Category Archives: Uncategorized

Fire Caused Strange Scene Near Portland

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Fire Caused Strange Scene Near Portland

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Portland, Ontario

 

In the year 1870 fire caused consternation among the wild things which inhabited a strip of uncultivated land on the north side of the Rideau across from Portland. The land was in North Burgess and was partly rocky, partly stumpy (had been cut for timber) and partly beaver meadow.

The land in question had a frontage of about a mile on the lake. The year 1870, as most people know, was a very dry year and fires broke out everywhere. Something started a fire in this “bad land.” The fire came from the north and the denizens of the “bad lands” could not escape that way.

The fire drove them towards the Rideau River. One day the residents of the south side of the Rideau witnessed a strange scene. They saw red foxes, coons, ground hogs, squirrels and rabbits jump into the river and swim towards the south side. It was a scene never before witnessed.

 

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historicalnotes

 - The Wood Fikes is Canada. Many incidents,...

 - fright; hardy men wno, perhaps never before...

Clipped from

  1. The Burlington Free Press,
  2. 07 Sep 1870, Wed,
  3. Other Editions,
  4. Page 2

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

relatedreading

The Drought of 1871 and the Mills on the Mississippi River

What Do You Know About the Burnt Lands?

When Crops Failed — Lanark County Went Manitoba Dreamin’

Run Pig Run–Shake it Off! Convictions of 1870

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Daughter of Minister Was Pinned to Log Wall by Wicked Bull

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Daughter of Minister Was Pinned to Log Wall by Wicked Bull

 

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Back in the 1850s there lived near Merrickville an Anglican minister named Morris, who was generally known as “Father” Morris. Mr. Morris, besides preaching, owned and operated a farm. He had some well bred cattle and included in  his stock was a valuable big imported bull with long out-pointing horns.

This bull was nearly the cause of the death of a favourite daughter. It appears that one day the daughter went out to an open log shed where the cattle found shelter in stormy weather. It was said that the bull was a very wicked animal. While the girl was in the shed the bull came along, and seeing her, bellowed and dashed at her. The girl tried to get away and ran close to the back wall in an attempt to escape.

The bull, however, cut her off and pinned her to the log wall. Its charge was so furious that it could not extricate its horns to gore the girl. The bull’s roars of rage attracted the attention of a brother who was in a nearby field. When this brother saw what the situation was ran Into the house, got a butcher knife, and returning, cut the bull’s throat.

As soon as the bull was dead the young man got an axe and released the animal’s horns from the log wall. When the girl was released she was unconscious but not seriously injured. The happening stirred the people of the Merrickville district greatly.

 

 - the per- of be in i I i to merrickville...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 19 Oct 1896, Mon,
  3. Page 3
  4.  - MERRK KVII.I.K. Merrickville, Sept. 23. Several... - boy. who has been In the United States for some...

    Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Citizen,
    2. 26 Sep 1898, Mon,
    3. Page 2Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

      relatedreading

      It’s the Merrickville News 1880

    4. Mentions of Merrickville: Fire and Folks

The 1982 Gas War — Perth Vs Carleton Place

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The 1982 Gas War — Perth Vs Carleton Place

 

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March 1982

The war was on between Perth and Carleton Place gasoline dealers and one operator says he’s giving up the business. Bob Chapman of Carleton Place (Golden Eagle) says there’s too much competition to earn a decent living. “Everyone seems to be getting into the act. I’m retiring from the gas business. There’s no money in it anymore”.

Differences of up to nine cents a litre were being reported between the two towns and the small dealerships were hurting. Saveway Gas dealer, Santiego Diaz of Carleton Place said he wasn’t sure where prices are going. “I’ll have to go to our head office to find out what can be done about the situation.”

 

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1994

Diaz was currently selling regular gas at 37.9 cents per litre and unleaded at 41.9 cents. At Denny’s Service Centre in Carleton Place gas prices were between 42 and 44 cents and owner Dennis Miller says,”I really don’t know what’s going on. Prices are being reduced but it’s not affecting me. After six years in the business, Miller said he had built up a steady clientele. “They prefer to come here because they know they’re going to get service.”

