Not Hogwarth’s —- It’s Hoggards of Ottawa! Besserer Street History

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Not Hogwarth’s —- It’s  Hoggards of Ottawa! Besserer Street History

bottles!!

lindaseccaspina

Bottle from Adin Wesley Daigle

George Hoggard manufactured carbonated water called deep rock Lithia water, and also produced ginger ale and cream soda. Instead of having a cork for a stopper, it had inside its neck a glass ball much like a marble. Pressure of the liquid forced the ball up into the mouth of the bottle, where it acted like a stopper. His brother William patented it in the late 1800s/

patent list for Wiliam Hoggard Ottawa for his stopper invention

So what was Lithia water? It’s defined as a type ofmineral watercharacterised by the presence oflithiumsalts(aslithium carbonateorlithium chloride). Natural lithia mineral spring waters are rare, and there are few commercially bottled lithia water products.

Between the 1880s and World War I, the consumption of bottled lithia mineral water was popular and during this era, there was such a demand for lithia water that there was a proliferation…

View original post 617 more words

Anyone Know About This? Via Dolorosa

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Anyone Know About This? Via Dolorosa

Thank you for not trespassing.

If you read some of Daniel Keating’s rules on Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley

Trespassing is not considered appropriate. It is understood that if we are alerted by a property owner about an area that is owned by them that we will remove your post.We must keep the integrity of the location intact for those that wish to view later.7. Absolutely no vandalism or theft from properties is condoned. Please keep these beautifully abandoned properties in their slowly decaying state.

Linda,

You don’t know me but I follow your posts in the various groups. I live in Beckwith Township and often take rides around the neighborhood. On one such ride I saw this on the side of the road on an old fence. It is located on the Brunton Side Rd. further along where the Beckwith /Montague border is. There is a farm opposite side with a large wooden gateway with a skull and some other stuff (also cool Lol)

Just wondering if you could shed some light on the significance of it relating to the area it is located. I took the photo of the Cross several yrs ago and a friend of mine recently jumped the fence and took the second photo. He did not want to venture any further inside the property as he was alone and probably trespassing. We know it’s religious significance just curious who owns the site etc etc. Any help solving this mystery would be much appreciated. Thanks.

Can anyone help?

The Via Dolorosa (Latin for “Sorrowful Way”, often translated “Way of Suffering”; Hebrew: ויה דולורוזה; Arabic: طريق الآلام‎) is a processional route in the Old City of Jerusalem. It represents the path that Jesus would have taken, forced by the Roman soldiers, on the way to his crucifixion. The winding route from the former Antonia Fortress to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre — a distance of about 600 metres (2,000 feet)— is a celebrated place of Christian pilgrimage. The current route has been established since the 18th century, replacing various earlier versions. It is today marked by nine Stations of the Cross; there have been fourteen stations since the late 15th century, with the remaining five stations being inside the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Wikipedia click here

I assume this is a nature walk for the stations of the cross.. I hope someone knows something about it.But please respect it and keep it safe.

Linda

Have you Ever Seen the Praying Station? The Buchanan Scrapbooks

The Mysterious 5th Line ?????

The Spirit of the 7th Line

Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

The Gnarled Beckwith Oak

So Where is that Gnarled Oak in Beckwith?

Lock Up Your Dogs — Devlin’s Cat Has Rabies 1929

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Lock Up Your Dogs — Devlin’s Cat Has Rabies 1929

November 1929

During the past week says the Carleton Place Herald, a cat belonging to Mr. W. Devlin scratched a couple of the children, a very unusual thing with the pet animal. A day or two later the cat again showed ill-will to the family by biting Mrs. Devlin on the hand. The scratches on the children healed naturally but the bite became alarming and a physician was called.

The history was to prove that the cat had been bitten by a dog some5 days previous. The cat was destroyed and the animal sent to Ottawa for examination when it was found to be a pronounced case of rabies. Those affected are progressing favorably and no serious results are expected. In the meantime the authorities have taken all precautionary measures to stamp out the trouble, and all dogs are ordered to be tied up in the meantime.

In 1911, Philadelphia drug company H. K. Mulford announced a new rabies treatment kit that could be shipped directly to doctors and was simple enough that “physicians who have had no previous experience may successfully apply it.” The kit is a reminder that even the best medicine is of no consequence if it is not available and affordable.

