Category Archives: Uncategorized

I Miss My Howick Ballroom Jeans –The 70s Revisited

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This is why Daylight Savings Time needs to be abolished– I think we all turned the clocks back a little too far. Someone is trying to cash in on nostalgia– you know, what is old is new again. Of course people who used to wear wide-leg jeans should now rejoice. According to Christie Creighton Wallace’s Facebook page the jeans that outfitted a generation are coming back to cover America’s legs in oversized, elaborately decorated denim. JNCO short for “jean company,” is a Los Angeles based clothing company who specialized in wide-legged jean styles for men and women that gained popularity in the ’90s . Yeah, let’s bring these back, along with random escalator fatalities, or something like that.

I’m not sure the teenagers will give up their skinny style just yet. However, if you been to anime cons or comic cons, or heard of Kandi Kids, I am pretty…

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Dow’s Swamp- The Most Dismal Place in the Wilderness

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Flashy Memories of Pandora’s Box ETC — Oh Ottawa Behave!

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Flashy Memories of Pandora’s Box ETC — Oh Ottawa Behave!

Updated for 2021

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“I had no interest in owning a strip club.  Heck I was barely in Pandora’s Box”-Harvey Glatt

 
 

When I opened Flash Cadilac on Rideau Street in the 70s, I had no idea that the general public venturing into my store would call it “weird or strange”. That opening Friday night I thought I was just “a run of the mill store” and had my first sale that was over $50. It was a vintage raccoon coat being sold to a stripper at Pandora’s Box that she bought along with a black feather boa.

I stared at the glimmer of her bright red hair and just envied everything about her. During our conversation she told me stripping was actually a thrill for her and she invited me to watch her dance. When I saw the photo of Pandora’s Box on Lost Ottawa last week it felt like it was…

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Appleton–Memories of Arthur Robinson –The Federated Women’s Institutes of Eastern Ontario

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Appleton–Memories of Arthur Robinson –The Federated Women’s Institutes of Eastern Ontario

Also read-Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

Appleton General Store – Names Names Names— Wesley West Appleton and Almonte Merchant

The Appleton General Store and Polly Parrot

Hot off the Press –Old Appleton Post Office & General Store –Sarah More

Snippets– James Wilson and Nelson Syme — Appleton

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

For the Love of Fungi and Leprechauns By Noreen Tyers

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From childhood I have been fascinated with all different fungi.  Being a child who climbed trees and would sit for a time and take in her surroundings, I was conscious of Nature and growing things.

I came from an Irish background and a grandfather that did instill the magic of the imagination.  I travelled on many adventures with him, touring his workshop and watching him create his many talents and thoughts. Grandpa always found a lesson in everything he did and always shared his knowledge.  

He was a man of many talents and one thing he did was make Dandelion Wine.  He had his recipe which had been in his family for years.  Come Dandelion season, he would be getting ready to pick his blossoms, he would ask if I would like to help.  Out to the woodshed he went and picked up an old apple basket and away we would go,

It seems to me the best place for the blossoms was the green space by the railway track.  We did have to walk the path at the end of the field across on the other side of Gardner Street.  The field/bush had many things to be discovered and one thing I had noticed was the fungi growing on the side of the tree. Because my Grandpa was always so smart and had the answers, I asked him about it.  As we were walking, we passed an old tree and there it was a charming growth on the trunk of the tree. When I asked about it, he said well you see that is where your leprechaun lives.

Laura Logan

Now I did believe that this is where my interest came from.  He explained that every little person had a leprechaun to watch over them, but they were hard to find, as they sometimes became invisible.  They did not like to be found as they were always watching out for your well being.  He told me if you approached the fungi and looked under it you might just find your little leprechaun sitting there. I do have to admit as we were on a mission for those yellow blooms from the dandelion, I did not get the chance to look.

I have to admit I never did find my Noisey O’Really in all my time of looking, although there were times I felt someone on my shoulder. 

You know things do come back into your life again and teachings you received as a child do come back to be.  When my nephew was about six years old he would come to visit for a week during the summer and stay at our home.  He was a delightful child.

