Tag Archives: business

Carleton Place in 1907–Town Likely to Boom Once More

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Carleton Place in 1907–Town Likely to Boom Once More

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Building the Dam in Carleton Place, 1907

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Canada’s Sprint Canoe Clubs–photograph Carleton Place C.C.

 

Great War Canoe Crews

A cheering crowd, a civic reception and a torchlight procession welcomed the Carleton Place paddlers two years later on their return from Montreal.  Competing successfully against larger clubs in the annual Canadian Canoe Association meet, they had won first positions in three events including the coveted half mile war canoe championship.  Photographs of the memorable half mile finish of 1907 made by Carleton Place photographer W. J. Hammond remain in existence.

The members of the winning crew were Carl Lamb, stroke, William Knox, Howard Morphy, Archie McCaw, John Hockenhull, M. Ryan, Wilfred Hunter, Fred Milliken, Andrew Dunlop, Gilbert Gordon, Mark Lamb, T. Winthrop, Neil McGregor, Andrew Robertson, and Ab. Keyworth, captain.–Howard Morton Brown

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Aug 1907, Thu,  Page 2

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  13 Aug 1907, Tue,  Page 2

 

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“J. Baird, Painter and Carriage-maker, c. 1907”.
John Baird (1867 – 1939) ran his carriage shop at the north west corner of Bridge and Charlotte Streets. The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum is lucky to have a wheelbarrow made by John in our collection thanks his Grandson Denzil Baird for the donation. —John Baird the Carriage Maker

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  02 May 1907, Thu,  Page 5

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  10 May 1907, Fri,  Page 9

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Jan 1907, Tue,  Page 8

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

relatedreading

The Art Loan Gallery Perth 1907-Names Names Names

Carleton Place Municipal Gossip–14 Dec 1907

 

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

 

142 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–The Day The Wizard of Oz Came to Carleton Place

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Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

142 Bridge Street Carleton Place

The Queen’s is the oldest hotel that is still in operation in Carleton Place as a hotel and was originally built for Duncan McIntosh of Perth Ontario who was the father of Dr. Duncan H.McIntosh, of Carleton Place.

 

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

In 1882, Mrs. M.J. Chatterton bought the hotel and operated it as the Chatterton House. Peter P. Salter doubled the size and renamed it the Queen’s Hotel. In 1889, it was repurchased and run by Mrs. Chatterton and Ab. Salter. Later it was renovated and operated by Dan Miller.

 

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The cost was $1.50 per day with hot water and electric lights. There were 40 new rooms and a free bus to the train. In 1937, the roof on the Queen’s Hotel blew off because of high winds and sat in the middle of Bridge Street. Dan Miller sold the Queen’s to Lloyd Ionson from Cobourg. There were 50 rooms. Miller ran the hotel from 1920-51 intermittently.

Mary Whyte remembers one of her school friends Pauline O’Keefe whose father owned the hotel at the time. When Dan Miller bought it he had a taxi business on the premises and had some year round boarders and one of them she remembered was Jabe Coombs a  foreman at Findlay’s. Later Dan’s son William and his wife Marguerite (Griffith) operated the hotel and Geoff Laycock was the next owner.

 

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

According to the museum history Miller ran it for 4 years then he sold it to Mr. Chadwick. In 1927, Miller re-obtained and ran the hotel for another 3 years and then rented it to Mr. Martin 2 years. Lindsay Thurlow was the next to operate the hotel. Mr. Miller’s sister Mrs. William Taylor took the building and changed it into apartments. Mr. Miller returned to Carleton Place in 1948 and began modernizing the hotel and providing a dining room. He changed the apartments back to hotel rooms and built 13 garages at rear and 2 apartments over a section of the garage.

When Tom Sloan was the owner of the Queen’s hotel he had a sign out front that was really worth reading:

Good Sample Rooms-Centrally Located

Commercial Rates- One dollar and a half per day

This house has been renovated all through and is one of the coziest and most enjoyable in the Ottawa Valley

Hotel Rules for Visitors

Board- 50 cents a square foot- meals extra

The hotel is convenient to all cemeteries- hearses to hire 25 cents

Guests are requested not to speak to the dumb waiter

Guests are requested not to play any games more exciting that Old Maid after 7 pm so as not to disturb the night clerk’s slumber

If the room gets too warm open the window and see the fire escape.