The treatment consisted of 25 injections of rabies vaccine: three on the first day, two on the second, two on the third, and one each day after for 18 days. Each dose was slightly stronger, or more virulent, than the preceding, so that the body could build up immunity. Because the vaccine had to be “fresh” to be effective it could not be stocked by druggists. Subsequent daily doses were shipped directly from Philadelphia in a special Caloris vacuum bottle (not unlike your coffee thermos).

Today the post-exposure treatment for rabies consists of four doses of vaccine given over a two-week period. The injections are usually given in the upper arm.

The museum’s rabies vaccine kit, from the early 1920s, contains the following: three ampules of rabies vaccine, doses one, two, and three; 26 syringes with physiological salt solution; 26 needles for the syringes; two metal piston rods and two metal finger rests for the syringes; one two-dram vial of tincture of iodine; two charts for recording cases; one letter of general instructions; two stamped return envelopes; one record-of-treatment blank; and one vial of sterile wires. The treatment at this time had been reduced to only 21 doses to be administered one a day for 21 days, and the Caloris vacuum bottle was replaced with a cardboard mailing tube.

1881 Census before he was married and he worked at a sawmill. His father’s name was Charles so he went by William

DetailSource

Name:Chas W Devlin
Gender:Male
Marital Status:Single
Age:23
Birth Year:abt 1868
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1891
Residence Place:Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Relation to Head:Son
Religion:e c
Occupation:Saw Mill Hand
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
French Canadian:No
Father’s Name:James Devlin
Father’s Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Name:Eliza J Devlin
Mother’s Birth Place:Ontario
Division Number:

1911 Census William worked at Findlay’s

Name:Chas W Devlin
Gender:Male
Race:White
Racial or Tribal Origin:English
Nationality:Canadian
Marital status:Married
Age:33
Birth Date:5 Jan 1868
Birth Place:Ontario
Relation to Head of House:Head
Religion:Church of England
Occupation:Foundry Laborer
Hourly Wage:400
Working at Trade in Factory or in Home:F
Months Employed at Trade in Factory:10
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
Can Speak English:Yes
Province:Ontario
District:Lanark (South/Sud)
District Number:81
Sub-District:Carleton Place (Town/Ville)
Sub-District Number:2
Family Number:49
Neighbors:View others on page
Household Members:NameAgeCharles Devlin33Florence Devlin32Verna W Devlin6Lloyd E. Devlin4

Save

Related reading

Eva L. Devlin Pilot Crashed at Perth Fair

The Devlins and Weldon Armour– Ray Paquette

Dishing up the Memories of The Devlins

What was Puking Fever? Child Bed Fever?  

Sadler Farm Part 2 Jaan Kolk Nancy Anderson and Lorraine Nephin

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I’m not quite finished annotation, but here is that aerial photo (finally).
These are the same image, one the way it came, and the second with annotations. The RCAF took the photo in 1966, shortly after we left the farm for the first time. Our second tenancy began in January of 1970 and ended in the summer of 1974.
Let me know if you have any questions.
Nancy Anderson

Photos from Lorraine Nephin-Sadler farm- kitchen ,living room, Lamp from kitchen. beaded by hand by my grandmother

Photos from Lorraine Nephin-Sadler farm- kitchen ,living room, Lamp from kitchen. beaded by hand by my grandmotherThe lamp was given to my dad. He had it in his new house. It now hangs in my kitchen.

From Historian Jaan Kolk

Unfortunately, the Belden atlas did not list any land owners for that area; however, the 1863 Walling map does have some names. If I have the location right, it looks like it was lot 16, Conc. X, marked as “O. Cambly” (not perfectly clear), beside P. Lynch and and J. Brushnaham in Conc. XI. Here’s a crop from that map. Does that look the right location to you?

Concession 10, lot 16 was the Sadler farm in 1916. J.E. Symington owned Conc. 11, lot 16. Here’s what I found in directories I have covering Ramsay Township: 1884 Fuller directory 10 16 (not found) 11 16 Patrick Lynch 1885 Farmers directory, 1886 Farmers 10 16 John Menzies, J B Menzies 11 16 Patrick Lynch 1904 Farmers directory 10 16 John Kelly and W G F Kelly 11 16 J K Darling, I A Nontell 1916 Vernon directory 10 16 Fred Sadler 11 16 J.E. Symington.

