Tag Archives: Carleton-Place

Rosemary McNaughton- Little Red Door Arrives at Bates and Innes

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Rosemary McNaughton- Little Red Door Arrives at Bates and Innes

 

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The drive to target women began before the Second World War and gathered pace throughout the rest of the 20th century. “Women are paying a deadly price for being targeted by tobacco advertisers in the post-war years, health experts claimed yesterday.”

Women were targeted but, according to the graph on the CRUK website, their smoking prevalence remained fairly constant between 1948 and 1975, whence it began decreasing. Obviously the advertising campaign wasn’t too successful! Yet here we have ASH creating the impression that it was, trying to deceive us that it’s now the “pretty” packaging, covered with health warnings and gory images, that is “appealing”.

 

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All photos Ottawa Journal April 20 1960-Carleton Place Bates and Innes Mill

 

In April of 1960 millworkers walked through the doors of good health in Lanark County. Rosemary McNaughton was part of the Canadian Cancer Society’s Little Red Door program. On April 20 the workers at Bates & Innes in Carleton Place shared McNaughton’s films, literature and words of advice.

The registered nurse set up her movie projector in an unused wool- carding room on an uneven floor. She laid out pamphlets in vice president’s Jack Stewart’s office and talked to everyone about what she knew about the truths and the myths of cancer. She visited with workers and even spent and hour with worried staff that had stricken family members.

By closing time the folks that worked at the Bates and Innes mill knew all about the seven signs of cancer. That was 1960, and here it is 2017 and there is still no cure.

 

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Jack Stewart and Ms. McNaughton who was on her way to the mills in Appleton and Smiths Falls and District

 

 

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Max Keeping 1942-2015
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Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

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Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

Unveiling service of historical plaque at St. John's Church, Riverside Heights

Black and white photograph of the unveiling service of an historical plaque at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Riverside Heights, Ontario. The plaque commemorates Reverend Samuel Schwerdtfeger, the first Lutheran pastor in Upper Canada.

 

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The Last Years of the Reverend J. Samuel Schwerdtfeger Book given to me by Krista Lee
Most books on the German element and on the Lutheran Church in Maryland mention the name of the Rev. J. Samuel Schwerdtfeger. A native of Burgbernheim, Bavaria, Schwerdtfeger had a difficult childhood.
After six years in the Neustadt orphanage, he entered Erlangen University where he attended some lectures on theology and law but soon began to drift aimlessly. He fell victim to immigrant runners who took him to Holland where he bound himself for passage to America. In the spring of the year 1753 he arrived in Baltimore where the ship captain offered him for sale as a studious theoligist for the amount of his passage. The Lutheran congregation of York, Pennsylvania, being at that time at loggerheads within their old pastor, heard of the bargain and bought Schwerdtfeger as their preacher.

 

 

 

scan0001.jpgHazel and Gladys Schwerdtfeger of Carleton Place with the plaque that was made for their direct ancestor.

 

After five years of service in York, he transferred to New Holland, Pennsylvania. Schwerdtfeger’s temperament was not conducive to a long ministry at one place. In 1763 he assumed the pastorate of the Lutheran Church in Frederick, Maryland. His five years of service there proved beneficial for the organization of that group of Lutherans which
had been without resident pastors for many years.

However, Schwerdtfeger felt the urge to move on. After a trip to Europe, he made again brief appearances in Maryland and Pennsylvania before settling in New York State where he distinguished himself through his pastoral work in Albany and Feilstown. He became one of the founders of the New York Ministerium. American Lutheran sources have claimed that Samuel Schwerdtfeger died at Feilstown, New York in 1788.

 

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Photo Philip Allan- Gladys Schwerdfeger in Carleton Place

Recent Canadian research, however, has proved that Schwerdtfeger’s controversial, yet often distinguished career did not end in New York. During the Revolutionary War, the pastor had remained a staunch loyalist. His name appears on a petition sent to the Crown Lands in Quebec in 1780, with those of 150 other citizens, asking that they be allowed to become citizens of Canada. His son, Frederick, who was born in Frederick, Maryland,in 1765, was then already living in Canada.

