Rosemary McNaughton- Little Red Door Arrives at Bates and Innes

Standard
Rosemary McNaughton- Little Red Door Arrives at Bates and Innes

 

article-2107948-0071459600000258-93_634x434.jpg

The drive to target women began before the Second World War and gathered pace throughout the rest of the 20th century. “Women are paying a deadly price for being targeted by tobacco advertisers in the post-war years, health experts claimed yesterday.”

Women were targeted but, according to the graph on the CRUK website, their smoking prevalence remained fairly constant between 1948 and 1975, whence it began decreasing. Obviously the advertising campaign wasn’t too successful! Yet here we have ASH creating the impression that it was, trying to deceive us that it’s now the “pretty” packaging, covered with health warnings and gory images, that is “appealing”.

 

Image result for cigarette ad 1960s

img.jpg

All photos Ottawa Journal April 20 1960-Carleton Place Bates and Innes Mill

 

In April of 1960 millworkers walked through the doors of good health in Lanark County. Rosemary McNaughton was part of the Canadian Cancer Society’s Little Red Door program. On April 20 the workers at Bates & Innes in Carleton Place shared McNaughton’s films, literature and words of advice.

The registered nurse set up her movie projector in an unused wool- carding room on an uneven floor. She laid out pamphlets in vice president’s Jack Stewart’s office and talked to everyone about what she knew about the truths and the myths of cancer. She visited with workers and even spent and hour with worried staff that had stricken family members.

By closing time the folks that worked at the Bates and Innes mill knew all about the seven signs of cancer. That was 1960, and here it is 2017 and there is still no cure.

 

cncnc

cncnc

 

Jack Stewart and Ms. McNaughton who was on her way to the mills in Appleton and Smiths Falls and District

 

 

ephemera_800

Max Keeping 1942-2015
Advertisements

Plum Hollow Witch and The Mountain Man of Pakenham

Standard
Plum Hollow Witch and The Mountain Man of Pakenham

maxresdefault (2).jpg

 

August 14 1874-Perth Courier

Pakenham Stew

John McCormack, of Pakenham, has gone astray and no tidings of him are forthcoming. Being an old man and partially imbecile, it is fearful he has wandered off into some of the many backward and unfrequented spots surrounding his home in the White Lake Mountains, and lay down to rise no more.

However, it is said on consulting the oracle at Plum Hollow, it was said that he was still alive and about to be restored to his sorrowing wife and family. Those who have faith in her ladyship’s prognostications are hopeful of seeing him again in the flesh, but we must be excused for doubting it on such authority.

 

Found

September 18, 1874-Perth Courier

A man of 74, named John McCormick, was found at 5 o’clock on Monday morning in the mountain region of Pakenham. He had been ailing for some time,  and wandered away from his home. Although an unceasing search bad been kept up with the help of The Witch of Plum Hollow, his remains were not discovered until the 11th, when they were found beside a log, less than half a mile from home, which he had been apparently trying to go across to see an old neighbour. To-day, Wednesday, he was followed to the grave by a large body of his oldest and nearest neighbours, who knew his worth.

As for the Witch of Plum Hollow? You win some and you lose some.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

 

An Interview with the Witch of Plum Hollow–Mother Barnes— The Ottawa Free Press 1891

My Grandmother was Mother Barnes-The Witch of Plum Hollow

A Bewitched Bed in Odessa

The Witch of Plum Hollow – Carleton Place Grandmother

Different Seasons of Witches in Lanark County

Local Miracle Story– Woken From a Ten Week Coma

The White Witch of Lanark County–Having the Sight

 

unnamed (1)

Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

Standard
Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

Unveiling service of historical plaque at St. John's Church, Riverside Heights

Black and white photograph of the unveiling service of an historical plaque at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Riverside Heights, Ontario. The plaque commemorates Reverend Samuel Schwerdtfeger, the first Lutheran pastor in Upper Canada.

 

No automatic alt text available.

 

The Last Years of the Reverend J. Samuel Schwerdtfeger Book given to me by Krista Lee
Most books on the German element and on the Lutheran Church in Maryland mention the name of the Rev. J. Samuel Schwerdtfeger. A native of Burgbernheim, Bavaria, Schwerdtfeger had a difficult childhood.
After six years in the Neustadt orphanage, he entered Erlangen University where he attended some lectures on theology and law but soon began to drift aimlessly. He fell victim to immigrant runners who took him to Holland where he bound himself for passage to America. In the spring of the year 1753 he arrived in Baltimore where the ship captain offered him for sale as a studious theoligist for the amount of his passage. The Lutheran congregation of York, Pennsylvania, being at that time at loggerheads within their old pastor, heard of the bargain and bought Schwerdtfeger as their preacher.

 

 

 

scan0001.jpgHazel and Gladys Schwerdtfeger of Carleton Place with the plaque that was made for their direct ancestor.