I found newspaper mention of a Fred Sadler of Almonte in 1900; however, the 1904 directory shows him in lot conc. 9, lot 13. Fred must have moved sometime between 1904 and 1916. I found no mention of a Joe Sadler; there was a Thomas Sadler in Appleton, and other Sadlers in other townships. Nancy Anderson mentioned the Sadler farm was 100 acres, and that fits conc. 10, lot 16 as well. The full lots were surveyed 200 acres originally, but as you can see, half of that lot had become part of the town by 1863.

From Howard Morton Brown CLICK

The first bold venture of Scottish settlers of Ramsay upon little-known local waterways was made in 1821 down the Clyde and Mississippi rivers from Lanark village to the falls at the site of Almonte. The boats, made of boards sawn at Lanark, proved fit to survive the rocks of the numerous rapids and the difficult portages of the excursion. The water borne explorers appear to have included Walter Black, James and Thomas Craig, John Downie, James Hart, Arthur Lang, John Lockhart, William Moir, John Neilson, William Paul, John Smith, John Steele, John Toshack and others. It seems that those undertaking boat building at Lanark probably also brought their families to Ramsay in the expedition by lake and river.

As recalled by Arthur Lang’s eldest son, William Lang (1811-1902), their craft were “rough boats build by the men. A good many portages had to be made and it took some days to complete the trip. When coming down Mississippi Lake they stopped at an island, and while preparing a meal a big Indian hove into sight. Fear filled every heart. The late John Steele was equal to the occasion. He seized a huge loaf of bread and presented it to the Indian as an evidence of their friendly intentions. The peace offering was not accepted and the Indian passed by on his way to his camp on another part of the island, paying no attention to them. A night was spent on the north shore of the river above the falls at Carleton Place, beds being spread on the ground.” At the present location of the Almonte town hall shelters were made in wigwam style for use as a headquarters until all had completed the building of cabins on their lands.

Five years earlier the native Indians had been in undisputed possession of the whole region of the unknown Mississippi. The Indians of the Mississippi area are seen in a description of them by the Rev. William Bell, recorded within two months of his 1817 arrival at Perth : “In the afternoon two families of Indians in three canoes came down the river and pitched their tent upon the island in the middle of the village. They were the first I had seen since I came to the place. They had deer, muskrats and various kinds of fowls which they exposed for sale. The deer was small but they sold it at a dollar a quarter – the head with the horns at the same price.

Their canoes were all of birch bark about eighteen feet long and three feet wide at the middle. They had in each canoe a capital fowling-piece and several spring traps for taking game and all the men were armed with the tomahawk. They had all black hair, brown complexions and active well-formed bodies. All of them even the children had silver ornaments in their ears.”

(Five days later:)

“While we were at breakfast the whole band of Indians with their baggage passed our house on their way to the Mississippi River ten miles distant. Each of the men carried a canoe on his head. The squaws were loaded with blankets, skins, kettles, tents etc., like as many asses.” Over the five year period before the pioneers of Ramsay had arrived settlers had located at points along the Mississippi from Morphys Falls and Mississippi Lake up to Dalhousie Lake. Sections still occupied by Indians included those at Mississippi Lake where as then noted by the Rev. William Bell, “some of the islands in the lake are still inhabited by Indians, whose hunting grounds are on the north side and who are far being pleased with the encroachments our settlers are making on their territories.”

Looking for Information on the Native Fort Farm of Fred Sadler of Almonte

The Sadler Farm on Highway 44– Nancy Anderson

Did We Find Henry Lang’s Barn?

Related Reading

The Little Door by the River

The Natives of Carleton Place — Violins and Deer

Constable Frank Rose – Moonshine, Indians, Raids, Drunks and Dances –The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Captured by Natives Alice Garland

Beckwith Child Stolen by Natives

Living with the Natives — Mrs Copithorne’s Bread

What Do You Know About Walpole Island?

Walking Without Knowing the Amplifying Truth

Kamloops Industrial School– “A New Idea in Residential Schools” After the Fire 1925

Another Segment in the Short Life of Jessie Comrie– Residential Schools –1919

1906 INDUSTRIAL AND PICTURESQUE OTTAWA CANADA – PHOTOS— Simpson Book Collection

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1906 INDUSTRIAL AND PICTURESQUE OTTAWA CANADA – PHOTOS— Simpson Book Collection

From the Simpson Book Collection-Ed and Shirley’s Simpson –Historic Books — the List

There is no date however based on some of the content it appears to have been published sometime between 1905 – 1910.
It measures approximately 6 1/2″ x 11″ with 64 pages
It was published by THE CITY OF OTTAWA PUBLICITY DEPARTMENT
Information and Photographs include:

