Tag Archives: fire

Lanark County Folk –Ethel McIntosh Ramsbottom — Russell Ramsbottom

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Lanark County Folk –Ethel McIntosh Ramsbottom — Russell Ramsbottom
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jul 1932, Mon  •  Page 8

From Stuart McIntosh
My Aunt Ethel McIntosh Ramsbottom recalled helping her grandmother making soap. “ They saved hardwood ashes in a barrel in the winter and in the spring the barrel was set on a base so that the edge was out over it. A hole was bored in the side of the barrel near the bottom and an iron pot set on the ground under the barrel. The boys and I carried water and put it on the ashes, and as it leached the ashes, the lye collected in the iron pot.


This was put in an iron cooler along with water and grease, and boiled over a fire most of the day. It had to be stirred often, a tedious job as the cooler was set on a stone foundation with a hollow under the fire. We used a stick(often a broom handle for stirring the soap.
When it was cooled enough, we put out the fire and put salt and water in the soap and left it till the next morning. At that time it would be firm enough to cut into bars and these would be set out on boards in the shed to harden.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Sep 1982, Wed  •  Page 50
RAMSBOTTOM, Russell, 1902 – 1982, his wife Ethel R. McIntosh, 1906 –     , Keith 1946 – 1969.

Families such as the Peacocks, Robertsons, Ramsbottom and Campbells also settled in the Rosetta area, the first earliest recorded burial was Robert Stoddart, in 1828.

Mr. Campbell entered Victoria Hospital, Montreal, March. 27th. Before going there he had been ill four weeks, and twice in that time his life was despaired of. But he gained strength rapidly, and was doing as well as could be expected until a day or two before his removal. A week ago on Friday last he underwent an operation, which was highly successful and promised the most favorable results, but on Monday of last week he took a change for the worse, requiring a second operation the following day. He suffered intensely after this operation, but remained conscious up to the last few minutes of his life. Characteristic of his business-like turn of mind was his action in settling all his bills with the hospital authorities a few hours before his death. Deceased was a son of the late Arch. Campbell, of Lanark township, and was born forty-one years ago on the farm now occupied by Mr. John Ramsbottom, jr.

James, m. Margaret Edwards, lived on Arklan Farm, part of original grant. (Arklan) Brice, m. Margaret Elizabeth Lynch On Burgess farm, on Lake Avenue. John J., (Ashton) Arnold W. (Taxi Driver) Willard Mrs. Wm.Simpson Mrs. Ray Kennedy Mrs. Horace Coleman Mrs. Jack Yeaman (Faye) Mrs. Robert Service Brice,m. Frank, m. Jessie Boale Isabel,m. Wm.Pierce Arthur,d.,m. Margaret Erena James Kathleen,m. Barry Fraser Norman Helen,m. Eugene Bezak Mildred, m. J.A. Lynch Margaret J., m. Mr. Price Eliza Anne, m. Mr. Ramsbottom Daughter went to St. Hilda’s.m. Rev. Grant Sparling Also adopted son. Nathaniel D. Moore, Blacksmith in Carleton Place–Family now in Washington State, USA Seven Children

People of Lanark County Andrew Dunlop 1944

People of Lanark County –The Rest of the Story — Weitzenbauer – Maberly

Allan Barratt– Pakenham– People of Lanark County

People of Lanark County — Mrs. Charlie Rintoul

Sweetest Man in Lanark County — Harry Toop Honey Maker

Hot Summer Days- August 6 1900 –Congregational Church Fire

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Hot Summer Days- August 6 1900 –Congregational Church Fire
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Aug 1900, Tue  •  Page 3

Monday afternoon about 4:30 a furious electric storm passed over Lanark Village and surrounding country. The tower of the Congregational church was struck at a distance of about 100 feet
from the ground, the ball of fire descending and breaking its way through the corner of the church. The alarm was given, and the firemen were quickly on hand and soon bad a stream playing on the burning tower. About five o’clock the flames seemed to be checked, but tne water
in the tank ran low, and again it made headway. The bose were changed on to the factory steam pump, and with this strong flow the fire was com­ pletely extinguished about eight o’clock. About
twenty feet of the spire feB, and the remainder of
it is completely rimmed out. The body of the church is badly soaked with water, and the rafters la the attic are badly burned. ~ The loss is placed at about $2,500; fully insured. Servioes win be held in the town hall next Sabbath morning

Authorities say that Monday was the hottest day for 46 years

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
08 Aug 1900, Wed  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
08 Aug 1900, Wed  •  Page 4


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
12 Sep 1900, Wed  •  Page 1

Fire in Zion Memorial Church January 1950

The Almonte Fire of 1909

Judge Senkler and the Almonte Fire Bug

The Almonte Fire– Bridge and Water Street 1903

Miss Eva Denault- Almonte 1911 Fire Heroine

The Re-Opening of the North Lanark Regional Museum (Appleton) 1980

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The Re-Opening of the North Lanark Regional Museum (Appleton) 1980

The Doreen Drummond House was officially opened Saturday, July 19, 1980 on the site of the former North Lanark Regional Museum, near Appleton. Stewart Drummond cut the ribbon on the building named by the North Lanark Historical Society (N LH S) in memory of his late wife. Doreen Drummond House replaces the former museum building which was destroyed by fire exactly one year ago, July 19. 1979.