In case of fire you will have a hard time finding the fire escape, there ain’t any.
If you’re fond of athletics and like good jumping, lift the mattress and see the bed spring

Married men without baggage are requested to leave their wives at the office for security
Don’t worry about paying your bills; the house is supported by its foundation.

Tammy Marion —There use to be a longish narrow building at the back of the Queens at the backside of the parking lot. It was still there in 1984-85. I was told years ago that it use to be a stable back in its day – for the people’s horses when they came by horse to the Queens. Don’t know if that was true or not – but took it as if it was. It had an upper level too. In 1984 or 85 there was an apartment on that upper level as I remember Audrey Wilson living there then.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  14 Apr 1899, Fri,  Page 6

 

The Queen’s most iconic boarder was Wandering Wayne Richards

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In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Time Travel- Is that Wandering Wayne in this 1930 Photo?

Christmas in April – (Wandering) Wayne Richards

More than Words- Mural is Almost Finished!

 

 

Related Reading to the Queen’s Hotel

The Day The Wizard of Oz Came to Carleton Place

Carleton Place Folk Art from the Queen’s Hotel –The Millers

Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel vs the Town of Carleton Place

People of Carleton Place, Ontario — Gail Sheen-MacDonald

Part 1- Tales of the Chatteron House Corset — Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place- can be found here.

Part 2- Hell on Wheels at Lady Chatterton’s Hotel in Carleton Place– can be found here.

Part 3- I Will Take Some Opium to Go Please —The “Drug Dispensary” at the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 4- Chatterton House Hotel Registrar- George Hurdis -1884

Part 5-What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

Part 6-The First Mosh Pits in Carleton Place — The Opera House of the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 7-All the President’s Men — Backroom Dealings in Carleton Place?

Part 8- Who Was John Boland? Chatterton House/Queen’s Hotel Registry — The Burgess Family Dynasty

Part 9-What Happens Behind The Queen’s Hotel Stays Behind the Queen’s Hotel

part 10-John Sparrow’s Royal Parilion – Chatterton House Hotel Carleton Place

part 11-The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

part 12 –He Did What? Tales of the Queen’s Hotel

The Sultans of Swing at The Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

Things That Disappear in Carleton Place — Elgin Street and The Queen’s Hotel Sign

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

 

151 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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151 Bridge Street Carleton Place

151 Bridge Street housed two stores but one side was vacant. R.D. Carmichael’s
grocery was located here. Carmichael’s was a long narrow store with a round wood stove in the back. There was a scale to weigh all bulk food and everything was put into small brown bags and tied with a string. It was mentioned in McDiarmid’s weekly column in the Canadian that a whole hank of bananas hung in the window and they became quite brown before they were all sold.

Mr. Carmichael employed his half sister Jessee McGregor, Alberta Whyte, Vera Cavers and Lorne Whyte was the delivery boy. Whyte used to call all the customers on Monday morning, took your order and delivered late that day or the very next morning. He repeated this on Thursday and Friday and the other side of the river was serviced on the between days. No money was exchanged between the delivery boy and the customer and every week you went in and either paid the bill or paid towards something towards the bill.

 

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Photo from the Canadian Files- from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

When the entrance way and the floor of his store got so worn it became a hazard Mr. C just moved all his groceries and carried on. After R.D. Carmichael’s relocated, R.A. Beamish had a store located here. The4 manager was Eddy Lavoie who married Jean Hamilton and he employed Daisy Peckett. Later the manager was Florabelle MacPherson. A fire occurred in the early part of the 1960s totally destroying the building. The current building was erected and has housed such businesses as Vicky’s Dress Shoppe, Esquire Dress Shoppe, the Bridge Hotel, The Bridgewater Inn, and now the Bridge Street Tavern. When the building burned one of the women’s clothing stores was in operation at this site. The owner had just purchased her new stock for the upcoming season. Of course we remember that it was the home of Ballygiblin’s Restaurant for many years.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Mar 1963, Fri,  Page 1

 

related reading

The Fire That Almost Wiped Out Part of Bridge Street

DILL we meet again! A Tip of the Glass to Ballygiblin’s

Derek Levesque – More than Words

Meet Chef Dusty Pettes from Ballygiblins

A Charming Woman is a Busy Woman – Sherry Duquette

It’s a Mad World! View from a Carleton Place Bench

 

150-152 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photos Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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150-152 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

