Ocean Wave Firemen Getting Uniforms

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Ocean Wave Firemen Getting Uniforms

September 1875

The uniforms for the Ocean Wave company in Carleton Place will soon be completed and served out to the members. The uniform is similar to that worn by the Almonte firemen. The shirts, which are being manufactured by P. Galvin & Son are made of fine red Chambly flannel, with black facings of farmer’s satin, and collars of the same material.

The pants which are black have a red stripe down the side of those

belonging to the officers. The caps are manufactured from black broadcloth, with a peak and a gold band. The belts, which being made by A. Waugh, our harness maker,

are of fine heavy morocco leather, with red binding and “Ocean Wave,” the

name of the Company, painted on them plain white letters.

About Ocean Wave

It was in 1875 when the Town’s present Fire Company replaced earlier, and temporary groups, as this community’s fire fighting organization.

An attempt to form a Carleton Place Fire Company is of record as early as 1853, when the community had a population of five hundred. It was about 1868-1869 when the Company purchased a hand-pumper that required 40 men to work it. In order to give this unit a fair trial, the Renfrew Fire Brigade was invited to town.

They were a large, fine looking and proud, body of men. The trial took place on Central Bridge and as the men forced the breaks to cry of “heave her down”, and as the great stream rose towards the sky and dam, the late James Murphy exclaimed with great rapture: “The Ocean Wave”.

On that day, so well remembered, the Ocean Wave Fire Company was christened.

The hand-engine thus gave way to the steamer and the “sir John” was purchased. Later, yet another steamer was added to the Company’s fire fighting arsenal. With a first-class water works system, and with Mort Brown’s & Hawthorne Factory’s auxiliary power, we stood second to none as a well-equipped town.

As the great steamers and hand-pumpers started to disappear, the Town purchased its first motorized fire truck. This truck was a Reo Speedwagon and was equipped with a specialized tank that used a chemical mix to develop the required pressure. 

The year was 1923, and since then, many fine trucks, some of which have been retired, have served this community faithfully. The Reo remains in the new Fire Hall, in full and proud working order. She has been honourably retired from active service and is now used for historic reference and parade duty.

The first Fire Hall was across from the present day Maple Leaf Dairy and this property was rented for $7.00 per month, for the period from 1st of December to the 1st of April. In 1902, the Company moved from Bridge Street to Mill Street and took up station in the Town Hall. The Company remained there until 1978, when a larger facility was built, further down Mill Street. In April of 1995, the Ocean Wave Company moved to its present site on Coleman Street.

Ocean Wave Fire Company is second to none, with only the best equipment, Officers and Firefighters, all who are volunteers, proudly and faithfully serving the community.

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Update to the Smiths Falls Fire — Ed Larmour

William McIlquaham From The Theatre to the Fire

Fires in Carleton Place–James Gillies House

Photos of Beckwith Township Fire Dept 1970s

Beckwith Fire Department 1965 Names Names Names

The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Help Thy Neighbour in Carleton Place- Ronnie Waugh Fire 1959

News of Butter– Fireman— and Women of Stamina in Carleton Place

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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