Tentative plans have been made by the NLHS for further expansion as finances permit. After a drive to the museum before her death Mrs Drummond had requested her sons help the Historical Society in their efforts to replace the museum building. Drummond Brothers Limited found a building 44 feet by 22 feet, completely insulated, the wall-to-wall carpeted floor reinforced with three full-length steel beams.

The building had been used as a mobile office by the Campeau Corporation of Ottawa. For $10,000 Drummond Brothers set the building on piers on the grounds of the former museum. Ramsay Township Council waived the $200 building permit. The building was paid for with $5,000 from the insurance on the former schoolhouse turned museum.

The other $5,000 was a gift from a friend of the North Lanark Historical Society, who wished to remain anonymous. There was no charge by Drummond Brothers for the move. Ramsay Township Council purchased the site from the Lanark County Board of Education for five dollars. Since last spring the new building was put on a permanent foundation. Doreen Drummond House is set further back on the lot than the former schoolhouse. A screened in veranda has been built on the back. There is a small kitchen with cupboards.

Dawn Leduc, Blakeney, Curator of the North Lanark Regional Museum, after a few brief remarks, asked Stewart to cut the ribbon, and unveil the name plaque, declaring Doreen Drummond House officially open. Frank Taylor, chairman of the museum building committee, expressed thanks to the Drummond family, the sons of Dawn Leduc and many others whose help had made possible the reopening of the museum in the new building. He especially praised Jean Steel, N LH S president, for her leadership. Before and after the opening ceremonies, visitors toured the museum, inspecting the various exhibits. Some members of Appleton Women’s Institute served refreshments on the soon-to-be completed veranda.

The time has come to celebrate the official grand reopening of Almonte’s historic pioneer cabin located at the North Lanark Regional Museum!
Join us anytime between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. on July 23rd (2022) as we welcome guests and visitors once again to tour through this fascinating landmark. We’ll have classic lawn games like horseshoes, pioneer toys, and crafts for kids. All day, you’ll have the opportunity to explore the cabin and the ways pioneer families lived their lives, and between 1:30 and 3:00, you can take a tour with our most active volunteers who will explain the process of restoring our historic building.

Stop by from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. to enjoy a live performance by a local fiddlers’ group. At 1 p.m. we’ll begin our official opening ceremony and twine cutting! Alex Gillis, president of the North Lanark Historical Society will say a few words, and cake will be served.

Lemonade and cookies baked from recipes in our museum collection will be available while supplies last. We encourage visitors to bring their own picnic, picnic blankets, and lawn chairs.
There is no admission cost to participate in the re-opening festivities, but donations are always welcome to assist with our ongoing restorations and programming costs.

The heritage Almonte cabin was built near the current roundabout in the 1840’s. It was moved to its present location in 1983 by the North Lanark Historical Society. The building has been displayed over the years in ways that reflect the lived experiences of pioneer settlers to Lanark County, showcasing a range of artefacts that were important in pioneering times.

This important building has been closed to the public throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, giving the Historical Society a fantastic opportunity to undertake much needed restorative work. Through the generosity of a community that responded in earnest to our fundraising campaign, we have successfully raised the building off the ground and placed it on new footings, repaired some exterior logs, and re-chinked and resealed areas between the logs. We have also been able to complete significant repairs to the attached side shed, install new doors, and clean the interior to provide better and safer artefact display.
But there is still work to be done to complete this project. The North Lanark Historical Society plans to build a third external building to complement the existing pioneer cabin. This third building will be used as a display area for large agricultural tools and machines currently housed in the North Lanark Regional Museum collection, many of which had temporary homes inside the pioneer log cabin.

To donate to this ongoing fundraising campaign, visit our website at www.northlanarkregionalmuseum.com
#NLRM #localmuseum #almonte #nlhs #mississippimills #appleton #NLHS #pıoneer #pioneercabin #logcabin
#pioneerday #pioneerdays #familyfun #community #fundraising #fundraiser #history #localhistory #localherita

The North Lanark Regional Museum is owned and operated by the North Lanark Historical Society with the goal of collecting, preserving and displaying the history of Mississippi Mills. The museum features several exhibit spaces including seasonal exhibits, permanent local history exhibits, and a pioneer log cabin. The museum is the perfect destination for families with young children, retirees and history buffs in general.