G.C. Stackhouse a dentist ran the store as a book, stationary, and variety store.
Then the store was under the ownership of John Flett (1836-1900), then by A.C.
McLean from Perth to March 1889, then by M.C. Pewtress from Hamilton Ontario. In
the 1890s, it became a soft drinks bottling plant of Adam R.G. Peden son of William
Peden (1813-1879) Carleton Place general merchant. He was Town Clerk from
1877-1921. This street corner stone building has long been divided into a bakery
and barbershop through the years.
It has had numerous businesses in its premises. In 1871 James M. Scott ran a
stationary shop (Lovell’s Dominion Directory). In 1876 a dentist G.C. Stackhouse
was located in the building (Woodburn’s Central Canada Directory). Mr. Stackhouse
seems also to have been in the jewellery trade since the Carleton Place Herald of
1878 contains an advertisement announcing his withdrawal from the trade. The
Herald announced that on March 3 rd of 1880 that Mr. John Flett was buying out Mr.
Stackhouse.
Woodcock’s Bakery and Jerry’s Bakery also operated businesses at 150 Bridge Street.  Some of their employees beside their son Roy were Viola Shannon and Dot Foxton. The man who delivered their baked goods around town daily by horse and cart was Harvey Paul.. People looked forward to the Easter season as on Holy Thursday he went around town delivering Hot Cross buns at 25 cents a dozen.

Bill W’s sister Evelyn ran a hairdressing salon in the right hand corner and the other entrance to this building was rented by Howard Mc Neely who had his barbershop  from about 1929 to the 1970s until he purchased the George Doucett building. His helper was his brother Mel and then his brother Earl. When Howard moved his store it became The Clip Joint a hair salon run by the late Barbara Lanthier and Linda Horricks Tompson until Barb moved her salon past the bridge.

Next door at one time was Ad Valiquettes Hair Dressing and later Dr. J. A. McEwen had his office there.

 

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Dale Costello One of my favourite CP stores. Woodcocks Bakery. If you could buy the smell of fresh baked bread, you couldn’t afford it.

Joann Voyce Worked there in the summer and weekends. Started at age 14.

Doug B. McCarten Butterscotch cookies yummy my favourite!

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston I am sure every mother in town knew her kids wouldn’t move an inch if they got to watch that donut machine – we sure didn’t! I wonder what happened to that machine – whether it was saved or not???????????? – not to mention the rest of the stuff.

Ray Paquette I had the only paper route in town that made no money because my last delivery was to Woodcock’s where my proceeds were “eaten” up buying those jam filled scones!!

Joann Voyce When I worked there I learned all my great work ethics from Vi Shannon and Ethel Reese.. Two great ladies !

Jim Amy Kirkpatrick The best raisin buns and caramel cookies in the world!!!

Sherri Iona And fresh bread, when maple syrup came in

Sharron Ann Foote Donuts made in the window on Saturday mornings. 50 cents bought a dozen—allowance for the week well spent!!

Valerie Edwards Woodcock’s bakery in right corner , the best caramel cookies preferably with raisins

Llew Lloyd I remember they had a red haired baker . He was the ginger bread man. He baked cakes really fast .

Catherine Marvin Cream Puffs for 50 cents.

Penny Trafford I’m with you Cathy, Cream Puffs. My memory of them I swear I was still in a stroller, I bet they were only 10 cents! 😂

Peter Hawkins We always stopped there, on our way into town to visit my grandmother, to pick up a dozen raisin cookies.

Llew Lloyd The raisin cookies were a staple at 81 Bell . Hot cross buns at Easter were another family favourite . Remember the ladder on rails to store bread etc. on the upper shelves ?

Ted Hurdis When Wendy got pregnant for Brodie my mom went to Woodcocks and got her 4 huge cream puffs in a box.

Wendy LeBlanc- Mum did all our baking to save money but I somehow recall the delightful triangular-shaped super-flakey pastries filled with jam and sprinkled with coarse sugar. Ooh! I can still recall the taste as I write about them. I also remember cream puffs – Peggi Mace and I were students of Helen Gardiner in Grade 5 in Central School; we ran errands for her downtown nearly every day and once a week we would go to the bakery for her; she always treated us with a cream puff. I can’t think of Helen – a wonderful teacher – without thinking of cream puffs and visa versa!

