Tag Archives: Carleton-Place

Looking for Memories of Edith Knowlton

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Looking for Memories of Edith Knowlton

 

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Photo 1978

In the early 20s the Barnes Family opened a store in what most people today know as McDonald Sports on Bridge Street almost across from the old  dairy.  It was purchased from the Barnes family who remodelled it with living quarters upstairs. Morna, Doris and Oliver Barnes later moved to George Street and then Clarence Emmerson’s family ran the grocery store. Jack, Ethel and Neil lived on the second floor and later moved to Smiths Falls. After that Mrs. Edith Knowlton continued the grocery business for a number of years. I would like to have her recorded here online.

What do we know about Edith Knowlton from Carleton Place?

1.She bought an illuminated sign and used to advertise community things

2. She understood her customers wanted

3.You could still run a tab at her store

4.You could order your groceries by telephone

5. You could drop in and have a chat and she served fresh coffee and had treats for all her customers at Christmas

6. Her husband ran a farm near Elgin

7. She had a daughter Janet

8. One wall of her store had happy face wallpaper

So what can you add? Please leave comments or email me at sav_77@yahoo.com

 

KNOWLTON, Edith W. (nee Crichton) In hospital, Carleton Place, Ontario, on Tuesday, March 16th, 2004, from earth to eternal rest with God in heaven. Loved wife of the late Charles Knowlton. Loved and remembered by her children, Janet and Allan; her brothers, George and Joe; a gazillion family members and relatives, friends and acquaintances, and last but not least Kaylie-Pup. After cremation, an informal time of visitation and service to remember her will be held at the ALAN R. BARKER FUNERAL HOME 19 McArthur Ave., Carleton Place on Tuesday, March 23rd, 2004 from 1 p.m. with service in the chapel at 2:30 p.m. with the Reverend David Mullin officiating. Edith’s ashes will be interred with her late husband in the family plot. Donations may be made to Carleton Place/Beckwith Community Support. “Come to Me all who are weary and heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” Matthew 11:28

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

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From the Files of The Canadian — Who is This? Where is This?

What is this? From Karen Prytula– LCGS

Lost and Found Carleton Place–Do you Have this?

Where is This?

Can You Read This?

Where is This?

What Would Our Ancestors Think of this? A Hippie Airbnb?

 

 

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The Argue Hardware Ruler Comments

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The Argue Hardware Ruler Comments

 

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Photo–Just sold on EBay for 26 bucks.. An Argue Hardware yardstick– 1930’s WOOD YARDSTICK; ARGUE HARDWARE, CARLETON PLACE ONT. (CANADA). YARDSTICK IS WITH WEAR/SOILING/FADING, BUMPED CORNERS. HOLE DRILLED AT ONE END. MADE BY CANADIAN RULER, BEDFORD, QUE.

 

 

 

Doug B. McCarten– OMG we had one of those at home! Chess and Helen were terrific friends of our family! Helen was my Dad’s secretary for many years!! Who knew?? Lol

Jan McCarten Sansom– I still have it lol …was it on your list??😍😫

Doug B. McCarten– Jan McCarten Sansom hahahaha nah, it’s okay, enjoy 😊!

Doug B. McCarten– The hole was purposeful for hanging on a nail.

Karen Fleming Ferguson– We have this one still. One side.

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Doug B. McCarten-– Eades Hardware, of course took over the business from Chess Argue!

 

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston Still have one.

Ray Paquette– I will take umbrage with the supposed date of the 1930’s! Ches Argue bought the store from Roy Gilmour in the 1950’s after he moved his family to Carleton Place from Leaside I believe. Some of your more mature correspondent can probably collaborate this. I was in school with Judy and Bill played ball for my Dad before going off to RMC.

Linda Seccaspina– It was the date quotes by the seller.. I try to stay out of that stuff LOL

Joann Voyce– Seller lied. Argue Hardware started in 1950/1951

Llew Lloyd —The Argue yardstick shown in the original photo was the Cadillac model . My father hung a lot of wallpaper in this town and the yardstick was one of the essential tools of the trade . Much like fabric , wallpaper came in rolls and there were so many yards in a roll . The estimate was done in yards. Once the job started the wallpaper was rolled out on the pasting board and the measuring and cutting of the individual strips was done with the yardstick . On the home front there was always a yardstick on the frame above the kitchen door . Those of you who remember the threat of the wooden spoon will easily guess the yardsticks other use.