The museum collection focuses on local history and includes: artefacts, photographs, documents and books. Our research library contains local history books, family histories and original copies of the Almonte Gazette.

647 River Rd, Almonte, ON K0A 1A0 (Appleton)

Send message

nlrmuseum@gmail.com

Phone(613) 257-8503

Appleton Museum 1980 Fire

Update — Teacher Fired in Appleton School May 1931 –Annie Neilson

Appleton Map and Odds and Ends — Clippings of Appleton

DUNCAN EGG GRADING Fire — 1956

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DUNCAN EGG GRADING Fire — 1956

May1956

It took only three quarters of an hour for fire to destroy the modern egg grading plant of Hugh Duncan, Clayton Road, Ramsay, on Monday afternoon. It is located about two miles from this town. Flames were seen by an employee at 4.45 and by 5.30 the building of cinder blocks, which was only two years old, had been consumed together with machinery, other equipment and 150 cases of eggs—30 doz. to the case.

It appears that rubbish had been burned in an outside incinerator located some distance away from all the farm buildings. But a high wind was blowing and after it was thought all life was out of the ashes, sparks must have been wafted to the egg grading building.

The Almonte Fire Brigade was sent for by Mr. Duncan, who was at home at the time and it responded with one of its pumpers and the township pumper which is carried with the large one. The town machine used water in its 300 gal. storage tank to thoroughly wet the wall of the house next to the blazing building and thus protect it from the fire.

The smaller machine was hooked on with its sucker in a creek and it helped protect the house although it was apparent little could be done to stem the flames that were consuming the grading station. Furniture was moved out of the house as it looked as if it was doomed. Windows were cracked by the heat. The loss is partially covered by insurance.

Meanwhile, the North Lanark Co-op has placed its egg grading equipment at the disposal of Mr. Duncan to help him out until he gets re-established. Among his customers are the Ontario Hospital at Smiths Falls, the Chateau Laurier, Ottawa and Perrault’s Gardens, Ottawa.

About 6.30 another alarm was received in town for a grass fire in the Burnt Lands, Huntley Twp., a t the top of what is known as the ‘Big Hill’ on Highway 44. This was not menacing any buildings but it was spreading through the dry grass and the scrub bush. It was fairly well under control when the town firemen arrived but they finished it with water from the storage tank on the pumper.

Also Read

The Egg House on the Hill — The Duncans

Eggs 10 Cents a dozen–Farmers Markets of Smiths Falls and Almonte 1880 and 1889

We Didn’t Throw the Eggs said Carleton Place!

Sweetest Man in Lanark County — Harry Toop Honey Maker

Two Years After the Lanark Fire 1961

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Two Years After the Lanark Fire 1961

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada13 Jun 1961, Tue  •  Page 36

Also read-Images of the Day After the Lanark Fire June 16 1959–

Images of the Day After the Lanark Fire June 16 1959–

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

June 17 1959– The Day After the Fire in Lanark Village

The Clyde Woollen Mill Fire — Hour By Hour 1917

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The Clyde Woollen Mill Fire — Hour By Hour 1917

CLIPPED FROMThe Lanark EraLanark, Ontario, Canada27 Jun 1917, Wed  •  Page 1

The was completely destroyed by fire late Thursday night. Of the large main building in which all the manufacturing was carried on nothing remains except a lint portion of the inactive stone wall and a great heap of smoking debris.

Part of Mr. Crierson, the Superintendants home, also fell prey to the flames, but the office and shipping room, store houses and a few other outhouses wore saved by the excellent and effective work of the firemen. The damage amounts to one hundred thousand dollars, covered by insurance to the extent of 50 thousand dollars. The fire originated at about 9.4.1 p.m. in the boiler room, and was first noticed hy Mr. Cardinal, nightwatchman, on his return from one of his hourly rounds.

A time clock is used and registered upon every hour as the watchman makes a complete inspection of the entire plant. He had just returned to the waiting quarters in the boiler room and had gone to the adjoining department for a handful of waste when the fire was spotted.

Though at times it seemed that the flames would get beyond the rear of the main building where there were a number of storehouses in which are kept large stocks of wool and other raw material it did not. The cloth from the shipping room was all removed to places of safety. Danger to the wool was immediate and serious, and, and the firemen did all they could do to hold down the danger at the east and north ends, the chances of cutting off the -wool losses seemed’ remote.

