Tag Archives: fire

One Year Later After the Fire — 1960 Lanark Village

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One Year Later After the Fire — 1960 Lanark Village

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada11 May 1960, Wed  •  Page 27

It’s booming in Lanark today, 10 months after a disastrous fire just last June 15 that threatened to wipe this village of 900 off the map. George Street the main street -will never look the same as it as before the fire, but most residents feel the change will be for the better. New business places have sprung up from the fire-blackened rubble and more are being planned. In the residential section at least 14 new homes have been built since the fire.

A spanking new post office slated for the village even before last summer’s holocaust is nearly ready to open. And everyone is talking optimistically of a new industry coming to town. Of the 45 families who left the village after the disaster, at least one has returned to stay and there is good reason to believe more will do the same before the anniversary date rolls around in June. Rita Traill, who with her parents lost two houses and a flower shop in the fire, was the first to reopen for business, followed, by Wally Machan, one of the village barbers.

To young Don Drysdale, whose family store on the east side of George Street was reduced to ashes, the future also looks bright. His new dry goods, men’s and women’s ready to wear-shop, on the former Bank of Nova Scotia property, is drawing trade from a wide area. Gordon Caldwell was just getting his locker business started when the wind-whipped flames.

With courage and aid from the Lanark Fire Relief Fund Gordon Caldwell has opened a new and fully modern supermarket on the main street. At least three commercial lots in the heart of the business section are still unoccupied and their owners have not yet revealed their intentions. But it is generally felt that these lots could be acquired at reasonable cost by anyone interested in Lanark as a future business location. New Town Hall The whole town looks forward anxiously to construction of a new town hall, fire hall and library, planned for the site of the old but handsome town hall, swept by flames at the corner of Clarence Street.

Plans are being drawn by Ottawa consulting engineers Chalmers-MacKenzie Associates and surveyors have taken levels and marked out foundation limits for a new $100,000 building. When completed next year the new town hall will house the Lanark fire department, police station and two jail cells, a 400-seat auditorium, offices for the town clerk and municipal officials; a library, kitchen and council chamber. Overall dimensions call for a 153-foot frontage on Clarence Street and 96 feet on George Street.

About $50,000 was realized from insurance on the old town hall and the balance required to build the new fire resistant structure will be raised by debentures. Last fall the utilities commis sion brightened up the streets with modern fluorescent street lighting and last week, with a $5,000 Lanark County grant, local workmen began replacing side walks in the burned-out areas. A new assessment will be made this summer and it is felt that, considering the modern type of homes that are replacing the fire ruined area, a substantial boost in property values will indicate a cut in taxes in the near future.

The village faces a considerable capital investment which includes the new town hall, but the future looks bright for Lanark. Brows furrow when someone mentions the disastrous fire of last June 15 but their first remark is usually “we are very thankful that there was no loss of life and no one was injured”.

Councillor Erroll Mason, editor of The LanarK fcra which was spared by the flames, took stock of the town after the fire. These are the business places he found were destroyed by flames:

Campbell’s Sash and Door, Traill’s Flower Shop, Homell’s Store. Charlton’s Grocery, Bell Telephone Office, Hewitt’s Bak ery, Machan’s Barber Shop, Drys-dale’s Store, Lee’s Hardware; Strang’s Drug Store, Quinn’s Shoe Repair, Wright’s Hotel, Lanark Locker Plant, MacFarlane’s Hardware. Lanark 5c to $1 Store (partially), Glenayr Knit boiler house roof and one large warehouse.

Municipal buildings destroyed were the town hall and fire hall; organization buildings lost were the Lanark branch of the Canadian Legion and the Masonic Temple. On Sundays after the fire, Lanark became a tourist mecca as people for miles came to see the effects of the devasating fire. Business places they found still standing were: Glenayr Knit Ltd. The Bank of Nova Scotia, O. E. Rothwell Lumber Co., The Lanark Era. Matthie and Gagne, Young’s Planing Mill and Furniture, Ferricr’a Garage, Murphy’s Meat Store, Topping’s Store, Campbell’s Restaurant, Munro’s Garage, McCulloch’s Feed Store and the Clyde Nursing Home.

The two burned-out areas the fire jumped across the main street were quickly levelled by bulldozers. Fire scarred trees and poles were cut down and wreckage hauled away. Only vacant fields remained where the once busy business places stood. A total of $92,541 was raised by the fire relief fund and this was matched by a grant from the Ontario government. The scars have healed over. The town is on the mend.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada11 May 1960, Wed  •  Page 27

Two Years After the Lanark Fire 1961

Images of the Day After the Lanark Fire June 16 1959–

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

June 17 1959– The Day After the Fire in Lanark Village

The Taylor Brothers from Carleton Place — Lanark Village Fire 1911

Remember the Village Queen in Lanark?

