Tag Archives: Carleton-Place

The 1982 Gas War — Perth Vs Carleton Place

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The 1982 Gas War — Perth Vs Carleton Place

 

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March 1982

The war was on between Perth and Carleton Place gasoline dealers and one operator says he’s giving up the business. Bob Chapman of Carleton Place (Golden Eagle) says there’s too much competition to earn a decent living. “Everyone seems to be getting into the act. I’m retiring from the gas business. There’s no money in it anymore”.

Differences of up to nine cents a litre were being reported between the two towns and the small dealerships were hurting. Saveway Gas dealer, Santiego Diaz of Carleton Place said he wasn’t sure where prices are going. “I’ll have to go to our head office to find out what can be done about the situation.”

 

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1994

Diaz was currently selling regular gas at 37.9 cents per litre and unleaded at 41.9 cents. At Denny’s Service Centre in Carleton Place gas prices were between 42 and 44 cents and owner Dennis Miller says,”I really don’t know what’s going on. Prices are being reduced but it’s not affecting me. After six years in the business, Miller said he had built up a steady clientele. “They prefer to come here because they know they’re going to get service.”

Perth Shell dealer Garfield Leach was concerned about where the price war could lead. “When something like this happens, the dealer gets caught in the middle. If I drop my prices I lose one-third of my markup.” Leach says gas companies do offer relief in the form of consignment sales for dealers interested. , “The company could offer to let me lower my prices if I sell on consignment, I would be guaranteed a profit but it would be less than what I make -now,” Leach says. Leach thinks about consignment all the time but says: “I’m in business to make profits.”

 

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photo by Faye Campbell of Bill McGonegal

Self-serve Esso dealer Bill McGonegal of Carleton Place says the situation was much the same as a price war that took place two years ago. “One day someone lowers his price and I have to follow him. My price is down to 36.6 cents and I think things have pretty much settled now,” McGonegal says.

But McGonegal’s neighbour wasn’t sure. Dwight Cochrane at Orr Pontiac expects to drop his prices again next week. “Bill and I are friends and we don’t want to start anything but, if his price drops, mine will have to. The price war is hurting my business,” Cochrane said.

 

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 31 Oct 1981, Sat,
  3. Page 83

 

Perth resident Delbert Bolton was irate about the local state of gas prices. “We’re being taken. The dealers have got to be playing games with us. I can go to Carleton Place and save $5.60 on a fill up.” “I’d prefer to spend my money where I earn it but if they don’t change, I’m not going to feel guilty about going out of town to buy gas.

 

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 17 May 1984, Thu,
  3. Main Edition,
  4. Page 24
  5. The Ottawa Journal,
  6. 23 Sep 1968, Mon,
  7. Page 26
  8. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading
  9. Filler Up! Got a Flat!! Photos of Gas Stations

  10. The Central Garage in Carleton Place by Terry Skillen

    The Garages of Carleton Place –1970’s

    Looking for Memories of Harold Linton’s Gas Station

    Take Me to Your Litre — The Anti-Metric Gas Station

    Esso? Downtown Bridge Street Carleton Place

    The White Rose Service Station in Carleton Place

    Dollars Worth of Gas in Carleton Place

    Before the Canadian Tire Gas Bar There Was..

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The Squeaker Election — November 1980 Carleton Place

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The Squeaker Election — November 1980 Carleton Place

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 - Citizen staff writer In Gananoque, Bill Nalon...

 - Carleton Place Mayor Meat Barker 1 ,912, ATJaa...

 

 - J Q. i J (ft ;7. A- - I 7 .' - c J A r; j i...

 

 - Lady Luck to decide who's mayor By Bob Marleau...

November 1980

historicalnotes

 

 - I ( I) Whi linn"" - I' ji. " Mm Allan Code...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 03 Nov 1982, Wed,
  3. Other Editions,
  4. Page 3

 

 - It's time for perennial Carleton Place mayoral...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 03 Jan 1983, Mon,
  3. Other Editions,
  4. Page 3

 - For Allan Code, who lost the job as mayor of...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 15 Dec 1980, Mon,
  3. Other Editions,
  4. Page 3

In 2010 Wendy LeBlanc became Carleton Place’s second mayor. Former mayor Melba Barker held the position for 11 years, beginning in 1980. Since 1901 when Carleton Place had their first mayor, Dr. Preston (we had reeves before that) there have been only 6 women in municipal power.