Extra precautionary measures were taken in this direction and all put in readiness with men and teams to remove the wool in short order. The arrival of the Perth Fire Brigade relieved the situation. They had been summoned and made the journey from Perth to help. When they came they saw a small smouldering fire in a wood pile which stands in the boiler room. Deciding that they could extingnish the blaze quite easily with a sprinkling of water, they went to procure pails and found upon their return that the flames had developed out of control, reaching high up the wells and all around the boiler room.

The alarm was given and quick help at hand, but so sudden and furious had the burning grow that it was impossible to do anything of an efficient nature. The mill firefighters were situated inside the building, but the raging flames prevented this being brought into service.

In a few minutes devastation hail spread east and went to the spinning and carding departments and westward into the finishing room. The last room of all to come to ruin was the weaving. Bursting from their confinement it hit the interior of the building, the flames passed out and over to the dye room and curled in the direction of Mr. Grierson’s house.

The situation was one of keeping control with Perth by means of relays of teams at points along every few feet. The Fire Captain (placed his engine at the Clyde Bridge on George Street), laid hose along Hillier St., caught up around the rear of the building anil joined with Captain White’s Lanark men in forming a complete barrage which cut off the danger from the wool stock anil outbuilding.

Stubbornly the flames shot and roared towards the superintendent’s home, lint equally stubborn and the ascendancy ebbed and flowed for nearly two hours before the flames showed signs of subsidence. In the mill itself large quantities of wool were stored amongst quantities of goods throughout the mill in various stages of fire.

In the scouring house downstairs a miscellaneous assortment of goods were ready for the machines and these were recovered. Thousands of dollars were in stock everywhere and had a strong wind prevailed even this might have been a vain effort, and when the fire spots came along they were quickly extinguished.

Precautions taken in this way saved the fire from spreading and the Fire Brigade was doing splendid work The fire engine stationed at the bridge, no more than one hundred feet distant from the burning building, worked along at full capacity and sent four strong, steady streams of water, distributed to the heat advantage, along the north sides of the building. This was a great task that demanded courage and perseverance.

About an hour after the first alarm the roofs began to weaken and fall, cracking and splitting with the terrific heat, broke off in sections and came down. The centre section of the mill was raised to the ground, disclosing fantastic shapes in twisted and gnarled machinery. A few years ago a brick storey had been added to tho mill, which is all gone, as well as about one-third of the eastern and western sections of the substantial old stone walls which enclosed the plant.

The destruction is so complete that all the order and form of this industry, which was Lanark pride and main support, has passed into the elements, and nothing remains but the slag of the ruin. The fire was all around and as far away as Smiths Falls the glare in the sky was noted. Crowds of people gathered from all quarters. Scores of automobiles came from the towns and villages and countryside. The fire alarm rang in Perth as soon as word was received there, end in a short time the engine and hose were ready end on the way.

Many of Perth’s folk came along in cars and other rigs.The building was originally a store owned by tlie Main, at that time a prominent business family in Lanark. A few years later the property was acquired by the late Boyd Caldwell and converted by him into a Woolen Mill. From time to time improvements end additions have been made.

When the wheels first turned that gave Lanark a standing as an industrial village there was general rejoicing. Caldwell’s Tweeds have honored Lanark for as long as it has existed. At the same time, it seems unthinkable that the place which has been the voice of inspiration for fifty years of successful effort and uninterrupted business policy, should be abandoned lightly. In the meantime plans have been in motion for recovering as fast as possible.

Appleton will take care of the finishing until machinery can be installed in the Perth plant. The Aberdeen Mill in Lanark will be doubled up in capacity by overtime.

Also read–100 Hands Thrown Out of Work –Lanark Village

CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
25 Jun 1917, Mon  •  Page 8

CALDWELL, WILLIAM CLYDE

Click here

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
16 Nov 1910, Wed  •  Page 8

Clyde Woolen Mills
  • Lot 2 George St.
  • Clyde Woolen Mills (Caldwell and Watchorn, proprietors; subsequently Boyd Caldwell and Co.) established a woolen mill in 1867.
  • The building was destroyed by fire in 1917. (the Glenayr Kitten Outlet Store was later situated in the Boyd Caldwell store).

Aberdeen Mills
  • Lot 2 George St.
  • William Clyde Caldwell, proprietor, built and began operating a woolen mill by 1890.
  • There was a fire at the mill in June 1901.
  • It was still operating under the Caldwells until 1930.

From-WOOLEN MILLS OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
19 Nov 1919, Wed  •  Page 1

100 Hands Thrown Out of Work –Lanark Village

A Walk through Lanark Village in 1871

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

William Craig Smithson Barn Fire 1950

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William Craig Smithson Barn Fire 1950

Fire destroyed Mr. Wm. C. Smithson’s bank barn, 10th line of Ramsay Township, on Sunday afternoon in a very short time. The barn and farm were leased to Mr. Kenneth Fee, local livestock dealer, and he lost 17 calves ready for market, a Hull valued at $250, four young pigs and about 20 tons of hay and baled straw .