 

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Related reading to the bakery

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

 

 

Related reading to the Aitkenhead family

The Aitkenhead Family at 20 Frank Street in Carleton Place

What Happened to the House and Family on Frank Street –Part 1

The Aitkenhead Family at 20 Frank Street in Carleton Place

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Hog’s Back Falls Ottawa –Aitkenhead Photo Collection

Photos of the Orange Parade Almonte 1963 — Name that Band?

How to Make a Vintage Apron- Aitkenhead Photo Collection

No Banker Left Behind – Bank of Montreal Almonte Photos

Down by the Mississippi River- Almonte Falls Photos 50s

Are These Memories Just for Ourselves? — The Family in a Box

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Vintage Carleton Place & Beckwith

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Photo just outside Movshovitz’s

From the Carleton Place Review Files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Carleton Place Ambulance team leading, Steven More, Tim McIntyre, Jason Watt… Thanks Jim McUsac! He said 1992-1993?-Remember the Hospital Bed Races of Carleton Place?

154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1885- Sumner Block

Valiquette’s hair dressing was in this building and later Dr. J.A. McEwen had his office
here. Max Movshovitz’s dry goods store was located in what was known as the
Sumner Building. Morbic Sumner operated a dry goods store also. The Sumner Building at 154-160 Bridge Street is on Lot 25, which is one of the larger lots on Bridge Street. In the 1960’s a large fire occurred and a parking lot took over where some of the businesses had been. So it is unclear based on land deeds if some of the businesses were located in the Sumner Building or at what is now the parking lot. Dr. Winters was a dentist and his
practice was taken over by Dr. Smith an MD. Two Stanzel sisters operated a
millinery.

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From the Carleton Place Review Files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

When Dr. J. A. McEwen had his office here the family lived on the corner of Franklin and Beckwith which had previously been a bank. ( see story-Cameron Ellis Building — What Happened to the Rest of it?)

When Mr. Movshovitz had their store in this building the family lived over the store with their son Isaac who was handicapped and their other children Abraham and Shirley. They were part of the Bridge Street business group for a very long time and two of their clerks were Mrs. Preston Shail (Laura Gorr) and Mrs. Earl Fleming (Emma Smith).

Next door was Godden’s Jewelry Store and then Jack Bennett opened an electric shop and
it was here that Stewart Cavers worked and learned the trade.  Later a Mr. Dunfield from Renfrew took over the shop and sometime later Mr. and Mrs. Earl Fleming turned it into living quarters.

 

Related reading

Magical Movshovitz Moments

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

 

Nelson R Baker- Fashionable Tailor of Lanark

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Nelson R Baker- Fashionable Tailor of Lanark

 

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Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

James George McLean was a tailor with his shop on the main St. of Lanark Village, next door to his mother-in-law’s, Marion Umpherson Prentice, millinery shop. In the mid 1990’s his name could still be seen in the cement sidewalk in front of that building.

The Lanark Era announced on Mar 23, 1910 that “Mr. Nelson R. Baker” has bought the stock and goodwill of Mr. J.G. McLean’s Tailoring establishment” and reported again on April 6, 1910 “owing to hundreds of requests from the people of Lanark and surrounding country, McLean the tailor has decided to stay with his customers instead of going back South”.

In 1910 Nelson R. Baker had opened up his own shop on George Street and he advertised that he provided his own elegant fit and superior finish and no other local merchant or importing tailor can hope to be  noted unless he meets these indispensable conditions. The House of Nelson R. Baker was situated on George Street and were admirably adapted for storage, display and sale purposes. Mr. Baker had a constant stock of English French and Scotch tweeds, suitings and trouserings in all the latest styles and novelties.

All garments turned out by the House of Baker are characterized by artistic cut and most careful workmanship, while the garments turned out by this house are characterized by artistic cut and most careful workmanship while the facilities for prompt fulfillment are unsurpassed. Parties living in or visiting in Lanark will find Mr. Baker always ready to offer excellent workmanship, finish, fabric and fashion not easily duplicated elsewhere. Mr. Baker had been in business since February 1908.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

historicalnotes

 

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Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

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Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

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Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

relatedreading

McLean the Tailor from Lanark and Other News

Some Cold Hard Facts- First Tailor in Ramsay and a Cow Without a Bell

Lost Buildings–Sinclair Brothers Tailor Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 10–

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Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

 

127-131 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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127-131 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

The first storey storefronts of this building have been modified from the original glass windows for easier viewing of merchandise–hence the different colours of brick. 127-131 Bridge Street has housed a number of different businesses including pharmacies, clothing stores, grocery stores, and poolrooms.

