Tag Archives: Carleton-Place

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to…

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to…

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Volume 1 of: Mississippi Hotel- Canadian Tire Gas Bar- Pizza Pizza-Bond store- As Good As New–Bud’s Taxi–The Moose– Brown & MacFarlane–CLICK HERE

Every day something new will be added… 59 more to go

26-28 Bridge Street Carleton

 

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Before

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Now

26-28 Bridge Street Carleton

Built circa 1880–

Ms. Dalgattie operated a store at 26 Bridge Street from about 1882 until the 1910s. During Ms. Dalgattie’s ownership of this building, the CP Telegraph was also housed in this building. Some of the people who rented half of the building from Ms. Dalgattie included Dummert’s Bakery, Stevens Grocery, Mrs. Broom rented an apartment, Hastie, and Shepherd. In the 1930s, Sam Wilson operated a second hand store and Mr. White operated a tinsmith shop.

Some of the business owners that worked out of 26 Bridge Street included Fevreau’s Bakery in the 1960s, Judy McGlade Financial, Tom’s Bike Repair, and Danny’s Meat Market until he moved to Bell Street.

I also seem to remember a music store there too and hope someone can help me out.

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Volume 1 of: Mississippi Hotel- Canadian Tire Gas Bar- Pizza Pizza-Bond store- As Good As New–Bud’s Taxi–The Moose– Brown & MacFarlane–CLICK HERE

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historicalnotes

 

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Carleton Place — A Valley Town at Confederation 

In Canada’s Year of Confederation, the busy sawmill village of Carleton Place had a population of about 700 people. Many citizens were sons and daughters of the Scottish emigrants who had settled the area in the 1820’s.Most of the town’s buildings stood on the north side of the Mississippi River, with only about 12 houses on the south.

Shops on Bell, Mill and Bridge Street were open from 6 am to 10 pm and the average work day for laborers was 11 hours! Want to know more about what Carleton Place (formerly Morphy’s Falls) looked like in 1867?

Read more in the Carleton Place Community Information Guide or stop by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum and check out their summer exhibition.

 relatedreading

So What Really Happened to Samuel Cram?

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So What Really Happened to Samuel Cram?

 

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Photo taken at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

I saw this display at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Friday night and became intrigued. What had made this clever, former school teacher in Beckwith drown? Surely there had to be more to the story. Nothing came up for awhile until I found it searching for something else. It was said he had sadly committed suicide.

 

December 3 1915-Almonte Gazette

Samuel Cram, an aged and esteemed resident of Carleton Place, was found drowned in shallow water near the power house Monday morning. He was 78 years of age and a few years ago underwent an operation on his head. Since then he has been a sufferer from neuralgia, although he was able to go about.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal29 Nov 1915, MonPage 2

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

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Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

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1920-02-27-01-Almonte Gazette

Brief mention was made last, week of the death of Mr. Peter Cram, one of our oldest and -most prominent citizens, which sad event occurred on the 18th instant, after a brief illness, of heart failure, although he had never fully recovered from the effects of a stroke that he sustained some 18 months previous.

Mr. Cram was born in Beckwith, in January, 1831, being a son of the the late James Cram, whose farm was that at present owned by Mr. Fred M. Cram, and who was a son of one of the earliest of the township’s settlers. The subject of our sketchsipent his early days upon the land, and shortly after the gold find in California joined a party of some half dozen young men from this locality– the Teskeys and Moffatts being of the party—and in 1852 travelled across the continent to the golden state.

A couple of years later he returned and in company with his brother, the late John F Cram built a tannery at Appleton, and made a success of it, later on adding wool-pulling as a branch of their business. While living at Appleton Mr. Cram was married, his wife being Margaret Campbell of Drummond, their marriage taking place in April, 1857.

Five children blessed their fireside, two sons and three daughters. One of the latter died in Perth, at the age of 14 years. The others survive—J. A. C., at home; John W., assistant king’s printer, Regina; Mrs. George Watters (Mary) and Mrs. Wm. Findlay. (Annie)

Mrs. Cram predeceased her husband, passing away in 1909, two years after celebrating their golden wedding. The business partnership at Appleton was dissolved by Mr. J. F. Cram withdrawing and coming to Carleton Place, and some years later Peter sold out and removed with his family to Perth, where they resided for some years, coming to Carleton Place in 1882, and a couple of years later purchasing the property on High Street, on the top of the hill, where his home has since been until the last.