Mr. Smithson lost about 30 tons of hay and all sorts of farming equipment that he had assembled since he moved to the farm on the edge of town from Pakenham 21 years ago. The horse stable, which was an annex of the barn, was burned with a large quantity of work and show harnesses, blankets, etc. The pump house which was separate also went up in the blaze. Five calves and a show horse were saved.

Mr. Smithson’ carried $2,000 insurance with the Lanark County Farmers’ Mutual and Mr. Fee had no insurance. The fire was first noticed about 2 p.m. by Gregory Smithson, 11- year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Smithson, who was in the barn at the time with Donald Reynolds of Carleton Place. At that time the hay on top of the granary was burning and as the barn doors were open, the fire spread in a matter of seconds.

The Almonte Fire Brigade was called and a thousand feet of hose had to be laid from the High School and the pumper connected. It was too late to do much good but the firemen stayed on the job until 6 p.m. and poured water on the ruins. When Gregory gave the alarm, Mr. and Mrs. Smithson and their daughter, Mrs. Millie Stokes, were at home. Mr. Smithson rushed to the cow stable but was unable to enter because of the extreme heat.

Mr. Fee usually visited the farm on Sunday but on this occasion only arrived when the fire was nearly over. In addition to the stock in the barn, he had 24 milk cows which were out on pasture. On Wednesday, the remains of the livestock had been removed and buried but there was still a big job of cleaning up. Mr. Smithson plans to rebuild. It is estimated the total loss will run around $25,000. 

August 1950

1956, Thursday August 23, The Almonte Gazette page 8
William C. Smithson

Following a month’s illness Mr William Craig Smithson passed away in Ottawa Civic Hospital on Wednesday, August 15h in his 70th year. Born at White Lake, he was the son of James Smithson and his wife, Barbara Craig. As a young man he worked at Cochrane for a few years and then settled in Pakenham Township.

Twenty-four years ago he purchased the farm on the outskirts of Almonte on the 10th line of Ramsay Township where the remainder of his life was spent. He was twice married. His first wife was Isabel Raycroft and following her death he married Jessie Ethel Armstrong in 1937. Surviving are his wife, and three sons and two daughters, William of South Porcupine; Dorothy, Mrs Peer Larsen of Kingston; Mildred, Mrs Dick Kitley of Regina; Douglas of Braeside and Gregory at home. There are also three brothers; Tom, Indian Head; Chris, Arnprior and Richard, Pakenham.

The funeral was held from his late residence, Martin Street on Saturday afternoon, August 18 and was largely attended. Rev Wm D. Reid of Carleton Place officiated and interment was in the Auld Kirk Cemetery. Among the tributes to the deceased were flowers from Circle No 2 of Almonte United Church and the employees of the Rosamond Woollen Company. The pallbearers were: Messrs Ted Sonnenburg, Kenneth Fee, William Hanson, Garnet Potter, Orval Peaver and Herman Ziebarth.

Three Years of Barn Swallows– Signs of Spring–Stuart McIntosh

Patrick Doyle Lanark County Barn Raising Ireton

The Lowry Barn on Highway 29

The Bank Barn of William Goth

Did We Find Henry Lang’s Barn?

The Day a Barn Raising Went Wrong- Meredith Family Genealogy

The Barn on Lot 25 Concession 10 Beckwith –Donna Mcfarlane

So What are the Mysterious “diamond cross” cut-outs seen on barns in Lanark County?

Stewart House Clippings and Memories

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Stewart House Clippings and Memories

Name of creator

Stewart House Incorporated (Pakenham, Ont.)

(1962-2006)

Administrative history

Stewart House Incorporated was a United Church of Canada learning centre located in the Village of Pakenham, Ontario. In 1962, Art and Elsa Stewart offered their home in Pakenham to serve as a learning centre since the other learning centre in Ontario, Five Oaks, was seen as too far away for the eastern presbyteries of the United Church of Canada. A joint committee of representatives from Renfrew and Ottawa Presbyteries was named to administer the project. The Stewarts then donated the property to the Renfrew and Ottawa Presbyteries in 1966 to serve as a permanent Christian Education centre or “retreat house” for Eastern Ontario. Stewart House was officially incorporated on February 6, 1965 and the operations were overseen by a Board of Directors. It was an accredited educational centre of the United Church of Canada. Stewart House closed in 2006.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Oct 1962, Wed  •  Page 50

