Tag Archives: firemen

The Almonte Mississippi Fire Dept. 1998

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The  Almonte Mississippi Fire Dept. 1998
Thanks to sarah more and our donater who wishes to remian private
photo from almonte.com

Things About Bill Lowry 1998

Remember The Almonte Fire Truck Company?

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Mar 1970, Mon  •  Page 5
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Aug 1931, Mon  •  Page 4
Thanks to sarah more and our donater who wishes to remian private

Letter to the Editor– Chief Dougherty Does not Have the Best Firetruck!

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo with ‘The Ronald’Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo with ‘The Ronald’

Editor Ottawa Journal:

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Aug 1897, Sat  •  Page 5

The advertizing of the Ronald fire engine by Chief Dougherty of Carleton Place requires some attention. We have no objection to Mr. Dougherty giving unsolicited testimony in favour of the Ronald fire engine so long as the evidence Is so Incorrect as to be an injustice and an injury to other people.

Mr. Dougherty forgot to mention that the C. P. R. has an excellent stationary fire engine belonging to the works and a well-equipped and thoroughly drilled brigade which had two splendid streams of water on the fire before a messenger had time to reach the general fire alarm box. Nor did he say that the fire was well under’control before the Ronald fire engine could be brought from the other side of the town and the 1,750 feet of hose, which he mentions, was put in working order.

The case Is similar to that in which the C. P. R. brigade saved Mr. Girouard’s house and Mr. D. claimed the credit of It for his company. We would not trouble you, Mr. Editor, were it not that Mr. Dougherty’s statement may lead the manager of the C. P. R. to the conclusion that their fire brigade is of no use In case of an emergency, when the fact Is that mainly through their efforts and the assistance of other Implements of the company the fire was checked and the property saved.

signed

On Looker.

Ronald (Canada) Andrew Hyslop and John D. Ronald established an engineering and shipbuilding firm at Chatham, Ontario in the mid 19th century. In the 1860s they also turned their attention to building steam fire engines. However, financial difficulties, and an acrimonious dispute with the town of Chatham over their choice of steam fire engine to replace its hand-powered engines, led to the sale of the Hyslop & Ronald plant to engineer David Park in 1877. The following year, J.D. Ronald was approached by the town of Brussels, Ontario, with the offer of a loan of $20,000 to relocate his works there. In addition to steam fire engines, the newly-established Brussels Steam Fire Engine & Agricultural Works built separators and offered castings for implements such as reapers and mowers. From the 1880s the company began shipping steamers to western Canada, with engines being purchased by fire Departments at Winnipeg, Calgary and Vancouver. Ronald was still building steam fire engines in the mid 1890s, but the subsequent fate of the company is unclear; no doubt they eventually found it impossible to compete with cheaper engines being imported from the United States.

Related reading

Ocean Wave Firemen Getting Uniforms

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Update to the Smiths Falls Fire — Ed Larmour

William McIlquaham From The Theatre to the Fire

Fires in Carleton Place–James Gillies House

Brand New Hand Fire Engine 1870s

Photos of Beckwith Township Fire Dept 1970s

Beckwith Fire Department 1965 Names Names Names

The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Help Thy Neighbour in Carleton Place- Ronnie Waugh Fire 1959

News of Butter– Fireman— and Women of Stamina in Carleton Place

Remembering Evelyn Clark — Larry Clark

Ocean Wave Firemen Getting Uniforms

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Ocean Wave Firemen Getting Uniforms

September 1875

The uniforms for the Ocean Wave company in Carleton Place will soon be completed and served out to the members. The uniform is similar to that worn by the Almonte firemen. The shirts, which are being manufactured by P. Galvin & Son are made of fine red Chambly flannel, with black facings of farmer’s satin, and collars of the same material.

The pants which are black have a red stripe down the side of those

belonging to the officers. The caps are manufactured from black broadcloth, with a peak and a gold band. The belts, which being made by A. Waugh, our harness maker,

are of fine heavy morocco leather, with red binding and “Ocean Wave,” the

name of the Company, painted on them plain white letters.

About Ocean Wave

It was in 1875 when the Town’s present Fire Company replaced earlier, and temporary groups, as this community’s fire fighting organization.

An attempt to form a Carleton Place Fire Company is of record as early as 1853, when the community had a population of five hundred. It was about 1868-1869 when the Company purchased a hand-pumper that required 40 men to work it. In order to give this unit a fair trial, the Renfrew Fire Brigade was invited to town.

They were a large, fine looking and proud, body of men. The trial took place on Central Bridge and as the men forced the breaks to cry of “heave her down”, and as the great stream rose towards the sky and dam, the late James Murphy exclaimed with great rapture: “The Ocean Wave”.

On that day, so well remembered, the Ocean Wave Fire Company was christened.