Perth Shell dealer Garfield Leach was concerned about where the price war could lead. “When something like this happens, the dealer gets caught in the middle. If I drop my prices I lose one-third of my markup.” Leach says gas companies do offer relief in the form of consignment sales for dealers interested. , “The company could offer to let me lower my prices if I sell on consignment, I would be guaranteed a profit but it would be less than what I make -now,” Leach says. Leach thinks about consignment all the time but says: “I’m in business to make profits.”

 

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photo by Faye Campbell of Bill McGonegal

Self-serve Esso dealer Bill McGonegal of Carleton Place says the situation was much the same as a price war that took place two years ago. “One day someone lowers his price and I have to follow him. My price is down to 36.6 cents and I think things have pretty much settled now,” McGonegal says.

But McGonegal’s neighbour wasn’t sure. Dwight Cochrane at Orr Pontiac expects to drop his prices again next week. “Bill and I are friends and we don’t want to start anything but, if his price drops, mine will have to. The price war is hurting my business,” Cochrane said.

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 31 Oct 1981, Sat,
  3. Page 83

 

Perth resident Delbert Bolton was irate about the local state of gas prices. “We’re being taken. The dealers have got to be playing games with us. I can go to Carleton Place and save $5.60 on a fill up.” “I’d prefer to spend my money where I earn it but if they don’t change, I’m not going to feel guilty about going out of town to buy gas.

 

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 17 May 1984, Thu,
  3. Main Edition,
  4. Page 24
  5. The Ottawa Journal,
  6. 23 Sep 1968, Mon,
  7. Page 26
  8. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading
  9. Filler Up! Got a Flat!! Photos of Gas Stations

  10. The Central Garage in Carleton Place by Terry Skillen

    The Garages of Carleton Place –1970’s

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    Take Me to Your Litre — The Anti-Metric Gas Station

    Esso? Downtown Bridge Street Carleton Place

    The White Rose Service Station in Carleton Place

    Dollars Worth of Gas in Carleton Place

    Before the Canadian Tire Gas Bar There Was..

The Warning of Death by a Local Farm Hand

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The Warning of Death by a Local Farm Hand

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There are various kinds of “ghost” stories. Some take the form of presentiments, warnings, etc. Here Is a strange story of a “warning” as told by Mr. Wm. Flood. About 40 or 45 years ago a man named Lamourie worked for Mr. Flood as a farm hand.

One day Mr. Lamourie said to Mr. Flood, “I am going to hear of the death of a dear friend or relative soon.” “Why do you say that?” Mr. Flood asked. “Well,” the other replied, “today I saw a load of hay moving across your lower field without any horses attached to it. In fact there was no load of hay there to move. What I saw was a ‘warning’.”

Mr. Flood tried to tell the man that it was a case of hallucination, but could not convince him. “I saw it with my own proper eyes,” he said. Three days later Mr. Lamourie came to Mr. Flood and said, “So and so (a close friend) died today. I told you it was a ‘warning that I had.” Mr. Flood did not reply. A reply would have been useless.

 

 

historicalnotes

 - DEATH WARNINGS. Andrew Long, in London Post. It...

 - llooring of the hearth, dropping so gently that...1901

 

 - WRITES.0F "DEATH WARNINGS" Leaden Man Heara ef...1903

The Conversationalist

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I have been told I talk a lot, or, I believe the word is–‘chatty’. I don’t really mind being labeled that as my Grandmother always told me if you didn’t ask questions, you’d never know anything. By the looks of my baby book that my late Mother began her entries in after I was born in 1951; she drove herself crazy marking down “Baby’s First Words”.  I know she wanted me to say “Mama” first but I dropped old Dad’s name instead at 8 months.

 

It also seems my early silence to her was an enemy as I have never heard of any child with such a big vocabulary at 18 months unless they were Doogie Howser. I failed math three times in Grade 8 and got a final mark of 29 out of 200, so brainiac I am not. I remember my poor Father’s face when he saw that report card and asked if they couldn’t have given me more marks for neatness. I should have asked him if saying “Bye Bye Daddy” at 17 months made up for anything.