Wilbert Foster Garage Fire —Lanark

Fred Orok Clippings- Lanark

Hanging With the Almonte Police 1984 —Joe Banks

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Hanging With the Almonte Police 1984 —Joe Banks

Just before the pick-up truck did a sweeping U-turn directly in front of the cruiser, I told constables Tom O ‘Connor and Stan Carter that I thought I knew how a monkey felt. “This cage is only 12 inches from my face,” I said, crammed into the backseat of cruiser 10- 369, the one with the metal screen between the front and rear seats. It’s supposed to protect the driver from a kick in the head or a spitting, or what bad guys could inflict from the back scat. “There’s no leg room, either.’ I just got those words out when the radio crackled.

It was Corporal Jack Munden back at base. We were to watch for a dark pick up full of kids, eggs and beer; a volatile combination. “ There they are,” Stan said, pointing to the south corner of Bridge and Water streets, just across from the town hall. The truck blatantly turned in front of the cruiser and headed south on Bridge Street, picking up speed. We followed, hitting the tracks at accelerating speed with lights flashing. All I could think of was the banjo music accompanying a chase scene on the Dukes of Hazzard. It was 9:15 pm. Luke needn’t feel threatened; the chase was a short one. The truck pulled over with its load of masked men, cartoned eggs and cold beer; all the ingredients for a night on the town.

The mood around the parked truck was jovial. A couple of the lads wearing rubber gorilla and monster masks smoked cigarettes through the openings. One of them whispered the word under his breath as he saw a six-pack of Labatt’s disappear into the hack of the cruiser. Tom filled out the citation quietly. Stan chatted with some OPP up from Perth, checking to see if Almonte needed help, A crowd was gathering at the end of High Street, where we’d pulled the truck over. It was show time. We heard that a mattress had been set on fire in the middle of Mill Street. Minutes later, I took a chance and decided to walk up to the ‘pool room corner’ after.

Number 369 headed back to the station to drop the confiscated goods off. I was being either very brave or very foolish– and I didn’t feel very brave. It was apparent I wasn’t going to last long at the corner without an egg-shell shampoo. I snapped off some shots of the fire as quickly as the flash would charge, which wasn’t soon enough. Eggs started landing around my feet. The mattress in the middle street burned brighter, shards of glass could be seen in the flickering light. They were from bottles, however. A window hadn’t been torched. The sidewalks were slick with egg and the calvary, constables Gerry Murphy and Greg Dainschinko in cruiser 10-557 (no cage), pulled up

“ Have you got room for three skinned raccoons,” came Stan’s voice over 557’s radio.

Greg looked at Gerry and Gerry looked at Greg. I tried to imagine what three skinned raccoons looked like and I knew there was no room for them. En route to a check behind Lee Pro Hardware, we pulled over a car for a spot check. Nothing transpired, but just before we climbed back into the cruiser, an incredible barrage of eggs rained down on us. It was a well-timed ambush and the projectiles were well-aimed. I ducked behind the cruiser, two eggs brushing the side of my head. Greg was hit in the shoulder, hut the left side of the cruiser absorbed the bulk of the attack. The car looked like a battered omelette, with shell and yoke solidifying on the windshield.

We drove back to the “front” — the terminology the men were using to describe the pool room corner. The fire was rising ten feet high by now, making upper Mill Street with its Shipman building under renovation look more like a section of Beirut than the commercial centre of an Ottawa Valley town. Garbage, pieces of wood and glass were everywhere. More eggs slammed into the windshield as we watched, parked on the corner. Gerry wheeled the car into the parking lot adjoining the Shipman building.

“They’ll have that plywood off the roof before long” he said, Greg said, “ They’re not even , wound up yet.”

We saw three or four youths sprinting away from the building. Just keep them moving, the constables agreed. Herd them like sheep. As long as there’s no rocks or golf balls or gasoline. “ Hey,” I remarked, inspecting my pants and coat, “I don’t believe it. Not even an egg mark.” “Yet,” Greg added.

One of the suspected egg attackers was stopped. “Get in ,” Greg told him . A few minutes later, he said, “give us the eggs’ ‘ and Gerry wheeled the cruiser down Brae Street. “ I haven’t got any,” came the answer from the masked man. “ You can search me if you w ant.” His voice was quivering. They knew who he was. They advised him to can the fun and go home. He was let off three blocks down the street. We drove out of the commercial section, away from the battle scene on Mill Street. The firemen continued to monitor the situation, but did not bring in the pumper. They knew what would happen. Not only would they and the truck pumper be pelted while dousing the flames, but the fire would be started again soon after they left. No, best to let them have their fun. Best to let the fire burn itself out, Greg said, and clean it up in the morning.

The quiet of the residential streets was a marked contrast to the front, but it gave the policemen time to reflect on the evening’s events. “ You know, Joe, we should take our hats off to these kids,” he said seriously. “ Things could be a hell of a lot worse. Give credit where credit is due.” And then he said that: “there is a handful of bad apples,” though most of them, he acknowledged are in the can.”

It was 10:29 pm.