The hand-engine thus gave way to the steamer and the “sir John” was purchased. Later, yet another steamer was added to the Company’s fire fighting arsenal. With a first-class water works system, and with Mort Brown’s & Hawthorne Factory’s auxiliary power, we stood second to none as a well-equipped town.

As the great steamers and hand-pumpers started to disappear, the Town purchased its first motorized fire truck. This truck was a Reo Speedwagon and was equipped with a specialized tank that used a chemical mix to develop the required pressure. 

The year was 1923, and since then, many fine trucks, some of which have been retired, have served this community faithfully. The Reo remains in the new Fire Hall, in full and proud working order. She has been honourably retired from active service and is now used for historic reference and parade duty.

The first Fire Hall was across from the present day Maple Leaf Dairy and this property was rented for $7.00 per month, for the period from 1st of December to the 1st of April. In 1902, the Company moved from Bridge Street to Mill Street and took up station in the Town Hall. The Company remained there until 1978, when a larger facility was built, further down Mill Street. In April of 1995, the Ocean Wave Company moved to its present site on Coleman Street.

Ocean Wave Fire Company is second to none, with only the best equipment, Officers and Firefighters, all who are volunteers, proudly and faithfully serving the community.

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Update to the Smiths Falls Fire — Ed Larmour

William McIlquaham From The Theatre to the Fire

Fires in Carleton Place–James Gillies House

Photos of Beckwith Township Fire Dept 1970s

Beckwith Fire Department 1965 Names Names Names

The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Help Thy Neighbour in Carleton Place- Ronnie Waugh Fire 1959

News of Butter– Fireman— and Women of Stamina in Carleton Place

Update to the Smiths Falls Fire — Ed Larmour

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Update to the Smiths Falls Fire — Ed Larmour

1971 fire Smiths Falls

Yesterday I posted this photo of the 1971 Smiths Falls fire where Mississippi Mills and Carleton Place firemen were called to help fight it. Then I got this email…..

Hi Linda
My dad, Ed, was a volunteer firefighter for as long as I could remember.  He was at the massive fire in Smiths Falls. He is one of the 2 men atop the building. We had this hanging in out TV room growing up and was always amazed how a fire that big could happen.  
Glad to share with you and the group. 
Neil Larmour

Ed joined BBDNE in 1972 and started with Ocean Wave in 1972 and retired in 1991. He believes he is the person on the left but not sure. However he was on that roof during the fire.

Photo- Neil

Smiths Falls Fire-Coghlan & Moag

It Started in the Candy Kitchen Restaurant– Kerfoot Fire Smiths Falls

Fire Destroys Smiths Falls Skating Arena

1975

Newspaper photos thanks to Joann Voyce

1975

1975-–Embers are still smoldering in an aftermath of a $650000 fire which gutted a three -storey brick building on Beckwith street Tuesday evening leaving 25 residents without a home. Firemen from eight area departments from as far away as Westport and Kemptville battled the blaze whipped by a 20 mph wind and exploding paint for three hours before bringing it under control about 8:30 pm. It was another three houn before firemen were able to leave for home.

The fire broke out again early this morning when an oil tank located on the third floor caught fire. Flames shot 60 feet in the air at this stage before the fire was brought under control a second time. Twelve apartments and three stores Vandusen Jewellers Reward Shoe Store and Myrtle’s Paint Store were gutted two other nearby stores sustained water and smoke damage.

Police managed to evacuate all residents when the fire broke out about 5:30 pm. No injuries were reported but several firemen sustained smoke inhalation while battling the blaze. Firefighters were called upon several times during the height of the fire to douse small blazes on surrounding buildings caused by flying sparks.

The fire apparently broke out in the Reward Shoe Store and then spread to a neighboring decorating store where several hundred gallons of paint turned the building into a blazing inferno. Walker’s Store located on the north side of the burning building sustained some fire damage on the second floor and heavy smoke damage in excess of $200000 to the south Marianne’s dress store also reported heavy smoke damage.

The gutted building owned by William Justus of Kingston was valued at $500000 It was insured None of the apartment dwellers carried insurance. The fire was reminiscent of the November 1971 blaze which gutted five stores a block south of the fire area leaving 35 people homeless at the time and causing over $1 million damage.

Firemen combating last night’s blaze were fortunate in having warmer temeratures than in 1971 when below freezing temperatures hampered the fire fighting operations. As in 1971 the arrival of the aerial ladder from Almonte a community of less than 5000 people turned the tide for the firefighters this time. After it arrived at 7:30 pm Tuesday firemen were able to contain the blaze to the one building.

The McEwen McEwan Fire 1949

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The McEwen McEwan Fire 1949

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The Gazette 
Montreal, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
13 Jan 1950, Fri

Hello again Linda !!

