Category Archives: Uncategorized

Nostalgia — Lamb Quarters

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Nostalgia — Lamb Quarters

Lambs quarters, fat hen, pig weed or goosefoot is one of the plants/weeds my Grandfather Crittenden talked about eating when he was a kid near Call’s Mills. Oddly, no one in the family ever fed it to me. My Grandmother would point it out when it was growing in her flowerbeds, and pull it out. Grampy Critt claimed not to know that much about edible wilds, but get him talking and quite a bit came out. Some folks used to call it “Poverty Food”.

Lambs quarter is also known as wild spinach, and is interchangeable with spinach in your usual recipes. I’ve seen some use it in vegetable lasagna or some of the spinach in smoothies. You can also replace some of the basil or spinach in pesto with lambs quarter. Remember — lambs quarter smells “green”. Do not to eat the lambsquarters raw. I can’t remember why, and since I didn’t taste them raw myself, I don’t know. Maybe because of the fuzzy texture? Or perhaps they have a bitter flavor?

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Lamb’s Quarters sprouts

Sautéed Lambs quarters with Lemon

a large bowl of lambs quarters
1 tablespoon butter
salt
lemon wedges

Pluck the leaves from the thicker stems (just because they can be a little tough), but don’t bother to separate out the tender baby stems. Wash well and spin dry.

Sizzle a pat of butter in a skillet and then toss in a great mountain of the weeds. Push them around for 1-2 minutes until wilted and dark green. Sprinkle with coarse salt and lemon juice. Serve hot.

Add skillet-cooked (or steamed) greens to any number of soups and pots of beans.

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The Orlando Sentinel
Orlando, Florida
06 Jun 1985, Thu  •  Page 85

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 May 1917, Sat  •  Page 8

Oddities — Lanark County Puffball Mushrooms

Remembering Milk Weed Pods and World War II

Did Bad Nutrition Begin with Importing Onions?

Cry Me a Haggis River!

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters — Part 28–I Didn’t Swindle Money from the Wampole & Co W.H. Brick

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters — Part 28–I Didn’t Swindle Money from the Wampole & Co W.H. Brick

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“Thou Shall Not Bear False Witness Against Thy Neighbour”

Written by Wampole employee W.H. Brick

On the Code Felt and Knitting Company Limited Stationary

Written in Toronto, March 14, 1907

Copy of Circulation Letter to the Citizens of Perth

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In all honesty I could write a Canadian mini series about this 5 page faded letter that was found in an envelope in my Thomas Code Journals. Neatly typed probably by Code’s secretary in defiance with what the Perth newspaper and its citizens were waging against Mr. Brick. A lot of it is fading and it is extremely repetitive, so I typed out the highlights with a hint of sarcasm. I could not help myself. Apologies

Toronto, March 14, 1907

When one disappears out of the blue one day, and money is missing from the great Wampole Medicine Company, one should not write that they have feelings of mingled surprise and interest 9 months later. So instead of letting the local Perth papers complain about you — you feel a 5 page letter of “Truth” is needed to stop the ‘fake news”.

The good people of Perth should know that I, Mr. W.H. Brick will no longer tolerate this behaviour and it will only be discussed in a court of law. No more ‘he said she said”!  “I shall take you all to court.”  Famous last words.

Please note my friends that one Mr. Danner never suffered injury at my hand and had always been the gracious recipient of the hospitality of my home. Now, however, he takes the advantage of “the psychological moment” by never losing an opportunity to condemn me in either public or private. 

Among the false statements Mr. Danner has circulated is the fact that I had robbed Wampole from day one! He was simply jealous that Mr. Wampole and Mr. Campbell respected me more and they failed to notice his remarkable worth. I believe that Danner also said that after my death I would need to answer for the insanity and subsequent death of Henry. K. Wampole. I, W.H. Brick was not responsible for Mr. Wampole’s or anyone’s death.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Sep 1906, Sat  •  Page 6

Then there is also a Mr. Maher who had the audacity to intrude into Hick’s Boarding House unannounced while my wife was seriously ill. He ranted that her dearest husband, me, was going to be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. He is nothing but  a dumb brute! There is also nothing to the truth that over $3,000 was short from a Toronto baseball club when I was treasurer. The gall of the Toronto papers sending copies to the newspapers of Perth! Ladies and gentleman, no other individual has entered a community with more desire to help than I did when I took up residence in Perth.

