Category Archives: Uncategorized

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to…

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to…

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Volume 1 of: Mississippi Hotel- Canadian Tire Gas Bar- Pizza Pizza-Bond store- As Good As New–Bud’s Taxi–The Moose– Brown & MacFarlane–CLICK HERE

Every day something new will be added… 59 more to go

26-28 Bridge Street Carleton

 

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Before

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Now

26-28 Bridge Street Carleton

Built circa 1880–

Ms. Dalgattie operated a store at 26 Bridge Street from about 1882 until the 1910s. During Ms. Dalgattie’s ownership of this building, the CP Telegraph was also housed in this building. Some of the people who rented half of the building from Ms. Dalgattie included Dummert’s Bakery, Stevens Grocery, Mrs. Broom rented an apartment, Hastie, and Shepherd. In the 1930s, Sam Wilson operated a second hand store and Mr. White operated a tinsmith shop.

Some of the business owners that worked out of 26 Bridge Street included Fevreau’s Bakery in the 1960s, Judy McGlade Financial, Tom’s Bike Repair, and Danny’s Meat Market until he moved to Bell Street.

I also seem to remember a music store there too and hope someone can help me out.

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Volume 1 of: Mississippi Hotel- Canadian Tire Gas Bar- Pizza Pizza-Bond store- As Good As New–Bud’s Taxi–The Moose– Brown & MacFarlane–CLICK HERE

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historicalnotes

 

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Carleton Place — A Valley Town at Confederation 

In Canada’s Year of Confederation, the busy sawmill village of Carleton Place had a population of about 700 people. Many citizens were sons and daughters of the Scottish emigrants who had settled the area in the 1820’s.Most of the town’s buildings stood on the north side of the Mississippi River, with only about 12 houses on the south.

Shops on Bell, Mill and Bridge Street were open from 6 am to 10 pm and the average work day for laborers was 11 hours! Want to know more about what Carleton Place (formerly Morphy’s Falls) looked like in 1867?

Read more in the Carleton Place Community Information Guide or stop by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum and check out their summer exhibition.

 relatedreading

So What Really Happened to Samuel Cram?

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So What Really Happened to Samuel Cram?

 

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Photo taken at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

I saw this display at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Friday night and became intrigued. What had made this clever, former school teacher in Beckwith drown? Surely there had to be more to the story. Nothing came up for awhile until I found it searching for something else. It was said he had sadly committed suicide.

 

December 3 1915-Almonte Gazette

Samuel Cram, an aged and esteemed resident of Carleton Place, was found drowned in shallow water near the power house Monday morning. He was 78 years of age and a few years ago underwent an operation on his head. Since then he has been a sufferer from neuralgia, although he was able to go about.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal29 Nov 1915, MonPage 2

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

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McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

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Daniel McLaren was William Muirhead’s uncle, the brother of his mother Agnes. He also was  a bachelor and very well to do. Mary McLeod and her sister Isabella were Daniel’s housekeepers and apparently upon his death when his will was read; he had left his estate to the McLeod sisters.

Christina/Christena Muirhead took the sisters to court and was successful in recovering all the real estate and chattels. All the McLeod sisters were left with after the court case were a bunch of blankets. Lawyers argued that it was a scene that had played over and over countless times  throughout the years. An old man verging on senility had the “wool blankets” pulled over his eyes by a couple of conniving and unscrupulous attendants.

These two sisters did not stop there. They also spread rumours that Christina/Christena Muirhead had poisoned her husband and then had her accused of murder. The trial was in Perth and upon opening statement the judge said to the lawyer,

“These two sisters say they heard you said that William Muirhead died from poisoning!”

The doctor quickly answered,

“I did say that- it was poisoning from the infection following a leg amputation, but not poison given to him by anyone!”

The case was immediately dismissed.

Next story: Life in Beckwith

 

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal28 Apr 1887, ThuPage 3

 

relatedreading

 

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Killed by Zulus — Duncan and James Box

Was a Boldt Castle Boathouse Once in our Midst? See the Home of the Daphne!

He Hailed from Carleton Place– Harold Box– The Forgotten Scientist?

“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

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Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

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1920-02-27-01-Almonte Gazette

Brief mention was made last, week of the death of Mr. Peter Cram, one of our oldest and -most prominent citizens, which sad event occurred on the 18th instant, after a brief illness, of heart failure, although he had never fully recovered from the effects of a stroke that he sustained some 18 months previous.