 



Mary Ann Gagnon– Judy and Bill’s mum was Helen Argue….she was the secretary at the high school for years before and during my dad’s reign there…

Doug B. McCarten– Most loved CPHS secretary!

Hazel Stewart-Huneault– I have one that belonged to my grand father. GEO. W. EADES LTD
Phone 1581
Old, but not sure how old.
When did Eades take ownership?

Doug B. McCarten– Talk about customer service, my Mom once bought a hand mixer for $2 but didn’t like the colour of the wooden handle so they painted it for her at no additional charge! Now that’s customer service!!

Just a note that I just finished tomorrows instalment on Main Street and read that Argue’s Hardware store had nothing to do with Eades. Argues Hardware was next to the Dominion Store which used to be Bailey’s grocery Store and Chester came in and took this small store over and employed James Patterson, Harry Crawford and Wilbert Giles. In two nights we will do Argue’s grocery store which used to be where the Granary was. But all that’s coming up…

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Memories of Argue’s Food Market?

The Granary in Your Backyard — Dena Comley

 

 

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to–

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to–

 

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Photo—GoBiking.ca

 

101 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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What Happened to the Sign?? 
Louis Antonakos
Louis Antonakos Hi Jennifer, The Olympia sign is currently being restored. POSTED–October 14 2014- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Facebook page
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Photo from The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

101 Bridge Street

Next to the New York Café (see Volume 6) was the Olympia Restaurant that was operated by James and Louis Laskaris and in 1960, the New York Cafe was destroyed in a fire as was the Olympia Restaurant, in the next building.

Located at 101 Bridge Street, the restaurant, with its booths, curved counter and red leather stools, was a local institution and operated by Louis and James Laskaris as the Olympic Candy Store in 1920. Jim was the manager and principal owner and Louis was the candy maker.  There was once  great displays of Turkish Delight fudge and butter cups displayed in their windows.

Jim married a local girl Helen Mesner and they had two children Bill and Nan. After Helen died Jim returned to Greece and remarried and sold to Jim Antonakos in 1958. Louis  Laskaris left Carleton Place and opened a business in Bowmanville. A fire destroyed the building in 1960, but it was rebuilt and opened again in 1961. Jim Antonakas had previously purchased the building 2.5 years before that fateful day. Antonakas had originally operated a restaurant in the Byward Market in Ottawa.

 

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Everything in the restaurant and garage was destroyed but the firemen aided by the residents of Carleton Place were able to save almost all of the equipment in the barber shop. A fire that amounted to $75,000 worth of damage to: The Olympia Restaurant, Howard Little’s Barbershop and a garage owned by Elmer Robertson containing a small amount of furniture fell prey to the flames. In 1961, the Olympia was rebuilt and reopened. At this time, Stewart Comba leased a part for his furniture shop and R.A. Downing had an office here.

One of the people that ran the Olympia restaurant was Monib El Jaji and his family. El had been cooking for other restaurants for 18 years when he decide to open his own. He had moved his family from Lebanon to Canada in 1967 as he wanted his kids to grow up in a peaceful place.

Some of the people that worked at the Olympia were: Pearl Wilson, Reta Chilcott, Toots Morris, Marian McDaniel and Ruby McPherson. The Olympia closed it’s doors for good in 2000 and is still greatly missed.

Tommy McCaffrey’s Barber shop was next door and he had various assistants such as Jack McPherson, his brother Earl, and Weary Little. Later Howard Little came along from Almonte and took over from McCaffrey. The barbershop was also destroyed by fire and when rebuilt they were set back in line with the rest of the stores instead of protruding 6 feet which narrowed the sdiewalk. There was a small apartment over the barber shop and it was occupied by Carrie Tosh who was employed at the local hydro office.

 

 

Memories of the Olympia & Howard Little Fire-Ray Paquette

Food Fit For Olympians in Carleton Place

The Howard Little- Olympia Fire on Bridge Street

 

104-106 Bridge Street Carleton Place 

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Photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Photo- Linda Seccaspina

104-106 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1889-1897

This property was the home of one of the most prominent persons in town during his lifetime. Dr. Richard F. Preston served the community not only as a Physician but as a Reeve of the village, the first Mayor of The town, a member of the Legislative Assembly in 1895 and a Member of Parliament in the 1920s. The building once had a very wide staircase from the centre of the lawn that led to the 2nd floor.