Suddenly a crash came and I went away as per an arrangement with the late Henry R. Wampole. After that fateful day an event that no man was ever more unjustly or atrociously maligned than myself. Since I have returned to Toronto I have been gathering evidence to clear up the words these gossipers are spreading through the town of Perth.

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Photo-Perth Remembered–

First- I did not leave Perth borrowing or attempting to borrow 50 dollars 100 dollars or a million dollars.

Second–I did not leave town without paying my honest debts, except my board bill at Hick’s House. But, I did pay it later, or did I? ( By the way W.H. Hicks left his wife at the boarding house when he left without paying the bills)

Third— That I did not dabble in stocks, place horse race bets or run with women. I also did not lose lots of money on poker games but I did lose a small stake with friends in a private game.

Fourth— That I did not deceive or fool the people of Perth

Fifth — that I did not speak badly or gossip about the people of Perth

Sixth— That I never took advantage or fooled any citizen or firm in Perth

To the Perth physician who told my wife she had no idea how she had put up with me so long– I wish to say we are living happily ever without his advice. 

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The Hicks House later the Perth Hotel– Perth Remembered

To the boarders at Hick’s Boarding House that gossip incessantly about me– I know they dare not say this to my face. To the editorial comments by a local barrister of Perth I saw “Pshaw!”

To those that have defended me in Perth it leaves me room to return even though I have a crushed and bleeding heart.

Scrapbook Clippings of Wampole

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The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
04 Mar 1905, Sat  •  Page 1

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Jul 1906, Mon  •  Page 3

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Feb 1907, Fri  •  Page 5

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Vancouver Daily World
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
21 Feb 1907, Thu  •  Page 13

Thomas Alfred Code Journal

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 26- Mary Rathwell and Eleanor Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 27- John Code and John Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 27- John Code and John Ennis

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 27- John Code and John Ennis

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Innisville Mills in background ( old bridge)

In 1876 John Code had been out West for a while ( since 1872) and he decided to come back to Innisville for a visit. John Ennis was running the flour and saw mills at that time and decided he didn’t want all the hard work at that time and was trying to interest someone into renting the mills.

Ennis had an employee at that time called Sam Spender and asked John Code if he would consider renting the property with him. Both Spender and Code went into business with each other and rented the Innisville mills for $850 a year for five years. They told Spender they would try it out and would give it up at the end of the year if they did not do well. Even though they did not do too badly John Code got gold fever once again and left to try out the west once again and the partnership ended.

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John Code –ancestry.ca

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

John Code of Perth and Wild Bill Hickock

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 26- Mary Rathwell and Eleanor Ennis

John Code of Perth and Wild Bill Hickock

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

Questions on the McCreary Settlement and the IXL Cheese Factory

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Questions on the McCreary Settlement and the IXL Cheese Factory

Linda – I am looking for information about the historical settlement of McCreary that was located Ramsay Conc3 Lot 3. There was a school located there and Claudia Smith told me that she had read that there was also a cheese factory although she couldn’t remember the document. Do you have any info about it? Laurel Cook

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

So I emailed Rose Mary Sarsfield and she sent me to Stuart McIntosh

Stuart McIntosh said:

McCreary School was located on Hwy. 7 just west of what used to be the Falcon Restaurant.

I believe the McCreary Cheese factory was located on the west of the Falcon on the road south of Hwy. 7 which leads to Scotch Corners. This road is on the junction of Highway 7 and Tatlock Rd. According to my cousin, the cheese factory was located on the left side of this road not far from the junction. Hope this is helpful. Ray Lowe, a supporter of the Anglican Church in Clayton could give you better information.