 

 

  1. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading

    The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

  2. It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

  3. Carleton Place is Like Kansas of the United States

One Day on William Street

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One Day on William Street

 

 

Neighbours assembled Saturday and Sunday outside a house in Carleton Place alleged to be haunted. It was located on William Street in 1921, and no mention who lived there was ever made. The police were forced to post extra men at the door in order to prevent entry by the curious.

Many of the people came from other neighbourhoods, and the police say they have never seen so many automobiles stationed in the area. The vicar of the Catholic parish blessed each room Sunday October 23. The town had made inquiries, and ascertained that fortune tellers had formerly occupied a part of the house. The fortune tellers had predicted by means of cards that terrifying happenings would take place there to anyone who would listen.

The police investigated after calls by neighbours and found the fortune telling cards were still there on the table. The priest not only blessed the house but he tore the cards up and flung them in the fire.  Since his visit the neighbours stated that everything is now back to normal and life in Carleton Place can go on normally.

 

historicalnotes

Please note that this is NOT the house.

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

relatedreading

Basil Flynn of William Street

The Attic Ghost of William Street?

The Continuing Curse of William Street in Carleton Place

Where is This in Carleton Place? Chaos on William Street?

The Very Sad Tale of Cecil Cummings of Carleton Place

Construction of 198 William Street– Photos from Greg Nephin

Clippings Of the McLaren Case The Scandal That Rocked Lanark County

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Clippings Of the McLaren Case The Scandal That Rocked Lanark County

If you read

McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

 

Daniel McLaren was William Muirhead’s uncle, the brother of his mother Agnes. He also was  a bachelor and very well to do. Mary McLeod and her sister Isabella were Daniel’s housekeepers and apparently upon his death when his will was read; he had left his estate to the McLeod sisters.

And so it began

 - on case. The action Is brought by consent by J....

 - . THE SKELETONS BEING EXPOSED Family History...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 21 May 1902, Wed,
  3. Page 5

 - j er. I did not open the valise and I do DID IT...

 - II GO IP IN SMOKE Continued from Page Five. but...

 

 - as By all I I I a I Mc-Kerracher, McKer-racher...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 23 May 1902, Fri,
  3. Page 8
  4.  - 0VER- fit-too t : the Reifler- en the a...

 - Dis-positiop sub-sequently Mc-Laren'g i ' j...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 24 May 1902, Sat,
  3. Page 13

 

 - - , iiTIrr,P or- PLAINTIFFS CASE 1 UOSED TODAY...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 22 May 1902, Thu,
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 - in in TAYLOR GIVEN DAMAGES BELL TELEPHONE CO....

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    1. The Ottawa Citizen,
    2. 03 May 1902, Sat,
    3. Page 9
  2. historicalnotes
  3.  - e l in I'erth thiw morning that i iot i ie...

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 - McLaren will case. Court of Appeal Decides That...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 03 Oct 1903, Sat,
  3. Page 5

So who won?

 - When the news reached town last evening that...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 19 Nov 1903, Thu,
  3. Page 7

historicalnotes

John A StewartJohn A. Stewart, McLaren’s nephew

In 1896 COL. A.J. MATHESON, became the proprietor and editor with CAPT. J.W. MOTHERWELL as publisher.  Both these worthy newspaper men have also passed to the great beyond.  In 1886 CHAS. F. STONE, fresh from Perth Collegiate, entered the Expositor as “printer’s devil,” and completed his apprenticeship in September, 1890, when he secured a position on the Deseronto Tribune, later on the Wiarton Echo and the Petrolia Advertiser.  In 1893, on account of the illness of Capt. Montherwell, Mr. Stone was offered the position of publisher and accepted it in March of that year.  Three years later, after Col. Matheson had received the endorsation of the electors of South Lanark to represent them in the Provincial Legislature, the control of the Expositor passed into the hands of Mr. Stone, who was its editor and proprietor until early in 1914, when he was appointed Collector of Inland Revenue.  His son, the late HAROLD E. STONE, who was killed overseas, published it until December 1914, when the Expositor passed into the hands of Mr. John A. Stewart. Perth Remembered

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In 1900 a bottle of McLaren’s “old Perth malt whiskey” sold for 90 cents; 80 cents if you brought your own bottle. Today, an empty McLaren bottle with label intact sells for as high as $5 in antique shops across Ontario.  One collector of old bottles predicted in twenty years the price for these fast disappearing artifacts of old Perth would go as high as $15 each.  Full bottles of which there are still a few left just are not for sale at any price.

Despite the disparagement in prices now and in the old days, John A. McLaren, Perth’s whiskey king, managed to eke out a fairly comfortable living.  In fact, he became one of the town’s wealthiest businessmen and his product was known to hundreds or thousands of Canadians from the Pacific to the Atlantic.