The elder Schwerdtfeger made several preaching tours among the Palatine United Empire Loyalists. Finally in 1790, the Evangelical Lutheran congregation in Williamsburg
township, Dundas county, Ontario, extended a call to Pastor Schwerdtfeger who accepted without hesitation. For more than a decade he labored among the German settlers along the Canadian side of the Saint Lawrence river. He died in Williamsburg, Ontario, in 1803. The Lutherans of Ontario consider J. Samuel Schwerdtfeger the patriarch of their denomination.

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Some time before the St. Lawrence Seaway was completed, the ladies of the Lutheran Church discovered that their founding pastor Johann Schwerdfeger was buried in an Anglican churchyard and this did not sit well with them. The women sponsored a drive to have his remains relocated to the Lutheran churchyard. Later when the St. Lawrence Seaway was being flooded, the original church was covered with water! Memorial stones were removed to a new churchyard on higher grounds. In some cases, the remains were also moved, but it is not known if Schwerdfeger’s remains were moved for the second time. It has long been speculated that the body was lost or destroyed Specifically? The Body is under the St. Lawrence Seaway.

 

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This is “Tranquila Lodge”,One of two cottages built by Henry Schwerdtfeger at Lake Park. The Schwerdtfegers spent the summers next door in their octagonal cottage, and this building was rented out. It still stands today, painted a bright blue colour!

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Jun 1945, Mon,  Page 19

 

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Lake Avenue West walking tour was treated to black licorice cigars in honour of Henry Schwerdtfeger, Bridge Street tobacconist. We learned about Henry and other business tycoons as we wandered Lake Avenue on this final summer tour.

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This is “Juanita Lodge”,One of two cottages built by Henry Schwerdtfeger at Lake Park. The Schwerdtfegers spent the summers next door in their octagonal cottage, and this building was rented out.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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 One of three in our collection belonging to Hazel Schwerdtfeger.

Hazel was a Carleton Place native who received her nurse’s registration in June of 1935. She eventually became a public nurse in Almonte. Just one of the many young Carleton Place women who went in to the nursing profession.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Bertha’s daughters Gladys and Hazel Schwerdtfeger’s childhood photos and clothingCarleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

A Letter from a Local Student Nurse 1930s

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

Bertha Schwerdtfeger — Mother of the Carleton Place Schwerdtfeger Sisters

Another Episode in Spinsterdom–The Armour Sisters of Perth

 

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Memories of the Golden Eagle Gas Station

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Memories of the Golden Eagle Gas Station

 

 

 

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James R. McIsaac with the hair and sunglasses…Barker Ambulance–Carleton Place Canadian files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum 70s

 

I never thought of closure for this building until they tore it down this week and I knew I had to document it. It was the last place you could pull up to the gas pumps and have someone fill your gas tank. Once upon a time, according to Lloyd Hughes, it was Mrs. Munroe’s grocery store. Remember when you used to put $.50 of gas in your car and cruise town at $.24.5 cents a gallon? It used to be the cheapest place to get gas, and handy being right in the centre of town back then.

 

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1970s– The late Stuart “Stewie” White of Campbell Street.. Photos–Carleton Place Canadian files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum 70s

 

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The property at 19 Moore St. in Carleton Place, the former Mr. Gas, was levelled on Tuesday, Sept. 19, making way for the construction of a microbrewery and brew pub. The pub’s patio will neighbour Carleton Place’s section of the proposed Ottawa Valley Recreation Trail.
Tara Gesner/Metroland Photo and Text–Carleton Place-Almonte Canadian Gazette

 

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Bryan Reingold It was nice to go there and have someone check your oil or fill up your windshield fluid reservoir. The last full service station I remember here. I had forgotten I had read they were tearing it down and somewhat shocked today when I went by and saw it gone.

Bill Brown I worked there for a time back in the day – full service jump to the pump!!