He was a great reader, possessed a wonderful memory and could quote whole sections of history or chapters of the Bible at will He was a versatile writer, and on occasion could use this faculty in a masterly fashion. He always took a keen interest in public affairs, and for many years was a member of the Board of Education and also a member of the town council.

In religion, he was a Presbyterian, and the services at the funeral, which took place on Saturday afternoon were conducted by Rev. Mr. Monds assisted by Rev. Mr. Forsythe.  The pallbearers were four nephews, Messrs. Ro’bt. Cram Westboro; Colin McIntosh, A. E. Cram and F. ‘M. Cram, and Messrs. Ro&t. Patterson and Wm. Baird. Interment w as made in Pine Grove cemetery.

Mr. J. W. Cram arrived from Regina on Saturday morning in time for the obsequies. We will miss the kindly smile and friendly greeting and long in vain to hear the ring of jovial laughter and to feel again his genial presence but with the poet can say

“Cold in dust the perished heart may die, But that which warmed it once can never die.”— From C.C.

historicalnotes

A Cyclopaedia of Canadian Biography: Being Chiefly Men of the Time …, Volume 2

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Read the rest at A Cyclopaedia of Canadian Biography: Being Chiefly Men of the Time …, Volume 2

The new fire engine was unable to save the inflammable new tannery and wool pulling plant of John F. Cram and Donald Munro, burned in 1886 with a fire loss of $10,000.

By 1840 Cram families owned seven different lots on Beckwith concessions 10, 11 and 12.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal11 Jan 1900, ThuPage 2

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal22 Mar 1900, ThuPage 7

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

The Fires of 1897

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The Fires of 1897

20013 06 20 Ste-E.JPG           The first Sainte Euphemie Church was built in 1886.

 

Searching for something else today I came across countless articles of brush fires. I wondered if there was a drought and nope, that was in 1891. The worst was the complete destruction of Casselman in 1897.

In 1897, the entire village of Casselman, including the church, was destroyed by fire

Casselman Fires

In July 1891, St. Euphémie Parish had its first great disaster: fire destroyed part of the village, the Casselman Lumber Co., and millions of feet of woodcut. A large number of workmen had to leave town in order to find work elsewhere. However, the fire transformed lots that had been only partly cleared until then into fertile prairies. Many new settlers came to Casselman to work its highly arable agricultural land.

On October 5, 1897, the Parish faced the greatest tragedy of its history: a terrible fire destroyed the entire Casselman area. Except for a very few homes, the village was reduced to ashes and its inhabitants were left homeless and lost all of their personal belongings. The Catholic church was completely destroyed save for the Holy Sacrament, which was rescued by the Vicar, Father Joseph-Hercule Touchette. Many families had to leave town due to the loss of all their belongings. However, strengthened by Father Touchette’s encouraging words as well as donations from many parts of Ontario and Quebec, those that remained took on the arduous task of rebuilding their community. Two days after the fire, a committee was formed to oversee the reconstruction of the Parish church.

In July 1919, the Parish again fell victim to a devastating fire. The buildings bordering the main street of the town were engulfed in flames, and almost everything was destroyed. Several tradesmen of the time lost a great part of their merchandise and equipment. Those who succeeded in saving part of their goods moved them into the church or the Town Hall. The church, the bank and the store of Damase Racine were saved thanks to the effective work of firemen from Ottawa. Within the following days, the townspeople courageously undertook the rebuilding of the main street.

 

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Clipped from The Brooklyn Daily Eagle06 Oct 1897, WedPage 1

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal08 Oct 1897, FriPage 3

 

historicalnotes

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal12 Oct 1897, TuePage 7

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal12 Oct 1897, TuePage 7

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal12 Oct 1897, TuePage 7

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal12 Oct 1897, TuePage 7

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

The Drought of 1871 and the Mills on the Mississippi River

What Do You Know About the Burnt Lands?