The McCreery family came to Lanark from County Armagh* in 1823, settling at Ramsay Twp. Con. 3 Lot 3E, next to William Hamilton Con. 4 Lot 3W who had been settled there in 1821. William MCreery Jr. (1810-1892)  –  the McCreerys’ second oldest son, age 11 when they arrived, would later marry Margaret Hamilton, who was 5 years old at the time. Most families came out from Ireland with friends and relatives – or knew someone already settled.  One wonders if these families knew each other in Ireland. It’s hard to determine. It was common for families to indicate only their County of origin. Each came from a village, townland and parish – but these origins often remain obscure. Having failed, to date, to find parish records for the McCreerys in Armagh, I will attempt to hone in on them below – but here I will concentrate on existing Irish settlers before 1823.

The earliest migrations to this part of Ramsay Township occurred in 1820 – but before going back to that year and the settlement of Boyd’s Settlement, I will digress slightly to the settlers who arrived about the same time as William Hamilton in 1821.

William Hamilton had been settled July 21st 1821.  John Hamilton had been placed at Lanark Twp. Con. 9 Lot 10W two days earlier on July 27th, William Wilson received Ramsay Twp. Con. 8 Lot 4W on the 30th and William Wallace received Ramsay Con. 7 Lot 7E one day later on July 31st. on the same day as Robert McFarlane (from Scotland) received Ramsay Con. 8 Lot 7E, and Thomas McLelland received Con. 7 Lot 7W – and James McFarland (from Scotland) received Con. 8 Lot 6EJohn McIntyre (also a Scot) had received Con. 8 Lot 8E in July 21st. and Stewart and William Houston received nearby lots Con. 7 Lot 5E and Con. 7 Lot 6E on the 8th of August of the same year.  Five of these families all gaining land at much the same time – the Hamiltons, the Wallaces, , the Houstons, the Wilsons and (perhaps even) the McLellands were Irish. Lacking records which might indicate that some or all of these Irish settlers came out together, or that they came from the same place

From Leaders of Tomorrow
Leaders-of-Tomorrow Institute®
Canadian Personalities - Thomas D'Arcy McGee
Thomas D’arcy McGee

SUMMARY:   My name is Brian Bailey. I grew up in Lanark County, Ontario, Canada, where my Irish ancestors landed and took root in the 1820’s. I am now 65 years old and counting. My search for my Irish roots began when I was seven years old, and came home from school asking my mother if there was anyone famous in our family. She too had been curious about this as a young person and had asked the same question to her mother – who told her that the McCreary side of our family were directly related to Thomas D’arcy McGee. My mother’s aunt, Laura (McCreary) Ferrill who had grown up in rural Lanark in the 1880s was the self-appointed family record keeper. When I was growing up, the family held picnics at Boyd’s Settlement where the family had landed and stayed on. This study adds to my Aunt Laura’s collection of names in the 1940s. Like my mother, I am a story teller and was more interested in the story than the names and dates. This is the story (or rather part of the story) as I know it.From Leaders of Tomorrow

Some time in 1823, it would seem just before the arrival of the Peter Robinson Settlers from Ireland, a group of Irish settlers were granted lots along what is now the Highway proceeding east into the first five or so concessions of Ramsay.

 

These were the McCrearys, the Kinchs, the Dowdalls, the Warrens and the Shepperds. Accompanying the McCrearys was Elizabeth Magee, mother of Elizabeth Magee McCreery, and grandmother of Thomas D’arcy Magee.

Thomas D’arcy McGee travelled often to Ramsay to visit his aunt Elizabeth Magee McCreery (his grandmother having already died) between 1857 when he moved to Canada and his death in 1868. A tombstone with his name on it was found in the basement of the McCreary family homestead at Ramsay III-3. But that’s neither here nor there. It is interesting that D’arcy’s daughter Mary Euphrasia McGee married a Quinn, as there were several Quinns from Ireland nearby in Ramsay. Coincidence? Files from Bytown.net

A copy of the article from the Carleton Place 
paper in 1944-Brian Bailey

IXL | Identify rocks using properties | 3rd grade science

Did you know that one of the landmarks for Scotch Corners used to be “to turn off Highway 7 at the lXL Cheese Factory”? It was a hopping corner with traffic jams consisting of farmers waiting to get their milk weighed in and upon leaving, a quick trip to the back to the whey vat pick up some whey to feed their pigs.