  • Panoramic view of Parliament Hill and Rideau Locks
  • Post Office 
  • Scenes of Government Driveway
  • Ottawa Palatial Houses
  • Monuments
  • His Excellency, Earl Grey
  • Ottawa University
  • Churches
  • Byrson, Graham
  • Gilmour & Hughson Mill
  • International Portland Cement Co
  • Packing Houses of the George Matthews Co. Ltd
  • Martin-Orme Piano Co
  • Britannia Was Canoe Crew, Champion of Canada
  • Hotel and Victoria 
  • and much more

ADVERTISEMENTS include:

  • The Bank of Ottawa
  • Ottawa Business College
  • The Willis Business College 
  • Canadian Pacific Railway
  • Ottawa Machinery
  • Ottawa Ladies College
  • Bank of Montreal
  • Richelieu and Ontario Navigation Company
  • John M. Garland , Son & Co
  • The Russell House Hotel
  • Ottawa Electric Railway
  • Pittaway’s Photo Studio
  • Hull Electric Railway
  • The Ottawa Stair Works 
  • and many more
E.B. Eddy’s– still running today-Jim Sharp

Simpson Book Collection

Bustling About Burritt’s Rapids– Public School Photos

Remember Lover’s Lane? Lover’s Walk? Les Chats Sauvage? Simpson Books

You Have to Open Up a Business Here!!! 1912 Ottawa Marketing — Simpson Books

The Oldest Building on Ottawa and Opeongo Line

Down on Main Street– 1911-Photos- For the Discriminating and the Particular — Simpson Books

The General Hospital 1867-1929 Photos — Simpson Books

Clippings of the Old Albion Hotel

Renfrew Fair 1953-1953-Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

Did You Know? Union School #9 and Goulburn #16

When One Boat Filled the Rideau Lock–Rideau King

Women’s Institute Burritts Rapids 1902-1988

I was Part of the French Revolution and I Forgot

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I was Part of the French Revolution and I Forgot

 
Tensions were high here in the nation’s capital — and across Canada.

On October 16, 1970 — 51 years ago today — the Canadian government, under Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, invoked the War Measures Act following the kidnappings of British diplomat James Cross and Quebec MLA Pierre Laporte.

The Ottawa Citizen’s Bruce Deachman took a look back at the FLQ cris
is:

https://ottawacitizen.com/…/citizen175-october-crisis…

Photo: Peter Bregg, Canadian Press

Ben Weiss shared a post.–Old Ottawa And Bytown Pics

I try to lay low on weekends, but once again Ben Weiss’s posting made me think of that era– so here is a piece I wrote years ago and seldom share.

I was Part of the French Revolution and I Forgot Linda Knight Seccaspina

Last year I wrote a blog on French Canada, and it seemed to rip open a box of memories that had been filed away in my mind for many years. I had actually lived through an important part of Canadian history and forgot all about it.

When Pierre Elliot Trudeau became Prime Minister in April of 1968 it changed Canadian history. The night he won I was at the Cowansville, Quebec Hotel with my friends and my father, who was a campaign manager for Jean Jacques Bertrand.

My French Canadian friends ran in and grabbed my arm for a night of celebrating. The feelings in the air were the same as when Barack Obama won in a 99% African-American neighborhood forty years later. My friends were thrilled that hopefully help was on the way for French Canadians.

My best friend kept teasing me, asking me if I was angry that a French Canadian man had won the election. Being Sally Sunshine all my life, I never take sides. Life should be about people working together, and not against each other. But, I was thrilled he had won, as I really liked him and hoped there would be no more taking sides. Even my stepmother and father were taking sides as she loved Trudeau also, and the conversation had gotten so unpleasant in my home that she had taped a giant poster of Pierre Trudeau to the living room wall. Sadly at one point, the people of French and English Quebec did take sides, and a revolution was born. Out of this unrest came the notorious FLQ (Quebec Liberation Front).

There were bombings, and declarations from them that called for a socialist uprising against those considered Anglo-Saxon imperialist oppressors. Yes, it felt just like the ‘play wars’ we always had in the lumber yard with my French friends as children, only on a bigger scale, and very real. They called for the overthrow of the Quebec government and the independence of Quebec from Canada.

At age 16, I started dating a French Canadian boy whom I will call Yves. His father had completely radical opinions about the English and did not mince words when his son brought home an English girl. It turned out that he had known my grandfather, and considered him one of the Anglo-Saxon imperialists, as he had money and what he considered “British airs”.