When Crops Failed — Lanark County Went Manitoba Dreamin’

Beckwith One Room Schools– Leona Kidd

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Beckwith One Room Schools– Leona Kidd

 

 

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From:School Article from the Heritage Committee

 

The state of schools and school teaching in Ontario’s early days has long been a favourite topic in oldtimers’ tales of life in the past century. Before the Canadian union of 1841 and for sometime after, ability to read and write and to do more than elementary calculation by numbers was beyond the reach of many citizens, both natives and immigrants, unless obtained by home training.

A grammar school or high school education was for the few, mainly a rare few with the opportunity and wish to prepare for a life in one of the learned professions. The widespread existence of tax-supported public schools in the province has a record extending back little more than a hundred years. Among the reforms of the 1840’s and 1850’s was a slowly growing common school system, fathered mainly by the native-born Rev. Dr. Egerton Ryerson, Methodist minister, first head of Victoria College, Cobourg, and from 1844 to 1876 Superintendent of Education for Ontario. Admission to a large share of the province’s public schools remained subject to payment of school rates or fees which not all parents were prepared to pay.

For the so-called Free Schools the part of operating costs not met from county and provincial taxes were raised by ordinary local property taxes instead of by rate-bill admission fees. Free schools increased in number only after overcoming strong opposition in many districts. Compulsory school attendance remained a remote idea.

 

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#3 Beckwith – Cuckoo’s Nest School

Men with ideas ahead of their time, as James Poole showed in his Carleton Place newspaper of the early 1850’s could be friends of education and enemies of the free schools. Teachers Salaries Under $200 In Lanark County tax-supported schools had increased in number to 91 by 1850, and teachers to 102, thirteen of which were women teachers. Only five of the county’s schools were free schools. Teachers average yearly salaries including board were about $40 for men and $30 for women, and about $10 less excluding board.

Fourteen of the county’s schools were good or first class schools, as graded in inspections of 1850. The rest were equally divided between second class and inferior or third class schools. The schools of Lanark and Renfrew counties of this time are pictured by the Rev. James Padfield, rector of the Church of England at Franktown, in an 1848 report to the Bathurst District Council in his capacity of superintendent of common schools of the united counties. He found 120 schools in operation under the Common School Act in the two counties, all but a few of which had been inspected by him in the preceding fall and winter.

Teachers of schools selected by Mr. Padfield for commendation where Mr. Warren, then of McNab township, Mr. Hammond of Lanark township, Mr. McDougall of North Sherbrooke, Mr. Morrison of Perth, Mr. Heely of Carleton Place, James Poole and Mr. York of Ramsay, Mr. McDougall and Mr. Lindsay of Beckwith, and Thomas Poole of Pakenham. Log Schools Mr. Padfield provides an eye witness summary of the nature of this district’s pioneer schools: “The Schools in general are better attended from the middle of November to the end of April.

Among the pupils may often be found many young persons, both male and female, from 15 to 20 years of age and upwards. During the other six and a half months the older pupils are kept at home to assist their parents in agricultural employments. The Schools then are practically deserted, having frequently and in almost every township not more than ten or twelve scholars in regular attendance in a school, often fewer. This interferes in a most disastrous way with the education of the young.

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The first schoolhouse was built in the 1820s at Gillies’ Corners on Lot 3 Con. 2 Beckwith. The union school, U.S.S. No. 4 Drummond & No.

“The School Houses throughout the District are for the most part built of logs, not more than twenty feet square and seldom eight feet high. Many are much smaller and less height. In each of these are crowded together during the winter months from twenty-five to forty children. The interior arrangements are often very defective. Many are quite unfit for schools. “Among the few good and tolerably commodious school houses in the District may be mentioned one on the south side of Perth and another under construction in Perth, both frame buildings. Another in Smiths Falls, built of stone, if finished would be the best in the District. But it is in a state and a high rent is paid for a miserable building in which the school is kept. There are also a few good log school houses in some of the townships, including two in Bathurst, three or four in Beckwith, a very good one at Westmeath and another at Pembroke. Of the rest many are too small an some few are ill built and worse finished, exhibiting loose and shattered floors, broken windows, ill-constructed desks, unsafe stoves and stove pipes and unplastered walls.