At the time we had a dog I would walk and Kevin  would come with me on a tour of our walk around the block.  One day on a tree by the spot between the sidewalk and the street there was a fungus on the trunk of the tree.  It was much too close to the ground for me to bend and look for the leprechaun.

Like any Irish descendant, Aunt would pass the story on,  and she told him that If he was quiet and did not make too much noise, he might find a leprechaun.  It seems to me whenever he visited he would come on my dog walk.  The only thing was the leprechaun also eluded Kevin.

I guess we were not quiet enough and I am still waiting to find my Leprechaun.

From the ✒ of Noreen

October 2021

Hair Attention — Noreen Tyers

The Handmade Tablecloth — Noreen Tyers

Cutting a Christmas Tree at the House of Old at R. R. # 4 — Noreen Tyers

Making the Fudge for that Special School Affair 1940s Noreen Tyers

The Teeter Totter Incident Noreen Tyers

Childhood Movie Nights at Reliance Motor Court in Eastview — Noreen Tyers

Hats, Ogilvy’s and Gaudy Teenage Years — Noreen Tyers

Sending Thoughts of Winter to You, from my Wee Dog Ruffy Noreen Tyers

A Trip in the Carrying Case– Noreen Tyers

Just Me Growing Up in the Early 1940’s Noreen Tyers

Grandma and the Cute Little Mice– From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Another Broken Bed Incident — Stories from Richards Castle — Noreen Tyers

Lets Play Elevator- Charles Ogilvy Store — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Jack’s in Charge-Scary Stories — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages —- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

I am Afraid of Snakes- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Hitching a Ride Cross Town — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

My Old Orange Hat –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Out of the Old Photo Album — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle — From the Pen Of Noreen Tyers

Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Barbra Ann Scott Doll –Noreen Tyers

Greetings From Ruffy on Groundhog Day Noreen Tyers

That Smell Of The Lanark County SAP Being Processed — Noreen Tyers

Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages — Noreen Tyers

The old Sheepskin Slippers Noreen Tyers

The First Half Century of Ottawa Pictorial McLeod Stewart – Simpson Book Collection

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The First Half Century of Ottawa Pictorial McLeod Stewart – Simpson Book Collection

From the Simpson Book Collection-Ed and Shirley’s Simpson –Historic Books — the List

Ottawa]: The Esdale Press, 1910. Softcover. 84 p. 17 x 26 cm. B&w photos and illustrations. Grey paper covers tied with cream-coloured twine.

This books has been reprinted

click here…

Related reading

Simpson Book Collection

Bustling About Burritt’s Rapids– Public School Photos

Remember Lover’s Lane? Lover’s Walk? Les Chats Sauvage? Simpson Books

You Have to Open Up a Business Here!!! 1912 Ottawa Marketing — Simpson Books

The Oldest Building on Ottawa and Opeongo Line

Down on Main Street– 1911-Photos- For the Discriminating and the Particular — Simpson Books

The General Hospital 1867-1929 Photos — Simpson Books

Clippings of the Old Albion Hotel

Renfrew Fair 1953-1953-Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

Did You Know? Union School #9 and Goulburn #16

When One Boat Filled the Rideau Lock–Rideau King

Women’s Institute Burritts Rapids 1902-1988

1906 INDUSTRIAL AND PICTURESQUE OTTAWA CANADA – PHOTOS— Simpson Book Collection

Not Hogwarth’s —- It’s Hoggards of Ottawa! Besserer Street History

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Not Hogwarth’s —- It’s  Hoggards of Ottawa! Besserer Street History

bottles!!

lindaseccaspina

Bottle from Adin Wesley Daigle

George Hoggard manufactured carbonated water called deep rock Lithia water, and also produced ginger ale and cream soda. Instead of having a cork for a stopper, it had inside its neck a glass ball much like a marble. Pressure of the liquid forced the ball up into the mouth of the bottle, where it acted like a stopper. His brother William patented it in the late 1800s/

patent list for Wiliam Hoggard Ottawa for his stopper invention

So what was Lithia water? It’s defined as a type ofmineral watercharacterised by the presence oflithiumsalts(aslithium carbonateorlithium chloride). Natural lithia mineral spring waters are rare, and there are few commercially bottled lithia water products.