The Crown granted the property originally to Edmond Murphy. Some of the other owners of the property included James McDiarmid, Allan McDonald, John McEwen, Archibald Gilles, and Alexander Forbes Stewart. Stewart sold the property to Preston and Dr. Preston is first mentioned in the Assessment Roll in 1880 when he was twenty-four years of age. He purchased the 11,336 square feet in 1883 for $1000. In 1885-1889 the Assessment Rolls list the property as vacant. From 1890-1897 the building is listed as unfinished. It seems that the house was made habitable and over the next six years, the details were completed.

From 1887 or so, Dr. Preston had a medical practice and he delivered both Lloyd and Harold Hughes. He was also the Mayor and a member of parliament for several years. The building itself had a stable behind it, which was kept by Mr. Halpenny who drove the house and buggy for the doctor. If a lady was having a baby in the country the doctor would not be able to get there in tie to deliver the child but a midwife would be on hand. The midwife would not only be the temporary doctor but would also stay with the family for a few days to help the mother and get the meals for the other members of the family. The doctor usually got there the day after the birth to ensure all was in order andreturn to town. In 1917, Dr. Preston brought in Dr. Smith. Dr. Smith was there for ten to fifteen years. Dr. Preston was quite old when he gave up his practice and Dr. James kept it up.

Dr. James at an old age died while trying to help someone get a car unstuck. Dr. MacDowell took on the practice. Before his practice in Carleton Place he worked out of Almonte. Some of the doctors that were located in this building were: Dr. Ivan James,Dr. Stone,Dr. Murphy, Dr. Ross McDowall and Dr. Bartlett. Dr. Clifford Dobb was also in this building before the Centennial Medical Centre was built. The second floor was made into apartments and one of the earliest tenants was Mr. and Mrs. Del Anderson and Mrs. Blanche Jelly. The downstairs was housed the Children’s Aid Society Office and a real estate office and is now apartments.

Related reading

Shades of The Godfather in Dr. Preston’s Office in Carleton Place

Dr.Preston Was in the House — The Case of the Severed Foot

Haggart vs Dr Preston– The Little Intriguer that Pulled the String….

 

110 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Original owner George’s Pizza, George Poulos flipping the dough, and outside the restaurant with his stepson, circa 1989Photo from Terry Poulos

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110 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

 

The façade of 110 Bridge Street has probably been renovated since it was initially built, and the original structure was probably was made of clapboard and later on stucco was put on to replace the clapboard. Originally, the building was the office of John (Johnny) A. McGregor, who was the county sheriff, commonly called doctor, but certainly was not a doctor of any kind. Carleton Place was ‘dry’ in his days but there still was a good number of bootleggers. Johnny was short in stature and wore a long fur coat in the winter that dragged through the snow like a western rustler.

Whenever a raid was to be carried out Johnny had to present and he would be transported to the scene of the crime by Kidd Bryce Taxi and word on the street was there were never too many successful raids.

This building also housed the ticker tape for the Toronto Stock Exchange and was operated by Howard Dack and Bill Patterson. The building sat idle for a few years and iconic George’s Pizza occupied it for years. Now there are apartments on the second floor and Heather Lalonde and Suze Tomas have a hairdressing establishment on the main floor. (Hair Loft and E2)

Related Reading…

RACK ‘EM UP —Do You Remember George’s Playhouse?

 

116 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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116 Bridge Street  Circa 1870

116 Bridge Street was the home of the Darou’s bakery for approximately sixteen years. Darou’s bakery was later operated by Minnie who was the daughter of the Darou’s and Earl Dunlop. It was under the ownership of the Dunlop’s up until 1957 when Nat Nelson purchased the building and operated a delicatessen with his wife bought the building. The Bridge Street store used to be the home base for Nate’s Delicatessen, which was run by Nelson’s parents. Paul took over when his dad died and operated a photography shop. Paul Nelson cherished, long time member of the Carleton Place Community, passed away Monday, February 28, 2011. It is now home to Solace Hair Design on the main floor and apartments on top.

William and Barbara Neelin sold lot 10 section D to William Brundige in May of 1873 for $1200. The early tenants included Steele’s tinshop, Wilson’s Bakery, Northern Telegraph and George Keyes Boots and Shoes. George Keyes was the son-in-law of William Brundige marrying his daughter Lucy. After the fire, the new red brick building was constructed in 1898 with two storefronts. The Union Bank rented 109 Bridge Street.