“Where are you Greg? the radio crackled. “We just passed Blackburn’s,” he answered. Stan was on the other end and wanted us to box some kids in an alley beside the Superior Restaurant, “ They’ve got water bombs or paint bombs or something,” he said. The cat and mouse game went on. The kids were long gone, but Greg spotted two of them who looked as if they were squaring off, ready to fight behind the Baker building. Gerry pulled the cruiser up and Greg got out. He asked them about eggs, frisked them and stopped suddenly as if jolted by a bolt of lightning. “ Sorry!” he exclaimed, face blushing. He climbed back into the cruiser. “Make sure you know who you’re frisking,” he said. “ I just made a mistake.” He had been mistaken about a girl dressed as an old man, a hobo. Score one for the kids.

The mood lightened in the cruiser, though it had never exactly taken on the air of a well-played police drama. These guys knew what to expect and little of what happened this night was going to be a surprise. It was shaping up to be an evening of the usual harmless hijinks. And that’s how it went, for the most part. Back at the front, the shouts and screams were dimming, though the mattress and boards were still burning on Mill Street.

“What are you doing here John ?” Gerry asked a young fellow picked up after he was spotted carrying a real estate sign to add to the fire. The youth, over from Carleton Place for the evening, said he was just there for a few laughs, no harm meant, “And no harm d o n e ,” Gerry said matter-of-factly. “ But I think you’ve had your fun tonight, don’t you?” John admitted yes. He was let off at the next corner. We returned to the pool room.

Greg looked non chalantly at the fire. “Do you know if they celebrate Halloween in Ireland?” he asked. People must be saying, ‘look at those cops sitting there not doing a damn thing,’ ” said Gerry surveying the activities at the front behind the wheel. I thought, those are the same people who would be the first to call a cop if they were pelted by an egg. It was 11:06 pm and the fire was still burning well. By now, bales o f hay had been added to it. Six minutes later, after another in a continuing series of egg barrages, I was with Stan and Tom again.

We took a quick drive to Almonte Motors, where a car was being reportedly tipped over. We saw the kids sprinting from the scene, but there was no sign of damage. At 11:30, we were making our way down a quiet residential street. “ You know ,” said Gerry, “they used to kick the s— out o f that place on Halloween,” gesturing to the house of a prominent Almonte citizen. “There’s nothing this year though.”

We turned the corner, the styrofoam coffee cups on the floor rolled, and he described an incident six or seven years ago that unnerved more than a few townsfolk. As they were this year, the kids had been throwing eggs at cars. They hit one, the driver stopped got out, and brandished a gun. Halloween had become a serious game. And how did he, I asked, compare Halloween to the others? Tom answered, voice rasping, “ exceptionally quiet. There’s usually a lot of calls in, but there’s not that many this year.” Later I’d found out there had only been one all night. Members of the local radio club were helping out in the surveillance o f the town, and alerted the base to any goings on.

We met some of the crew about every ten minutes, parked silently in a shadow or driving through and past the front. It was past midnight and the carnival-like atmosphere that prevailed on Mill Street for much of the night was dissolving. But as we sat directly across from the Royal Bank, another ambush transpired. This time Constable Tom O ’C o nnor, whose window was open, caught an egg on the shoulder. The night wasn’t over yet. A half-hour later, I was again riding with 557. Shortly after leaving the station, Greg spotted someone he knew. “ Stop there a sec,” he said quickly. “That kid’s been carrying eggs around all night.” When he was searching him , he accidentally broke an egg in the young fellow’s pocket. The teenager muttered something I couldn’t make out. Greg got back in the car and we left.

“Hey, Mister, don’t you think it’s past your bed time?” Gerry Murphy asked a youth hanging on to the beer store sign post. “You’re on probation aren’t you?” The kid nodded. “ If I see you out on the street again,” he told him as we drove past the probation office.” And then he added, “ Y ou’ve been drinking too? Underage?” But he let the lad off with a warning; it probably would be enough. “ He’s basically not a bad kid ,” Gerry said as we drove off. “ They’re just like little lambs. They’s got to be led. But this one is not a bad kid at all. He got into some trouble at the arena a little while back.”

On our way back downtown, I remarked about the number of smashed eggs around town. “ The old chickens must be working overtime tonight,” Gerry joked. We pickced up Greg, who had been on foot for about a half-hour checking out the alleyways and doorways downtown. The two policemen compared notes and swapped names of kids they’d spotted. No sooner had they finished, when one of them saw a youth holding what appeared to be eggs.”Are those golf balls he’s got?” Gerry asked. “ Yeah, let’s take a run over.” Three or four were hanging out on the steps of the Royal Bank, still wearing the identity-hiding masks. “ Isn’t it past your bedtime band Tito ?” Gerry asked one dressed as a Mexican bandit: I stepped on an empty coffee cup. The night was getting old. The kids moved on.

“Just make sure,” Greg said, noticing me taking notes, “that you put in there just how good the kids are in this town. It’s been a long year, and they could’ve gotten even lots of times. ” It was true. Tonight could have been a disaster, as it had been a number of years ago. Even those kids we just stopped could have told the police where to get off. Or, they could have broken a few hundred windows. Or they could have made life generally unpleasant for the merchants.