My father was equally concerned.  Not that Yves might have some radical tendencies, but the fact that his hair looked a little long. This was typical of my father. Never worry about the important stuff, just make sure he cuts his hair. It certainly would be a travesty if people talked about it. It was all around town anyways that Arthur Knight had trouble with his oldest daughter.

He also did not like the fact that his daughter was not dating a nice Anglican boy, and he told me to “kiss him goodbye”. In Quebec, the age of consent to marry was 21 and he would not allow me to marry Yves until I reached that age. Maybe he had the right idea as the marriage only lasted a year and a half, but I knew the only reason was because he had long hair and worked at Vilas in Cowansville. Not good enough for his daughter.

On October 15, 1970, more than 3,000 students attended a protest rally in favor of the FLQ. The FLQ then kidnapped James Cross, the British High Trade Commissioner, and when their demands were not met they kidnapped the Minister of Labour and Vice Premier of Quebec, Pierre Laporte.

When a CBC reporter asked Prime Minister Trudeau how far he was going to go to stop the FLQ he said,

“Just watch me!”

On October 16th, at 8 am I stepped out of my apartment building on Pine Ave. in Montreal what I saw was unbelievable. Prime Minister Trudeau had invoked the War Measures Act at 4 am, and military forces lined my street like there was a war going on. That’s when all hell broke loose.

The next day, October 17th, 1970, Pierre Laporte was found dead in the trunk of a car, strangled to death.

Living in Montreal during the time of the War Measures act was like living in a war zone. Soldiers halted anyone they felt was suspicious, and I was even stopped at the Greyhound Bus Terminal and asked for my passport. All they said was that I looked like someone who was on a list.

Of course I have been on lists all my life. For years, I was considered a threat to the Canadian population because of “those” Viet Nam War protests and I sold subversive literature in my store. Subversive literature would be the alternative music and radical fashion magazines that I sold in my store Flash Cadilac in the 70’s and 80’s. Thankfully, things have changed.

In the end of all this chaos: 453 people were rounded up, and some were given asylum in Cuba. The five flown to Cuba were jailed when they returned to Canada years later. Yves and I split up, and I have not seen him in 47 years. Most of my generation moved out of Quebec and went to Ontario after they graduated. They sadly left because of too many rules and regulations about language and cultural issues. I often wonder what could have been, I really do. I will always miss ‘Ma Belle Province’ –language issues or not.

.

Troops march in the streets of Montreal Oct. 20, 1970. Bob Olsen Toronto Star-

Dedicated to my Weekend Protesting Hippie Generation — Nothing Changes Does it?

Friday Nights with Brian Murphy

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Friday Nights with Brian Murphy
Photo by Jim Roy

Every second or third Friday night for a number of years CHEZ-FM DJ Brian Murphy could be found in my store Flash Cadilac talking to me for hours. I will never understand how we became friends, as we were different as night and day. But there he was sitting on a stool next to my cash register, and we always had hours to chat about stuff. Both of us had a love of music, but no one knew more about music than Murph. I loved to tease him about his love affair with Dire Straits, and he would in turn constantly mention my extremely bad taste in music. But sometimes he would admit that some pop music wasn’t all that bad. I wonder what he would have thought of BTS. Murph, I’m going to ask you that when I hopefully got up into rock and roll heaven, unless Hell is Gothic, and well, you know, I might enjoy that.

Brian was never there to shop, and seldom took interest in my customers (even the sexy ones) unless they mentioned music. I always had a Diet Coke or two for him, as he got thirsty discussing life, and sometimes he overwhelmed me with his knowledge. You could never have a 15 minute conversation with the music genius–his musical thoughts came in volumes. He would talk endlessly about his record collection in his basement which was floor to ceiling, as well as covering the stairways and hallways. Brian, you would be happy to know (in later life) I married one of “your tribe” who had 7000 records to get rid of in Berkeley, California to move here to Canada. I know you would have told him what was more important in life LOL.

After Brian was let go amid the big CHEZ-FM shuffle I wondered what he was up to when I no longer saw him anymore. When I read his obituary I was devastated and angry at myself for not reaching out to him and hoped to God his frog collection would be taken care of. He will always be the Sultan of Swing to me and so much more.

There isn’t a day that goes by that I wonder what Brian would have to say about a particular genre of music I’m playing. When he died CHEZ-FM posted the following on their website:

“Heaven has just welcomed its new music director.”