George Keyes died in 1909 and the Deir’s open a grocery store at 107 Bridge Street. Cal Moore moved from Smiths Falls and purchased and operated Moore’s Central grocery in 1919. Calvin was also the son-in-law of George Keyes marrying Edena Keyes.

Maynard Argue operates Argues’s Grocery at 107 Bridge Street for many years and then the Mi-Lady Dress Shoppe operated out of the same location from 1953-1977. It was owned by Dorothy Burns and later E. Shane. The tenants included: the Remembrance Gift Shop and Charlie Jay Shoes. Ken’s Discount Shoes opened at number 109 in 1965 and then The Granary Natural Foods opened at 107 Bridge Street in 1977 expanding in 2015.

Related reading:

Life Before Digital Cameras in Carleton Place – Remembering Paul Nelson

107-109 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photos from —Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum —Before the fire

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107-109 Bridge Street Carleton Place–1880 ca, 1898 rebuilt fire

Originally 107-109 Bridge Street was the tin shop of Mr. Steele and the tin shop shared
the premises with Wilson’s bakery in the latter part of the 19th century.
During the early 20th century Garant and Weir operated a grocery. Also
occupying the building at this time was the Northern Telegraph. For approximately
fifty years, up until the middle of the Twentieth Century there has been a grocery
store operated in this building. Deachman and Weir Grocery was later taken over by

 

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The old photo shown with this article was taken circa 1919, shortly after Cal Moore purchased the store from Deachman and Weir.-Photos from —Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The original structure that occupied the lot was built in the early 1800’s. Originally 107-109 Bridge Street was the tin shop of Mr. Steele and the tin shop shared the premises with Wilson’s bakery in the latter part of the 19th century and the modest wood building housed the Keyes’ family shoe business and living quarters. The early tenants included Steele’s tinshop, Wilson’s Bakery, Northern Telegraph and George Keyes Boots and Shoes.The structure was destroyed by fire in the 1880’s and the current building was constructed in 1887 and it quickly become known as “The Keyes Block”.  

George Keyes was the son-in-law of William Brundige marrying his daughter Lucy. After the fire, the new red brick building was constructed in 1898 with two storefronts. The Union Bank rented 109 Bridge Street.

George Keyes died in 1909 and the Weir’s open a grocery store at 107 Bridge Street. Deachman and Weir Grocery was later taken over by C.W. Moore Food. Cal Moore moved from Smiths Falls and purchased and operated Moore’s Central grocery in 1919. Calvin was also the son-in-law of George Keyes marrying Edena Keyes.

Originally 107-109 Bridge Street was the tin shop of Mr. Steele and the tin shop shared
the premises with Wilson’s bakery in the latter part of the 19th century. During the early 20th century Garant and Weir operated a grocery. Also occupying the building at this time was the Northern Telegraph. For approximately fifty years, up until the middle of the Twentieth Century there has been a grocery store operated in this building. Deachman and Weir Grocery was later taken over by

The current building was constructed in 1887 and this address has been home to several grocery stores including C.W. Moore’s and Maynard Argue’s. C.W. employed Charles Costello for a number of years and had Charlie Whyte as a delivery boy. Maynard Argue took over the business for a short time until he went to become the manager of the IGA store in the newly renovated Rubino Bldg. at the corner of Albert Street.

Baird and Riddle operated a men’s and boy’s clothing store for quite some time and Mi Lady Dress Shoppe conducted business from 1953-1977 and it was owned by Dorothy Burns and later E. Shane.  Their staff was: Ortie Luons and Carmell Hurell Scissons. Other tenants included: the Remembrance Gift Shop and Charlie Jay Shoes. George Keyes operated a shoe store at 109 Bridge and then Ken’s Discount Shoe Store operated a shoe store in 1965 for several decades. In 1977, The Granary took up residence at 107 and continues to operate in 2017 in this location also having expanded into where Ken’s Discount Shoe Store was at 109 Bridge Street.

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Related reading:

Under Lock and Keyes- Keyes Building

The Old Grocery Counter –Calvin Moore

Memories of Argue’s Food Market?