Local lad Alfie Poole had the answers to the local stories in those days and there was a reason as to why this particular cheese factory was called ‘the IXL’. Seems there was a couple of cheese factories down the road and no one wanted to mix them up. There was one past the St John’s Anglican Church on the Ferguson Falls Road called the “Fair Play” and another opposite the church called the “Grab All”. These were the actual names I kid you not.

Well the farmer’s around the McCreary settlement were having none of that, and wanted to have the best cheese factory in the area. So up the factory went and it became known as the IXL but was sadly destroyed by fire in 1969.

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The Ottawa Journal,
02 Apr 1969, Wed,
Page 5

August 18, 1979 William Gordon James

William Gordon James, R. R. # 1, Carleton Place, a former reeve of Ramsay Township and warden of Lanark County, died in Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital, Saturday, August 18, 1979 in his 73rd year after a lengthy illness. Born April 20, 1907, Gordon was the eldest of the late William E. and Annie James of the James Settlement in Lanark Township. In earlier years he spent some time surveying in the Rouyn District of Northern Quebec. At one time he played on the Union Hall Ball Team. Mr. James was active in community affairs. He was a member of Lanark Township Council, Reeve of Ramsay Township and Warden of Lanark County in 1964. He was a Past County Master of Lanark County Loyal Orange Lodge. Mr. James was an active member of St. George’s Church, Clayton, and later of St. John’s Church, Innisville. He took a keen interest in the Union Hall and IXL Cheese factories. As well as his wife, the former Wilhemena Dunlop, Mr. James is survived by one son, Charles and daughters, Eleanor (Mrs. David Aldus) R. R. # 1, Carleton Place, Marilyn, R. R. # 1, and daughter-in-law, Evelyn James. Mr. James is also survived by his grandchildren Lisz and Shelley Aldus and Marshall and Travis James. Also surviving are three brothers, Warren, Perth; Frank and John E., R. R. #2, Carleton Place and one sister, Eleanor (Mrs. Ray Bartlett), Carleton Place, as well as his aunt, Mrs. Eleanor Stewart, Calgary, Alberta. The funeral took place from the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home, Carleton Place, Tuesday, August 21, 1979 to St. John’s Church, Innisville, for service at 1:30 p.m. with Rev. Roger Young officiating. Interment took place in St. George’s Cemetery. Pallbearers were Leonard Dowdall, John Weir, George Wright, John R. W. James, Steven Bartlett and Gary Hudson.

January 11, 1980 Gertrude Elizabeth Dowdall         

        Gertrude Elizabeth Dowdall, wife of the late George Norman Dowdall, R. R. # 1, Carleton Place, Ontario died January 11, 1980 In Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital after a lengthy illness, age 76. Mrs. Dowdall was born in Dalhousie Township, November 28, 1903, daughter of the late Hugh McDougall and his wife, Elizabeth Fair. She received her early education at Watson’s Corners. Mrs. Dowdall was a retired Registered Nurse, a member of the first graduating class from  the former Rosamond Memorial Hospital, Almonte, in 1925.  She was married to the late George Norman Dowdall November 10, 1926, in the United Church, Balderson. Mr. and Mrs. Dowdall farmed in McCreary’s Settlement, near Carleton Place. Mrs. Dowdall attended St. John’s Anglican Church, Innisville and was a member of the St. John’s ACW. As well as sons Ken, St. George’s; Bill, Mel, and Leonard (Mac)  Carleton Place; Donald, Forester’s Falls; Wayne, Maitland; Mrs. Dowdall is survived by daughters, Anna (Mrs. Art Ferguson) and Pearl, Newmarket; Lois (Mrs. Eric Robertson), Drummond and Doris (Mrs. E. Craig) Appleton. She is also survived by 25 grandchildren. Mrs. Dowdall is also survived by her sister, Mrs. Ruby Rodger, Perth. She was predeceased by one brother, Melville McDougall and sisters, Effie (Mrs. Lester Jamieson) Almonte and Pearl McDougall. The funeral took place from the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home, Carleton Place to St. John’s Church, Innisville for Service at 2:30 p.m., January 14, 1980 with Rev. Roger A. Young officiating. Interment was St. John’s Cemetery, Innisville. The pallbearers were John Weir, Charles James, George Wright, Dan McCreary, Bob Dezell and Lloyd Code.