If tears could build a stairway, 

And memories a lane.

I would walk right up to Heaven

And bring you back again.

The Brian Murphy Fund
*Application and donation links found below*
A Sub Fund of the Education Foundation of Ottawa and An Endowment Fund within the Community Foundation of Ottawa
This award is in memory of Brian Murphy, host of CHEZ 106 “The Source” “Blues 106,” “Jazz 106” and other programs. He was known as one of Ottawa’s most original people. Brian will be remembered for his encyclopedic knowledge of musi

Please leave comments so I can them all here for permanent doucmentation… thanks

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 May 1991, Sat  •  Page 51

This is Artcetera, speaking from the home of Brian Murphy, host of CHEZ’S The Source, Blues 106 and Jazz 106 programs on Sunday nights. The shows reflect Murphy’s eclectic tastes in music, a subject for which he is wildly enthusiastic. He’s also a champion talker. Let’s listen in.) Now I’m going to get myself in real serious trouble with what one friend calls the jazz ayatol-lahs, and another friend calls the jazz weasels. Because really what jazz is, even though it has become in a sense an art form ta-dah ta-dah, is pop music. MOZART WROTE POP MUSIC, or adapted pop music. And nothing makes me angrier than the jazz ayatollahs or the jazz weasels, or the BLUES ayatollas or the BLUES weasels, people who are so structured in their musical taste.

. . . I’ve always gotten from certain people in the Ottawa jazz scene the ayatollahs, the weasels the feeling that they really can’t take me seriously when it comes to jazz. Why? Because I like rock and roll. (It’s me again. We’re talking to Murphy because May 24 is his 50th birthday, and CHEZ is dedicating the day to his music, and also holding a birthday party for him at the Penguin. The radio station is broadcasting from his house that day, and they’ve asked him to pick 125 to 150 rock songs, and they will make up the playlist for the station that day.) I just took a page for every letter and as songs came into my mind I started going through them … So you got a list that starts A’s: Allman Brothers, Ramblin Man and Animals, House of the Rising Sun. B’s: The Band, The Weight, The Beach Boys, Good Vibrations, here’s a tough one, Beatles, I’ve got two, Am The Walrus and In My Life. And I’ve got Bonzo Dog in here, which will probably come out, and this particular song means a lot to me: Urban Spaceman . . . (Music magazines spill on the floors of Brian Murphy’s house.

There’s barely room on the kitchen table for the breakfast he eats at 4 p.m. he doesn’t go to sleep until 8 or 9 a.m. He collects things in the shape of frogs, and frogs spill along the shelves of his living room in ceramic and plastic and wood. A frog quilt spills off his bed. CDs spill out on top of the thou sands of albums kept in the boxes in his basement. Books spill on his desk. Words spill out of Brian Murphy.) First of all, above all, I’m an entertainer. I’ve got to make people feel good. That doesn’t mean that occasionally I can’t stop and make them think about something or make them angry about something that makes me angry. But at the same time as I’m entertaining, I’m kind of teaching. I’m taking all of this lore, all of this knowledge, all of this listening, and sifting them through this particular body and mind, and what comes out is some kind of synthesis of all this stuff. (May 24 is also the 50th birthday of Bob Dylan.

Above Murphy’s basement sanctuary, where he goes to turn on a record and read some science fiction and think about the connections that run through music, above that sanctuary is a sign: ‘The Most Famous Album Never Released: Bob Dylan & The Band The Basement Tapes.’ Basement. Tapes. Connections.) Dylan was the wordsmith. Dylan was the man, the person who opened the words up for everybody. In a sense, Bob Dylan made poetry acceptable to the masses. What a horrible way to have to put it. (Murphy rocks from leg to leg, from subject to subject. He loves music of all kinds, he hates people who put it into pigeonholes, he wants people to understand . . . There are only kinds of music another line I’m going to steal and it’s been attributed to Kurt Weill and it’s also been attributed to Igor Stavinsky there are two kinds of music, good music and bad music.