1962

Turning over of Stewart House at Pakenham to United Church Sunday took place when Mrs. Elsa Stewart, ( read-History Clippings of the the Centennial Restaurant – Pakenham)

left, hands Rev. Murray McBride case containing golden key, while he already holds deeds given to properties. Other property is White House next door to shelter those on lay retreats and conferences. Photo by Peter Greene

At largely attended ceremony, – **Church accepts Stewart House **- Stewart House, spacious lay retreat house in Pakenham, and its adjoining White House, used for overnight accommodations, were formally turned over to the United Church of Canada in a largely attended ceremony on Sunday afternoon. Chairman of the Board, of Stewart House Inc., Rev. Murray McBride of Arnprior accepted the deeds and a gold key from the donor, Mrs. Elsa Stewart. “I’m told that my idea of Stewart House is 25 years ahead of its time,” Mrs. Stewart said, and I nevertheless feel very moved at this time to see so many who have turned out for the occasion from which quietness and fellowship in small groups of those to use the project will derive much inspiration and spiritual joy.” 85,000 say thanks.

Mrs. Stewart wanted credit to go to all concerned, but she did want to mention the names of Mrs. Errol Amaron, of Admaston, who could not be present, and Rev. Lloyd Shorten and Dr. Norman Coll of Ottawa. Receiving thanks from Mrs. Stewart for caring for the reception part of the occasion were the Church ladies of Pakenham Cedar Hill and Blakeney. Rev. McBride, in reply, said that Mrs. Stewarts gift was “no ordinary act, on no normal day, and it gives me great honour when I speak for all our Church people in the Ottawa and Renfrew Presbyteries to extend 85,000 thank you’s.” It was said that Art and EIsa Stewart had given their personal dimension of generosity and dedication to the gifts, and that the salutary benefits from the retreat center would “have value to the extent of the imagination of those using it.”

Rev. McBride recalled that the project idea had been formed eight years ago by the Stewarts and has been fostered by many in the interval to make it “a vision made real”. The opening invocation was given by Rev. John Angus of the Renfrew Presbytery, and the closing benediction was said by Chairman of the Ottawa Presbytery, Rev. Richard Carson. Leisurely spur. The guest speaker was Rev. George Young, Director of the Five Oaks retreat and leadership center, Paris, Ont.

Rev. Young reviewed the Church’s first project in retreat houses in British Columbia some 20 years ago, and traced their growth down to the splen­did Stewart House complex in so beautiful and inspirational a setting. The speaker said increased leisure these days has stimulated thoughtful people to avail themselves of lay training centers from which foundations of hope grow anew. “Those who come to Stewart House will be transformed people, and transforming disciples,” Rev. Young assured his numerous listeners, and to show the extent of the continuing challenge he said “with the birth of every new child, God hath not yet despaired of man.” “Stewart House will be a place of renewal, and a core of mission, in a fearless confrontation of a secular world more and more exposed to Christ,” the speaker confirmed.

Rev. Young closed with the words “Lead on, oh King Eternal, the days of March have come.” Directors noted. Rev. McBride, Stewart House Board Chainman, asked the other Directors to step forward and receive recognition for their contributions and sacrifices. They are: Mrs. John Harrington, Rev. Hank Weiler, Secretary, Al Monaghan, Rev. Ken Robinson, Mrs. Errol Amaron (absent), Jack West, Miss Jean Connery, Treasurer, and Mrs. Elsa Stewart. The presence was noted of Anglican Pakenham Rector Rev. C. C. Conliffe. Those attending the function numbering 600, were shown through Stewart House, and the 9-room White House.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Apr 1966, Sat  •  Page 26

Alice Paige

The Stewart family did so much for Pakenham and area. Humble, modest and generous!

Pakenham’s Stewart Community Centre was named for Art and Elsa Stewart who greatly contributed to the restoration and revitalization of Pakenham in the 1960s, 70s and 80s. It was opened in 1974, replacing the old Community Hall. Art and Elsa were awarded the Order of Canada in June of 1983. Operators of a model livestock-breeding farm, the Stewarts were active in many farm organizations and founded university entrance bursaries to the Ontario Agricultural College in Guelph for local students. From the Millstone

Andrea MacFarlane-Grieve

January 21  · 

I found this picture in a collection of photos that Danny Paige had put together several years ago. It shows Austin Stanton and a friend in front of a gas station/garage and I believe the location was in what is now the empty parking lot across the street from the once-upon-a-time Stewart House.
It would be interesting to know the history on this building and who owned it over the years …. although I am sure it is in the Tweedsmuir History if I went and looked.