The Old Fashioned Carleton Place Picnic Tackberry Hill? McCreary’s Creek?

Say Cheese! It’s an IXL Story

The Old Union Hall Cheese Factory By Berenice McKay

Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

Pakenham Cheese & Butter Factory– McCreary Blair Storey

Watson’s Corners And Vicinity 1891–Shetland Ponies and Cheese

When the Cheese Crashed Through the Floor

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 26- Mary Rathwell and Eleanor Ennis

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 26- Mary Rathwell and Eleanor Ennis

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Innisville- loggers and mills

 

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New Addition to the Code Journals (actual letter to T.A. Code from Mrs W.J. Rothwell ( Mary)

Lanark R. R. 1

March 18 ( no year)

To: Mr. T. A. Code, Perth

Dear Mr. Code,

I was very pleased to have your letters in Sat. mail and deem it quite a prize to hold– the documents re: Ennis Estate. I shall draw your attention to one error contained. The *Ennis “Cresh” if there is any.

*(author’s note–Cresh-Historically, surnames evolved as a way to sort people into groups – by occupation, place of origin, clan affiliation, patronage, parentage, adoption, and even physical characteristics (like red hair)

Thank you, my husband W. J. is quite himself to-day. He remains in bed. In fact he had to as his cold affected the head and stomach. He expects to attend Mr. Morris’s funeral to-morrrow.

David was the only child of the first marriage. My mother, Eleanor, was the oldest of the second family.

In order: Eleanor, Sarah, Maggie, John, Esther, Rebecca.

I like your ideas of the family tree, and have been meandering about.

Truly yours,

Mary Rothwell

Mrs. W. J. Rothwell (William Joseph)

Lanark, R.R. 1

Mary E. (James) Rothwell obit- 1941 -

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Jan 1941, Fri  •  Page 19

 

William Joseph Rothwell

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Death: December 03, 1940 (65)
Immediate Family: Son of John Rothwell and Eleanor Mary Warren
Husband of Mary Ethel James
Father of Eleanor Kathleen Dorothy Rothwell

 

Original letter typed up in 1929 by T. A. Code and sent to Andrew Haydon from the journal I purchased.-Perth, Ontario,1929. Noted history about Eleanor Ennis mother of Mary Rathwell who wrote the above letter and why she was interested in Ennis family history.

Perth, December 16,1929.

Ennis Genealogy

Coped from a letter from Arthur Foster of Chilliwack, B.C. dated September 29th 1929. to George Ennis of Balderson, Ontario.

James Ennis, senior was married in Ireland before coming to this country. Four children were the issue of this union viz.

Mrs. Charles Harvey, Mrs. john Chalmers, Mrs. James Cook and one son James Ennis Jr. also one son David died young.

The name of his first wife not related or known. His second wife was Caroline Buell who died at Ennisville/Innisville in the early eighties.

James Ennis, Jr. married Miss Jackson and one son David was the only issue. He was again married to Essie Jackson, a sister of his first wife, and the following family followed.

Eleanor- Mrs. Wm. James (Mary Rothwell’s Mother)

Sarah-Mrs. John James, Clayton

John-later of Port Huron

Esther- Mrs. T. A. Kidd Burritts Rapids

Death

Perth Courier, Feb 24 1925 Death
In Lanark twp, February 15, Eleanor Ennis, wife of William H James, aged 50 years, 2 14 days. Born in Innisville in 1845. Daughters are Mrs R Montgomery, Lanark; Mrs Thomas Hands, Drummond, Mrs Wm Rathwell, Lanark and Mrs Frank, Edmonton and Sadie, Gladys and Nellie at home. Son William also at home…to St George’s
Cem…brother John E, Sarnia; brother-in-law T A Kidd, Burritt’s Rapids (Carleton Place ‘Central Canadian’)

 

Mary Ethel James

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Death: January 15, 1941 (62)
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Immediate Family: Daughter of William Hill James and Eleanor Ennis
Wife of William Joseph Rothwell
Mother of Eleanor Kathleen Dorothy Rothwell

 

relatedreading

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

 

ephemera_800

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

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The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

 

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1970s photos from the old Canadian and Almonte Gazette files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

I found this article in one of the old Amonte Gazette’s of Lucy Poaps and I believe it was from the 1990s.  Brent Eades and Toronto restaurateur Wolf Savcioglu were in the final stages of buying the Almonte Hotel from the then current owner Hap Peattie.