The Hughes family bought the pharmacy from Dr. Preston in 1905.

W. J. Hughes Rexall Drug store was located on the corner and Thomas Lloyd Hughes born in 1897 along with his brother Harold until they each decided to run a smaller store at the opposite  ends of town. Lloy’s store was on Moffatt Street and Harold on Lake Ave West. For 50 years they were in groceries together and then the store was sold to Thomas’s nephew and for 12 years Thomas drove a butcher wagon. There was a dark room at the rear of the store where Mr. Hughes tested your eyes for glasses. You could buy a roll of film #116 for a Brownie Box camera for 25 cents and for $1.25 he would send it away to be developed.

The folks in Carleton Place will always remember the Rexall Drug annual 1 cent sale and every local household stocked up on cough medicine, cough drops, peroxide and all sorts of liniment. Some of the clerks that worked there were: Olive Dick, Ruby Voyce, and John Briscoe and Wilbert Robertson.

Harvey Asselstine attended the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1929. In 1944, he
returned to Carleton Place and bought the drugstore at the corner of Bridge and
Franklin, from W.J. Hughes who operated it for 38 years. Betty Findlay and Mary Cook both worked at Assestine’s Pharmacy.  In the rear of Asselstine’s drug store the CPR Telegraph operated during the 1950s. Asselstine expanded his drug store and bought out Hughes Grocery. In 2006 the Athen’s Corners Restaurant  was located there.

Taber and McCrae operated a Men’s and Boy’s clothing store within Struther’s Block, which later became a pool hall  (next door) operated by Mel Barclay. Charlie Giroux, who only had one arm took over the pool hall then Ab Dowseth from Smiths Falls operated it for a short time but when McCann and Porter gained ownership they moved the pool hall to the old Bank of Commerce.

Jeremy Stinson— That corner was, for much of my childhood, the home of the Blossom Shop. Back before the one way street.

Related Reading

Bridge Street V.E. Day Parade Photos- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Who was the “Drugstore Woman” in Asselstine’s Rexall?

 

133-137 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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All photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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133-137 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1885 1904

In 1903 there was a fire so the entire Bell Block had to be rebuilt. 133-137 Bridge Street originally owned by Mr. Andrew Bell. Without the adventurous capitalist Andrew Bell, Carleton Place would not have flourished the way it has. Bell bought the property from McGregor in 1885.

 

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The building belonged to Anne, Andrew’s wife until 1919 when she sold it to Stanzel. In
1898, Stuart’s or Stewart’s (confirm) drug store was situated in the Bell Block. W.J.
Muirhead had his hardware store in the Bell Block for a few years and returned to his
old stand when there was a fire in 1903. In 1906, Abraham and Aboud operated a
clothing store at this location. Percy Hardy had a music and photo shop in the Bell
Block that later became T. Eaton’s and Company.

Th doorway upstairs led up to Taber Business College on the third floor under the supervision of Charles J. Taber. Besides having students from Carleton Place there were many that arrived daily shortly sfter 9 am on the CPR local from the Ashton and Stittsville area. After C.J Taber retired his son Gordon took over

In 1917, Lewis and Frizell opened up shop in the Bell Block. In 1920, D.N. Frizell and Co. were the successors to Lewis and Frizell. Mr. Maguire operated his harness shop here and his site was eventually taken over by Mr. J. Craig who was a jeweller. By 1930, Mr. Craig left Carleton Place.

In 1936, Stanzel leased the building to Stedman and in 1960 Stedman bought
the building. Stedman’s operated at this location up until 1992 when the building
was sold to Cotter Canada Hardware and Variety. At 133 –Stedman’s Seltire Store or what was commonly referred to as the 15 cent store was located here. It employed about 4 girls and a boy to help with the heavy lifting. In 1936 Mr. Chittick was the manager and the staff included: Vera Edwards, Helen McGregor, Eileen Hart and Ethel Cable. Marg Whyte was one of the part tie gals and made 85 cents on a Saturday from 6 pm until closing which was about 10:30 Pm. It later became Stedman’s or V & G.

Next door was Eaton’s and their order office. Over the year it was staffed by 2 girls at a time and extras during the holiday rush. Florence McIntyre, Dot Peden, Leita Reid, Pat Bennett, Marjorie Crawford, Audrey Peden, Bertha Pye and Bessie Fee were some of the employees.

 

Related reading:

Who Was A. W. Bell of Carleton Place?

Stedman’s of Carleton Place 1950s

Stedman’s — Carleton Place Memories

Come Back to the Five and Dime Carleton Place–Robertson’s

The Taber Business College- Women in the 20s

Before and After — Photos of Carleton Place

 

139-141 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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139-141 Bridge Street Carleton Place–Circa 1880 ca, 1904

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

A fire in 1903 required 139-141 Bridge Street to be rebuilt.  William Stanzel, originally of France, settled in Goulbourn and in 1874, William moved his shoe shop from Goulbourn to Carleton Place. William’s son Stephen learned the trade and Ross and Earl later owned Stanzel’s shoes. William’s daughters had a millinery shop on Bridge Street too.

139 Bridge Street was sold to Andrew Bell in 1885 and belonged to his wife Annie
until 1919 when she sold it to Stanzel. Stanzel started out in business in 1888. In 1917, Stanzel’s moved once more to its final location at 139 Bridge Street where Graham’s Shoes is now. There was a bad fire and one side of the building was entirely gutted. After the fire, Stanzel’s Shoes moved to 143, then moved to 101.

In 1929, James Moore and William Buse owned the business for four years. and called it The Boot & Shoe Store. Moore and Buse were former Findlay employees who wanted another occupation. Walter later went into the taxi business and in 1958, Stanzel’s Shoe Store was sold to James Graham. Graham worked at Allan Bros Shoes for 35 years and in 1971 Bob and Isobel Hawkins took over the business. Now their son Doug Hawkins runs it.

 

gras
141 Bridge Street originally part of the property owned by the McArthur family was
sold in 1885, to Mr. Pattie. Pattie and Andrew Bell built what was referred to as the
Opera Hall. In 1898, Pattie sold the building to James McDiarmid who owned 141
Bridge Street until 1926 when it was sold to  W.W. Taber and Ladies and Millinery were sold on the 2nd floor. Among his staff were Bertha Grant, Edith Machlen and Louise Playflair who all remained spinsters. It remained in the Taber name
until 1963.

 

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Wally Cook of Cook’s  retired after 37 years and in 1958, Cook went into business for himself. Wally managed the Walker’s store that was at the same location and there were other managers and Dutch Ryan was another popular man in the store. Over the years some of the clerks were: Violet Craig, Eileen Bunty Muff, Gladys McLaren, Gwen Cable, Helen McKittrick and Stewart McGregor was the delivery boy.

At the turn of the twentieth century when the Tabers owned the store and there was
a vault on the first floor. Due to a fire, the vault fell through the floor into the cellar
and the front of the vault was up against the wall. Wally’s wife, Mary was curious
about what was inside so on the last night that the store belonged to the couple, the
vault was opened and they found in the vault a small box inside with a piece of paper
with McDiarmid Block in large bold letters. Later The Remembrance Shop was in this location.

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Clipped from Manitoba Morning Free Press,  26 Jan 1904, Tue,  Page 4

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  30 Jan 1904, Sat,  Page 19

Related reading:

And Then There was Cook’s– and Most of All Mary Cook

Mary Cook’s Deportment Classes for Young Ladies in Carleton Place

Carleton Place Mod Fashion Show 1960’s

The “Chosen Friends” of Carleton Place –The Fire of 1904

Tales From the Maguire Block in Carleton Place

Do You Know What This Building Used to Look Like in Carleton Place?

Where Was Walker Stores in Carleton Place?

 

143-147 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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143-147 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1880 ca, 1904

 

Some of the earlier businesses in the Bell Block included Tucker’s Jewellers, T.
Steele’s shoe store, W. Philips Men’s Clothing Store, Mayhew, and Robert McDiarmid.
W.J. Muirhead’s hardware store also sold wallpaper and paint and Peter Dunlop was an employee and Ken Muirhead worked for his father before moving on to the RCMP.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  31 Dec 1894, Mon,  Page 3

It was sold in 1932 to George W. Eades, who operated his hardware store at 143 Bridge Street up until his death in 1983 and then his estate took over ownership. In 1953, Eades remodelled his store front, and this was when the hardware store took over the smaller shop next door. George made improvements to the store and also employed Pete Dunlop, Gerald Haskins, Jim Griffith, Carman Lalonde and George’s daughter Helen was the bookkeeper.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 May 1951, Wed,  Page 47

 

The small store Eades took over had been a tailor shop and at one time a jewellery shop run by Mr. Craig. It had also been a tearoom where a lady would read your tea leaves for an extra 25 cents. The George Allan Shoe Store was known for its large green boot and their longest serving staff was James Graham who later opened his own shoe store. On the 2nd floor was the dental office of Dr. Ernie Walroth, a photography shop operated by Percy J. Hardy and later by Victor Goodwin as well as the office of Fred. J. Tighe who gave music lessons and later William Stephenson. Did you know the Walroths lived in the brick house at the corner of William Street and Baines that had a Hackaberry tree on the premises.

 

Eades Hardware of Carleton Place-Allen Wrenches Toilet Seats and Electric Heaters

The J. H Tucker Store Carleton Place

In Memory of Carman Lalonde — Grandfather, Father and Historian of Lanark County

 

149 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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149 Bridge Street Carleton Place– Circa 1880

 

In 1894, C.C. Allan Shoes conducted business at 149 Bridge Street. Mr. E. Farmer
bought the business in 1900 and sold it in 1910 to George Allan. Allan’s shoes store was one of the first Stedman’s stores in the Carleton Place area and it belonged to Charles Allan in 1890. Charles’s son George took over in 1900. There was a fire in either 1903 or 1904 so George bought Box’s shoe store at 149 Bridge Street in 1910. George sold the store to Maher in 1958. In or around 1969 Simpson Sears conducted business at 149 Bridge Street until about 1977. Nancy’s Impressions has been in business since 1983.

 

Related reading..

Past “Impressions” of Nancy Code Miller

Nancy Code Miller– A Chip Off the Old Block

“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s

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When I was 17- The Kitten- Glenayr Knitting Mills Reunion

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When I was 17- The Kitten- Glenayr Knitting Mills Reunion

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I’ve never gone to a reunion before; not even high school, because honestly I’m always afraid that there’s going to be some ‘Carrie’-like incident that I won’t be able to deal with.

My life began in Cowansville, Quebec, a mill town similar to most places in rural Lanark County. The last time I personally saw or spoke with any of my old friends was years ago, although I retain a relationship with some of them in my Cowansville High School group on Facebook.

I was honoured to be part of the former Glenayr Knitting mill employees reunion on Monday. There were a few who had not seen each other since the plant closed down in 2000 I’m sure. Most of the employees were women as it was pretty well the only job available in the area in those days. Some at the reunion on August 7th at the Lanark & District Museum still had their original tools of the trade (scissors etc) from their former jobs whether it was knitting, dyeing fabric or sewing.

 

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

Was the reunion a sense of nostalgia or just reminders of what had transpired years ago? No matter how wonderful and interesting the lives of the former employees from Tatlock, Watson’s Corners, McDonald’s Corners and even Carleton Place have been, there was just something endearing about this work reunion of the staff that most went home with a pay cheque of 45 cents an hour.

In 1953 the mill was the backbone of Lanark, and some still called it the Clyde Woolen Mill. David Markle made lots of improvements in the old grist mill, with new machinery initially making men’s woolen socks, blankets, and motor rugs. In 1945 the Markle brothers bought the large two storey stone building on the main street by the Clyde River and used it as a store. The Kitten Factory  at one time had a payroll of over $200,000 that turned over three times in local businesses before it left the village in the year 2000.

 

 

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

I am sure some of them talked late into the day on Monday where they  laughed, cried, and reveled in nostalgia. I was surprised at the intensity of their bonding; perhaps it was the acute awareness of how much everything had changed. At the soul level they were still the same people they always were, and seeing them all together reminded me of how important it is to stay connected.

 

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Lanark Era Photo–Gena Gibson

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

Feryn Donaldson was still Miss Kitten of Glenayr Knitting on Monday with her original 60s sash. She was voted in by her fellow employees and got an outfit to wear for special events as long as it was back by 5. When asked if she became the “belle of the ball” of Lanark Village after she won her crown she laughed and said she was already married with two children at that point.

I doubt if there’s anyone among us that can’t remember that first day of work, and sometimes we reflect on the people we were crazy about, and some we weren’t so crazy about. These women still remembered the muffins brought by some to work, perms that were given in the washrooms, and the fact that a few actually met their future spouses at that plant.  As one woman said:

” I moved to Lanark in 1947 and most of the people that worked in the mill became my friends. I lived here, my family lived here, and when the time comes I will die here.”