“A greater uniformity in textbooks is beginning to prevail. I recollect visiting one School last winter at which fifteen children were present, no two of whom had books of the same kind. The quarterly examinations have been almost a dead letter. In many instances not a single person has been present to show the least interest in the advancement made by the scholars, except perhaps a solitary Trustee.

 

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S . S . 2 , FRANKTOWN , LOT 11 , CONC . 3

On the whole in spite of these various hinderences our Common Schools are undoubtedly improving (signed) J. Padfield, S.C.S. Bathurst District, 2 October, 1848.” Of ten new school houses completed in the district in the following six months, as noted in Mr. Padfield’s next inspection report, one in Perth was ‘a commodious frame building divided into two apartments, one for boys and the other for girls,” three were log schools in Montague, one a 22 foot square log school in No. 18 Drummond, and one in Beckwith at Franktown, described as a substantial stone building. It appears the latter building is still standing at Franktown, though not in school use.

At Franktown and No. 14 Montague the previous schools had been destroyed by fire. Teachers Convention, 1842 School teachers meeting at Perth and Carleton Place in 1842 were the first general conventions of this District held following enactment of the Canadian school statute.

At Perth the superintendent of Education for Canada West, Mr. Murray, had recommended to an August gathering of teachers of the two counties that they select a committee to suggest improvements to the new Common School Bill. The committee, consisting of one teacher, from each of the townships of Bathurst, Beckwith, Burgess, Drummond, Horton, McNab, Pakenham and Ramsay, met at John McEwen’s inn at Carleton Place a month later. Its recommendations, compiled by a subcommittee of three teachers (Thomas Ferguson of the Derry School, Beckwith, J. Fowler of Bathurst and Mr. Kerr of Ramsay), favoured “a union of Townships for the proper forming of School Districts, and that the Commissioner in whose Township the school is located manage the same.” Other recommendations were that no teachers lacking specified qualifications be employed, and that teachers salaries be not less than $50 per year, payable half yearly.

 

 

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Beckwith One Room Schools List:

School Section #1 Lot 3 Concession 2 Gillie’s Corners

S.S. #2 Lot 11 Concession 3 Franktown

S.S. #3 Lot 15 Concession 3 Cuckoo’s Nest

S.S. #4 Lot 24 Concession 4 Prospect

S.S. #5 Lot 9 Concession 7 7th Line Beckwith East

Union School S.S. #5 Beckwith Township Lot 1 Concession 7 Tennyson

Union School S.S. #10 Drummond Township Lot 1 Concession 7 Tennyson

S.S. #6 Lot 22 Concession 6 Derry

S.S. #7 Lot 11 Concession 9 9th Line Beckwith West

S.S. #8 Lot 19 Concession 8 9th Line Beckwith East

S.S. #9 Lot 22 Concession 10 11th Line Beckwith East

Union School S.S.#10 Beckwith Township Lot 2 Concession 10 Scotch Corners

Union School S.S. #14 Drummond Township Lot 2 Concession 10 Scotch Corners

Union School S.S. #12 Beckwith Township School located in Ashton

Union School S.S. #11 Goulbourn Township School located in Carleton Cty

Union School S.S. #13 Beckwith Township Lot 1 Concession 10 Montague Twp

Union School S.S. #10 Montague Township Lot 1 Concession 10 Montague Twp

Union School S.S. #15 Marlborough Lot 1 Concession 10 Montague Twp

S.S. #14 Lot 14 Concession 11

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Outhouses Need to Be Cleaned– Conditions of Our Rural School– 1897

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

Ladies & Gentlemen- Your School Teachers of Lanark County 1898

“Teachester” Munro and the S.S. No. 9 Beckwith 11th Line East School

The Forgotten Clayton School House

Be True to Your School–SS #15 Drummond

Scotch Corners Union S.S. #10 School Fire

School’s Out at S.S. No. 14 in Carleton Place

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place

Remembering Leckie’s Corners 1887

Schools Out for the Summer in the County

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

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Volume 2 has now started– CLICK HERE

Every day something new will be added…

6 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Now

 

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Photo from John Armour

Then

 

Canadian Gas Bar–6 Bridge Street Carleton Place

This land was part of the original land grant from the Crown to Edmond Morphy. In
1839 Edmond’s son Edmond owned the land. This lot was divided and passed
through many hands before it became Major Hooper and his wife’s residence in
1920. Hooper’s residence was referred to as the Raloo Cottage.