Take your pick. . to understand something called Sturgeon’s Law, a law that says that 90 per cent of everything is trash. Mur phy’s Corollary puts Brian Murphy that at 95 per cent. So you shouldn’t be surprised … – -J Pop music is banal and all of those things, but! lot of it more than you realize is great music. It can move you. “I’d be surprised if a lot of pop music is bad- ‘ A lot of everything is bad. But when it’s good; -” we just ask Brian Murphy.) . Part of what I try to do is I go through life trying to find these perfect records. To me the ultimate compliment about a piece of music, no matter what its genre, is it makes you feel good to be alive.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada18 May 1991, Sat  •  Page 51

Missing Berkeley Series – Larry Thrasher

Clippings of –The Naughty Boys –The Eastern Passage -60s Music

The Canadian Beatles aka The Beavers- Mike Duffy was their Road Manager –Bands of the 60s

Saturday Date with “Thee Deuce” in Almonte

Dance Hall Days with The Coachmen
The Coachmen Return!!! Born to be Wild Circa 1985

The Day I Tried to Long Tall Sally Paul McCartney

Kindle Fire Minutes of “Dancin the Feelin“ with James Brown

Music in the 60s- Memories of Herman’s Hermits

Back to The Future — Twisting Your Dignity Away

An Update to the Kennedy House — Harold “Ozzie” McNeely

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An Update to the Kennedy House — Harold “Ozzie” McNeely

The former Kennedy House on High Street

As you know Thomas Quinn of Ferguson’s Falls led the four teams required to move this house down the frozen Mississippi River and Lake to its present site. Tragically there was a devasting fire that consumed a lot of this house in August of 2021. It is said at present that it is a complete tear down.

Firefighters with Ocean Wave Fire Company and the Mississippi Mills and Beckwith fire departments battled a fire that destroyed a home on High Street in Carleton Place Aug. 22. The home sustained over $500,000 in damage due to the fire, which originated in the basement.–READ HERE

Today I talked to Harold “Ozzie” McNeely and he told me when he was growing up the move of this house was always in conversation. They used to go up to Ferguson Falls for business (live stock) and he remembers being shown as a child where the house once existed in that village. One of his teachers in High School was a Kennedy who owned the house as they too often spoke about this house. Ozzie said the house that was moved was very small and unlike the size it was at present. The home had an addition built on to the main small house in later years.

He said it took awhile, about a week, to move down the ice with teams of horses and the house’s port of entry to Carleton Place and High Street was Nichol’s wharf which is now Centennial Park. From there teams of horses and sleighs pulled the house to its present location through the snow.

I would like to correct some misinformation regarding the Kennedy house. My Dad, Douglas Kennedy , did teach at CPHS until 1955 when he went to Lisgar Collegiate in Ottawa to teach.
There had not been any previous Kennedys in the house as he bought it from a Miss Campbell in the early 50’s.
My siblings and l grew up in that house and were saddened to hear of the fire and the possible demise of our childhood home.
Evelyn Kennedy Julian

Corrected thanks Evelyn!

Nichol’s Wharf-Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum — read-Before and After at Centennial Park

Thanks Ozzie, and he also told me there used to me a small tunnel under the RBC bank was and where the safe was. Also, the Queen’s Hotel had/ has two basements and there was one tunnel to bring the beer out to the back parking lot.

The rollers that moved the house-Findlay recorded the event of his findings and this actual document is at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

INTERESTING HISTORY

To read the stories click:

The Name of the Man that Moved the Kennedy House

The House that Skated to Carleton Place — Kennedy House

Back in 2015, Carleton Place Coun. Linda Seccaspina profiled the unique story behind the home on her blog.

Known as the Kennedy House, at the corner of Flora and High streets, the home wasn’t actually built in Carleton Place. It was moved down the frozen Mississippi River from Innisville to Carleton Place during winter around 1900 by a large group of horses and men.

“Thomas Quinn of Ferguson’s Falls led the four teams required to move this house down the frozen Mississippi River and lake to its present site,” she stated in her blog post.

Carleton Place was the home’s third location. It was originally built in 1845 on land in Ferguson’s Falls–.READ HERE

Putting Together Pieces About Historical Homes– John Moore’s House –Napoleon Street

The Derry Farm of Angus McDiarmid

The House on the Cliff and the Old Bridge

The Pakenham House—- Thomas Lowe House

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

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Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

Last week I wrote about Minnie Dunlop who used to run Darou’s Bakery on the corner of Emily and Bridge Street in Carleton Place. If you had no idea like I and some of the family did: Minnie not only baked her heart out, and ran that part of town like she was in charge, but she was also married to a former mayor from Carleton Place, Andrew Earl Dunlop.