 

My Mother was not going to accept the sound of crickets between us so the vocabulary was flying until I was 18 months. She stopped documenting after that, so obviously we were having many fireside chats at the age of 2. Apparently word at the A & P was the child across the street didn’t talk until he was 4. That was about the time Diefenbaker was running. Somehow his first word was “Diefenbaker’ and it was gossip fodder for months on Albert Street in Cowansville.

 

My Grandfather Crittenden used to visit on weekends and would always rub his hands before he ate and say “lordy, lordy, lordy”. When I was a wee gal I would sit next to my him and copied everything he did. One fine morning at breakfast, I broke the seal on my voicebox once again with new words and said “lordy, lordy, lordy” in sync with him. Funny I never saw that documented in my baby book.

 

Another family story was that my Father was chopping wood for my Grandmother Knight when the axe head came off the handle, striking him in the foot. This caused him to yell “sh*t,” which caused me to repeat it for the rest of the day. Sixty years later that word is still my instinctive response to being startled.

 

I was never neurotic about speech with my own children like my Mother was. I believe my oldest son’s first word was “Holstein” at 10 months, and he hasn’t stopped talking since. Skyler was a collicky baby so rides in the country was a daily event to calm him. I was always pointing out the different cows in the fields for his vocabulary benefit. As long as you talk to your children and keep them interested you can’t go wrong making animal sounds in the car which was interesting to him and the folks passing by in their cars.

 

Today baby’s first words have been said to be “tablet” or Amazon’s “Alexa” which shows how many children have switched to tech modes of entertainment similar to  Ipads and the like. It just marvels me how my young Granddaughters can manoeuvre these things while I can just play slots on my iPad.

 

I have come to the conclusion that at 67 my conversational skills encouraged by my Mother will never stop. They say the less you talk the more people listen–maybe that’s why no one ever listens to me these days..

 

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Documenting Houses -Almonte — 133 Marshall Street

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Documenting Houses -Almonte — 133 Marshall Street

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133 Marshall Street Almonte now for sale

 

 

This place is now for sale so I put put a 411 on information so we can document it. Thanks john Morrow

John Morrow— I lived next door to this house with my grandparents, Frank and Agnes (Napier) Morrow, at 133 Marshall Street before I started school. My cousin Maureen (Morrow) Dugdale and her husband Jim bought that house from our grandmother shortly after they were married.

 

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When I was living there the house at 143 Marshall Street was owned and occupied by Morley and Louise Parsons and their family of 5 Morley had a huge garden in the open space between the two houses. Their son, Morley Jr.(surprisingly nicknamed “Dick” or Dickie” despite their full names being Harold Morley Parsons in both cases) died in a freak shooting accident trying to unload a gun at a police checkpoint on Wolf Grove Road in September 1968. When my Dad, who was born at 133 Marshall Street, was growing up the owners were Amos and Rose Robinson, parents of Jenny Munro of Clayton.

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historicalnotes

 - Young hunter killed on trip with his girl...

 

 - PARSONS, Harold Morley In nosmtal, Almonte....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 23 Sep 1968, Mon,
  3. Page 26Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

    relatedreading

    Comments Comments Comments–Documenting History

  4. The End of 41 Julian Street — Is That All There Is?

  5. The Time Capsule of CPHS

  6. My Fondest Memories of Almonte –Marty Taylor

Entire Dam Above Smiths Falls Swept Away

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Entire Dam Above Smiths Falls Swept Away

 - Entire Dam Above Smith's Falls is Swept Away,...

 - 81 cUl to The Evening Journa. Email Fall. April... - t the break, but At beat it will perhaps be a... - I ordin-1 I I There' waa little or no demage...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 13 Apr 1904, Wed,
  3. Page 1

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  1. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading

    The Smiths Falls Storm of 1897

  2. The Storm of June 1899

    Ya call that a Snowstorm? Linda’s Mailbag

    Storms of Carleton Place- Which One?

    Lightening Strikes Again –The Storm of 1972

    The Day The Wizard of Oz Came to Carleton Place

    To All the Snowmageddons I Have Loved Before

    Lightening Strikes Again –The Storm of 1972