Hope you had a great time at the Carleton Place 200th parade. So sorry to have missed it. I have a question for you concerning the McEwen Family of the Ottawa Valley. Shortly after the funeral of Clarke Gourlay I became part of another real-life adventure belonging to the McEwan Family of the Ottawa Valley The story that I have become immersed in is that of Cpl Enos McEwan and his wife Olive Matheson. On Dec 27th 1949 their Christmas Tree caught fire trapping them and their 5 children in their home near Billings Bridge. The parents would shortly die as a result of their severe burns received in saving the lives of all 5 children and the children would be divided among the relatives.

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There is a remarkable tribute to Olive on Page 3 of the Ottawa Journal from the 12th of Jan 1950.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Jan 1950, Thu  •  Page 3

In addition to bringing life back to this remarkable story of parents’ ultimate sacrifice and love for their children’ I thought it might be interesting if you could spread the story in the hopes that maybe , just maybe, there might still be a young nurse or fireman or doctor that was present at that time that might be able to add so much to that side of the story and the fires impact on the community outside of the immediate family.

Christopher Muller

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Jan 1950, Thu  •  Page 13

historicalnotesan

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Jan 1950, Mon  •  Page 14

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Things About Bill Lowry 1998

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Things About Bill Lowry 1998

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In 1998 he had spent 27 years on the Almonte and Ramsay Fire Dept.

Bill had also spent a 7 year term in Almonte as a police officer, resigning in 1971 and joining the Fire Dept. as a volunteer.

He became a deputy fire chief in 1973 and assumed the chief’s role in 1978.

In 1973 they were getting 20-25 calls a year and in 1998 it was over 200.

Rescue units accounted for about 20-25 of the calls while most of the others are alarms or carbon monoxide detectors.

It used to be an employer thought having a firefighter in the fold and now when they do sometimes they can’t get away and they do it without pay.

Bill said people do not understand outside the fire dept the toll the job takes on volunteers. Unless you’ve been there, you have no idea.

The goal is to beat the fire before it does any damage. After the fire, you can tell if the firefighters are upset as they become quiet or start to drink. You have to be ready to talk to them about the stress.

You remember fires, accidents and sometimes you wake up seeing the victim’s faces years after.

In this election season Bill Lowry’s word’s from 20 years ago reminded me of people bringing a list of complaints and wanting everything under the sun for the new councils to approve. Not one person says they ever want a new fire truck or something for the fire dept.

What do remember about Bill Lowry?

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Linda Nilson-Rogers I had a chat with Bill not to long ago, he lived (lives) near where my parents lived. We were laughing about the time I drove illegally from Cedar Hill to Almonte, to the License Bureau 1 month late, to get my new plate, and had to ask for a screw driver to put it on! The license bureau was then across the street from the police station, he had retired from the force then. I always found him to be a kind but dutiful police officer.

James R. McIsaac I first met Bill when I started on the ambulance in 1974, did a lot of rescue calls with him over the years, super guy, I even had his 2 sons work for me over the years…good memories.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

News of Butter– Fireman— and Women of Stamina in Carleton Place

William McIlquaham From The Theatre to the Fire

Photos of Beckwith Township Fire Dept 1970s

Beckwith Fire Department 1965 Names Names Names

The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Help Thy Neighbour in Carleton Place- Ronnie Waugh Fire 1959

News of Butter– Fireman— and Women of Stamina in Carleton Place

William McIlquaham From The Theatre to the Fire

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William McIlquaham From The Theatre to the Fire

 - FATAL RUN TO FIRE Carleton Place Fire Chief Vic...

 

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 - FIRE CHIEF DIES SUDDENLY AFTER ATTENDING FIRE... - kor-hod afar-reret Tem-plf-Pmlrkk. mucker-mere,...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 12 Jan 1928, Thu,
  3. Page 2

The first Fire Hall was across from the present day Maple Leaf Dairy and this property was rented for $7.00 per month, for the period from 1st of December to the 1st of April. In 1902, the Company moved from Bridge Street to Mill Street and took up station in the Town Hall. The Company remained there until 1978, when a larger facility was built, further down Mill Street. In April of 1995, the Ocean Wave Company moved to its present site on Coleman Street.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

Photos of Beckwith Township Fire Dept 1970s

Beckwith Fire Department 1965 Names Names Names

The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Help Thy Neighbour in Carleton Place- Ronnie Waugh Fire 1959

News of Butter– Fireman— and Women of Stamina in Carleton Place

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

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On Tuesday night I stood in front of Alan Barker’s funeral home watching our local area firemen in awe. Fire Dept. Representatives had all come to attend local Carleton Place resident and fireman Ab Hurdis’s wake. Standing on that step I almost broke out in tears. I personally feel I owe the Ocean Wave Fire Dept. a lot, and so does the rest of the town of Carleton Place. Who else would come running at a moments notice when something happens to us, or our homes, if we didn’t have them?