 

After five years of service in York, he transferred to New Holland, Pennsylvania. Schwerdtfeger’s temperament was not conducive to a long ministry at one place. In 1763 he assumed the pastorate of the Lutheran Church in Frederick, Maryland. His five years of service there proved beneficial for the organization of that group of Lutherans which
had been without resident pastors for many years.

However, Schwerdtfeger felt the urge to move on. After a trip to Europe, he made again brief appearances in Maryland and Pennsylvania before settling in New York State where he distinguished himself through his pastoral work in Albany and Feilstown. He became one of the founders of the New York Ministerium. American Lutheran sources have claimed that Samuel Schwerdtfeger died at Feilstown, New York in 1788.

 

Screenshot 2017-09-21 at 11.jpg

Photo Philip Allan- Gladys Schwerdfeger in Carleton Place

Recent Canadian research, however, has proved that Schwerdtfeger’s controversial, yet often distinguished career did not end in New York. During the Revolutionary War, the pastor had remained a staunch loyalist. His name appears on a petition sent to the Crown Lands in Quebec in 1780, with those of 150 other citizens, asking that they be allowed to become citizens of Canada. His son, Frederick, who was born in Frederick, Maryland,in 1765, was then already living in Canada.

The elder Schwerdtfeger made several preaching tours among the Palatine United Empire Loyalists. Finally in 1790, the Evangelical Lutheran congregation in Williamsburg
township, Dundas county, Ontario, extended a call to Pastor Schwerdtfeger who accepted without hesitation. For more than a decade he labored among the German settlers along the Canadian side of the Saint Lawrence river. He died in Williamsburg, Ontario, in 1803. The Lutherans of Ontario consider J. Samuel Schwerdtfeger the patriarch of their denomination.

Image may contain: 1 person

Some time before the St. Lawrence Seaway was completed, the ladies of the Lutheran Church discovered that their founding pastor Johann Schwerdfeger was buried in an Anglican churchyard and this did not sit well with them. The women sponsored a drive to have his remains relocated to the Lutheran churchyard. Later when the St. Lawrence Seaway was being flooded, the original church was covered with water! Memorial stones were removed to a new churchyard on higher grounds. In some cases, the remains were also moved, but it is not known if Schwerdfeger’s remains were moved for the second time. It has long been speculated that the body was lost or destroyed Specifically? The Body is under the St. Lawrence Seaway.

 

historicalnotes

 

This is “Tranquila Lodge”,One of two cottages built by Henry Schwerdtfeger at Lake Park. The Schwerdtfegers spent the summers next door in their octagonal cottage, and this building was rented out. It still stands today, painted a bright blue colour!

Image may contain: house and outdoor

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Jun 1945, Mon,  Page 19

 

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Lake Avenue West walking tour was treated to black licorice cigars in honour of Henry Schwerdtfeger, Bridge Street tobacconist. We learned about Henry and other business tycoons as we wandered Lake Avenue on this final summer tour.

Image may contain: 5 people, people smiling, people standing and outdoor

This is “Juanita Lodge”,One of two cottages built by Henry Schwerdtfeger at Lake Park. The Schwerdtfegers spent the summers next door in their octagonal cottage, and this building was rented out.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Image may contain: house, sky and outdoor

 One of three in our collection belonging to Hazel Schwerdtfeger.

Hazel was a Carleton Place native who received her nurse’s registration in June of 1935. She eventually became a public nurse in Almonte. Just one of the many young Carleton Place women who went in to the nursing profession.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

No automatic alt text available.

 

 

Bertha’s daughters Gladys and Hazel Schwerdtfeger’s childhood photos and clothingCarleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

No automatic alt text available.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

A Letter from a Local Student Nurse 1930s

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

Bertha Schwerdtfeger — Mother of the Carleton Place Schwerdtfeger Sisters

Another Episode in Spinsterdom–The Armour Sisters of Perth

 

unnamed (1)

Steam Engines– Clippings About Harold Richardson

Standard
Steam Engines– Clippings About Harold Richardson

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Aug 1977, Fri,  Page 42

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Aug 1977, Fri,  Page 42

 

Linda Temple– John here, Harold and his family were wonderful neighbours when I was growing up. Everyone took things to him to fix. Margaret, his wife, was an historian and geneology researcher. She and her sister Anna Gorman mapped cemeteries in Montague in the 50s and 60s. Harold’s son Ron runs the shop today.

 

img.jpg

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Jul 1970, Tue,  Page 5

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Photos!! Who is With These Steam Engines?

Glory Days of Carleton Place–So What Happened to the Moore Steam Engine?

The Old Steam Engine Tractor on Mullet Street

James Miller Steam Engine Man from Perth

Hissing Steam, Parades and a 1930 Hearse–Pioneer Days Middleville

 

unnamed (1)

Middleville–The Vertical Board House–Another Beaver Medallion

Standard

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Sep 1971, Sat,  Page 30

 

Did you know that Middleville was originally named for its location? It is the central location of Lanark County sitting comfortably on a bluff overlooking the valley and the road to the west that heads on out to Hopetown. The town was settled in the 1820s and was a busy hub offering a tannery, a blacksmith, and of course a cheese factory. What town didn’t have a cheese factory?