Major Hooper’s wife before she was married was Mabel McNeely. It remained in the hands of the Hooper Family until 1954 when McColl Frontenac Oils purchased the land. A gas bar and convenience store has been at this location ever since and today it is a Canadian Tire Gas Bar.

Major Hooper became Postmaster in 1920 until his retirement in 1950. During
Hooper’s time if office many changes occurred. He had control of the clerk for the
position of Telegraph operator until the telegraph service moved to its own building.

Peter Iveson- Aunt Craig, Mrs. James Craig lived at Lake and Bridge across the street, I remember the white house being torn down about 1957 and the garage station built.

Related Reading

Before the Canadian Tire Gas Bar There Was..

 

 

Mississippi Hotel –7 Bridge Street, Carleton Place

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NOW

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THEN

 

Mississippi Hotel –7 Bridge Street, Carleton Place

The land was originally deeded in 1824 to Willliam Morphy one of Carleton Place’s first settlers. It was built by Napoleon Lavallee who operated it as a hotel and place for public and council meetings until 1883. Lavallee also owned and operated the Carleton House later called the Leland Hotel from 1846-70. As a major part in the life of Carleton Place, The Mississippi Hotel continued to operate as a hotel and entertainment centre under the ownership of W. Clyde McIlquham. It was built by Napoleon Lavallee and was opened by him in 1872 and he operated the hotel until 1883. Lavallee came to Carleton Place from Montreal in the early 1830s and first worked as a cooper and soon became part owner of a cooperage building.

 

Prior to the hotel’s construction, Lavallee owned and operated the Carleton House later called the Leland Hotel from its opening day in 1846 until 1870 – excluding 1852-3 when he and his wife Sarah were in Australia and California. When he returned to Carleton Place in 1853, Lavallee established a lime manufacturing enterprise on Napoleon Street, which he operated until 1889. He also built a large frame house on the corner of Lake Avenue West and Napoleon Street in 1881.

 

In 1883, he sold it to Walter McIlquham who operated it until his death in 1907. His son then succeeded him as owner and operated it until 1959. Some accounts of the history of the building describe it as being used to entertain the popular television personality “Juliette” in 1867 when she was called onto present some local awards. Apparently, a crowd of 1200 was fed and entertained in the building, hosted by such local dignitaries such as the mayor of the time Howard McNeely and Mary Cook.

 

Walter McIlquham purchased the Mississippi from Lavallee in 1883 and seven years later doubled its size to 56 rooms. A 1902 news item reports that William Willoughby a local stone mason was involved in the construction of the addition. In 1907, Walter’s son W. Clyde took over operations when Walter died.
In 1959, there was a disastrous fire and with the new renovations the top storey and extensive two storey verandahs were removed. David and Lorraine Lemay from Kemptville purchased the hotel in 1959 for $30,000. Lorraine Lemay was the new owner when the doors reopened in about 1964. Lemay was a great supporter of country music and was later inducted into the Ottawa valley Country Music Hall of Fame as a promoter of country music. From 1964-88 the building operated as a popular country and western establishment featuring well known entertainers from around the Ottawa Valley including Stompin’Tom Connors.Lemay was at the helm of the operation until 1985 when she sold the business to Brian Carter.

 

During the late 1980s that the idea was proposed to renovate the Mississippi Hotel, so the Town Hall could be established here. However, the plan did not come to realization. During the earlier 1990s Brian Carter obtained a demolition permit because the hotel had been closed and on the market for almost two years. The only offers for purchase were coming in from oil companies wanting to tear down the Mississippi to put a gas station. Stompin’ Tom Connors wrote a letter expressing his grief at the thought of the Mississippi being torn down when all it needed was a “facelift.” Connors played at the Mississippi and said the people of Carleton Place took him in as one of their own.