The Granary in Your Backyard — Dena Comley

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

Read in the series

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

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What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall August 1897

Community Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 8– It was 1963

Community Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 9– It was 1903!

A Lyle Dillabough Flashback– 150th Birthday

Carleton Place Community Memories 1967–150th

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Glory Days in Carleton Place— Jan McCarten Sansom

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Glory Days in Carleton Place— Jan McCarten Sansom
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We love stories and if you have any please drop me a line at sav_77@yahoo.com and I will print it and give you full credit and put it in our series: “Glory Days in Carleton Place”
This is from Jan McCarten Sansom
Hi Linda, 
I liked the story about the Patterson Funeral Home. My Grandparents lived across the from the Hearse House on Bridge St. at 233 Bridge St. My Grandfather was ill with cancer and mostly bedridden. It was a lovely Spring day and he dearly wished to be downstairs to enjoy the view and be closer to the family.
He was unable to walk downstairs himself, so my Grandmother called Putt Patterson to come over with his stretcher to carry my Grandfather downstairs. Needing and extra hand they called George, who worked at Bennett’s Butcher store next door to come and help, which he did willingly. All he was told was they needed help bringing Mr. Buchanan downstairs.
Arriving at my grandparent’s home, George saw that my grandfather was already lying on the stretcher, arms folded and eyes closed. Just as they started down the front stairs, my grandfather, raised his head and greeted George with a smile and a hello. Poor George almost dropped his end of the stretcher, because he thought they were taking my grandfather to the funeral home. My grandfather had a wicked sense of humour and thought this was a great joke. Poor George disappeared from work for about 4 days after—probably due to the shock!

 

 

Thanks Jan– this was fabulous!!

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

  relatedreading

 

Glory Days in Carleton Place- Ray Paquette

Glory Days of Carleton Place-The Olde Barracks– Sharon Holtz– Part 2 

As the World Turns in Carleton Place — Soap and Ground Beef

Memories of Ruth Ferguson

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The Devil, a Regatta, the Enterprise and a Gale

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The Devil, a Regatta, the Enterprise and a Gale
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In preparation for  the American Canoe Association Regatta in June of 1902 the course from Nagles Shore to the Lake Park steamboat dock was measured on the ice in March.

Mounting interest in June was noted in the local newspaper by W. W. Cliff, who said :

“There are some thousands of persons who regard the coming Canoe Meet as considerably more important than the new fast trans Atlantic service, or even perhaps the end of the war in Africa.  Doubtless they are mistaken, but the world would lose a good deal if a temporary bias due to the ardor of youth did not exist.” (Howard Morton Brown)

 

The forces behind the American Canoe Association Regatta reported after the fact that the meet in Carleton Place in June of 1902 should have been cancelled. The races were postponed two days running due to the terrific winds which blew two days and nights and part of the third day. Winds higher than those on the St. Lawrence of the year before played havoc with the schedule of the national regatta held at Lake Park. In the earlier part of one day the press recorded the waves as being higher than any sea. It was one of the worst meets in the ACA history and older residents of Carleton Place said they couldn’t remember a wind of such force that went on for two days.

The visiting canoeists, numbering over two hundred, were said to be the largest group of paddlers ever gathered at one meet in Canada.  They had their tents pitched on the Lake Park grounds and remained there until the completion of the regatta.  Though the wind was very high, on the second day the principle events were completed before nightfall.

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo 1902 Lake Park

 

The trip to Lake Park was described in the newspapers as not inviting, and local management was not to be congratulated on the arrangements made for all the visitors. A couple of indifferent steam engine boats, some described almost in the condition of a shipwreck, took passengers by the steam route. Those that took the boat ride got a good wetting and many of the ladies were quite alarmed from the trip once they docked.

 

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Public Archives— Carleton Place Canoe Club photo no date

The Ottawa Journal said that every possible old rig in the county took “victims” on a long land ride on a road that was certainly innocent of any good roads movement in Ontario. Several gasoline yachts that had made their way up to Lake Park were compelled to go back or be swamped. Lake Park was deemed useless for canoe racing in a gale.

The management of the meet was most unsatisfactory with executive meetings every 5 minutes, yet nothing was done. The various canoe clubs said the local committee was lacking in knowledge of what would be required, and accommodation in every aspect was lacking. Had Thursday been a holiday over 5,000 more people would have been attended and half of them would have to sit up all night.