Having said that though and if I am correct on the location, then have a funny story to tell that most people of my age group would remember. After the garage was torn down, the only thing left was a cement retainer wall at the back of the proper to stop the hill from collapsing. One Halloween, someone (whose name I know but won’t tell) wrote F*** OFF in big block letters on that wall. Well, it only took a few days for someone to come around and paint over it ….. however …


For about 15 years afterwards, every spring after the thaw, the cover-up paint decayed and lo-and-behold, the wonderful message would reappear as clear as day on the wall.
And every time it did, it got a chuckle from most of the youngsters in town. 

Peter Stanton

My dad is in photo and I am in the baby carriage. Winter of 54- 55. He had garage along with drill but the drilling business got much busier so he stopped garage about 56.

Shirleen Duncan

Hi, my husband says it was originally Allan Scotts garage, he remembers it being there. The Scott’s lived across the road from the Cedar Hill school house. Both of Allan’s sons are listed on the cenotaph in Pakenham. Mary Shaw (née Scott) is 105 years young and lives in Arnprior, so say’th Bill.

Andrea MacFarlane-Grieve

Bonnie MacFarlane Take a closer look Bonnie. This is not the garage that was beside the Stanton’s house. Check out the house at the top of the hill to the right …. it is Ralph McKenzie’s place.. That is why I said it was the garage that used to be in the Stewart House parking lot.

Cathy Lyon

Brian Kenneth Needham Yes, you are right it was Allie Scott. Maybe he sold the garage and property to Austin Stanton after he retired. He and his wife Laura lived up on the hill beside my Dad, Wm. Y. Wood. I remember them both very well. I lived with them for awhile after my Mother died.

April 11,2022 

Robert GardinerPakenham History: 1823-2023

In light of last night’s devastating fire on the main street, it’s worth pointing out the heritage value of the property. This building dated back to at least the 1870s-80s, if not earlier, when Benjamin Dunnet built a large limestone store at the site (see circled image below). Over the years it was used as a general store, residence, office, and service station.

In 1957 Art and Elsa Stewart bought the property and demolished the stone building with the exception of one wall at the back. They built themselves a house on the site, which was later used as a church building and more recently as a restaurant. Even until recently many people still referred to it as “Stewart House”-Pakenham History: 1823-2023

Pakenham History: 1823-2023

Kelsey Braendli

My husband and I are the current home owners of “The White House” and to see the fire last night was devastating. We are extremely thankful to all of the fire departments who arrived quickly and stayed throughout the night to prevent anyone from getting hurt.

Alice Paige

How awful! Stewart House ( and the White House next door) were run by the United Church. I used to stay there in the late 70’s when Art and Elsa Stewart were traveling. I would stay in the office to help with any needs while groups were there. It was a busy place. Marguerite Millar and Lois Grainger were the cooks. I even got a few cooking lessons from them. They often made meals for 10-50 people. Meetings, youth programs, marriage renewal classes, spiritual retreats and more were run and I always thought well attended. There was a beautiful Findlay oval cookstove in the rec room which was in perfect condition. It was a fine place! I believe the United Church sold it because they didn’t have the funds to run it. Maybe others know more?

History Clippings of the the Centennial Restaurant – Pakenham

The Pakenham Fire of June 1939 –Names Names Names

Mayne Store–Memories of the Pakenham Fire 1940

  1. The Pakenham Fire of 1940
  2. July 8, 1940 Fire at the Mayne Store Pakenham
  3. Dickson Hall Fire Pakenham-H. H. Dickson
  4. Fire at Pakenham Woollen Factory with Town Directory
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Sep 1973, Sat  •  Page 27

Original Burgess Buildings Burn 1921- Burgess Merrick History Carleton Place

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Original Burgess Buildings Burn 1921- Burgess Merrick History Carleton Place

It’s Charles Burgess built this grist mill at the CPR siding in the 1890’s. It was located about where today’s Mews mall is on Landsdowne Avenue. ( these were the newer buildings built after the fire)

It was run by Ab Hurdis’s grandfather William Hurdis– and later still by Russell Munro, whose son Keith remembers it burning down about 1965.–Before The Carleton Place Mews?

Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The original Grist Mill Burnt down

1921-04-22– Almonte Gazette

A feed mill belonging to Chas. F. Burgess was completely destroyed by fire, Tuesday night. The damage is estimated to be in the vicinity of $15,000. The cause of the fire is unknown, but it started in a shed where a small quantity of hay was stored adjoining the mill. No one knew the building was in trouble until all of a sudden fire broke out with a rush and in a few seconds the entire shed was a mass of flames.

The fire spread to the mill, which on account of its frame construction fell an easy prey. For nearly two hours the buildings were a raging furnace, and although tons of water were poured into them by the Carleton Place fire department. The fire had gained too much headway and could not be got under control till the buildings were completely gutted.