 

In 1995 Barbara Wynne-Edwards purchased the Mississippi and renamed it The Graystones Inn. In 1996 Gerald Weller became the owner of The Graystones and changed the name to the Carleton Place Heritage Inn. In 2002 the troubles did not end for the Carleton Place Heritage Inn as it had to close its doors once more. There were plans to turn the much-loved hotel into a senior citizen retirement home. The owner at that time was Tony Kechican who purchased the hotel in 2000 from Weller.

 

The Seccaspina family bought it in 2010 and operated it in until 2014 when the Angelo Seccaspina died. However, with that being said the hotel was sold in 2017 and will now continue to operate as The Grand Hotel serving fine food and overnight accommodations to travelers, which was its main intent as it was all along.
Related Reading

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Thieves at the Mississippi Hotel–When Crime Began to Soar

All About Lorraine Lemay –Mississippi Hotel

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

The Napoleon of Carleton Place

Grandma’s Butterscotch Pie

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

In the Mississippi Hotel Mood with Mrs. Glen Miller

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel in 1961

Where Was Linda? A Necromancer Photo Blog -Victorian Seance at the Mississippi Hotel

Spooky Night at the Seccaspina Hotel

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?

 

As Good As New–33 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Then

 

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Now

 

As Good As New–33 Bridge Street Carleton Place

In 1820 this was part of the 100-acre land grant to Edmond Morphy. Like many of the other properties on Bridge Street, it passed through a number of different owners. In 1872, a Robier sold the land to Cuthbert who in turn sold it to Kurrich or Kurrick. In 1879, the property was sold to John Gillies and in 1885 Gillies sold it to Bertha Mayhew who married Henry Schwerdtfeger. 1903 was the year that saw ownership falling into the hands of Henry Schwerdtfeger . Shwerdtfeger sold tobacco products and paraphernalia at his store up until 1989 when the store was sold to the Lanark County Interval House. As Good as New is now located in the building.

Related Reading

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

Bertha Schwerdtfeger — Mother of the Carleton Place Schwerdtfeger Sisters

A Letter from a Local Student Nurse 1930s

 

 

12-14 Bridge Street

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12-14 Bridge Street–Date of Construction 1890

This land was part of the original land settlement in Carleton Place that the Crown granted to Edmond Morphy. In 1839, the property belonged to Edmond Jr. and it is not clear from the information from the Land Registry office who sold the property to a Mr. Whitcher. The possibilities include James L. Murphy or a Mr. Cameron, but it is from the sales of the land after Whitcher’s ownership that are clear about the land transfers that result in the Salvation Army ownership of the property in 1922.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal03 May 1898, TuePage 7

In 1916, Whitcher sold the land to a James Steele and in 1920 Steele sold the land to Bates and Innes. The year 1922 was the year that Bates and Innes sold the land to the Salvation Army. The Salvation Army may have been located at 12 Bridge Street since 1907 and rented the building and in 1922 bought it.

The Salvation Army in Carleton Place dates 65 years from 1907-1972. The doorswere closed due to lack of attendance. In 1958, the Citadel was rebuilt because a fire damaged the previous building on this site.

This site was the home of the Salvation Army for 50 years until 1972 when Aldot Ltd. purchased the land. There is a judgment on the books in 1983 and then the Victoria and Grey Trust Co. assumed ownership and sold the property to Dianne Orr.  In 1985 a Milford assumed ownership until 1990 when Milford transferred ownership to Ontario 656731. In 1991, Ontario 656731 leased the property and building to Pizza Pizza and it has been Pizza Pizza at this location to the present day until the company moved out in 2017 into a new location on Highway 7 and McNeely Ave.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal19 Jun 1952, ThuPage 10

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal18 Oct 1901, FriPage 7

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal21 Jun 1898, TuePage 7

 

 

17-19 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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ThenThe Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Before

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17-19 Bridge Street Carleton Place

The building was built in 1860 and in 1999, Dave Hick purchased the property at 17-19 Bridge Street, was cleaning up the basement, and found the tombstone of Jacob Bond and his infant son Joseph. Jacob was born February 18, 1837 and died May 1873 from accidental poisoning.