It was a cold January day in 1995, and the kids were flooding the rink outside when I noticed our German Shepherd, Snoopy racing in from the greenhouse with a huge plume of black smoke trailing him. If there is an emergency, I am not the one to send to an EMT unit as I panic easily. I screamed for someone to call 911, and we simply thought a hose spraying a steady stream of water into the basement window was enough to contain the fire.

Within five minutes the basement was engulfed with flames and I attempted to go into the greenhouse to save the birds and ferret. Smoke quickly turns into a blackness that cannot be measured on a colour chart, and within seconds I was trapped. An Ocean Wave fireman pulled me out of that room as I could no longer find my way out.

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My sons and I were sent over to a neighbour’s home while we watched the firemen try to save our house. I wanted to cry but I couldn’t, and the kids kept asking me if everything was going to be alright. In my irrational mind I thought things would return to normal once the fire trucks were gone and life would go back to the way it was.

The fight for our home was not over for another 18 hours. The firemen left at about 5 pm overwhelmed with the intensity of the smoke and one ended up in the hospital. They had done their best and thought the fire had been put to rest, but my husband Angelo and his father sat guard all night watching for hot spots. Sure enough at 1 am a wall in the living room went up in flames. Had they not been there the house would have been a total loss.

The next day the kids and I returned to our home and I knew then and there that everything was not going to be alright. The living room hardwood floor was swollen with water and raised in many places. The charred Christmas tree and all its decorations stood against silent black walls. I stood there and realized there was a long road ahead of us, and my tears began. But my family was alive, and that was thanks to the Ocean Wave Fire Dept.

The Carleton Place firemen had given us a couple of boxes that were decorated like Christmas presents. They had not wanted the kids to be upset, so they had wrapped up the perished pets as gifts. Since it was in the dead of winter I could not bury them, so I made a tiny raft and sent them down the Mississippi river.

No matter what has been done to your home, once it has been touched by fire it will never be the same. It seems to lose the original soul in the belly of its interior, and because of the destruction many pieces of emotions are lost and will never come back. But loss of life is far worse than a building or an inner soul needing to be renovated.

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Firefighters are some of the most selfless people you will ever encounter. These volunteers sometimes ignore the dangers even when no one is inside a burning building to be saved. Like Ted Hurdis said about the late Ab Hurdis: “Ab wasn’t very big, but if you ever saw him coming out of a burning house you would swear he was 7 feet tall”!

Firefighters are essential to the safety and security of our local communities. We owe it to these men, and this week we lost 40-year-old volunteer fireman Ab Hurdis. Like a home rises out of the ashes, sometimes so do firemen. Last night I saw my son’s childhood friend Troy Hurdis standing in that line of firemen in dress uniform. Troy is now also part of the Carleton Place Ocean Wave Fire Dept. I know Ab and all the generation of Hurdis’s that were in the fire dept. were looking down on Troy and smiling– I know I was. We are truly blessed to have the Ocean Wave Fire Dept.

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Just in case some of you did not see this — from the Alan Barker Website

Hurdis, H. Albert “Ab”
Retired-Ocean Wave Fire Company
(Carleton Place Fire Dept.)
with 40 years service and
Carleton Place Hydro
with 19 years service.

Suddenly at home in Carleton Place, Ontario on Sunday, August 23, 2015, in his 78th year.

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

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Shy Hurdis put this up of his Dad.

 

 

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The largest building at James and William Street was destroyed in February 1987.

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Blair White volunteer firefighter being helped by fellow firefighter Ray McIntosh 1987

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Burning Down the House in Carleton Place

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Thank You to Carleton Place’s Volunteer Ocean Wave Fire Dept.– I know I will forever owe you a debt for saving my home.

2008

Photos from the Carleton Place Canadian files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, Linda Seccaspina and Ocean Wave website.

 

 

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place

Smoke on the Water Walking Tour –The Great Carleton Place Fires

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A look at the darker history of Carleton Place!  Hear about the many Bridge Street fires and the one that almost destroyed the street. This tour follows along the Carleton Place Main Street with stories about the famous Mississippi Hotel Fire that a floor of the hotel was lost forever.  We stop along the way to listen to stories about the various business fires– those that are remembered, and those whose tales are forgotten.

Did you now there is one building that still has a ghost that remains from the ashes of the fire? Hear about the fire at Zion Church and Mrs. James Gillies home across the street that only been built for 3 years. As we walk to the end of Bridge Street we finish on the site of one of the most famous fires– that of Dr. Johnson’s home.

Join us after at Ballygiblin’s where we will share free slabs of locally hot baked bread topped with garlic and mixed cheese accompanied with homemade double smoked bacon jam!

See you then- Wednesday August 19th, at 6:45 P.M. in front of Moore House (170 Bridge Street) across from the Carleton Place Town Hall

Approx Time- 645 P.M- 8 P.M

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