They hoped renovations would begin soon and an architect was drawing up the plans and estimates would be in the 100s of thousands. They wanted to preserve the old hotel such as interior woodworking and exterior clapboard. The hotel dates back to the 1800s but no one is really sure. Researchers figure the hotel which was originally called The David House Hotel was probably built in the 1870s.

A map from 1889 shows the structure with stables and driving sheds behind it on High Street back to the brick house around the corner. Carriages appear to have entered from Bridge Street between the hotel and a two-storey storage house which was connected by a second floor walkway. The storage house is in the same location as the present retail store but it is not known if it is the same building. 

Brent’s uncle, George Eades, owned a shoe store on Mill Street years ago and later moved to Carleton Place moved to Carleton Place to open Eades Home Hardware store which was located on Bridge Street.

 

Almonte Hotels

Almonte House

Hotels were built along Mill Street to serve the anticipated traffic from the new mills and railway. John Murphy’s hotel at the current site of 34, 36 and 38 Mill Street, later the North American Hotel, was destroyed by fire in 1877. After Shipman’s death in 1852, his daughter Catherine added a three-storey hotel to the north side of her father’s house (95 Mill Street) for a railway hotel known as “Almonte House”.

 

Stafford’s Hotel

When Stafford’s Hotel was destroyed in an 1877 fire, it was replaced by three, three-storey brick buildings, which were later also destroyed in a 1909 fire.

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Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Nov 1935, Sat  •  Page 18

 

Shipman House

Even the former Shipman house and hotel became a pool hall and tailor shop, with the rear addition converted to the Alma Apartments, managed by Alma Rooney.

 

Info

The 1889-1902 fire insurance plan for Almonte shows: Rosamond Mill on Coleman Island; a series of woollen mills, knitting mills and foundries along the river side of Mill street; the Post Office and Almonte House Hotel in the triangle of Bridge, Mill and Little Bridge; and the south side of Mill Street lined with wooden and brick storefronts

The Crown regranted the land to Daniel Shipman, who with several other settlers quickly developed the grist and sawmills, and in the next few years a blacksmith’s shop, school, hotel, distillery and other ventures. he first European settler here was a David Shepherd, who in 1819 obtained a Crown grant of land in the area of present-day Almonte, where he began.

 

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jan 1943, Thu  •  Page 1

 

Temperance in Almonte

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Dec 1913, Sat  •  Page 13

 

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!

A. Huckels & Co. -The Story of a Bottle- Thanks to Jaan Kolk

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A. Huckels & Co. -The Story of a Bottle-  Thanks to Jaan Kolk

Linda, I thank you for all your research into your local soda water bottlers.

You have a great future treasure in your town. Adin Daigle is a very keen collector of Carleton Place and area history. You also are lucky to have Scott Wallace. Please involve Adin in research projects and mentor him in research. One day this will pay off in preserving the local history for generations to come.

I have a challenge for you. I have two bottles from A. Huckels & Co. from Ottawa. I cannot find information them. He has a flag for a logo. No one has been able to tell me the significance of the flag. Perhaps you can unlock this secret?

I hope you join our hobby, it holds lots of history and we have some passionate collectors like Adin and Scott. You would be very welcomed.–Glen William Gordon–

Linda says: We are on this Glen– with my Ottawa historian friend Jaan Kolk

Photos of bottles by Glen William Gordon-

Jaan Kolk

Jaan Kolk—In 1901, A Huckels and Co. was at 326-328 Queen street, with about 8 employees. By 1909, Huckels and his company had moved to nearby 181-185 Lyon Street.