 

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The Carleton – Photo– Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum


On the evening of  Friday the 27th the local canoeists entertained the visitors at the Leland Hotel, where a fine spread was laid by host Mr. Salter.  However no one dined before a group of the participants crowded onto the Mississippi Hotel veranda and “with bared heads” sang God Save the Queen. After the tables were cleared Mayor Patterson took the chair and then a ball was tendered for the visitors at the Lake Park Queen’s Royal Hotel, combined with a huge bonfire and a fireworks display.

 While the bonfire burned and the fireworks shot across the sky on the last night of the American Canoe Association Regatta there was another ball of fire in view. The Carleton steamer which had its top deck removed by this time docked in front of the Queen’s Hotel was burned to the water’s edge. They say the devil attended the Regatta that year and no one forgot the events for years.

Love many, trust few and always paddle your own canoe.

 

 

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Public Archives— Carleton Place Canoe Club photo no date

 

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  28 Jun 1902, Sat,  Page 15

 

Carleton Place Canoe Club officers for the big year of 1902 were patrons Mayor Robert Patterson, William McDiarmid and Dr. George McDonald, commodore Colin McIntosh, vice-commodore R. A. Sibbett, captain W. J. Welsh, secretary treasurer J. N. Gibson, executive Frank Donald, Dr. K. C. Campbell, George Cornell, J. F. Moffatt and Fred McRostie, and auditors M. G. Howe and C. A. Roberts.  Chairmen of committees were, Racing, Fred McRostie ; Sailing, Dr. K. C. Campbell ; Entertainment, Frank Donald ; Property J. F. Moffatt.– Howard Morton Brown

The summer resort record of Lake Park, central site of  the early Canadian Canoe Club Association and Northern Division regattas goes back over 100 years. In its days Allan’s Point, and for many years later, was a favourite location for the aquatic outings and sport days of Carleton Place social organizations. It’s first small two- storey summer hotel was built in 1887. The Lake Park Company of Carleton Place Ltd. completed most of the existing lot and street subdivision of the community in 1893. To serve it with transportation the company built the Carleton ­ which was the lake ’s largest steamboat, an 80- foot double decked paddle wheeler.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

  relatedreading

The Young Olympic Hopefuls-1970’s Carleton Place Canoe Club

Know Your Carleton Place Olympians!

The Ministry of Propaganda in Carleton Place — Carleton Place Canoe Club

Looking for Information on Pooh Bell & The Powder Puffs

Three Cheers for Dave Findlay –The Movie

Who Was Mickey Morphy? Noteworthy Paddles to Portage

 

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 5

Don’t Be Scared Ladies –Steamers on the Mississippi

 

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It Raineth Every Day in Lanark County–Social Notes–July 30, 1897

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It Raineth Every Day in Lanark County–Social Notes–July 30, 1897

 

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A trio of young men from Almonte attracted by the bright illumination’
in the sky on Tuesday evening, the night the car shops were burned in
Carleton Place, drove over to watch the fire, but when they got there the
fire was all out and the streets deserted. They felt greatly disappointed,
and were going to interview the mayor about it had they not been assured that it was altogether an oversight on the part of the C.P .R. officials in not notifying them in time.

 

On Tuesday last a severe thunderstorm passed over a portion of Darling
township. Mr. D. Barr was busy in the hay field coiling up hay when the storm came, and two or three minutes after he left the field and at the last coil he put up was struck with lightning and burned.

 

 

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A number of Almonte’s young men have established a camp on the shore of the Mississippi below “Wylie’s Dam,” where they will spend the hot season. They are said to be great entertainers, and are showing hospitality to numerous visitors from town.

 

With fine weather on Saturday Almonte will show its sympathy with the plan to give telephone connection with Clayton by sending out a crowd for the “ telephone picnic.” An interesting feature will be a baseball match between the Almonte and Lanark nines.

A few local nimrods made an expedition up the river last week to try their luck among the finnies, and many and lengthy are the stories now told. One party, after being on the river a short while, suddenly remembered that they had no bait. They rowed back and dropped their anchor—a 16-pounder—and proceeded to catch minnows. When they had caught sufficient for their trip the strongest man of the party was put at the oars so that they might catch up with the rest of the crowd. He pulled a good stroke and did not spare himself any, but progress was very slow, and it was not until they reached Gleason’s Bay that they noticed they had forgotten to pull in the anchor!