John A. was one of the first liquor manufacturers to put out what is known as “mickies” (12 oz bottles) on the Canadian market.  The product came in amber with clear bottles the latter having a bluish tinge.

The McLaren distillery was founded in 1831 by Robert McLaren, father of John A. , who followed the traditions of the great Scotch whiskey manufacturers of his day, many of which are still going strong.  “Old Perth Malt” had a unique flavor due to wood being used in the malt making, rather than peat as used in Scotland and Ireland.  Its Canadian contemporaries were made in four days while McLaren was processed a full 30 days.

One of the wealthiest if not the wealthiest manufacturing establishments in Perth was the McLaren Distillery, located on what is now Stewart Park directly behind the home of Mayor E.S. Burchell on Market Square.  Opposite the mayor’s house stood the McLaren stables, which boasted more than 100 bulls happily thriving on the mash left over from malt making.

Stewart Park might well stand today as a monument to John A. McLaren as well as to John A. Stewart for it was from the enterprising “booze king” that the Stewart fortune and holdings were acquired.  Stewart, a relative of McLaren’s, was the principal heir in the malt maker’s will and himself became a national figure in business and politics.  He served as M.P. for Lanark and entered the Bennett cabinet as Minister of Railways and Canals.

When John A. McLaren died at the turn of the century, Stewart continued the operation of the distillery along with other enterprises including the Henry K. Wampole Company and later the Perth Expositor.  He was described as a shrewd businessman and opportunist as well as a master of litigation.

Perhaps Stewart’s finest display of legal finesse came with the handling of the McLaren will.  Although he proved to be the legal heir, it took a bit of explaining to the powers that be before the fortunes of his kinsman could be added to Stewart’s coffers.

“Old Perth Malt Whiskey has gained such a high reputation among the judges of fine liquor it is regarded as non-injurious and has become a household staple where other whiskies would not be tolerated” said the proponents of the day.

Unfortunately, despite the eloquent pleas put forth by the hidden persuaders of yesteryear, the Ontario Temperance Act disagreed and in 1917 “Perth Old Malt Whiskey” along with its imitators was banished from the Ontario market.  Prohibition had descended on the land and the whiskey sellers, the licensed ones at least, were left with empty shelves. Article from The Perth Courier– Perth Remembered

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

relatedreading

Perth’s Millionaire Bachelor – Who Inherited His Fortune? — arlene stafford wilson

The Continuing Saga of Christena McEwen Muirhead—The McLaren Mill

McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

For the Love of Money-Gillies Gilmours and the McLarens

 

The Sundial of Springside Hall

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The Sundial of Springside Hall

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Around the beginning of the 1900s the Crams moved into my home on Lake Ave East in Carleton Place called Springside Hall by the original owners the Morphys. There was a sidewalk on the left that people could come and stroll the grounds, but no sundial.

 

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I would say in the 1910-1915 era, the Crams invested in a concrete sundial as you see here on the circular median in the driveway.

 

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Here are the Crams on the porch in the dead of winter with the sundial in full view.

 

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Here Mrs. Cram stands beside the sundial with the McNeely/Bracewell home in the background. The top of the sundial remained until the Reaburns sold the house to Mr. Faulkner. When we bought the house everything was stripped by Mr. Faulkner including the top of the sundial. We bought the house with a hole in the roof and a light bulb left.

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A pond was built with a fountain and this is how it looks today.

 

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So what is left of the sundial? It sits in the backyard of my mother in law still catching the suns rays.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USA

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

relatedreading

Then and Now Springside Hall 1920s-1930s Photos

Reusing the Past of Carleton Place — The Morphy’s and the McCann’s

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

My Neighbours –Photos of the Cliff- McCann House and Springside Hall

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers — Part 2 — To Hell and Back

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers

Dumbwaiter Calamities of Crockery

While You Were Sleeping —-The Storyland Bunny Moves to the Hi Diddle Day House

Carleton Place Directory 1859

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Carleton Place Directory 1859

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Mississippa(sic) River, Carleton Place–Guelph Public Library Archives 

 

 

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In case you guys haven’t seen this yet..Its from 1859 – Lanark County & ( Leeds,Grenville,Lanark & Renfrew………https://qspace.library.queensu.ca/bitstream/handle/1974/8798/leedsgrenvillela00copl.pdf;jsessionid=90866F7E421F523B9D342BABE604C0F2?sequence=1

 

 

 - DIED, In Carleton Place, on tbe 6th Inst., Mr....

