 1967, the Young’s (Ken and Joy) began their operation of Young’s Variety leasing the premises and for 22 years conducted business at 124 Bridge Street until 1989, when the couple retired from business. Some of their employees were: Frances Smith, Peggy Johnston and Marg Smith. Later it became a sports store, a pizza parlour and in 2006 a Tai Chi Studio is in operation at 124 Bridge Street.

 

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Bridge Street 2006 The Thai Chi group — In 2006, a Tai Chi Studio is in operation at 124 Bridge Street. Photo by Mike Jeays.

 

Related reading

It’s Dave Young’s “Variety” Photo Page -70s

The Roar of the Referees and the Smell of the Hockey Bag in Carleton Place

 

126 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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126 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

The property at 126 Bridge Street belonged to the Burke Estate for quite a number
of years before ownership passed to Lloyd Tetlock. In 1918, Tetlock bought the
building from Burke at 126 Bridge Street. Tetlock ran a plumbing and tinsmith shop.
Osie Hastie began working for Tetlock in 1923. Upon Tetlock’s death in 1945, Osie
and Roy bought the business. Roy retired in 1971.

This is someone I am proud to call a friend– Ken Hastie.. He is a part of Carleton Place history and he is also one of the hearts and souls of St. Andrews.. He is my granddaughters great grandfather and isn’t feeling so well these days.. Please keep him in your thoughts and prayers. Get well Pappy so we can talk about Carleton Place history again.. Sending love to you big time.

 

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, sunglasses, hat, closeup and outdoor

 - HASTIEAt Carleton Place, on Thurs-riir....

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Dec 1939, Sat,  Page 30

 

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Interior of Tetlock store-Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The sons of RoOssie Hastie kept the business going for a short time. In 1989, Hastie Bros. moved from their Bridge Street location after serving Carleton Place for 44 years. Mr. Hastie took over the small store next door which had been the hair salon of Edna (Wright) Curtis to have more floor space for displays.  Gerald and Ken continued the business for a short time and Gerald ended up moving his business to Campbell Street in 1959. Hastie’s continued to own the building until 1999 when it was sold to Ferguson who then sold it to Van Zetten.

 

Related reading:

Goin’ Shopping at The Tetlock Bros of Carleton Place

130-132 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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130-132 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870 1920

There must have been a fire in the early 1900s and this building seems to be reconstructed. Assessment rolls had Dr. Switzer at this location renting
from William McDiarmid.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Mar 1898, Wed,  Page 2

Marg Whyte recalls that Mr. White was the first person to live in this building but he does not take ownership until 1920.One of the first mentions of Dr. Switzer pharmacist is in the 1876 Assessment Rolls.
There is an advertisement for Switzer and Bros in an 1883 edition of The Carleton
Place Herald. The first family to occupy this brick building was Robert White and he operated a taxi business. They were a large family consisting of Mrs. Stunden,Mrs. Carrie Grove and Edith White. The boys were: Jack Everett and Guy.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 04 Jan 1974, Fri, Page 43 CLICK on whole article to read all about local photographer Ernie Foote–

The other side of the building was rented to Ernie and Anne Foote who ran a photography shop. Ernie Foote photographer took school photos and was responsible for distribution of an Ottawa paper.

Jim Amy Kirkpatrick said: “He was my uncle and yes the optometrist was was in his building. I used to watch all the parades from upstairs.”

Nancy Hudson said: He took all the school photos and then they would be displayed in his store windows.

Howard Little ran a barbershop there later and then it was rented to G.B. McDonald an optometrist for a number of years. Bruce McDonald was an optometrist in one half of building. Then Ernie Foote retired and Howard Little ran a small barber shop there and it later rented to G. B. McDonald.  Bruce McDonald took over the entire building and when he retired and left Carleton Place Dr. Ian Edmonson took over.

 

136-138 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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136-138 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

Before Sam Dunfield took over ownership of 136 Bridge Street some of the
businesses included O’Neill’s barbershop, McFarlane’s harness shop, Howe Jewellers,
and Tucker’s Jewellers.

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

The Sam Dunfield building had two recessed entrances as well as another door leading to the upstairs living quarters. Mr. Dunfield ran a bottling works and manufactured them after buying the business from A.R. G. Peden.

These were put into stone bottles with a spring cap and the most popular ones were Cream Soda and Ginger Ale. Their daughter Agnes was the social correspondent for the local paper and Pegg (Flegg) worked for Matthews Furniture store.

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Ottawa Citizen – Jan 18, 1937

Elmer Doyle later on ran an eatery on the side next to the Queen’s and called it The Blue Spot. Sometime after that the town rented both of these outlets and made them into public washrooms but on account of vandalism this was discontinued. William Miller  and his wife Marguerite Griffin purchased the building and also became tenants. There is a photograph of this store at the National Gallery but is not viewable.

Artist
Medium
Photograph
Date
1966-1970

Related Reading

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

Read in the series

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s–

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What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall August 1897

Community Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 8– It was 1963

Community Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 9– It was 1903!

A Lyle Dillabough Flashback– 150th Birthday

Carleton Place Community Memories 1967–150th

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About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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