Between the 1880s and World War I, the consumption of bottled lithia mineral water was popular and during this era, there was such a demand for lithia water that there was a proliferation…

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Anyone Know About This? Via Dolorosa

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Anyone Know About This? Via Dolorosa

Thank you for not trespassing.

If you read some of Daniel Keating’s rules on Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley

Trespassing is not considered appropriate. It is understood that if we are alerted by a property owner about an area that is owned by them that we will remove your post.We must keep the integrity of the location intact for those that wish to view later.7. Absolutely no vandalism or theft from properties is condoned. Please keep these beautifully abandoned properties in their slowly decaying state.

Linda,

You don’t know me but I follow your posts in the various groups. I live in Beckwith Township and often take rides around the neighborhood. On one such ride I saw this on the side of the road on an old fence. It is located on the Brunton Side Rd. further along where the Beckwith /Montague border is. There is a farm opposite side with a large wooden gateway with a skull and some other stuff (also cool Lol)

Just wondering if you could shed some light on the significance of it relating to the area it is located. I took the photo of the Cross several yrs ago and a friend of mine recently jumped the fence and took the second photo. He did not want to venture any further inside the property as he was alone and probably trespassing. We know it’s religious significance just curious who owns the site etc etc. Any help solving this mystery would be much appreciated. Thanks.

Can anyone help?

The Via Dolorosa (Latin for “Sorrowful Way”, often translated “Way of Suffering”; Hebrew: ויה דולורוזה; Arabic: طريق الآلام‎) is a processional route in the Old City of Jerusalem. It represents the path that Jesus would have taken, forced by the Roman soldiers, on the way to his crucifixion. The winding route from the former Antonia Fortress to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre — a distance of about 600 metres (2,000 feet)— is a celebrated place of Christian pilgrimage. The current route has been established since the 18th century, replacing various earlier versions. It is today marked by nine Stations of the Cross; there have been fourteen stations since the late 15th century, with the remaining five stations being inside the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Wikipedia click here

I assume this is a nature walk for the stations of the cross.. I hope someone knows something about it.But please respect it and keep it safe.

Linda

Have you Ever Seen the Praying Station? The Buchanan Scrapbooks

The Mysterious 5th Line ?????

The Spirit of the 7th Line

Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

The Gnarled Beckwith Oak

So Where is that Gnarled Oak in Beckwith?

Lock Up Your Dogs — Devlin’s Cat Has Rabies 1929

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Lock Up Your Dogs — Devlin’s Cat Has Rabies 1929

November 1929

During the past week says the Carleton Place Herald, a cat belonging to Mr. W. Devlin scratched a couple of the children, a very unusual thing with the pet animal. A day or two later the cat again showed ill-will to the family by biting Mrs. Devlin on the hand. The scratches on the children healed naturally but the bite became alarming and a physician was called.

The history was to prove that the cat had been bitten by a dog some5 days previous. The cat was destroyed and the animal sent to Ottawa for examination when it was found to be a pronounced case of rabies. Those affected are progressing favorably and no serious results are expected. In the meantime the authorities have taken all precautionary measures to stamp out the trouble, and all dogs are ordered to be tied up in the meantime.

In 1911, Philadelphia drug company H. K. Mulford announced a new rabies treatment kit that could be shipped directly to doctors and was simple enough that “physicians who have had no previous experience may successfully apply it.” The kit is a reminder that even the best medicine is of no consequence if it is not available and affordable.

The treatment consisted of 25 injections of rabies vaccine: three on the first day, two on the second, two on the third, and one each day after for 18 days. Each dose was slightly stronger, or more virulent, than the preceding, so that the body could build up immunity. Because the vaccine had to be “fresh” to be effective it could not be stocked by druggists. Subsequent daily doses were shipped directly from Philadelphia in a special Caloris vacuum bottle (not unlike your coffee thermos).