“Stop here at this truck,” Greg said as we passed a black four by four. It was 1 am , early Thursday morning. For the first time that night, Greg took out the A L E R T , a small box-like device used to determine whether a driver should be driving or not after drinking. He explained carefully and purposefully to the driver what the device did, and asked him if he understood what it was to be used for. The driver nodded yes. “ That’s a warning,” he told him after the driver blew into the tube. “Under the Highway Traffic Act, that means I can seize your licence for 12 hours.” The driver understood, and was cooperative. The only problem was, he couldn’t find his driver’s licence.

For me, that was the last, first hand ride of the night. It was well after 1, and police work was becoming tiring. Back at the office, Jack Munden poured another coffee. “It’s fresh out of our new coffee maker. Sure you don’t want any?” I declined, having already ingested enough that night to float a ship. The base radio was inactive. Jack was happy. Halloween, once a feared evening in this town, passed without a single serious incident.

To show for this year’s antics, the detachments had seized dozens of cartons o f eggs, some barbecue starters and beer. There wasn’t a soul in the lock-up. Detachment number 10-60 Almonte, with all four constables and a corporal on duty, had coped. For an Ottawa Valley town of Almonte’s notoriety on Halloween night, to an outsider, that might seem remarkable. But to those who know better, Almonte’s notorious reputation is now a thing of the past, a story to be remembered by yesterday’s youths when they swap lies with their friends in bars. The image, certainly for me, had been laid to rest

The Day After Halloween in Almonte –1979

The Ongoing Fight of Rooney’s and Karl’s Grocery — Part 2

The Seven-Barrelled ‘pepper box’ Revolver — Rosamond Fight — July 1875

Chief Irvine Preys on Motorists According to Almonte

Chatterton’s Hotel Pakenham– Fire 1871

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Chatterton’s Hotel Pakenham– Fire 1871

Feb 1871

The beds and stables attached to Chatterton’s Hotel Pakenham, were destroyed by fire on the morning of the 7th together with the horses, a quantity of hay,etc. The alarm soon attracted a number of people of the town and their whole exertions were turned to saving the hotel. Through the extraordinary efforts of Mr. Wm. Dicksonson and others this was eventually  accomplished. A gentleman on the Opeongo Road was the owner of a valuable team destroyed; another was owned by a party from Portage du Fort. Dr. Pickkup of Pakenham lost one horse, and the mail contractor from Pakenham to Ottawa another. April 1871

The former Commerical Hotel in Pakenham was leased by Mr. Samuel D Chatterton in 1868 from Mr. Dickson and renamed it the Ontario House.

CLIPPED FROMOttawa Daily CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada06 Jul 1872, Sat  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROMOttawa Daily CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada21 Jul 1880, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada05 Feb 1887, Sat  •  Page 3

CLIPPED FROMOttawa Daily CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada05 Sep 1871, Tue  •  Page 2

DetailSource-1871 Census

Name:Saml D Chatterton[Samuel D Chatterton]
Gender:Male
Marital Status:Married
Widowed:M
Origin:Scottish (Scotish)
Age:31
Birth Date:1840
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Place:Pakenham, Lanark North, Ontario
District Number:80
Subdistrict:c
Division:02
Religion:Weslyan Methodist
Occupation:Hotel Keeper
Family Number:48
Neighbours:View others on page
Household Members (Name)AgeSaml D Chatterton31Margaret Chatterton29Estella Chatterton6Susan Chatterton1/12Harcourt Howlett33

Samuel D. Chatterton

BIRTHunknownDEATH28 Oct 1904BURIAL

Albert Street CemeteryArnprior, Renfrew County, Ontario, Canada

You Didn’t Need to Sell Whiskey to Make Money

British Hotel Pakenham –Mrs. McFarlane

Letter from Davis House to Scotts in Pakenham- Adin Daigle Collection– Where Was Davis House?

The Aitkenhead Bakery Fire 1971

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The Aitkenhead Bakery Fire 1971

1971

A fire that broke out about 4:30 last Thursday afternoon seriously damaged the Almonte Bakery on Queen Street. Firemen fought the blaze for over an hour before it was brought under control. The fire, which broke out under a stairway at the rear of the oven, gutted the baking area and kitchen and caused considerable damage to an upstairs apartment and the roof. A garage adjacent to the rear of the shop was also damaged as was the house next door belonging to Mr. and Mrs Frank Vetter.

Firemen of the Almonte Fire Department, however, kept the blaze from spreading. Cause of the fire was not immediately known. Made temporarily homeless by the blaze were Mr. and Mrs. Robert Aitkenhead Sr., proprietors of Almonte Bakery and daughter, Mildred Aitkenhead. Mr. Aitkenhead was taken through a window on the second floor by his son Bob when they were trapped by the flames.