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Word comes that Mr. Thomas Haley’s buildings, near Ferguson’s Falls, were struck by the great storm of Tuesday and consumed. The Hawthorne Factory in Carleton Place was nipped at the roof.

 

Burglars last Sunday night entered the residence of Mr. J. H. Spencer,  stole $33 from his pant’s pockets in his bedroom, and set fire to his woodshed.

 

WATSON

Perth Remembered

Watson’s Corner’s News

The Ladies’ Aid of St. James will hold a social on July 5th.
Miss Ray Scott, of Fallbrook, spent Saturday and Sunday at home.

Mr. James Fair is shipping a few loads of sheep and pigs this week.
Miss M. Reid, of McDonald’s Corners, spent Saturday and Sunday at
home.

Rev. J. A. and Mrs. Leitch have gone to Renfrew for a couple of
weeks.

Miss A. Fife, of McDonald’s Corners, spent a few days with friends in
our village.

Mr. Henry Barrie has gone to Lanark to undergo an operation on one
of his eyes.

Mr. and Mrs. C. Donaldson paid a visit to Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Craig on
Saturday last.

The weather is warm though the nights continue cool. Quite a refreshing
shower fell on Thursday forenoon last.

Mrs. J. Borrowman and her sister, Miss A. Dick, of Drummond, paid a
visit to their sister, Mrs. Wm. McChesney, last week.

The sacrament of the Lord’s Supper was dispensed in St. James church on
Sabbath last. The church was crowded. Rev. J. A. Leitch preached an
impressive sermon from 1 Peter 4:13.

A baptismal service was held at the home of Mr. Stephen Park on Friday
afternoon last, when Rev. J. A, Leitch baptized 21 children and
adults. Elders Barr and Paul were present, besides a number of the parents
and others, there being between forty and fifty at the service.

A school children’s picnic will be held at Dalhousie Lake on Wednesday
of this week. By the way, the lake is getting to be a popular resort,
and deservedly so. Its beautiful scenery cannot easily be surpassed.
Take a day or more and go to Dalhousie Lake to admire the beauties of
nature and be lifted nearer to nature’s God.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Appleton Social Notes 1908 –Names Names Names

Christmas Social Notes from Pakenham 1933

Social Notes from Watson’s Corners

Smiles of Content and Social Notes in Clydesville

Social Note Shenanigans from the Almonte Gazette June 1899

Watson’s Corners And Vicinity 1891–Shetland Ponies and Cheese

It’s the Watson’s Corners News 1895!

 

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The Case of the Bell that Disappeared

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The Case of the Bell that Disappeared

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The Old Hawthorne Renfrew Mill- Carleton Place–Photo from  Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson collection

 

Sometime around 1910, Colorado acquired a bell in 1894 by the C.S. Bell Company in Hillsboro, Ohio, and the historic bell weighed nearly 500 pounds. Its chiming could be heard across the tiny campus of Colorado Agricultural College and throughout most of Fort Collins, CO.

 

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The Old Hawthorne Renfrew Mill- Carleton Place–Photo from  Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson collection

 

The bell rang every morning to announce the start of classes, and as you might expect on a college campus, students often gave into the temptation to pull the bell’s rope in the middle of the night, angering nearby residents.

Sometime around 1915 it was reported in the Rocky Mountain Collegian that the bell’s clapper had been stolen – perhaps by residents who had grown weary of the frequent and very loud noise. Students weren’t about to stop ringing the bell, however, and used sledge hammers and even an axe to make it chime. The Collegian reported in 1919 that the bell was permanently silenced when cracked by overzealous students and their hammers. The ruined bell, legend has it, remained in the Old Main Tower for years.

One night – likely in 1919 – a group of at least four men climbed the tower and removed the bell. They managed to slip away unseen, but that is where their planning had ended. They didn’t know what to do with their prize and, scared of being caught, they moved the instrument to a nearby farm and buried it. That’s where it remained for the next 50 years.

 

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The Old Hawthorne Renfrew Mill- Carleton Place–Photo from  Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson collection

 

By the early 1970s, the original bell had been all but forgotten. A select few members of a fraternity and its alumni were aware of the story but were sworn to secrecy. But when it was revealed that the farm where the bell was buried was on the market, action was required. The bell was exhumed and – for the first time in five decades – moved back to an off-campus fraternity house in Fort Collins. There it remained, hidden, for a number of years.