 

Caroline Anderson Loved the guy who first started the Mr. Gas there, and he had the one on the highway at Appleton Side road. I remember when I first had my own car I always went to either of his stations because he always took good care of me and my car. Those were the days when gas was 35 cents a litre.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

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Esso? Downtown Bridge Street Carleton Place

Filler Up! Got a Flat!! Photos of Gas Stations

The Central Garage in Carleton Place by Terry Skillen

The Garages of Carleton Place –1970’s

Looking for Memories of Harold Linton’s Gas Station

Take Me to Your Litre — The Anti-Metric Gas Station

Esso? Downtown Bridge Street Carleton Place

The White Rose Service Station in Carleton Place

Dollars Worth of Gas in Carleton Place

Before the Canadian Tire Gas Bar There Was..

George Willis — Photographer and Son of Pioneer Family

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George Willis — Photographer and Son of Pioneer Family

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Dec 1935, Thu,  Page 17

 

George Willis Jr. (1820-1892) succeeded his father on the farm at the end of Lake Avenue (Conc. 11, lot 12) and there brought up a family long known in Carleton Place, including Richard, drowned while duck hunting in November 1893, and George E. Willis, photographer, musician and bandmaster, who died in Vancouver in 1940 at age 96 while living with his son Stephen T. Willis of Ottawa business college fame; William and John H. of Carleton Place, and daughters including Jane, wife of James Morphy Jr. the son of “King James” of the pioneer Morphy family.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Feb 1940, Sat,  Page 7

 

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Willis home at the end of Lake Ave West-photo- Linda Seccaspina

Clipped from The Winnipeg Tribune,  08 Nov 1915, Mon,  Page 5

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Photos of G. E. Willis Photographer

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Sam by Willis of Carleton Place

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Whatcha’ Talkin Bout Willis? — This Old House in Carleton Place

The Forgotten Cemetery at the End of Lake Ave West

 

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Ola!! Muy Delicioso!!! Cabano Kitchen

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Ola!!  Muy Delicioso!!! Cabano Kitchen

 

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It’s been a long summer and I have been cooped up for a couple of months. I heard I missed nothing due to the weather– but I did miss out on the Mexican food from Cabano Kitchen-10488 Highway 7 Carleton Place, Ontario, ON K7C 0C4..

I once lived in an area where burrito trucks were on every corner, and I really miss the culinary delights of Latino cuisine. Not anymore– I can faithfully say Cabano Kitchen is amazing with fresh fresh Mexican food right here in Carleton Place.

 

All Photos Linda Seccaspina

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I got the Vegetarian Taco with fresh fresh greens, guacamole, corn and black bean salsa, grilled pineapple, slaw, topped with Cilantro Crema. Yummy and healthy.

 

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These fries were crispy, hot and not greasy. You need to add the Chipolte Sauce to this side!

 

 

 

 

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A great meal right out of the Baja Peninsula, and a taste of summer– and heck, anytime of the year will do. These fish tacos were yummy with freshly cooked beer battered cod and  fresh crunchy slaw and your choice of Crema. Steve got spicy Crema and he has already given a thumbs up to their burritos.

Yeah, he went without me! LOL.

 

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Love their salsa or their guacamole?! They sell it by the litre! [12.50 – salsa] [22.50 – guacamole] come and get some for your next party or just to enjoy some when you’re relaxing at home!

 

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Mastering acidity, seasoning, tradition, and technique in a Mexican kitchen is a talent. It is not a skill that one learns by simply going to cooking school or working at a nice restaurant. You will know right away if the cook possesses it… and by golly gee I give Cabano Kitchen a big Mariachi band thumbs up!

Cabano Kitchen Facebook page click here..

 

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Pick Up a Free Coupon to work off that Mexican Food from SAVEON FITNESS at Cabano Kitchen for a free class!! Then you can come back and eat more at Cabano Kitchen! A 2 for 1 special I tell you!!

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Music to eat Cabano Kitchen food too.. “Vamos a comer!” (Let’s eat!)

 

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Hot out of The Good Food Co. Thanksgiving Treats! Order Now!!