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    1. The Gazette,
    2. 22 Feb 1859, Tue,
    3. Page 2
  2.  - PROS PECTUS or tn RAMSAY LEAD MIIG & SMELTLVG...
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    1. The Gazette,
    2. 12 Jan 1859, Wed,
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    4.  - Asarvau At Mcno's Hom, Kaiorsa (JAird for). J....

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      1. The Gazette,
      2. 26 Aug 1859, Fri,
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  4. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USA

    Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

    relatedreading

    LANARK VILLAGE – 1851 DIRECTORY

    Village of Lanark Business Directory 1886– 1887

    Business Directory for Ferguson Falls 1866

    Business Directory for Ferguson Falls 1866

    Farmersville 1859 County Directory (Athens)

    PAKENHAM VILLAGE DIRECTORY – 1851

  5. Charleston Lake Village 1800s Directory

    The Tiny Hamlet of Bellamy’s Mills 1851

  6. Business Directory of Carleton Place 1866 and 1867- Any name you recognize?

    CARLETON PLACE – 1851 DIRECTORY

  7. 1898-1899 Carleton Place Directory

  8. Carleton Place 1903 Business Directory –Names Names Names

“The Italian Job” from Carleton Place?– Dr. Howard I Presume

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“The Italian Job” from Carleton Place?– Dr. Howard I Presume

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He was a deceiver of women (including his wife) He extracted money for his pockets by the wiles of his mysteries. Standing over 6 feet tall, almost the size of a grand bear and occasionally sporting a turban G. S. Howard– The Sage of  Aru/Carleton Place definitely created the crime of the century in our town, yet no one  in Carleton Place questioned his guilt– ever. He was always considered one of the pillars of the town and was said to be treated unfairly.

In December of 1922 the fact was being deplored that Canada had let “slip over the border” one of the finest art collections on this continent.” This collection” had been housed at Carleton Place and was said to be priceless, containing as it did works by such artists as Gainsborough, Titian, Rubens. Rembrandt, Greuze, Veronese and Raphael and others of like renown.

For this act of dereliction of duty the National Gallery of Canada was being chided. Now there has come a sequel. The owner of the collection, one Dr. Howard, from Carleton Place is at present a fugitive from the law in Bermuda. The “priceless” collection which he sold to a New York collector for $300,000 has been pronounced by experts as practically worthless and a series of copies and imitations. With this view Mr. Eric Brown, director of the National Gallery, agrees, as also does Mr. Ernest Fosbery, of Ottawa, both of whom had an opportunity of inspecting the best of the collection at Perth, where it had temporarily been removed.

According to the American Art News of New York, he is a native of the southern United States and was a resident of an Ontario town, which is Carleton Place. On November 16th and the 22nd there  were letters in the Toronto Globe and an Ottawa paper from Mr. E. Billing, of Carleton Place. In these letters Mr. Billing, no doubt convinced of the genuineness of the canvases as others had been, said that he could not help deploring the apathy of “our art directors in Canada,” adding that a truckload of valuable paintings had just crossed the St. Lawrence into the United States.

The next chapter in the story, following the crossing of the border, is that printed by the American Art News for December 31st. It said: “in New York city at the  present time is an aged man, ill in body and with mind distraught, because he paid more than $300,000 for old masters which art experts have declared in affidavit not to be worth more than $500.

Back in Bermuda, watched by detectives, was Englishman called Dr. Howard, of courtly appearance, who sold him the pictures, and who sailed from New York on the day following the discovery of the true value of the property, lie claims the right to the title of nobility. His activities in the art world would have extended over several years. He is declared to have been the owner of three old masters which ex Senator Clark purchased in 1910.

The victim of the transaction whose name is not divulged, out of deference to the wishes of his family, is a retired New York business man. He had the acumen to amass a comfortable sum of money and  he ‘fell for the lure of old masters or the idea of fabulous riches to be made out of them forgetting that the making of money honestly in art transactions is the work of specially trained minds and of a knowledge so highly specialized that it takes years and years of experience to acquire it.

Mcliurk was the first New York expert to denounce the pictures,

“There Is not one picture in the whole collection,” was Mr. Mcliurk’s verdict.

“What do you mean?” asked the victim, who had lost a fortune.