Today the post-exposure treatment for rabies consists of four doses of vaccine given over a two-week period. The injections are usually given in the upper arm.

The museum’s rabies vaccine kit, from the early 1920s, contains the following: three ampules of rabies vaccine, doses one, two, and three; 26 syringes with physiological salt solution; 26 needles for the syringes; two metal piston rods and two metal finger rests for the syringes; one two-dram vial of tincture of iodine; two charts for recording cases; one letter of general instructions; two stamped return envelopes; one record-of-treatment blank; and one vial of sterile wires. The treatment at this time had been reduced to only 21 doses to be administered one a day for 21 days, and the Caloris vacuum bottle was replaced with a cardboard mailing tube.

1881 Census before he was married and he worked at a sawmill. His father’s name was Charles so he went by William

DetailSource

Name:Chas W Devlin
Gender:Male
Marital Status:Single
Age:23
Birth Year:abt 1868
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1891
Residence Place:Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Relation to Head:Son
Religion:e c
Occupation:Saw Mill Hand
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
French Canadian:No
Father’s Name:James Devlin
Father’s Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Name:Eliza J Devlin
Mother’s Birth Place:Ontario
Division Number:

1911 Census William worked at Findlay’s

Name:Chas W Devlin
Gender:Male
Race:White
Racial or Tribal Origin:English
Nationality:Canadian
Marital status:Married
Age:33
Birth Date:5 Jan 1868
Birth Place:Ontario
Relation to Head of House:Head
Religion:Church of England
Occupation:Foundry Laborer
Hourly Wage:400
Working at Trade in Factory or in Home:F
Months Employed at Trade in Factory:10
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
Can Speak English:Yes
Province:Ontario
District:Lanark (South/Sud)
District Number:81
Sub-District:Carleton Place (Town/Ville)
Sub-District Number:2
Family Number:49
Neighbors:View others on page
Household Members:NameAgeCharles Devlin33Florence Devlin32Verna W Devlin6Lloyd E. Devlin4

Save

Related reading

Eva L. Devlin Pilot Crashed at Perth Fair

The Devlins and Weldon Armour– Ray Paquette

Dishing up the Memories of The Devlins

What was Puking Fever? Child Bed Fever?  

Sadler Farm Part 2 Jaan Kolk Nancy Anderson and Lorraine Nephin

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I’m not quite finished annotation, but here is that aerial photo (finally).
These are the same image, one the way it came, and the second with annotations. The RCAF took the photo in 1966, shortly after we left the farm for the first time. Our second tenancy began in January of 1970 and ended in the summer of 1974.
Let me know if you have any questions.
Nancy Anderson

Photos from Lorraine Nephin-Sadler farm- kitchen ,living room, Lamp from kitchen. beaded by hand by my grandmother

Photos from Lorraine Nephin-Sadler farm- kitchen ,living room, Lamp from kitchen. beaded by hand by my grandmotherThe lamp was given to my dad. He had it in his new house. It now hangs in my kitchen.

From Historian Jaan Kolk

Unfortunately, the Belden atlas did not list any land owners for that area; however, the 1863 Walling map does have some names. If I have the location right, it looks like it was lot 16, Conc. X, marked as “O. Cambly” (not perfectly clear), beside P. Lynch and and J. Brushnaham in Conc. XI. Here’s a crop from that map. Does that look the right location to you?

Concession 10, lot 16 was the Sadler farm in 1916. J.E. Symington owned Conc. 11, lot 16. Here’s what I found in directories I have covering Ramsay Township: 1884 Fuller directory 10 16 (not found) 11 16 Patrick Lynch 1885 Farmers directory, 1886 Farmers 10 16 John Menzies, J B Menzies 11 16 Patrick Lynch 1904 Farmers directory 10 16 John Kelly and W G F Kelly 11 16 J K Darling, I A Nontell 1916 Vernon directory 10 16 Fred Sadler 11 16 J.E. Symington.