The Spice of Life — Sagar Indian Cusine & Raj’s Indian Kitchen

A Burrito for All Seasons– Good Food Company

The Eating Place! You’ve Got to Eat in Carleton Place!

Hurry my Curry! You’ve got to Eat in Carleton Place!

Seduction–One Night at Chesswood

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Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

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Did You Know we Once Had a  Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

 

 

 

 

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The Grand Hotel has opened in Carleton Place, and today I found out we once had a Grand Hotel here in the late 1800s. It was actually called The Grand Central Hotel and it was first owned by David Dowlin. When he headed west to Minnesota he leased the hotel to his nephew Thomas Doyle from Drummond.

After doing research for a few hours I failed to come up with the location so I called Jennifer Fenwick Irwin at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum to see if she knew. She had never heard of it either, but we both assumed it had to be near the train station as it kind of went with the Grand Trunk Railroad that went through town– and maybe it wasn’t.

 

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The Grand Hotel

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Thanks to Jaan Kolk–Hey Linda, the 1888-9 Ontario Gazetteer you referenced actually has an ad for the Grand Central Hotel on the page following the listing (p.225) with a drawing – and it gives the location as directly opposite CPR station

 

 

In 1905 Thomas went to visit his uncle David Dowlan and was injured in a Great Northern train wreck. I don’t think the Carleton Place hotel lasted too long as Thomas Doyle went to Ottawa and opened the Strathcona Hotel on York Street. I can’t seem to find anything on that hotel either, but it is nice to see that the New Grand Hotel name in Carleton Place has a wee bit of reference to days gone by.

 

 

 

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Shane Wm Edwards  family photo On Franktown Road Carleton Place. Notice the carriages at the old station.

 

 

historicalnotes

 

Perth Courier, April 12, 1895–Mr. Thomas Doyle of Drummond has gone to Carleton Place to take charge of the Grand Central Hotel there having leased it from his uncle D. Dowlin.

Grand Central Hotel- Carleton Place-David Dowlan— Ontario Gazetteer and Business Directory (late 1800s)

 

Perth Courier, Jan. 24, 1896

The Carleton Place Herald of Jan. 14 says:  “Last Tuesday morning William Earle of Carson and Earle of this town and Annie Doyle of Drummond were united in marriage.  The ceremony was performed in St. John’s Church, Perth, by Rev. Father Duffus after which the party drove out to the residence of the bride’s parents where the marriage festivities were observed.  Miss Hattie Doyle, cousin of the bride, was maid of honor and Thomas Doyle, proprietor of the Grand Central Hotel was best man.  The guests were many and a pleasant evening was spent. The presents were numerous and handsome and useful.”

 

Obituary of Thomas Doyle

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  30 Nov 1935, Sat,  Page 9

 

 

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Jaan Kolk–Linda, you mentioned relatives moved west. Thomas M. Doyle, age 24, died in Anaconda, Montana. (Ottawa Journal, June 11, 1903)
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Jaan Kolk–I had trouble finding anything on the the Strathcona Hotel, York St. too, until I found this June 13, 1903 Ottawa Journal obituary for Thomas M. Doyle, which gave me the address 32 York St., and a year. The 1901 Might directory lists the Strathcona Hotel, 32 York St., Thomas Doyle prop. The 1890-91 Woddburn directory lists it as the Lynott House (Wm. & David Lynott) and the year before it was the Davidson House. The Strathcona was short-lived – by 1906 or earlier it was the Farmers’ Hotel, H.R Boyd prop.

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Jaan Kolk–And here is a June 6, 1906 Journal notice of transfer of tavern license for 32 York St., already the Farmers’ Hotel from the Strathcona in Ottawa. I had trouble finding anything on the the Strathcona Hotel, York St. too, until I found this June 13, 1903 Ottawa Journal obituary for Thomas M. Doyle, which gave me the address 32 York St., and a year.
The 1901 Might directory lists the Strathcona Hotel, 32 York St., Thomas Doyle prop. The 1890-91 Woddburn directory lists it as the Lynott House (Wm. & David Lynott) and the year before it was the Davidson House. The Strathcona was short-lived – by 1906 or earlier it was the Farmers’ Hotel, H.R Boyd prop.