Marion and Mildred Aitknhead and Ruthie Burnside April 9 1930 20 Frank Street Carleton Place

Aitkenhead – The Almonte Bakery Ontario,Queen Street 1969 (Look at the building across the street)

He was assisted by Boyd Jamieson and Gordon Donaldson who rushed over from the Co-op store with a 32 foot ladder. Mr. Aitkenhead had not been feeling well and was in bed when the fire started. Only quick thinking on the part of all concerned averted a tragedy. He was treated at Almonte General Hospital for smoke inhalation and released.The family’s pet dog was dropped out the second floor window into the arms of a bystander. She quickly made tracks for parts unknown but was at the door again the next morning. No estimate of damage is yet available but at the present time Mr. Aitkenhead plans on re-opening the business as soon as repairs can be completed.

The Aitkenhead family have operated the bake shop for the past 24 years. Although the history of the building is somewhat clouded, it has been both a bake shop and a private home at various times in its past. The Vetter home next door which was also threatened is one of Almonte’s older landmarks, its age being well over the century mark. April 1971

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Hog’s Back Falls Ottawa –Aitkenhead Photo Collection

How to Make a Vintage Apron- Aitkenhead Photo Collection

Old fashioned Raisin Bread WITH ZEST

No Banker Left Behind – Bank of Montreal Almonte Photos

Down by the Mississippi River- Almonte Falls Photos 50s

What Happened to the House and Family on Frank Street –Part 1

The Aitkenhead Family at 20 Frank Street in Carleton Place

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Hog’s Back Falls Ottawa –Aitkenhead Photo Collection

Photos of the Orange Parade Almonte 1963 — Name that Band?

Lanark County Folk –Ethel McIntosh Ramsbottom — Russell Ramsbottom

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Lanark County Folk –Ethel McIntosh Ramsbottom — Russell Ramsbottom
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jul 1932, Mon  •  Page 8

From Stuart McIntosh
My Aunt Ethel McIntosh Ramsbottom recalled helping her grandmother making soap. “ They saved hardwood ashes in a barrel in the winter and in the spring the barrel was set on a base so that the edge was out over it. A hole was bored in the side of the barrel near the bottom and an iron pot set on the ground under the barrel. The boys and I carried water and put it on the ashes, and as it leached the ashes, the lye collected in the iron pot.


This was put in an iron cooler along with water and grease, and boiled over a fire most of the day. It had to be stirred often, a tedious job as the cooler was set on a stone foundation with a hollow under the fire. We used a stick(often a broom handle for stirring the soap.
When it was cooled enough, we put out the fire and put salt and water in the soap and left it till the next morning. At that time it would be firm enough to cut into bars and these would be set out on boards in the shed to harden.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Sep 1982, Wed  •  Page 50
RAMSBOTTOM, Russell, 1902 – 1982, his wife Ethel R. McIntosh, 1906 –     , Keith 1946 – 1969.

Families such as the Peacocks, Robertsons, Ramsbottom and Campbells also settled in the Rosetta area, the first earliest recorded burial was Robert Stoddart, in 1828.

Mr. Campbell entered Victoria Hospital, Montreal, March. 27th. Before going there he had been ill four weeks, and twice in that time his life was despaired of. But he gained strength rapidly, and was doing as well as could be expected until a day or two before his removal. A week ago on Friday last he underwent an operation, which was highly successful and promised the most favorable results, but on Monday of last week he took a change for the worse, requiring a second operation the following day. He suffered intensely after this operation, but remained conscious up to the last few minutes of his life. Characteristic of his business-like turn of mind was his action in settling all his bills with the hospital authorities a few hours before his death. Deceased was a son of the late Arch. Campbell, of Lanark township, and was born forty-one years ago on the farm now occupied by Mr. John Ramsbottom, jr.

James, m. Margaret Edwards, lived on Arklan Farm, part of original grant. (Arklan) Brice, m. Margaret Elizabeth Lynch On Burgess farm, on Lake Avenue. John J., (Ashton) Arnold W. (Taxi Driver) Willard Mrs. Wm.Simpson Mrs. Ray Kennedy Mrs. Horace Coleman Mrs. Jack Yeaman (Faye) Mrs. Robert Service Brice,m. Frank, m. Jessie Boale Isabel,m. Wm.Pierce Arthur,d.,m. Margaret Erena James Kathleen,m. Barry Fraser Norman Helen,m. Eugene Bezak Mildred, m. J.A. Lynch Margaret J., m. Mr. Price Eliza Anne, m. Mr. Ramsbottom Daughter went to St. Hilda’s.m. Rev. Grant Sparling Also adopted son. Nathaniel D. Moore, Blacksmith in Carleton Place–Family now in Washington State, USA Seven Children

People of Lanark County Andrew Dunlop 1944

People of Lanark County –The Rest of the Story — Weitzenbauer – Maberly

Allan Barratt– Pakenham– People of Lanark County

People of Lanark County — Mrs. Charlie Rintoul

Sweetest Man in Lanark County — Harry Toop Honey Maker

Hot Summer Days- August 6 1900 –Congregational Church Fire

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Hot Summer Days- August 6 1900 –Congregational Church Fire
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Aug 1900, Tue  •  Page 3