Mr. Cram was born in Beckwith, in January, 1831, being a son of the the late James Cram, whose farm was that at present owned by Mr. Fred M. Cram, and who was a son of one of the earliest of the township’s settlers. The subject of our sketchsipent his early days upon the land, and shortly after the gold find in California joined a party of some half dozen young men from this locality– the Teskeys and Moffatts being of the party—and in 1852 travelled across the continent to the golden state.

A couple of years later he returned and in company with his brother, the late John F Cram built a tannery at Appleton, and made a success of it, later on adding wool-pulling as a branch of their business. While living at Appleton Mr. Cram was married, his wife being Margaret Campbell of Drummond, their marriage taking place in April, 1857.

Five children blessed their fireside, two sons and three daughters. One of the latter died in Perth, at the age of 14 years. The others survive—J. A. C., at home; John W., assistant king’s printer, Regina; Mrs. George Watters (Mary) and Mrs. Wm. Findlay. (Annie)

Mrs. Cram predeceased her husband, passing away in 1909, two years after celebrating their golden wedding. The business partnership at Appleton was dissolved by Mr. J. F. Cram withdrawing and coming to Carleton Place, and some years later Peter sold out and removed with his family to Perth, where they resided for some years, coming to Carleton Place in 1882, and a couple of years later purchasing the property on High Street, on the top of the hill, where his home has since been until the last.

He was a great reader, possessed a wonderful memory and could quote whole sections of history or chapters of the Bible at will He was a versatile writer, and on occasion could use this faculty in a masterly fashion. He always took a keen interest in public affairs, and for many years was a member of the Board of Education and also a member of the town council.

In religion, he was a Presbyterian, and the services at the funeral, which took place on Saturday afternoon were conducted by Rev. Mr. Monds assisted by Rev. Mr. Forsythe.  The pallbearers were four nephews, Messrs. Ro’bt. Cram Westboro; Colin McIntosh, A. E. Cram and F. ‘M. Cram, and Messrs. Ro&t. Patterson and Wm. Baird. Interment w as made in Pine Grove cemetery.

Mr. J. W. Cram arrived from Regina on Saturday morning in time for the obsequies. We will miss the kindly smile and friendly greeting and long in vain to hear the ring of jovial laughter and to feel again his genial presence but with the poet can say

“Cold in dust the perished heart may die, But that which warmed it once can never die.”— From C.C.

historicalnotes

A Cyclopaedia of Canadian Biography: Being Chiefly Men of the Time …, Volume 2

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Read the rest at A Cyclopaedia of Canadian Biography: Being Chiefly Men of the Time …, Volume 2

The new fire engine was unable to save the inflammable new tannery and wool pulling plant of John F. Cram and Donald Munro, burned in 1886 with a fire loss of $10,000.

By 1840 Cram families owned seven different lots on Beckwith concessions 10, 11 and 12.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal11 Jan 1900, ThuPage 2

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal22 Mar 1900, ThuPage 7

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Do You Know Where the Floor is From in the Almonte Town Hall?

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Do You Know Where the Floor is From in the Almonte Town Hall?

 

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My New Waterfront Home

January  22 1920-Almonte Gazette

Almonte’s bush lot is going to prove of greater usefulness than the supplying of fuel for our local citizens. It will also provide a new hard maple flooring for the town hall, both upstairs and downstairs. The floors of the town hall are giving out and they are worn and uneven. When wood flooring was considered it never occurred to one of the bright minds of the council that there was enough of the very finest hard maple in the town’s bush lot to cover the floors and lots more besides.

This is to be acted upon and Councillors Bennett and McDonald moved on Wednesday that the fuel committee supply a sufficient amount of hard maple to cover the floors. This was carried unanimously as was also a motion later by Councilors O’Reilly and Gilmour that a sufficient quantity of timber to be taken out of the town bush lot to also cover the bridge near the Wylie Mill.

Councillor Gilmour stated in reply that there was enough red elm and spruce to do this work. In connection with both proposals it is stated that the advice of Council Gilmour will prove vauable when the details as to sawing and drying about  the wood, particularly the maple for  the town hall flooring, are under consideration.