Jaan Kolk
 This is pure speculation, but given that the flagship ( 😉 ) product was “German Seltzer”, the flag in the trademark may have represented the National and merchant flag of the German Empire, 1871-1918, which was three stripes: black, white, red. From the 1901 city directory:

Image may contain: text that says '(A Huckels & Co), Huckels Alexander h 326 Queen HUCKELS A & co (Alexander Huck- els, Frederick Cirkel) ,Mineral and Aerated Waters and Bottlers, 326- 328 Queen, Telephone 1082'

Jaan Kolk—The company was established in Ottawa in 1894. Here is an ad from the Citizen, June 29, 1894

Image may contain: text

Jaan Kolk A note from the Citizen, Sept. 27, 1895 on the display at the Exhibition

No photo description available.
Image may contain: text

Jaan Kolk–In 1912, The A. Huckels operation was taken over to become the Ottawa branch of major beverage producer J.J. McLaughlin Ltd. (of Canada Dry Ginger Ale fame), retaining the same 1082 phone number. From the Citizen, Mar. 29, 1912

Jaan Kolk—I could not find much mention of Alexander himself in the papers, except for this incident you might find amusing, Linda: Alexander was assaulted by Johnny “Dixie” McDowall, “America’s oldest newsboy.” From the Citizen, Aug. 25, 1910

Image may contain: text

Linda says:

Linda Seccaspina

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jun 1894, Thu  •  Page 8
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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Aug 1894, Tue  •  Page 7

According to a research book the A. Huckels & Co. were one of Ottawa’s larger bottlers and operated from 1894-1911 and then seem to disappear. Their bottles were also smaller from the typical soda water bottle possibly 6 ounces or 7.5 ounces in size. The Huckel family was well known in the Ottawa area and when I get a chance I will write about Benjamin and the tragedies he went through.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Jan 1900, Wed  •  Page 7

Alexander Huckels was of German descent and as Jaan Kolk said given that the flagship product was “German Seltzer”, the flag in the trademark may have represented the National and merchant flag of the German Empire. Mr. Davis was noted as one of the managers of the company.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Aug 1895, Thu  •  Page 3

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Dec 1898, Thu  •  Page 6

Huckel’s was once located at 326-328 Queen Street in Ottawa-328 Queen St. E. has been vacant for more than a decade. It was extensively damaged in a 2009 by a fire that was blamed on faulty wiring.

David Helwig

Not much is known about his private life but in May of 1907 he began building a lovely home on Slater Street for a mere $4000.

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eThe Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 May 1907, Thu  •  Page 1
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Jun 1906, Tue  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Sep 1897, Sat  •  Page 2

Of course with everything there were discrepancies in the water.. just like today..:P Check out the article below.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Mar 1911, Wed  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Nov 1909, Sat  •  Page 1
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Feb 1911, Fri  •  Page 4

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Jun 1897, Thu  •  Page 8
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Aug 1909, Fri  •  Page 4
Adin Wesley Daigle
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 May 1899, Wed  •  Page 1

Interesting People –R. E. Irvine — The Story of a Bottle

Where Were the Miracle Salt Springs in Pakenham? I Love a Challenge!

Social Note Shenanigans from the Almonte Gazette June 1899

Mrs. James Lawrie and Her Ginger Beer

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” in Lanark County

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

The Marvellous Jaan Kolk

Talking Through Your Hat? Jaan Kolk

So Where Was Caldwell Mills? Thanks Jaan Kolk

The Thrift Store Couple – More Information-Jaan Kolk

The House on the Hill — Up the 8th Line of Ramsay — Jaan Kolk Files

Britannia Boat House Doomed— April 1907 Ice Jam –Jaan Kolk Files

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign–Dr. Winters 154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place –Jaan Kolk Files

Please take the Devil Out of Me? Rev. James Wilson of Lanark

Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

The Cholera Epidemic of 1911

The Ashton Hotel– Questions Questions Flemmings and McFarlanes

Benoit & Richardson Photo– a Mystery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Does Anyone Remember Cohen’s in Lanark Village?