I found newspaper mention of a Fred Sadler of Almonte in 1900; however, the 1904 directory shows him in lot conc. 9, lot 13. Fred must have moved sometime between 1904 and 1916. I found no mention of a Joe Sadler; there was a Thomas Sadler in Appleton, and other Sadlers in other townships. Nancy Anderson mentioned the Sadler farm was 100 acres, and that fits conc. 10, lot 16 as well. The full lots were surveyed 200 acres originally, but as you can see, half of that lot had become part of the town by 1863.

From Howard Morton Brown CLICK

The first bold venture of Scottish settlers of Ramsay upon little-known local waterways was made in 1821 down the Clyde and Mississippi rivers from Lanark village to the falls at the site of Almonte. The boats, made of boards sawn at Lanark, proved fit to survive the rocks of the numerous rapids and the difficult portages of the excursion. The water borne explorers appear to have included Walter Black, James and Thomas Craig, John Downie, James Hart, Arthur Lang, John Lockhart, William Moir, John Neilson, William Paul, John Smith, John Steele, John Toshack and others. It seems that those undertaking boat building at Lanark probably also brought their families to Ramsay in the expedition by lake and river.

As recalled by Arthur Lang’s eldest son, William Lang (1811-1902), their craft were “rough boats build by the men. A good many portages had to be made and it took some days to complete the trip. When coming down Mississippi Lake they stopped at an island, and while preparing a meal a big Indian hove into sight. Fear filled every heart. The late John Steele was equal to the occasion. He seized a huge loaf of bread and presented it to the Indian as an evidence of their friendly intentions. The peace offering was not accepted and the Indian passed by on his way to his camp on another part of the island, paying no attention to them. A night was spent on the north shore of the river above the falls at Carleton Place, beds being spread on the ground.” At the present location of the Almonte town hall shelters were made in wigwam style for use as a headquarters until all had completed the building of cabins on their lands.

Five years earlier the native Indians had been in undisputed possession of the whole region of the unknown Mississippi. The Indians of the Mississippi area are seen in a description of them by the Rev. William Bell, recorded within two months of his 1817 arrival at Perth : “In the afternoon two families of Indians in three canoes came down the river and pitched their tent upon the island in the middle of the village. They were the first I had seen since I came to the place. They had deer, muskrats and various kinds of fowls which they exposed for sale. The deer was small but they sold it at a dollar a quarter – the head with the horns at the same price.

Their canoes were all of birch bark about eighteen feet long and three feet wide at the middle. They had in each canoe a capital fowling-piece and several spring traps for taking game and all the men were armed with the tomahawk. They had all black hair, brown complexions and active well-formed bodies. All of them even the children had silver ornaments in their ears.”

(Five days later:)

“While we were at breakfast the whole band of Indians with their baggage passed our house on their way to the Mississippi River ten miles distant. Each of the men carried a canoe on his head. The squaws were loaded with blankets, skins, kettles, tents etc., like as many asses.” Over the five year period before the pioneers of Ramsay had arrived settlers had located at points along the Mississippi from Morphys Falls and Mississippi Lake up to Dalhousie Lake. Sections still occupied by Indians included those at Mississippi Lake where as then noted by the Rev. William Bell, “some of the islands in the lake are still inhabited by Indians, whose hunting grounds are on the north side and who are far being pleased with the encroachments our settlers are making on their territories.”

Looking for Information on the Native Fort Farm of Fred Sadler of Almonte

The Sadler Farm on Highway 44– Nancy Anderson

Did We Find Henry Lang’s Barn?

Related Reading

The Little Door by the River

The Natives of Carleton Place — Violins and Deer

Constable Frank Rose – Moonshine, Indians, Raids, Drunks and Dances –The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Captured by Natives Alice Garland

Beckwith Child Stolen by Natives

Living with the Natives — Mrs Copithorne’s Bread

What Do You Know About Walpole Island?

Walking Without Knowing the Amplifying Truth

Kamloops Industrial School– “A New Idea in Residential Schools” After the Fire 1925

Another Segment in the Short Life of Jessie Comrie– Residential Schools –1919