Today, one of the family, Doug Caldwell called me and we had a lovely chat about the town of Carleton Place. He remembers the pool hall really wasn’t the place and Minnie often hauled her son Murray home by the ear after rescuing them from the evils of pool-playing. Oh the horrors! She was a no nonsense woman who believed in the theory that sliced bread was here to stay and purchased one of the first bread sliceing machines to stay ahead of the competition. Doug remembers her telling him to grab a stool and show Carleton Place how its done slicing the bread. He said he was pretty proud doing that job.

Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum- read-In Memory of Mike Moldowan — The Man Behind the Fries

But Doug not only helped Murray, he helped Mike Muldowan at the chip wagon and when he got there early in the morning Mike would give him a large pail of potatoes to peel. I asked him if he ate his weight in chips for payment. He said, “You know I would have, but I remember getting silver coins, Mike never paid in paper!”

His mother Edna Florence Caldwell, was a hairdresser on Bridge Street and his grandmother, Mrs. Jamieson played the organ at St. James Anglican Church, and his two aunts sang in the choir. He also remembers the horse stables in the back of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church. The farmers came to church with their teams and sleighs and it was quite the sight as they parked. When they left they had to unharness everything and regroup, and mumbled and grumbled. But that was not the only place they mumbled in grumbled at St. Andrew’s. In the days that Captain Hooper’s house Raloo Cottage was going to be torn down the citizens of Carleton Place were not happy. Not happy at all! So I asked him,”Did they protest?” He said they protested the way they always did– complaining in front of the churches on Sunday!”

Photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–Around 1950 the southeast corner of Lake Avenue and Moore Streets looked like this. Originally the site of W.A. Nichols’ Sons Lumber, it became W & S Building Supplies around 1948

He also remembers every year the gypsies–(2021 word Romani) and would set up shop on the corner of Lake and Beckwith near where Nichols Planing Mill was. He said it was quite the event as in those days the stream behind it was quite larger than it is today.

So they mumbled and grumbled about the Levine building across the street, and they muttered about the new Fleming Funeral Parlour opening up on Lake Ave West. Because, that’s the way things were done. His grandfather, Will Jaimeson was a CPR railroad man and he did the Ottawa Brockville run which was a very prestigious run in those days.

Doug remembers being put on top of one of the L carts and having his Grandfather perform a steam show so to speak. His grandfather would holler to start shovelling the coal really fast and once the steam would get up to speed it was a sight to see. So he ran the smaller wheels and then the bigger wheels to show his grandson how much power that Locomotive had. Meanwhile the coal man wasn’t too happy and he would tell young Doug that his grandfather was showing off just because he showed up.

In the end everyone moved away after the war so the family could seek better fortunes, and on October 30th, 2021, the families are all reuniting once again at the Gastro Pub in Carleton Place for a salute to the “Jamieson Daughters”. It’s time for the family to reunite, celebrate and time for the younger generations to know their history. Family reunions are the place where you remember where you came from.

Thanks Doug for the stories!

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

The Almonte Gazette in Manitoba

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How the Almonte Gazette was for many years the only link between certain pioneer settlers of Manitoba and the outside- world, is told by Mr. James McKelvey, who with his wife has been visiting relatives in this district before leaving on a trip to the old land.

Mr. McKelvey tells how the Gazette was the only newspaper which came into their district in these early days. His father was a faithful subscriber and a warm friend of the late Hon. W William Templeman. When the McKelvey family had faithfully perused the contents of the Gazette’s weekly budget of news it was passed on to the nearest neighbor. 

A stream flowed between the two farms, and the neighbour was always on the alert for the first sign that the Gazette had fulfilled its mission on the McKelvey homestead. The creek could not always be forded and there was no boat so the McKelveys used to wrap the newspaper around a stone and fling it across the stream. Neighbor after neighbor read it for miles around and at the end it was so worn that the print was scarcely decipherable. 

‘The district correspondence which appealed to the McKelvey family most was the Middleville news written over half a century ago, as it is now, by Mr. Archie Rankin. It was a strong link which bound them to their old home. Mr. McKelvey  spoke affectionately of the message of cheer and friendship which the Gazette brought, to those people who in earlier days had gone forth to make a home for themselves in the wilderness. 

It is doing the same today, in far places and every little scrap of news about the old home and the old friends and the old associations is eagerly read. Mr. McKelvey is a cousin of Mr. Robert Stead, the novelist, and on his visit here he was accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Stead.

November 1930

Related reading

OFF TO MANITOBA 1879– Local Lads Names

When Crops Failed — Lanark County Went Manitoba Dreamin’