Monday afternoon about 4:30 a furious electric storm passed over Lanark Village and surrounding country. The tower of the Congregational church was struck at a distance of about 100 feet
from the ground, the ball of fire descending and breaking its way through the corner of the church. The alarm was given, and the firemen were quickly on hand and soon bad a stream playing on the burning tower. About five o’clock the flames seemed to be checked, but tne water
in the tank ran low, and again it made headway. The bose were changed on to the factory steam pump, and with this strong flow the fire was com­ pletely extinguished about eight o’clock. About
twenty feet of the spire feB, and the remainder of
it is completely rimmed out. The body of the church is badly soaked with water, and the rafters la the attic are badly burned. ~ The loss is placed at about $2,500; fully insured. Servioes win be held in the town hall next Sabbath morning

Authorities say that Monday was the hottest day for 46 years

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
08 Aug 1900, Wed  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
08 Aug 1900, Wed  •  Page 4


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
12 Sep 1900, Wed  •  Page 1

Fire in Zion Memorial Church January 1950

The Almonte Fire of 1909

Judge Senkler and the Almonte Fire Bug

The Almonte Fire– Bridge and Water Street 1903

Miss Eva Denault- Almonte 1911 Fire Heroine

The Re-Opening of the North Lanark Regional Museum (Appleton) 1980

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The Re-Opening of the North Lanark Regional Museum (Appleton) 1980

The Doreen Drummond House was officially opened Saturday, July 19, 1980 on the site of the former North Lanark Regional Museum, near Appleton. Stewart Drummond cut the ribbon on the building named by the North Lanark Historical Society (N LH S) in memory of his late wife. Doreen Drummond House replaces the former museum building which was destroyed by fire exactly one year ago, July 19. 1979.

Tentative plans have been made by the NLHS for further expansion as finances permit. After a drive to the museum before her death Mrs Drummond had requested her sons help the Historical Society in their efforts to replace the museum building. Drummond Brothers Limited found a building 44 feet by 22 feet, completely insulated, the wall-to-wall carpeted floor reinforced with three full-length steel beams.

The building had been used as a mobile office by the Campeau Corporation of Ottawa. For $10,000 Drummond Brothers set the building on piers on the grounds of the former museum. Ramsay Township Council waived the $200 building permit. The building was paid for with $5,000 from the insurance on the former schoolhouse turned museum.

The other $5,000 was a gift from a friend of the North Lanark Historical Society, who wished to remain anonymous. There was no charge by Drummond Brothers for the move. Ramsay Township Council purchased the site from the Lanark County Board of Education for five dollars. Since last spring the new building was put on a permanent foundation. Doreen Drummond House is set further back on the lot than the former schoolhouse. A screened in veranda has been built on the back. There is a small kitchen with cupboards.

Dawn Leduc, Blakeney, Curator of the North Lanark Regional Museum, after a few brief remarks, asked Stewart to cut the ribbon, and unveil the name plaque, declaring Doreen Drummond House officially open. Frank Taylor, chairman of the museum building committee, expressed thanks to the Drummond family, the sons of Dawn Leduc and many others whose help had made possible the reopening of the museum in the new building. He especially praised Jean Steel, N LH S president, for her leadership. Before and after the opening ceremonies, visitors toured the museum, inspecting the various exhibits. Some members of Appleton Women’s Institute served refreshments on the soon-to-be completed veranda.

The time has come to celebrate the official grand reopening of Almonte’s historic pioneer cabin located at the North Lanark Regional Museum!
Join us anytime between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. on July 23rd (2022) as we welcome guests and visitors once again to tour through this fascinating landmark. We’ll have classic lawn games like horseshoes, pioneer toys, and crafts for kids. All day, you’ll have the opportunity to explore the cabin and the ways pioneer families lived their lives, and between 1:30 and 3:00, you can take a tour with our most active volunteers who will explain the process of restoring our historic building.

Stop by from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. to enjoy a live performance by a local fiddlers’ group. At 1 p.m. we’ll begin our official opening ceremony and twine cutting! Alex Gillis, president of the North Lanark Historical Society will say a few words, and cake will be served.

Lemonade and cookies baked from recipes in our museum collection will be available while supplies last. We encourage visitors to bring their own picnic, picnic blankets, and lawn chairs.
There is no admission cost to participate in the re-opening festivities, but donations are always welcome to assist with our ongoing restorations and programming costs.

The heritage Almonte cabin was built near the current roundabout in the 1840’s. It was moved to its present location in 1983 by the North Lanark Historical Society. The building has been displayed over the years in ways that reflect the lived experiences of pioneer settlers to Lanark County, showcasing a range of artefacts that were important in pioneering times.

This important building has been closed to the public throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, giving the Historical Society a fantastic opportunity to undertake much needed restorative work. Through the generosity of a community that responded in earnest to our fundraising campaign, we have successfully raised the building off the ground and placed it on new footings, repaired some exterior logs, and re-chinked and resealed areas between the logs. We have also been able to complete significant repairs to the attached side shed, install new doors, and clean the interior to provide better and safer artefact display.
But there is still work to be done to complete this project. The North Lanark Historical Society plans to build a third external building to complement the existing pioneer cabin. This third building will be used as a display area for large agricultural tools and machines currently housed in the North Lanark Regional Museum collection, many of which had temporary homes inside the pioneer log cabin.