Legend goes that shoemakers Thomas McGee and his loyal assistant Peter Turiff travelled through the rural areas taking orders for shoes from those who didn’t frequent towns too often.

In 1860 Archie Affleck built what is called “The Vertical Board” house just past the General Store leading to the schoolhouse which is now called The Middleville Museum. But you knew that right?:) The central hall has hand painted simulated marble and similar to the McTavish home in Beckwith it too has an interior ceiling medallion of a hand painted beaver. This medallion must have been the thing to have in those days.

William Angus, his brother, and two spinster sisters also lived in the home for a number of years until the Rankin family bought it. William Rankin a wagon maker left the property to his son Archie and his daughter Jean. To the left off the entrance hall the room facing the front porch was originally a doctor’s office and then Archie Rankin’s office who was the Township clerk and always at the hub of township affairs.

Donald Sommerville bought the house in 1963 after Jean Rankin’s death and were antique dealers. Know what the Sommervilles are famous for? Check the next blog.

 

About that Beaver medallion

The House on a Beckwith Hill–The McTavish House and Ceiling Medallions

Update to the: The House on a Beckwith Hill–The McTavish House and Ceiling Medallions

The Middleville Chair that Ended up Rocking John F. Kennedy President of the United States

Standard
The Middleville Chair that Ended up Rocking John F. Kennedy President of the United States

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  14 May 1963, Tue,  Page 2

 

 

The health benefits of rocking were introduced to the American public when President John F. Kennedy was prescribed time in a rocking chair by his physician in 1955 to help relieve his chronic back pain. The President found his rocker to be so beneficial that it accompanied him on Air Force One and around the world. Kennedy also bought rockers for Camp David and the family estate, and was even known to give the chairs as gifts to friends and heads of state.

 

Screenshot 2017-09-20 at 14.jpg

 

b99147285z.1_20131121171713_000_gel3ia9n.1-1.jpg

Stock photo– not the Middleville chair.

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Sep 1971, Sat,  Page 30

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Jun 1979, Sat,  Page 23

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

Why I will Never Write a Book like The Death of a President

The Whiskey Keg Chair of Lanark County

 

unnamed (1)

Memories of the Golden Eagle Gas Station

Standard
Memories of the Golden Eagle Gas Station

 

 

 

15171118_10154435012611886_8511079377651401851_n.jpg

James R. McIsaac with the hair and sunglasses…Barker Ambulance–Carleton Place Canadian files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum 70s

 

I never thought of closure for this building until they tore it down this week and I knew I had to document it. It was the last place you could pull up to the gas pumps and have someone fill your gas tank. Once upon a time, according to Lloyd Hughes, it was Mrs. Munroe’s grocery store. Remember when you used to put $.50 of gas in your car and cruise town at $.24.5 cents a gallon? It used to be the cheapest place to get gas, and handy being right in the centre of town back then.

 

Image result for golden eagle carleton place

15578884_10154499109756886_2866388883604145473_n.jpg

1970s– The late Stuart “Stewie” White of Campbell Street.. Photos–Carleton Place Canadian files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum 70s

 

21687441_2001158573464217_1524554474218480631_n.jpg

The property at 19 Moore St. in Carleton Place, the former Mr. Gas, was levelled on Tuesday, Sept. 19, making way for the construction of a microbrewery and brew pub. The pub’s patio will neighbour Carleton Place’s section of the proposed Ottawa Valley Recreation Trail.
Tara Gesner/Metroland Photo and Text–Carleton Place-Almonte Canadian Gazette

 

comments

Bryan Reingold It was nice to go there and have someone check your oil or fill up your windshield fluid reservoir. The last full service station I remember here. I had forgotten I had read they were tearing it down and somewhat shocked today when I went by and saw it gone.

Bill Brown I worked there for a time back in the day – full service jump to the pump!!

 

Caroline Anderson Loved the guy who first started the Mr. Gas there, and he had the one on the highway at Appleton Side road. I remember when I first had my own car I always went to either of his stations because he always took good care of me and my car. Those were the days when gas was 35 cents a litre.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

across (1).jpg

Esso? Downtown Bridge Street Carleton Place

Filler Up! Got a Flat!! Photos of Gas Stations

The Central Garage in Carleton Place by Terry Skillen

The Garages of Carleton Place –1970’s

Looking for Memories of Harold Linton’s Gas Station

Take Me to Your Litre — The Anti-Metric Gas Station

Esso? Downtown Bridge Street Carleton Place

The White Rose Service Station in Carleton Place

Dollars Worth of Gas in Carleton Place

Before the Canadian Tire Gas Bar There Was..

%d bloggers like this: