Tag Archives: business

Nelson R Baker- Fashionable Tailor of Lanark

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Nelson R Baker- Fashionable Tailor of Lanark

 

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Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

James George McLean was a tailor with his shop on the main St. of Lanark Village, next door to his mother-in-law’s, Marion Umpherson Prentice, millinery shop. In the mid 1990’s his name could still be seen in the cement sidewalk in front of that building.

The Lanark Era announced on Mar 23, 1910 that “Mr. Nelson R. Baker” has bought the stock and goodwill of Mr. J.G. McLean’s Tailoring establishment” and reported again on April 6, 1910 “owing to hundreds of requests from the people of Lanark and surrounding country, McLean the tailor has decided to stay with his customers instead of going back South”.

In 1910 Nelson R. Baker had opened up his own shop on George Street and he advertised that he provided his own elegant fit and superior finish and no other local merchant or importing tailor can hope to be  noted unless he meets these indispensable conditions. The House of Nelson R. Baker was situated on George Street and were admirably adapted for storage, display and sale purposes. Mr. Baker had a constant stock of English French and Scotch tweeds, suitings and trouserings in all the latest styles and novelties.

All garments turned out by the House of Baker are characterized by artistic cut and most careful workmanship, while the garments turned out by this house are characterized by artistic cut and most careful workmanship while the facilities for prompt fulfillment are unsurpassed. Parties living in or visiting in Lanark will find Mr. Baker always ready to offer excellent workmanship, finish, fabric and fashion not easily duplicated elsewhere. Mr. Baker had been in business since February 1908.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

historicalnotes

 

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Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

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Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

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Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

relatedreading

McLean the Tailor from Lanark and Other News

Some Cold Hard Facts- First Tailor in Ramsay and a Cow Without a Bell

Lost Buildings–Sinclair Brothers Tailor Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 10–

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Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

 

127-131 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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127-131 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

The first storey storefronts of this building have been modified from the original glass windows for easier viewing of merchandise–hence the different colours of brick. 127-131 Bridge Street has housed a number of different businesses including pharmacies, clothing stores, grocery stores, and poolrooms.

The Hughes family bought the pharmacy from Dr. Preston in 1905.

W. J. Hughes Rexall Drug store was located on the corner and Thomas Lloyd Hughes born in 1897 along with his brother Harold until they each decided to run a smaller store at the opposite  ends of town. Lloy’s store was on Moffatt Street and Harold on Lake Ave West. For 50 years they were in groceries together and then the store was sold to Thomas’s nephew and for 12 years Thomas drove a butcher wagon. There was a dark room at the rear of the store where Mr. Hughes tested your eyes for glasses. You could buy a roll of film #116 for a Brownie Box camera for 25 cents and for $1.25 he would send it away to be developed.

The folks in Carleton Place will always remember the Rexall Drug annual 1 cent sale and every local household stocked up on cough medicine, cough drops, peroxide and all sorts of liniment. Some of the clerks that worked there were: Olive Dick, Ruby Voyce, and John Briscoe and Wilbert Robertson.

Harvey Asselstine attended the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1929. In 1944, he
returned to Carleton Place and bought the drugstore at the corner of Bridge and
Franklin, from W.J. Hughes who operated it for 38 years. Betty Findlay and Mary Cook both worked at Assestine’s Pharmacy.  In the rear of Asselstine’s drug store the CPR Telegraph operated during the 1950s. Asselstine expanded his drug store and bought out Hughes Grocery. In 2006 the Athen’s Corners Restaurant  was located there.

Taber and McCrae operated a Men’s and Boy’s clothing store within Struther’s Block, which later became a pool hall  (next door) operated by Mel Barclay. Charlie Giroux, who only had one arm took over the pool hall then Ab Dowseth from Smiths Falls operated it for a short time but when McCann and Porter gained ownership they moved the pool hall to the old Bank of Commerce.

Jeremy Stinson— That corner was, for much of my childhood, the home of the Blossom Shop. Back before the one way street.

Related Reading

Bridge Street V.E. Day Parade Photos- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Who was the “Drugstore Woman” in Asselstine’s Rexall?

 

133-137 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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All photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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133-137 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1885 1904

In 1903 there was a fire so the entire Bell Block had to be rebuilt. 133-137 Bridge Street originally owned by Mr. Andrew Bell. Without the adventurous capitalist Andrew Bell, Carleton Place would not have flourished the way it has. Bell bought the property from McGregor in 1885.

 

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The building belonged to Anne, Andrew’s wife until 1919 when she sold it to Stanzel. In
1898, Stuart’s or Stewart’s (confirm) drug store was situated in the Bell Block. W.J.
Muirhead had his hardware store in the Bell Block for a few years and returned to his
old stand when there was a fire in 1903. In 1906, Abraham and Aboud operated a
clothing store at this location. Percy Hardy had a music and photo shop in the Bell
Block that later became T. Eaton’s and Company.

Th doorway upstairs led up to Taber Business College on the third floor under the supervision of Charles J. Taber. Besides having students from Carleton Place there were many that arrived daily shortly sfter 9 am on the CPR local from the Ashton and Stittsville area. After C.J Taber retired his son Gordon took over

In 1917, Lewis and Frizell opened up shop in the Bell Block. In 1920, D.N. Frizell and Co. were the successors to Lewis and Frizell. Mr. Maguire operated his harness shop here and his site was eventually taken over by Mr. J. Craig who was a jeweller. By 1930, Mr. Craig left Carleton Place.

In 1936, Stanzel leased the building to Stedman and in 1960 Stedman bought
the building. Stedman’s operated at this location up until 1992 when the building
was sold to Cotter Canada Hardware and Variety. At 133 –Stedman’s Seltire Store or what was commonly referred to as the 15 cent store was located here. It employed about 4 girls and a boy to help with the heavy lifting. In 1936 Mr. Chittick was the manager and the staff included: Vera Edwards, Helen McGregor, Eileen Hart and Ethel Cable. Marg Whyte was one of the part tie gals and made 85 cents on a Saturday from 6 pm until closing which was about 10:30 Pm. It later became Stedman’s or V & G.

Next door was Eaton’s and their order office. Over the year it was staffed by 2 girls at a time and extras during the holiday rush. Florence McIntyre, Dot Peden, Leita Reid, Pat Bennett, Marjorie Crawford, Audrey Peden, Bertha Pye and Bessie Fee were some of the employees.

 

Related reading:

Who Was A. W. Bell of Carleton Place?

Stedman’s of Carleton Place 1950s

Stedman’s — Carleton Place Memories

Come Back to the Five and Dime Carleton Place–Robertson’s

The Taber Business College- Women in the 20s

Before and After — Photos of Carleton Place

 

139-141 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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139-141 Bridge Street Carleton Place–Circa 1880 ca, 1904

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

A fire in 1903 required 139-141 Bridge Street to be rebuilt.  William Stanzel, originally of France, settled in Goulbourn and in 1874, William moved his shoe shop from Goulbourn to Carleton Place. William’s son Stephen learned the trade and Ross and Earl later owned Stanzel’s shoes. William’s daughters had a millinery shop on Bridge Street too.

139 Bridge Street was sold to Andrew Bell in 1885 and belonged to his wife Annie
until 1919 when she sold it to Stanzel. Stanzel started out in business in 1888. In 1917, Stanzel’s moved once more to its final location at 139 Bridge Street where Graham’s Shoes is now. There was a bad fire and one side of the building was entirely gutted. After the fire, Stanzel’s Shoes moved to 143, then moved to 101.

In 1929, James Moore and William Buse owned the business for four years. and called it The Boot & Shoe Store. Moore and Buse were former Findlay employees who wanted another occupation. Walter later went into the taxi business and in 1958, Stanzel’s Shoe Store was sold to James Graham. Graham worked at Allan Bros Shoes for 35 years and in 1971 Bob and Isobel Hawkins took over the business. Now their son Doug Hawkins runs it.

 

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141 Bridge Street originally part of the property owned by the McArthur family was
sold in 1885, to Mr. Pattie. Pattie and Andrew Bell built what was referred to as the
Opera Hall. In 1898, Pattie sold the building to James McDiarmid who owned 141
Bridge Street until 1926 when it was sold to  W.W. Taber and Ladies and Millinery were sold on the 2nd floor. Among his staff were Bertha Grant, Edith Machlen and Louise Playflair who all remained spinsters. It remained in the Taber name
until 1963.

 

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Wally Cook of Cook’s  retired after 37 years and in 1958, Cook went into business for himself. Wally managed the Walker’s store that was at the same location and there were other managers and Dutch Ryan was another popular man in the store. Over the years some of the clerks were: Violet Craig, Eileen Bunty Muff, Gladys McLaren, Gwen Cable, Helen McKittrick and Stewart McGregor was the delivery boy.

At the turn of the twentieth century when the Tabers owned the store and there was
a vault on the first floor. Due to a fire, the vault fell through the floor into the cellar
and the front of the vault was up against the wall. Wally’s wife, Mary was curious
about what was inside so on the last night that the store belonged to the couple, the
vault was opened and they found in the vault a small box inside with a piece of paper
with McDiarmid Block in large bold letters. Later The Remembrance Shop was in this location.

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Clipped from Manitoba Morning Free Press,  26 Jan 1904, Tue,  Page 4

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  30 Jan 1904, Sat,  Page 19

Related reading:

And Then There was Cook’s– and Most of All Mary Cook

Mary Cook’s Deportment Classes for Young Ladies in Carleton Place

Carleton Place Mod Fashion Show 1960’s

The “Chosen Friends” of Carleton Place –The Fire of 1904

Tales From the Maguire Block in Carleton Place

Do You Know What This Building Used to Look Like in Carleton Place?

Where Was Walker Stores in Carleton Place?

 

143-147 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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143-147 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1880 ca, 1904

 

Some of the earlier businesses in the Bell Block included Tucker’s Jewellers, T.
Steele’s shoe store, W. Philips Men’s Clothing Store, Mayhew, and Robert McDiarmid.
W.J. Muirhead’s hardware store also sold wallpaper and paint and Peter Dunlop was an employee and Ken Muirhead worked for his father before moving on to the RCMP.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  31 Dec 1894, Mon,  Page 3

It was sold in 1932 to George W. Eades, who operated his hardware store at 143 Bridge Street up until his death in 1983 and then his estate took over ownership. In 1953, Eades remodelled his store front, and this was when the hardware store took over the smaller shop next door. George made improvements to the store and also employed Pete Dunlop, Gerald Haskins, Jim Griffith, Carman Lalonde and George’s daughter Helen was the bookkeeper.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 May 1951, Wed,  Page 47

 

The small store Eades took over had been a tailor shop and at one time a jewellery shop run by Mr. Craig. It had also been a tearoom where a lady would read your tea leaves for an extra 25 cents. The George Allan Shoe Store was known for its large green boot and their longest serving staff was James Graham who later opened his own shoe store. On the 2nd floor was the dental office of Dr. Ernie Walroth, a photography shop operated by Percy J. Hardy and later by Victor Goodwin as well as the office of Fred. J. Tighe who gave music lessons and later William Stephenson. Did you know the Walroths lived in the brick house at the corner of William Street and Baines that had a Hackaberry tree on the premises.

 

Eades Hardware of Carleton Place-Allen Wrenches Toilet Seats and Electric Heaters

The J. H Tucker Store Carleton Place

In Memory of Carman Lalonde — Grandfather, Father and Historian of Lanark County

 

149 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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149 Bridge Street Carleton Place– Circa 1880

 

In 1894, C.C. Allan Shoes conducted business at 149 Bridge Street. Mr. E. Farmer
bought the business in 1900 and sold it in 1910 to George Allan. Allan’s shoes store was one of the first Stedman’s stores in the Carleton Place area and it belonged to Charles Allan in 1890. Charles’s son George took over in 1900. There was a fire in either 1903 or 1904 so George bought Box’s shoe store at 149 Bridge Street in 1910. George sold the store to Maher in 1958. In or around 1969 Simpson Sears conducted business at 149 Bridge Street until about 1977. Nancy’s Impressions has been in business since 1983.

 

Related reading..

Past “Impressions” of Nancy Code Miller

Nancy Code Miller– A Chip Off the Old Block

“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s

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When I was 17- The Kitten- Glenayr Knitting Mills Reunion

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When I was 17- The Kitten- Glenayr Knitting Mills Reunion

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I’ve never gone to a reunion before; not even high school, because honestly I’m always afraid that there’s going to be some ‘Carrie’-like incident that I won’t be able to deal with.

My life began in Cowansville, Quebec, a mill town similar to most places in rural Lanark County. The last time I personally saw or spoke with any of my old friends was years ago, although I retain a relationship with some of them in my Cowansville High School group on Facebook.

I was honoured to be part of the former Glenayr Knitting mill employees reunion on Monday. There were a few who had not seen each other since the plant closed down in 2000 I’m sure. Most of the employees were women as it was pretty well the only job available in the area in those days. Some at the reunion on August 7th at the Lanark & District Museum still had their original tools of the trade (scissors etc) from their former jobs whether it was knitting, dyeing fabric or sewing.

 

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

Was the reunion a sense of nostalgia or just reminders of what had transpired years ago? No matter how wonderful and interesting the lives of the former employees from Tatlock, Watson’s Corners, McDonald’s Corners and even Carleton Place have been, there was just something endearing about this work reunion of the staff that most went home with a pay cheque of 45 cents an hour.

In 1953 the mill was the backbone of Lanark, and some still called it the Clyde Woolen Mill. David Markle made lots of improvements in the old grist mill, with new machinery initially making men’s woolen socks, blankets, and motor rugs. In 1945 the Markle brothers bought the large two storey stone building on the main street by the Clyde River and used it as a store. The Kitten Factory  at one time had a payroll of over $200,000 that turned over three times in local businesses before it left the village in the year 2000.

 

 

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

I am sure some of them talked late into the day on Monday where they  laughed, cried, and reveled in nostalgia. I was surprised at the intensity of their bonding; perhaps it was the acute awareness of how much everything had changed. At the soul level they were still the same people they always were, and seeing them all together reminded me of how important it is to stay connected.

 

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Lanark Era Photo–Gena Gibson

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

 

Feryn Donaldson was still Miss Kitten of Glenayr Knitting on Monday with her original 60s sash. She was voted in by her fellow employees and got an outfit to wear for special events as long as it was back by 5. When asked if she became the “belle of the ball” of Lanark Village after she won her crown she laughed and said she was already married with two children at that point.

I doubt if there’s anyone among us that can’t remember that first day of work, and sometimes we reflect on the people we were crazy about, and some we weren’t so crazy about. These women still remembered the muffins brought by some to work, perms that were given in the washrooms, and the fact that a few actually met their future spouses at that plant.  As one woman said:

” I moved to Lanark in 1947 and most of the people that worked in the mill became my friends. I lived here, my family lived here, and when the time comes I will die here.”

Catching up with the past and seeing your  former friends and co-workers reminds us that your life story is not over. The final chapter has not been written and we are still writing new endings to our lives. That very thing happened at the Glenayr Knitting Mill Reunion on George Street in the Village of Lanark– as a forever friend is really someone who knows all your best stories and lived them with you. In the end you always go back to the people that were there in the beginning.

 

When I was seventeen, it was a very good year
It was a very good year for small town girls
And soft summer nights
We’d hide from the lights
On the village green
When I was seventeen

 

 

historicalnotes

 

Jo Camelon— Of the 11 siblings of the Camelon family. I believe 9 worked at some time in the different departments of kitten mill. Thank you for sharing

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Photos by Linda Seccaspina at the Lanark & District Museum

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

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How Much is that Kitten Sweater in the Window?

Stories from the Old Kitten Mill

Down by the Old Kitten Mill

Linda’s Mail Bag– Do You Have any Info on my Blanket?

You’re from the Village of Lanark You Say?

 

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Where Was Pinecraft?

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From Mississippi Mills

 

In 1969 Pine-Craft turned out 500 handcrafted reproductions of early Canadiana reproductions annually for Eastern Canadian furniture markets. Popularity of the pieces resulted in a  5-6 week backlog from the company of 5 carpenters of wood stainers. Ownership of the 7 year-old company had changed in 1968 when Ottawa businessman bought the business from a group of Almonte businessman. Mr. Cook operated all the Four Corners stores in Ottawa.

 

 

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1969

 

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 Jun 1962, Fri,  Page 55

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  19 Apr 1971, Mon,  Page 14

OBITUARY

MR. JAMES SNEDDEN – The community was deeply saddened on Christmas morning when word was received that James Snedden had passed away in his sleep at his home, 149 Mitcheson St., Almonte, in his 65th year. He was the son of the late William Snedden and Jennie Toshack. In 1941 he married the former Eliza Irene McCann of Pakenham. They lived on the 8th line of Ramsay until a year ago, December 19th, when they moved to their new home in Almonte. When ill health compelled him to give up farming he was employed by Pinecraft Ltd., Almonte. He was a faithful member of Blakeney United Church serving as treasurer and as a member of the Session for a number of years. Besides his wife he leaves to mourn, one son, Bruce and a grandson, David Snedden of Ottawa; three brothers, Wilfred of Almonte; Jack and Alex of Ramsay; one sister, Jean, Mrs. Connor Sutton of Renfrew. One sister, Isabel, Mrs. Arthur Blakeley, predeceased him several years ago. The funeral was held on Wednesday, December 27th, from the Kerry Funeral Home, to Almonte United Church for service conducted by Rev. H. F. Skoutajan and Rev. W. L. Henley of Carleton Place. Pallbearers were six nephews, Bill and David Snedden, Bill Sutton, Hugh Fulton, Earl and Sandy Snedden. Interment was in Auld Kirk Cemetery.

 

relatedreading

Antique Furniture? The End of an Era?

The Whiskey Keg Chair of Lanark County

The Drought of 1871 and the Mills on the Mississippi River

 

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Archie MacDonald of George Street

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Archie MacDonald of George Street

 

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Photo-Perth Remembered

 

The largest and most prominent business establishment of its kind in Lanark is that of Mr. A. MacDonald located on George Street. This business was an old established one and has been under its present management for 7 years. The premises occupied are embraced in a large commodious store comprising of 3 floors which are neatly and fitted up in perfect keeping.

 

A warehouse is maintained in the rear and the stock of goods is one of the largest kind to be found in Lanark. The articles carried includes: dry goods, ready made clothing, boots, shoes, carpets, linoleums, wallpaper, groceries, provisions, glassware,hardware etc.

A leading specialty is made of high class dress goods, trimming, ready to wear skirts, jackets, furs, and ladies wear in general. All the goods are stylish and and up to date. The staff of salespeople there will be found ready obliging and courteous to the trade at all times. Mr. MacDonald is well known here and devotes strict personal attention to every detail pertaining to it.

Circa 1910 Lanark Village

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

historicalnotes

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Dec 1924, Thu,  Page 2

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  02 Feb 1952, Sat,  Page 5

 

 

relatedreading

Village of Lanark Business Directory 1886– 1887

John A Darou 1905 Lanark Village

Does Anyone Remember Cohen’s in Lanark Village?

The Watts Bros Seed Company Lanark Village

The Lanark Ginseng Company?

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

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122 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Photo-Steve Flint

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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122 Bridge Street Carleton Place

The long narrow outlet was Nat McAllister’s bike repair shop and later became a candy shop. The building at 122 Bridge was more than likely affected by the 1923 fire at The Golden Lion store next door, so it has either been rebuilt on account of that and since then has remained virtually unchanged except for the windows on the second storey and the addition of the area between 120 and 122 Bridge Street.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 02 Jul 1953, Thu, Page 35

Originally this building was the site of a cooperage operated by Mr. Burke and eventually
became the property of William McDiarmid. Murray O’Dell moved to town and set up an appliance shop in the larger building. Bob Flint became his second in command and he took over the business when O’Dell married Doris Munshaw and left town. Onna Culberton Archdeacon who had been an employee moved the business of O’Dell’s to 73 Bridge Street where The Eating Place is today.

Bob Flint’s store was the first to sell televisions in Carleton Place. and Bruce Sadler put up all the aerials in Carleton Place. Bob Flint’s son continued the business under the same name and years later they moved to the other side of Bridge Street closer to the Town Hall.

 

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The Carleton Place area photo posted is from the Porteous family collection. It was one that Pat Allan’s Mom, Muriel (nee Porteous) James, took when she was stationed near Ottawa while in RCAF (WWII) Pat Allan.. Looking for names.. Downtown Carleton Place–I see the Philco sign of Flints and the Billiards sign and the Keyes building

Related reading

Bob Flint’s TV Tips

The Danger Zone —TV Technicians in Carleton Place

The Anchor on Lake Ave East???? Land Ahoy!!! Mike Flint

 

124 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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124 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

Before Williams operated his butcher store at 124 Bridge Street, a tea store was
housed in this building. McDonald’s tea store sold a great variety and selection of
teas. In 1897, B.Y. Williams moved his butcher shop from the opera hall block to the
Burke building next to the old Duncan McDiarmid store. In 1898, Moore Knowles bought out Williams. In 1899, Olmstead and Stanzel bought Moore Knowles butcher shop. In the same year Williams opened his shop next to Mitchell and Cram.

 

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In 1918, Williams returned to 124 Bridge Street to conduct his butcher shop business. Later it was run by his son C.Y. Buzz Williams. Some of the employees were: Maurice Pommerville, Willis Armour, Mervin Devlin, Susie Rothwell as well as John and Peter Williams. Buzz and his wife took over the store for some time but later Joe Kleibor and Mr. Bernicky of Smiths Falls ran the butcher business for a period of time.

124 Bridge Street remained in the Williams Family until 1971 when the building was sold to Ken Young. In 1967, the Young’s (Ken and Joy) began their operation of Young’s Variety leasing the premises and for 22 years conducted business at 124 Bridge Street until 1989, when the couple retired from business. Some of their employees were: Frances Smith, Peggy Johnston and Marg Smith. Later it became a sports store, a pizza parlour and in 2006 a Tai Chi Studio is in operation at 124 Bridge Street.

 

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Bridge Street 2006 The Thai Chi group — In 2006, a Tai Chi Studio is in operation at 124 Bridge Street. Photo by Mike Jeays.

 

Related reading

It’s Dave Young’s “Variety” Photo Page -70s

The Roar of the Referees and the Smell of the Hockey Bag in Carleton Place

 

126 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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126 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

The property at 126 Bridge Street belonged to the Burke Estate for quite a number
of years before ownership passed to Lloyd Tetlock. In 1918, Tetlock bought the
building from Burke at 126 Bridge Street. Tetlock ran a plumbing and tinsmith shop.
Osie Hastie began working for Tetlock in 1923. Upon Tetlock’s death in 1945, Osie
and Roy bought the business. Roy retired in 1971.

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Interior of Tetlock store-Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The sons of Roy and Osie Hastie kept the business going for a short time. In 1989, Hastie Bros. moved from their Bridge Street location after serving Carleton Place for 44 years. Mr. Hastie took over the small store next door which had been the hair salon of Edna (Wright) Curtis to have more floor space for displays.  Gerald and Ken continued the business for a short time and Gerald ended u0 moving his business to Campbell Street in the old tannery building. Hastie’s continued to own the building until 1999 when it
was sold to Ferguson who then sold it to Van Zetten.

 

Related reading:

Goin’ Shopping at The Tetlock Bros of Carleton Place

130-132 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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130-132 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870 1920

There must have been a fire in the early 1900s and this building seems to be reconstructed. Assessment rolls had Dr. Switzer at this location renting
from William McDiarmid.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Mar 1898, Wed,  Page 2

Marg Whyte recalls that Mr. White was the first person to live in this building but he does not take ownership until 1920.One of the first mentions of Dr. Switzer pharmacist is in the 1876 Assessment Rolls.
There is an advertisement for Switzer and Bros in an 1883 edition of The Carleton
Place Herald. The first family to occupy this brick building was Robert White and he operated a taxi business. They were a large family consisting of Mrs. Stunden,Mrs. Carrie Grove and Edith White. The boys were: Jack Everett and Guy.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 04 Jan 1974, Fri, Page 43 CLICK on whole article to read all about local photographer Ernie Foote–

The other side of the building was rented to Ernie and Anne Foote who ran a photography shop. Ernie Foote photographer took school photos and was responsible for distribution of an Ottawa paper.

Jim Amy Kirkpatrick said: “He was my uncle and yes the optometrist was was in his building. I used to watch all the parades from upstairs.”

Nancy Hudson said: He took all the school photos and then they would be displayed in his store windows.

Howard Little ran a barbershop there later and then it was rented to G.B. McDonald an optometrist for a number of years. Bruce McDonald was an optometrist in one half of building. Then Ernie Foote retired and Howard Little ran a small barber shop there and it later rented to G. B. McDonald.  Bruce McDonald took over the entire building and when he retired and left Carleton Place Dr. Ian Edmonson took over.

 

136-138 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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136-138 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

Before Sam Dunfield took over ownership of 136 Bridge Street some of the
businesses included O’Neill’s barbershop, McFarlane’s harness shop, Howe Jewellers,
and Tucker’s Jewellers.

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

The Sam Dunfield building had two recessed entrances as well as another door leading to the upstairs living quarters. Mr. Dunfield ran a bottling works and manufactured them after buying the business from A.R. G. Peden.

These were put into stone bottles with a spring cap and the most popular ones were Cream Soda and Ginger Ale. Their daughter Agnes was the social correspondent for the local paper and Pegg (Flegg) worked for Matthews Furniture store.

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Ottawa Citizen – Jan 18, 1937

Elmer Doyle later on ran an eatery on the side next to the Queen’s and called it The Blue Spot. Sometime after that the town rented both of these outlets and made them into public washrooms but on account of vandalism this was discontinued. William Miller  and his wife Marguerite Griffin purchased the building and also became tenants. There is a photograph of this store at the National Gallery but is not viewable.

Artist
Medium
Photograph
Date
1966-1970

Related Reading

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

Read in the series

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s–

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What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall August 1897

Community Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 8– It was 1963

Community Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 9– It was 1903!

A Lyle Dillabough Flashback– 150th Birthday

Carleton Place Community Memories 1967–150th

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Looking for Memories of Edith Knowlton

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Looking for Memories of Edith Knowlton

 

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Photo 1978

In the early 20s the Barnes Family opened a store in what most people today know as McDonald Sports on Bridge Street almost across from the old  dairy.  It was purchased from the Barnes family who remodelled it with living quarters upstairs. Morna, Doris and Oliver Barnes later moved to George Street and then Clarence Emmerson’s family ran the grocery store. Jack, Ethel and Neil lived on the second floor and later moved to Smiths Falls. After that Mrs. Edith Knowlton continued the grocery business for a number of years. I would like to have her recorded here online.

What do we know about Edith Knowlton from Carleton Place?

1.She bought an illuminated sign and used to advertise community things

2. She understood her customers wanted

3.You could still run a tab at her store

4.You could order your groceries by telephone

5. You could drop in and have a chat and she served fresh coffee and had treats for all her customers at Christmas

6. Her husband ran a farm near Elgin

7. She had a daughter Janet

8. One wall of her store had happy face wallpaper

So what can you add? Please leave comments or email me at sav_77@yahoo.com

 

KNOWLTON, Edith W. (nee Crichton) In hospital, Carleton Place, Ontario, on Tuesday, March 16th, 2004, from earth to eternal rest with God in heaven. Loved wife of the late Charles Knowlton. Loved and remembered by her children, Janet and Allan; her brothers, George and Joe; a gazillion family members and relatives, friends and acquaintances, and last but not least Kaylie-Pup. After cremation, an informal time of visitation and service to remember her will be held at the ALAN R. BARKER FUNERAL HOME 19 McArthur Ave., Carleton Place on Tuesday, March 23rd, 2004 from 1 p.m. with service in the chapel at 2:30 p.m. with the Reverend David Mullin officiating. Edith’s ashes will be interred with her late husband in the family plot. Donations may be made to Carleton Place/Beckwith Community Support. “Come to Me all who are weary and heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” Matthew 11:28

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading.jpg

 

From the Files of The Canadian — Who is This? Where is This?

What is this? From Karen Prytula– LCGS

Lost and Found Carleton Place–Do you Have this?

Where is This?

Can You Read This?

Where is This?

What Would Our Ancestors Think of this? A Hippie Airbnb?

 

 

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