Catching up with the past and seeing your  former friends and co-workers reminds us that your life story is not over. The final chapter has not been written and we are still writing new endings to our lives. That very thing happened at the Glenayr Knitting Mill Reunion on George Street in the Village of Lanark– as a forever friend is really someone who knows all your best stories and lived them with you. In the end you always go back to the people that were there in the beginning.

 

When I was seventeen, it was a very good year
It was a very good year for small town girls
And soft summer nights
We’d hide from the lights
On the village green
When I was seventeen

 

 

historicalnotes

 

Jo Camelon— Of the 11 siblings of the Camelon family. I believe 9 worked at some time in the different departments of kitten mill. Thank you for sharing

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Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

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How Much is that Kitten Sweater in the Window?

Stories from the Old Kitten Mill

Down by the Old Kitten Mill

Linda’s Mail Bag– Do You Have any Info on my Blanket?

You’re from the Village of Lanark You Say?

 

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Where Was Pinecraft?

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From Mississippi Mills

 

In 1969 Pine-Craft turned out 500 handcrafted reproductions of early Canadiana reproductions annually for Eastern Canadian furniture markets. Popularity of the pieces resulted in a  5-6 week backlog from the company of 5 carpenters of wood stainers. Ownership of the 7 year-old company had changed in 1968 when Ottawa businessman bought the business from a group of Almonte businessman. Mr. Cook operated all the Four Corners stores in Ottawa.

 

 

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1969

 

 

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 Jun 1962, Fri,  Page 55

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  19 Apr 1971, Mon,  Page 14

OBITUARY

MR. JAMES SNEDDEN – The community was deeply saddened on Christmas morning when word was received that James Snedden had passed away in his sleep at his home, 149 Mitcheson St., Almonte, in his 65th year. He was the son of the late William Snedden and Jennie Toshack. In 1941 he married the former Eliza Irene McCann of Pakenham. They lived on the 8th line of Ramsay until a year ago, December 19th, when they moved to their new home in Almonte. When ill health compelled him to give up farming he was employed by Pinecraft Ltd., Almonte. He was a faithful member of Blakeney United Church serving as treasurer and as a member of the Session for a number of years. Besides his wife he leaves to mourn, one son, Bruce and a grandson, David Snedden of Ottawa; three brothers, Wilfred of Almonte; Jack and Alex of Ramsay; one sister, Jean, Mrs. Connor Sutton of Renfrew. One sister, Isabel, Mrs. Arthur Blakeley, predeceased him several years ago. The funeral was held on Wednesday, December 27th, from the Kerry Funeral Home, to Almonte United Church for service conducted by Rev. H. F. Skoutajan and Rev. W. L. Henley of Carleton Place. Pallbearers were six nephews, Bill and David Snedden, Bill Sutton, Hugh Fulton, Earl and Sandy Snedden. Interment was in Auld Kirk Cemetery.

 

relatedreading

Antique Furniture? The End of an Era?

The Whiskey Keg Chair of Lanark County

The Drought of 1871 and the Mills on the Mississippi River

 

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Archie MacDonald of George Street

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Archie MacDonald of George Street

 

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Photo-Perth Remembered

 

The largest and most prominent business establishment of its kind in Lanark is that of Mr. A. MacDonald located on George Street. This business was an old established one and has been under its present management for 7 years. The premises occupied are embraced in a large commodious store comprising of 3 floors which are neatly and fitted up in perfect keeping.

 

A warehouse is maintained in the rear and the stock of goods is one of the largest kind to be found in Lanark. The articles carried includes: dry goods, ready made clothing, boots, shoes, carpets, linoleums, wallpaper, groceries, provisions, glassware,hardware etc.

A leading specialty is made of high class dress goods, trimming, ready to wear skirts, jackets, furs, and ladies wear in general. All the goods are stylish and and up to date. The staff of salespeople there will be found ready obliging and courteous to the trade at all times. Mr. MacDonald is well known here and devotes strict personal attention to every detail pertaining to it.

Circa 1910 Lanark Village

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

historicalnotes

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Dec 1924, Thu,  Page 2

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  02 Feb 1952, Sat,  Page 5

 

 

relatedreading

Village of Lanark Business Directory 1886– 1887

John A Darou 1905 Lanark Village

Does Anyone Remember Cohen’s in Lanark Village?

The Watts Bros Seed Company Lanark Village

The Lanark Ginseng Company?