In an effort to keep the bell safe, it was decided to move it again – this time out of state. The bell was no longer in prime form and although in still decent form it had a broken yoke. It needed to be refurbished and restored, but it was determined the bell could be rung again without fear of damage.

 

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The Old Hawthorne Renfrew Mill- Carleton Place–Photo from  Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson collection

 

The bell will reside in a tower outside the Iris and Michael Smith Alumni Centre, which is connected to the new stadium. So all bell that ends bell. So what about one of our bells? Yes, in Carleton Place we had many bells that rang throughout town. The Town Hall bell, the MacArthur Mill bell and the many school bells that rang each day.

At the open house to the Hawthorne Mill yesterday there was a gentleman that brought Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson pictures from the removal of the bell tower from the building. Unfortunately he did not get his name or contact info as it was in the midst of giving the people that had lined up for access. Wally has decided to restore the tower to it’s former glory and would love to get information on where the bell is located today. Any and all leads are welcome.

It’s not the honour that you take with you but the heritage you leave behind.

 

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The Old Hawthorne Renfrew Mill- Carleton Place–Photo from  Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson collection

It would be fantastic if it was found but, like our missing Ballygiblin sign that should be replaced I hope it has not been melted down. So if you know anything and would like to hear it ring again like the Renfrew Mill/Rencraft Fire Dept once did then drop Wally a line.

 

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This photo appears to have been taken in the CP Council Chamber- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. see the rest here–The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

 

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comments

 

John Armour– I hope that they found my kite that I got wrapped around the bell, when I was 12 years old, (with Greg Wilson)

Ray Paquette– One of the “jobs” I had in the early ’60’s was a two or three day job I got to work for Charlie Baker of Almonte who had a contract to clear out the building pictured of all the abandoned but salvageable material that remained in the building from when it was a functioning woolen mill. Leigh Instruments which was expanding rapidly and which was housed in the former office wing of the plant was preparing to take over the remainder of the mill. It was this time of year and it was hot, dirty labour and I believe that Milt Phillips, my neighbour at the time, might have been behind Mr. Baker hiring me.

Llew Lloyd– I worked for my Dad that summer cleaning an degreasing all the beams . We then spray painted them and painted the floors . It sure brightened the place up . Ted Lemaistre told me he worked as a joe boy there all summer too . When it came time to get paid he was asked if he’d rather be paid in stock options . He and every kid at that time took the money . Mrs. Robertson was smarter.

Ray Paquette And your final comment on the stock option probably explains why we are not independently wealthy and spending the summer following our favourite baseball team around the league circuit!!

 

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Llew Lloyd--Now you’ve got me working again . I knew I had this photo tucked away somewhere . That’s my father , Llewellyn Wescott Lloyd in the foreground of a good pic of the Hawthorne Mill in the mid 30’s . The fourth floor and bell tower are still there , but when I zoom in I’m not sure if the Bell is . As I’ve explained in other posts, even though my name is David Llewellyn Lloyd I am known by both David and Llew because of a nickname ritual that goes back to my public school days . ” Ossie ” McNeely is the best example of this as all the McNeely boys ended up being called Ossie . Dot Smith somehow was ” overlooked ” .

 

historicalnotes

 

 

1872– Carleton Place

Another Bell ~ By far the most pleasant feature in our busy town of Carleton Place is the number of bells, which at stated periods, ring out their various calls. A new one was this week placed in the steeple of Mr. Wm. H. Wylie’s woolen mill by. Mr. Bond, of Carleton Place.

 

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

historicalnotes

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From Joyce MacKenzie

relatedreading

Hawthorne Mill–The Early Years– 1874 -1927

The Revolutions of the Hawthorne Mill

The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

Photo Memories — The Hawthorne Mill

Ring Those Bells in Carleton Place– Wylie’s Woolen Mill

The Dacks and the Mysterious Old Anchor

The Floating Bridge of Carleton Place — Found!

Chimneys and Black Boxes —Leigh Instruments

Remembering Industry in Carleton Place- Digital and Leigh Instruments

Bomb Scare in Carleton Place

Saved By The Bell in Carleton Place? What Does the Photo Say?

 

 

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Things that have disappeared in Carleton Place

What do you Know about the Prince of Wales Cairn?

So About that Ballygiblin Sign…. Fourteen Years Later!

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

 

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