With the buildings were all there was also destroyed stock and machinery which included a carload of flour that had just been unloaded. Nothing was saved but a small quantity of office equipment and a few bags of flour. At no time was there any danger of the fire spreading beyond the Burgess buildings, as these were somewhat isolated from the rest of the town.

On account of this no outside help was asked, but the town firemen under Fire Chief Wm. McIlquham fought the fire gallantly, though were unsuccessful in their efforts. The burned buildings were among the old landmarks of the town. They were erected many years ago by a Mr. Merrick, an old pioneer of Carleton Place.

Merrick

CLIPPED FROM
The Merrickville Star
Merrickville, Ontario, Canada
18 Apr 1901, Thu  •  Page 8
CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
26 Feb 1891, Thu  •  Page 4
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Feb 1898, Tue  •  Page 8
CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
25 Feb 1887, Fri  •  Page 8

The Burgess Will and Other Burgess Oddities

When Things Come 360 –The First Automobile Fatality in Carleton Place– Torrance, Burgess, and Names Names

Arthur Street The Burgess House and Dangerous Places- Ray Paquette

A.C. Burgess “Dining Hall Carleton Place” 1885

Arthur Burgess Closes Carleton Place C.P.R. Restaurant

The Crazy Town World of Mr. George Arthur Burgess of Carleton Place

Before The Carleton Place Mews?

Who Was John Boland? Chatterton House/Queen’s Hotel Registry — The Burgess Family Dynasty

The Auction of the Year in Carleton Place

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

More Notes about the Mysterious Arklan Farm

Fire at the Manse in Watson’s Corners

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Fire at the Manse in Watson’s Corners
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
26 Aug 1908, Wed  •  Page 1

During Rev. McConnells’ ministry, the first manse at Watson’s Corners was built in 1893, and the next year the Zion Church was built at Watson’s Corners. During Rev. McLean’s ministry in 1908, the Manse was burned to the ground on August 20, but was rebuilt immediately after the fire.

Perth Courier, November 10, 1893

Watson’s Corners:  On the night of 31st October the minister and his family, who lately moved into the new manse at Watson’s Corners, got a very pleasant surprise by the ladies and their friends of that section of the Dalhousie congregation.  On the evening named Mr. and Mrs. McConnell were invited out to tea and while at the house of their hostess and before the hour for tea had come, two messengers arrived announcing that visitors had come to the manse and Mr. and Mrs. McConnell were wanted.  On retracing their steps they found the ladies and gentlemen to the number of 36 had taken full possession and on being ushered into the dining room they found the table loaded with everything inviting to the appetite and they were invited by the president of the Ladies Aid of Watson’s Corners to take their places at the table.  After supper, Mr. McConnell was called to take the chair for the evening and a very pleasant hour was spent in religious exercises.  Congratulatory addresses were made on the work done since the minister’s labors began in this part of the Dalhousie congregation to which the minister replied and thanked all who were present for the earnest and zealous aid he had received since his arrival at Watson’s Corners.  The ladies not only brought ample supplies for all present but enough to make a good beginning in the way of supplying the manse for some time to come.  Nor was the minister’s horse forgotten for several bags of oats were brought and stored away for him. Such a visit as this of which we have written is stimulating and helpful both to the minister and the people; and we trust the kind words spoken by those present on this occasion and the response returned by the chairman will long be remembered by all.  In concluding this brief recital of what happened at the Presbyterian manse on the night of the 31st October we may add that besides the representatives of our own church and congregation we had male and female members of the Methodist Church who were as liberal and cordial in their gifts and kind words as others.  At about 10:00, after singing “God Be With You Till We Meet Again”, etc., the chairman pronouncing the benediction the company dispersed well satisfied with the entertainment of which they were the originators and active agents.




The Landmark Pine Tree in Watson’s Corners– Gloria Currie

When Researching — Tragedy Somehow Shows Up- Fair Family- Watson’s Corners

More Photos of the Watson’s Corners Kangaroos – Thanks to Connie Jackson

The Valley Calendar 1976– Cindy Duncan–Watson’s Corners

Watson’s Corners School

Watson’s Corners

It’s the Watson’s Corners News 1895!

Social Notes from Watson’s Corners

All the Single Ladies?

It’s the Watson’s Corners News 1895!

The Miserly Woman From Watson’s Corners 1903

The Deserted Fireplace at Watson’s Corners

WATSON’S CORNERS NEWS. 1897-April 16

Watson’s Corners And Vicinity 1891–Shetland Ponies and Cheese

So…. We drove by Kangaroo Crescent

Tie Me Jackelope Down Boy–Tie Me Jackelope Down!

More about Cindy Duncan – Thanks to Connie Jackson