 

Clipped from The Minneapolis Journal,  06 Jul 1905, Thu,  Page 2

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Carleton Place Folk Art from the Queen’s Hotel –The Millers

The Leland and Rathwell Hotels on Bridge Street

Leo Doyle of the Leland Hotel in Carleton Place –Calling All Doyles

The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

Death from Corrosive Sublimate —Carleton Place’s Revere House

Jules “Julie” Pilon of the Leland Hotel– Weather Man

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

Lake Park Lodge – Queen’s Royal Hotel- Mississippi Lake Carleton Place Ontario

So Who Painted Those Wall Murals at our Carleton Place Hotels?

 

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

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Accident at the C.P.R. Shop –James Moulton

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Accident at the C.P.R. Shop –James Moulton

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Hi Linda

 The attached articles are about my Grandfather, James Moulton.  The day his accident happened, my Grandmother, Harriet Walker Fisher Moulton gave birth to their youngest daughter which made 8 children.  They eventually had two more sons.

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James Moulton was my Grandfather and Harriet Walker Fisher my Grandmother
who had a farm across the street from us on Sarah Street.All the children were born at 26 Sarah Street, in later years it was changed to 92 Sarah Street.

On Monday afternoon Mr. James Moulton of the C.P.R. shops in Carleton Place was seriously injured whilst engaged in assisting in repairing a snowplow. In some way the wing was put into motion and Mr. Moulton was caught and most severely crushed. He was rushed to the public hospital in Smiths Falls with little delay and everything is being done to save his life with very little hope of success. Mr. Moulton is  48 years of age and has a wife and seven children depending on him. 1925-02-06- Almonte Gazette

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The CPR gave my Grandparents a lifetime pass with the railroad and it was used a couple of times, mainly to go to Montreal when there had been other serious accidents in the family (Montreal seemed to be the place to go for medical care).  As far as I know, he did not receive any other financial benefits, and I don’t know if the CPR paid for his stay in hospital.  My Grandpa did not go back to work at the CPR, he was never very healthy after the accident.  He farmed on Sarah Street, Caldwell Street (where the school is now) and also a few acres on Woodward Street.  He lived to be 87 and died November 8, 1962 of “hardening of the arteries”, known as Alzheimer’s now. —-Norma Ford

 

 

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My favourite picture of my Grandfather James Moulton (how I remember him) and some of your readers will remember him from this picture.–Norma Ford

 

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Norma and I still have not found out when he was released from the Smiths Falls Hospital and returned to Carleton Place in the newspaper archives.

I know when he was sent home we was still bedridden.  My Grandmother did what a physical therapist would do today – rubbed him down, made sure he was turned and made him exercise his limbs.  She was credited with getting him walking again.  Something we think nothing about today but it must have been a real hardship back then with a bedridden husband, a new baby and 7 other children.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Mar 1968, Sat,  Page 5

 They (the family) said he was never the same physically again although I remember him milking the cows, other farm related work and he had a massive garden that he maintained although I now realize why he worked slower than my Dad.  —Norma Ford

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Nov 1962, Fri,  Page 3

 

 

 

historicalnotes

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This is a picture of Norma Ford’s family cow on the old Caldwell Street farm.  Donna McLaren posted it as she loves this cow..thank you!

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Today’s photo is of workers taking a break at the CPR Engine Repair Shops. Built in 1890 as a round house and repair shop for the Canadian Pacific Railway, it employed about 200 workers. After operations were moved to Smiths Falls, the building was purchased by the Canadian Cooperative Woolgrowers. Iron tracks from the turntable in the roundhouse were sold as scrap to help the war effort in 1940. Can you help us identify any of these men?–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  06 Jun 1904, Mon,  Page 8

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Nov 1907, Mon,  Page 8

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Norma Ford

A Carleton Place Fenian Soldier’s Photo

Carleton Place Wins Prizes for their Wool!

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place– Wooly Bully!!!! Part 6

Before The Carleton Place Mews?

 

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