Irma Willoughby’s husband was related to the Bonds and she was working on the Bond Family tree and was able to fill in some of the blanks. She said the accidental poisoning was because of the glue in the wallpaper that was highly toxic in small-enclosed areas. It is unclear why Joseph died in July 1874.

Jacob was the first of ten children born to Joseph and Henrietta Bond. Jacob was a shoemaker and cloth finisher. It is unknown when the tombstone was brought back to the Bond store with the intention of fixing it but how long it had been there is unclear and unknown.

The Bond store operated until the 1970s as a successful and busy mercantile establishment. Mrs. Bond’s store when first opened was only to handle a few school supplies along with post cards, needles, thread, lace etc, but she kept enlarging her stock until only she knew where to find things. Mr. Harry Bond operated a barbershop next door and it was in business a long time. Some of the barbers over the years were Ab Leach and Pat Patterson. Miss Joie/Joey Bond retired from her unique variety store in 1977. When her mom became ill, Joie/Joey took over the store. Joey’s father John started his barbershop around 1900.

In 2006, 17-19 Bridge Street was a Christian Book Store and H & R Block. Now it is home to H&R Block and Bud’s Taxi.

Related reading

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place –Part 1–Bud’s Taxi

The True Carleton Place Story of Joie Bond- by Jennifer Hamilton

The Name is Bond—-Joie Bond

Looking for information on Joey Bond

Before the Stompin Tom Mural….There Was

 

 

20 Bridge Street, Carleton Place

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Then

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Before

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Now

 

20 Bridge Street, Carleton Place

Built Circa 1860-1870

While many different people owned and occupied this building, it is referred to as the Levine Store, as Philip Levine and his wife rented the store from the Mayor of the day, G. Arthur Burgess, in 1921 and bought it in 1926. Levine’s store began as a dry goods store but changed gradually to a second hand shop as the used metal parts business was found to be more lucrative. The business operated for many years and the place came to be owned by the Levine’s daughter Shirley Sheinfleld who sold it in 1983.

In 1871 there is a record of a Yeoman,  and Peter Grant, living on the site. A labourer named James Brownlee bought the house in 1872 but in 1873, he had to move out and rented the place to William H. Farrell who was a bandleader.

In 1876, John McEwen and family purchased the store. McEwen was a weaver from Scotland and is registered in the census of 1851-2 as a resident of Carleton Place.His family continued to live there after his death in 1887 until 1901. The front half of the store was rented and occupied by a decorative painter and wall paperer Charles Whitcher, (see Pizza Pizza building) and occupied the front half of the store. In 1901, the building was sold and rented to The McAllister Brothers Paint Company, who specialized in house painting.

After that several people owned the property. A barber named Henry Bond (see Bond store) bought it in 1914 and George Arthur Burgess former Mayor of Carleton Place bought it in 1921. He did not live on the premises but rented it to persons operating a dry goods business.

The building changed hands many times, but became known as the Levine Store from 1921 when Philip Levine and his wife operated a dry goods store and alfer a second hand shop. The building remained in the Levine Family until 1983. In February 1986 there was a destructive fire but thankfully the building was rebuilt to match the original. It then became Boomers, and now The Thirsty Moose.

Related Reading

Before The Moose in Carleton Place There Was—

Does anyone still Have Fun at the Moose?

The Day The Moose in Carleton Place Burned Down

Boomers of Carleton Place

How to Paint “The Moose”

The Carleton Place Dump War

Woodstock in Carleton Place– Let the Tambourines Play and — And About That Junk Pile!

 

21 Bridge Street

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Then

 

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Later

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Now–Brown & MacFarlane Glass Co Inc

21 Bridge Street

This building was built circa 1870 and in 1906 Thomas Stevens had a new store at this location, which was called The Palace Grocery. In 1920, Stevens sold out to Bowland and Sutherland. Bowland and Sutherland Grocery store had a small China shop on the right of the grocery store.