“I mean that there is not a picture here which would bring more than ten dollars on the market,” replied Mr. Mcliurk. Augustus Lefevre, of Silo’s, was called, and corroborated Mr. Mcliurk.

master

Last Saturday’s issue of the American Art News retracts its reflection saying:

“We owe an apology to England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and all the rest of the British Empire, with the exception, perhaps, of Canada, because it said an Englishman had sold a retired New York business man a collection of 85 old masters which experts had valued at $500. It goes on to say that the man was a native of the southern section of the L S. A., albeit a resident for a number of years of a small city in the province of Ontario.

This man, it adds, is now about 80 years old and is extremely picturesque, in the proverbial southern colonel style. He wears a long goatee,  is declared to be about six feet tall, and to be a most convincing talker. He bears the appellation of  ‘doctor’ and is a maker on a small scale of patent medicines.

It appears that G. Frank Muller, another expert, had before inspected the pictures and placed their value at $1,500. Mr. Muller found on the pictures labels of Budworth’s and of the Manhattan Storage Warehouse, and of different New York auction houses. Thanks to the “apathy” of Canada’s art directors, this country was not victimized by the picturesque Carleton Place “art” salesman.

 

 

historicalnotes

In 14 February 1922, Granby Billings, a 90-year-old chemist, arrived at Southampton from New York. Billings was described as having lived in Canada; with him was Edith Billings, a 42-year-old widow from New York. Both gave the same London address: 7 Endsleigh Gardens. Soon after, in 2Q 1922, it is recorded that Edith S. Billings married Granby S. Howard in Pancras, London.

It is thought that this was Granby Staunton Howard who had quite a fascinating background. In 1894, Howard — then around 60 years of age — was accused of swindling $5,000 from Mrs. Joseph H. Sprecht, wife of a wealthy St. Louis clothing dealer who lived at Gunton Hall, VA.

Howard was living in Montreal and styling himself as “Dr.”, although he held no medical license in Canada and was making a living selling patent medicines. Dr. Howard stood over six feet in height, and was described as having “a really handsome face and courtly address, he has the added advantage of a splendid education and great power of self-command.” Howard claimed at various times to have been descended from the historical Howards of Norfolk on his father’s side; that he was a baron by descent, one of the original thirty barons of England; that while he was heir to the baronial estate he went to India, entered the Brahmin-Indian order and gave up his heirship to his younger brother.

The libel action failed and costs were awarded against the plaintiff. It was not the last time that Dr Howard found himself in trouble. The New York Times on 24 January 1922 reported that a New York pearl merchant named David I Rogow was launching an action against Granby Staunton Howard of Carleton Place, Ontario, for selling him $150,000 worth of paintings which Howard claimed were the original works of old masters and famous modern artists but proved to be copies.

Three weeks later, “Granby Billings” and Edith S. Billings arrived in Southampton aboard the Cunard liner Aquitania. Howard, over six foot in height and reputedly aged 90, accompanying Edith Billings, under half his age at 42 and small at 5 feet 2 inches, with blue-eyed with dark brown hair. They must have made an interesting couple.

After their marriage in 1922, there is almost no trace of Granby or Edith Howard. Edith’s novel, Cleomenes was re-registered for copyright by Edith S. Howard, of Rutherford, N.J., in 1944, so we have to presume that she returned to the United States some time in between. By then she was in her late 70s, so it seems likely that she died in New Jersey.

As for Granby, he is even more elusive. Virtually nothing turns up on a search for him, other than two passenger records noting his arrival in Canada in 1921, where his age is given as 60 and his birthplace as Northumberland, England, and his arrival in New York on 29 December 1921 from Bermuda. Again, the age is 60 and he is English. In the latter it would appear, although the record itself isn’t easy to read, that he is travelling with his niece.

Are 60-year-old Granby Howard and 90-year-old Granby Howard one and the same? Was Edith Billings the niece he was travelling with from Bermuda to New York in 1921 and was Howard the “Granby Billings” who travelled from New York to England in 1922?

Was Granby Howard even his real name? It doesn’t turn up on any birth records in the UK (although if he was born in c.1831, that would predate births being centrally registered) or marriage records — and the court case in 1898 revealed that he was married. It is also known from the court case that he adopted the name Wilson for some time, so other identities are also quite possible.

And how did Edith Billings end up marrying a man who appears to have been a serial conman?

All mysteries for another day. Read more here

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and the Sherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USA

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

relatedreading

More on the Despicable Dr. Howard of Carleton Place

Dr. G. S. Howard of Carleton Place — Just Call Me Master!

The Shenanigans of Dr. Howard of Carleton Place – Part 2

Did You Know Who was Cooking in Back of Lancaster’s Grocery Store? Dr. Howard I Presume! – Part 3