To donate to this ongoing fundraising campaign, visit our website at www.northlanarkregionalmuseum.com
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#pioneerday #pioneerdays #familyfun #community #fundraising #fundraiser #history #localhistory #localherita

The North Lanark Regional Museum is owned and operated by the North Lanark Historical Society with the goal of collecting, preserving and displaying the history of Mississippi Mills. The museum features several exhibit spaces including seasonal exhibits, permanent local history exhibits, and a pioneer log cabin. The museum is the perfect destination for families with young children, retirees and history buffs in general.

The museum collection focuses on local history and includes: artefacts, photographs, documents and books. Our research library contains local history books, family histories and original copies of the Almonte Gazette.

647 River Rd, Almonte, ON K0A 1A0 (Appleton)

Send message

nlrmuseum@gmail.com

Phone(613) 257-8503

Appleton Museum 1980 Fire

Update — Teacher Fired in Appleton School May 1931 –Annie Neilson

Appleton Map and Odds and Ends — Clippings of Appleton

DUNCAN EGG GRADING Fire — 1956

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DUNCAN EGG GRADING Fire — 1956

May1956

It took only three quarters of an hour for fire to destroy the modern egg grading plant of Hugh Duncan, Clayton Road, Ramsay, on Monday afternoon. It is located about two miles from this town. Flames were seen by an employee at 4.45 and by 5.30 the building of cinder blocks, which was only two years old, had been consumed together with machinery, other equipment and 150 cases of eggs—30 doz. to the case.

It appears that rubbish had been burned in an outside incinerator located some distance away from all the farm buildings. But a high wind was blowing and after it was thought all life was out of the ashes, sparks must have been wafted to the egg grading building.

The Almonte Fire Brigade was sent for by Mr. Duncan, who was at home at the time and it responded with one of its pumpers and the township pumper which is carried with the large one. The town machine used water in its 300 gal. storage tank to thoroughly wet the wall of the house next to the blazing building and thus protect it from the fire.

The smaller machine was hooked on with its sucker in a creek and it helped protect the house although it was apparent little could be done to stem the flames that were consuming the grading station. Furniture was moved out of the house as it looked as if it was doomed. Windows were cracked by the heat. The loss is partially covered by insurance.

Meanwhile, the North Lanark Co-op has placed its egg grading equipment at the disposal of Mr. Duncan to help him out until he gets re-established. Among his customers are the Ontario Hospital at Smiths Falls, the Chateau Laurier, Ottawa and Perrault’s Gardens, Ottawa.

About 6.30 another alarm was received in town for a grass fire in the Burnt Lands, Huntley Twp., a t the top of what is known as the ‘Big Hill’ on Highway 44. This was not menacing any buildings but it was spreading through the dry grass and the scrub bush. It was fairly well under control when the town firemen arrived but they finished it with water from the storage tank on the pumper.

Also Read

The Egg House on the Hill — The Duncans

Eggs 10 Cents a dozen–Farmers Markets of Smiths Falls and Almonte 1880 and 1889

We Didn’t Throw the Eggs said Carleton Place!

Sweetest Man in Lanark County — Harry Toop Honey Maker

Two Years After the Lanark Fire 1961

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Two Years After the Lanark Fire 1961

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada13 Jun 1961, Tue  •  Page 36

Also read-Images of the Day After the Lanark Fire June 16 1959–

Please note actual footage of the fire is below on this link..thanks

https://www.britishpathe.com/video/VLVAG8AI8M3Z05T7SXPBN74YBY53-LANARK-TOWN-ON-FIRE-CANADA/query/Lanark

Images of the Day After the Lanark Fire June 16 1959–

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

June 17 1959– The Day After the Fire in Lanark Village

The Clyde Woollen Mill Fire — Hour By Hour 1917

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The Clyde Woollen Mill Fire — Hour By Hour 1917

CLIPPED FROMThe Lanark EraLanark, Ontario, Canada27 Jun 1917, Wed  •  Page 1

The was completely destroyed by fire late Thursday night. Of the large main building in which all the manufacturing was carried on nothing remains except a lint portion of the inactive stone wall and a great heap of smoking debris.

Part of Mr. Crierson, the Superintendants home, also fell prey to the flames, but the office and shipping room, store houses and a few other outhouses wore saved by the excellent and effective work of the firemen. The damage amounts to one hundred thousand dollars, covered by insurance to the extent of 50 thousand dollars. The fire originated at about 9.4.1 p.m. in the boiler room, and was first noticed hy Mr. Cardinal, nightwatchman, on his return from one of his hourly rounds.

A time clock is used and registered upon every hour as the watchman makes a complete inspection of the entire plant. He had just returned to the waiting quarters in the boiler room and had gone to the adjoining department for a handful of waste when the fire was spotted.