When Bowlands gave up the Chinaware, this small space was rented to Harold Warren from Perth as a watch repair store. Later Mel Covell operated it. In 1951, Townend Plumbing and Heating was located here. In 2006, the building was part of the dry cleaners located at 27 Bridge Street. Today the business Brown & MacFarlane Glass Co Inc is located there.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal03 Jan 1942, SatPage 6

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal26 Nov 1931, ThuPage 13

 

Volume 2 has now started– CLICK HERE

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

historicalnotes

 

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Carleton Place — A Valley Town at Confederation 

In Canada’s Year of Confederation, the busy sawmill village of Carleton Place had a population of about 700 people. Many citizens were sons and daughters of the Scottish emigrants who had settled the area in the 1820’s.Most of the town’s buildings stood on the north side of the Mississippi River, with only about 12 houses on the south.

Shops on Bell, Mill and Bridge Street were open from 6 am to 10 pm and the average work day for laborers was 11 hours! Want to know more about what Carleton Place (formerly Morphy’s Falls) looked like in 1867?

Read more in the Carleton Place Community Information Guide or stop by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum and check out their summer exhibition.

 relatedreading

A Local Handmaids Tale? What Happened ?

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A Local Handmaids Tale? What Happened ?

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If you are watching The Handmaid’s Tale or read Margaret Atwood’s book women did not have much liberty in the 1800s. It was stay at home until your father passed you on to your new husband.

I found two clippings. Same girl– they just misspelled her name on the second one above. Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 15 Nov 1895, Fri, Page 7 and posted them earlier this week.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 29 Nov 1895, Fri, Page 8

So what happened to her? I found this.

A Mysterious Case December 1895 —Last week a sensation was caused in Ottawa by the sudden and unaccountable disappearance of a young girl from Carleton Place. She was later reported found by her mother. Soon she disappeared once again and the matter was further shrouded in mystery by the receipt by friend of the missing girl, of a letter stating her determination to commit suicide.

It stated that the missing girl was seen on the streets since, but this report lacks confirmation, and the general opinion is that the unfortunate girl met her death at her own hands.

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From the time she was young, a woman was groomed for this role in life–dutiful wife and mother. Properly trained, she learned to sing, play piano or guitar, dance and be conversant about light literature of the day. She also learned French and the rules of etiquette as well as the art of conversation and the art of silence.

A girl was under her mother’s wing for the first few years of her social life. She used her mother’s visiting cards, or that of another female relative if her mother was dead. This same person usually served as her chaperone, as a single girl was never allowed out of the house by herself, especially in mixed company

Great care had to be taken at these public affairs, so as not to offend a possible suitor or his family. Following are some rules of conduct a proper female must adhere to:

  • She never approached people of higher rank, unless being introduced by a mutual friend.
  • People of lesser rank were always introduced to people of higher rank, and then only if the higher-ranking person had given his/her permission.
  • Even after being introduced, the person of higher rank did not have to maintain the acquaintance. They could ignore, or ‘cut’ the person of lower rank.
  • A single woman never addressed a gentleman without an introduction.
  • A single woman never walked out alone. Her chaperone had to be older and preferably married.
  • If she had progressed to the stage of courtship in which she walked out with a gentleman, they always walked apart. A gentleman could offer his hand over rough spots, the only contact he was allowed with a woman who was not his fiancée.
  • Proper women never rode alone in a closed carriage with a man who wasn’t a relative.
  • She would never call upon an unmarried gentleman at his place of residence.
  • She couldn’t receive a man at home if she was alone. Another family member had to be present in the room.
  • A gentlewoman never looked back after anyone in the street, or turned to stare at others at church, the opera, etc.
  • No impure conversations were held in front of single women.
  • No sexual contact was allowed before marriage. Innocence was demanded by men from girls in his class, and most especially from his future wife.
  • Intelligence was not encouraged, nor was any interest in politics

An unmarried woman of 21 could inherit and administer her own property. Even her father had no power over it. Once she married, however, all possessions reverted to her husband. She couldn’t even make a will for her personal property, while a husband could will his wife’s property to his illegitimate children. Therefore, marriage, although her aim in life, had to be very carefully contemplated.

Because many marriages were considered a business deal, few started with love. Although as the years passed, many couples grew tolerably fond of each other, often resulting in a bond almost as deep as love.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

Just Like Internet Dating?— Circa 1913

Because You Loved Me — A Vintage Lanark Romance

The McArthur Love Story