 

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal18 Dec 1965, SatPage 33

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal17 May 1969, SatPage 6

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal28 Jul 1917, SatPage 16

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

An Unfounded Rumour Going on at the Almonte Town Hall

She Came Back! A Ghost Divorce Story

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She Came Back! A Ghost Divorce Story

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A True Story from the Newspaper Archives 1897

When Miss Rippledeane married Mr. Baldwin in 1897 he was a widower. The marriage hit the skids pretty quickly and Mrs. Baldwin brought suit for divorce. It must have baffled the lawyers and judge as the grounds was because a ghost of former Mrs. Baldwin, his first wife, insisted on still jointly sharing the house and interfering with their matrimonial happiness in spirit.

Mrs. Baldwin insisted she was once a cheerful healthful woman, and now she was in a nervous frame of mind altogether owing to the ghostly persecutions of her husband’s former wife.

Apparently the former missus was waiting for the new missus the day they got married and the new bride saw her standing in the doorway dressed in white waiting for the new couple. The new Mrs. Baldwin asked her new husband who the lady was and he said he saw nothing of the sort. She thought he was jesting and upon giving the description of the ghostly vision the maidservant gave way to emotion declaring it was none other than the dead wife herself, Rosamond Baldwin.

Since that initial encounter the ghost followed her wherever she went, pinching her, pulling her hair, and causing her to cry out in front of guests. To collect further evidence she called for her sister Miss Anna Rippledeane to come visit, not telling her that the former Mrs. Baldwin was still calling her former residence home. One day Anna screamed in fright insisting that she too saw the lady in white. She made her new brother-in-law search for the ghost under the bed, which was futile.

In Mrs. Baldwin’s suit she claimed she once overheard her husband begging: “Rosamond please go away and leave him in peace”. Upon being interviewed Mr. Baldwin refused to speak about the incident. But, the divorce suit was brought forward and will determine whether Mrs. Baldwin is entitled to a divorce and whether Mr. Baldwin is creating bigamy by having one under the quick and even the dead.  if the divorce has granted Mr. Baldwin has assured his current wife that he will not marry again.

 

 

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Another sad Baldwin Tale

 

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Clipped from The Inter Ocean26 Apr 1889, FriPage 7

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

 

To Be Manic Depressive in a Rural Town — Kingston Insane Asylum

The Insane Spinster Ghost of Appleton Ontario

Embroidery of the Insane?

Be on the Lookout for the Sharps! Scams of Yesteryear? Shop Local!

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Be on the Lookout for the Sharps! Scams of Yesteryear? Shop Local!

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Be on the Lookout for the Sharps! 1911

 

An old confidence game is being played in this district with considerable success, and 30 victims at least are known in Lanark county. To prevent our readers from being “ roped” we will give a description of the game, taken from the Renfrew Mercury, and if the swindlers give you a call, set your bulldog on them.

A stranger comes along with a story, varying somewhat in different places, but generally something after this fashion:

He is an engineer, who has been running on a steamer to New Zealand, but has come to Canada to see an only sister, who dies, however, before he readies her. He had brought out to her, as a present, a very handsome chain, worth about $30. He is run out of funds at present and he tells the farmer at whose house he stops, that he is on his way to visit a rich uncle at a neighbouring town. If the farmer will only advance him a few dollars on the chain, he will be doing him an everlasting service, which he will not forget when he returns to recover the chain, and pay back the amount which he has borrowed.

Many persons have accommodated him with sums ranging from $1 to $5 and that is the last they have seen of him. A visit generally follows to the town jewellers, who have now become quite accustomed to the peculiar characteristics of a “ long face.” The chains are brass, lightly gilded, of taking appearance, but really worth about 20 cents a piece. Remember to trade with the local dealers exclusively and you will come out ahead in the end.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

The Young Buckos of Crime–The Jumpin’ Jack Flash of Clayton

Lanark County Convictions 1859-Who Do you Know?

Throwing a Snowball is Going to Cost you $1- Your Convictions of 1898

Step Right Up- Here are Your Family Convictions-September, 1894

Breach of the Town Bylaws and Other Convictions.. Sept. 11 1888

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–July 17, 1885

Assault Abusive Language and Bridget McNee

The Notorious Bridget McGee of Perth

Down at the Old Perth Gaol

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–Dec. 13, 1898-Who Do You Know?

Auctionering Without a License and Pigs on the Loose

Going to the Chapel –Drummond Whalen and Johnson of Carleton Place

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” in Lanark County

Jailhouse Rock in Lanark County Part 2

The Drunken Desperados of Carleton Place

The Young Offenders of Lanark County