Though at times it seemed that the flames would get beyond the rear of the main building where there were a number of storehouses in which are kept large stocks of wool and other raw material it did not. The cloth from the shipping room was all removed to places of safety. Danger to the wool was immediate and serious, and, and the firemen did all they could do to hold down the danger at the east and north ends, the chances of cutting off the -wool losses seemed’ remote.

Extra precautionary measures were taken in this direction and all put in readiness with men and teams to remove the wool in short order. The arrival of the Perth Fire Brigade relieved the situation. They had been summoned and made the journey from Perth to help. When they came they saw a small smouldering fire in a wood pile which stands in the boiler room. Deciding that they could extingnish the blaze quite easily with a sprinkling of water, they went to procure pails and found upon their return that the flames had developed out of control, reaching high up the wells and all around the boiler room.

The alarm was given and quick help at hand, but so sudden and furious had the burning grow that it was impossible to do anything of an efficient nature. The mill firefighters were situated inside the building, but the raging flames prevented this being brought into service.

In a few minutes devastation hail spread east and went to the spinning and carding departments and westward into the finishing room. The last room of all to come to ruin was the weaving. Bursting from their confinement it hit the interior of the building, the flames passed out and over to the dye room and curled in the direction of Mr. Grierson’s house.

The situation was one of keeping control with Perth by means of relays of teams at points along every few feet. The Fire Captain (placed his engine at the Clyde Bridge on George Street), laid hose along Hillier St., caught up around the rear of the building anil joined with Captain White’s Lanark men in forming a complete barrage which cut off the danger from the wool stock anil outbuilding.

Stubbornly the flames shot and roared towards the superintendent’s home, lint equally stubborn and the ascendancy ebbed and flowed for nearly two hours before the flames showed signs of subsidence. In the mill itself large quantities of wool were stored amongst quantities of goods throughout the mill in various stages of fire.

In the scouring house downstairs a miscellaneous assortment of goods were ready for the machines and these were recovered. Thousands of dollars were in stock everywhere and had a strong wind prevailed even this might have been a vain effort, and when the fire spots came along they were quickly extinguished.

Precautions taken in this way saved the fire from spreading and the Fire Brigade was doing splendid work The fire engine stationed at the bridge, no more than one hundred feet distant from the burning building, worked along at full capacity and sent four strong, steady streams of water, distributed to the heat advantage, along the north sides of the building. This was a great task that demanded courage and perseverance.

About an hour after the first alarm the roofs began to weaken and fall, cracking and splitting with the terrific heat, broke off in sections and came down. The centre section of the mill was raised to the ground, disclosing fantastic shapes in twisted and gnarled machinery. A few years ago a brick storey had been added to tho mill, which is all gone, as well as about one-third of the eastern and western sections of the substantial old stone walls which enclosed the plant.

The destruction is so complete that all the order and form of this industry, which was Lanark pride and main support, has passed into the elements, and nothing remains but the slag of the ruin. The fire was all around and as far away as Smiths Falls the glare in the sky was noted. Crowds of people gathered from all quarters. Scores of automobiles came from the towns and villages and countryside. The fire alarm rang in Perth as soon as word was received there, end in a short time the engine and hose were ready end on the way.

Many of Perth’s folk came along in cars and other rigs.The building was originally a store owned by tlie Main, at that time a prominent business family in Lanark. A few years later the property was acquired by the late Boyd Caldwell and converted by him into a Woolen Mill. From time to time improvements end additions have been made.

When the wheels first turned that gave Lanark a standing as an industrial village there was general rejoicing. Caldwell’s Tweeds have honored Lanark for as long as it has existed. At the same time, it seems unthinkable that the place which has been the voice of inspiration for fifty years of successful effort and uninterrupted business policy, should be abandoned lightly. In the meantime plans have been in motion for recovering as fast as possible.

Appleton will take care of the finishing until machinery can be installed in the Perth plant. The Aberdeen Mill in Lanark will be doubled up in capacity by overtime.

Also read–100 Hands Thrown Out of Work –Lanark Village

CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
25 Jun 1917, Mon  •  Page 8

CALDWELL, WILLIAM CLYDE

Click here

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
16 Nov 1910, Wed  •  Page 8

Clyde Woolen Mills
  • Lot 2 George St.
  • Clyde Woolen Mills (Caldwell and Watchorn, proprietors; subsequently Boyd Caldwell and Co.) established a woolen mill in 1867.
  • The building was destroyed by fire in 1917. (the Glenayr Kitten Outlet Store was later situated in the Boyd Caldwell store).

Aberdeen Mills
  • Lot 2 George St.
  • William Clyde Caldwell, proprietor, built and began operating a woolen mill by 1890.
  • There was a fire at the mill in June 1901.
  • It was still operating under the Caldwells until 1930.

From-WOOLEN MILLS OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
19 Nov 1919, Wed  •  Page 1

100 Hands Thrown Out of Work –Lanark Village

A Walk through Lanark Village in 1871

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959