Tag Archives: carleton place

Documenting the First Female Councillor in Carleton Place

Standard
Documenting the First Female Councillor in Carleton Place

In 1890 Dr. Preston of Bridge Street, was the first mayor of Carleton Place. I had someone ask me who the first female councillor was. So, who was the first female councillor?

Well, I had a list of women, and documented what Mary Cook said about women being in politics in Carleton Place. (read—It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook)

BUT, how many women have been in Carleton Place government? Thanks to Stacey Blair, Town of Carleton Place Clerk, and Jennifer Fenwick Irwin from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum for the help!!!

There were only 8 since 1901 when Dr. Preston became the first mayor and they are:

Linda Seccaspina

 Theresa Fritz

Wendy LeBlanc (mayor)

Linda Schmidt

Melba Baker (mayor)

Barbara Walsh

Trudie Dickie

Geneva Anne Tripp (1952)

That’s 70 years for anyone who is counting LOLOL. Thanks to Deputy Clerk Stacey Blair, she found a Mrs. Tripp who became Carleton Place’s first female councillor in 1952. She was known only as Mrs. Tripp at the Town Hall and Mrs. Homer L. Tripp to everyone else. This was 1952 after all. Doing more research I found out her first name was Geneva and her maiden last name was Wilson.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Dec 1951, Tue  •  Page 20

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada31 Jul 1952, Thu  •  Page 17

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Dec 1951, Mon  •  Page 12

Read- Chamber of Commerce Then and Now in Carleton Place

Thanks to Jennifer fenwick Irwin of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum for the photo.. Carleton Place Council 1952. Councillor Geneva Anne Tripp on the left hand side.

Name:Geneva Anne Tripp
Birth Date:7 Jan 1911
Death Date:7 Oct 2008
Cemetery:United Cemeteries
Burial or Cremation Place:Beckwith, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:N
Spouse:Homer Leroy Tripp
Children:William Guy Tripp

TRIPP, Geneva Anne – Beloved mother of Leroy Tripp (Vija) and Brenda Weinberg (Dick), and dear grandmother of Cathryn Flick (Bill), Guy Tripp (Julia), Leslie McClure (Henry), Jacqueline Anderson (Mark), Eric Tripp (Lisa), and Abbie Weinberg (Grant MacPherson), Geneva died October 7, 2008, in Toronto, at the age of 97. ”Nanny” was a loving great-grandmother to Will, Ryan, and Meredith Flick, Michael (Laura) and Matthew Tripp, David Tripp, Freya and Rowyn Anderson, and Cydney and Kylia Tripp. Geneva will be lovingly remembered by her sister, Isabel Bradley (Bill), her brothers, Kenneth Wilson (Audrey) and Donald Wilson (Shirley), and her many nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her beloved husband, Homer ”Hank” Tripp, her infant son, William, her sisters, Alean Prime, Margaret Davis, Pearl Reynolds, Doonie Richards, and Lola Brown, her brother, Bill Wilson (Connie), and her parents, Annie DeMarse and William Wilson. Geneva was a registered nurse who loved working as a school nurse for North York Public Health Department. A talented artist, she was also the first woman to be elected to the Town Council in Carleton Place, Ontario, where she was born. At Geneva’s request, cremation has taken place. A celebration of her life will take place in Carleton Place on May 30, 2009.

Published by Toronto Star on Oct. 11, 2008


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Feb 1964, Mon  •  

Carleton Place Ladies Auxiliary — Chamber of Commerce 1987– Mary Cook Archives

Chamber of Commerce Then and Now in Carleton Place

It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

Johnny J. McGregor — Still Buster and Mayor

Outstanding Personalities of Carleton Place – Dr. J.A. Johnston — Billy Nichols– William Barclay

Banker Snedden —–James Snedden

Standard
Banker Snedden —–James Snedden

Almonte Gazette

April 7, 1882

The Late Mr. James Snedden – The chronicler of local events has at no time a sadder duty to perform than when called on to record the death of those well known to the generality of our readers, and who have to a certain extent identified themselves with the history of the locality. No face was more familiar on our streets that that of the gentleman whose death it is our sad duty to record today. Very few indeed of our readers in Almonte and the surrounding neighborhood but can recall the good-humored countenance of the man who was so well and favorably known as “Banker Snedden,” but whose smile will be seen no more.

The late Mr. James Snedden was born in the 11th line of Beckwith in 1821. About fifty-five years ago the father of the deceased removed to Ramsay, settling at Rosebank, and building the grist mill there, afterwards going into the lumbering business, and dying at Quebec of cholera about 1834. At the time of his father’s death James, who was the eldest son, was about fourteen years of age, and from that time he acted as a father to his brothers and sisters. Three brothers, James, William and John, continued to work harmoniously together until the youngest was about thirty years of age, but although they were then working each for himself, the elder brother never lost his fatherly interest in their well being.

Like his father, the deceased engaged in lumbering and speculation of other kinds, and was very fortunate in his pursuits, but the hard times in the lumber trade and a heavy expenditure he had been led into to improve the passage from his timber limits, caused him heavy losses. It must not, however, be supposed that he was straightened in his resources, as the widow and family are left well provided for. The deceased attended church at Rosebank on Sunday, as usual, and on Monday morning he harnessed his horse to come to Almonte. He went into the house to wash his hands, and coming out of the washroom he placed his hand on his head and exclaiming “Oh! My head!” fell on the floor in an apoplectic fit, and only rallied for a brief time in the evening, and died on Tuesday morning about six o’clock, in the 61st year of his age.

The deceased was borne to the 8th line cemetery on Thursday afternoon, the funeral being attended by a large concourse of friends and neighbors, who were unanimous in the opinion that a good husband, a loving father, a kind brother and worthy neighbor has been called away. The family have the sympathy of the entire neighborhood in their bereavement.

James died on Apirl 4, 1882 and Christina died on the 9th of Novemember 1883.

The brick house they lived in in Bennie’s Corners was made on the homestead in the brick yard owned by James. Their furniture was made by the inmates at the Kingston Penitentary.

The eldest son, David Bain Snedden after farming at Bennie’s Corners moved to Carleton Place and operated a hotel next to the train station. (with files from: from The Snedden Saga: From Lanarkshire to Lanark County Paperback – Jan. 1 1994)

Snedden Hotel on Moore Street (Franktown Road)– the building across the street used to house a rag business and was The Grand Central Hotel.. Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

In 1904 Carleton Place’s eight hotels were:

James Lee’s The Leland

Walter McIlquham’s The Mississippi Hotel

Albert Salter’s Queens Hotel

The Revere House- formerly The British Hotel

J. E. Rathwell’s Royal Hotel, formerly the Wilson House

D. B. Snedden’s

P. J. O’Briens

Victoria House

P. Salter’s Queen’s Royal at Lake Park

Read-The Old Morgan House — Ray Paquette and Gord Cross Memories

Old Almonte Photo Collection — In Back of the D. W. Snedden Drugstore 1953

Rosebank, Blakeney, Norway Falls and Snedden’s Station

Bennies Corners and the Snedden Family

.

Photos- The Sibbett Family– From Rita Sibbett-Davidson

Standard
Photos- The Sibbett Family– From Rita Sibbett-Davidson

From Rita Sibbett-Davidson=These I just found while packing for a move. My great grandfather Sibbitt and his wife.

Mary Morphy
Mary Morphy

CLIPPED FROMKemptville TelegramKemptville, Ontario, Canada19 Mar 1908, Thu  •  Page 1

Alexander Sibbitt The Summitt Store Collectables – Adin Daigle

Norman Cram and Ed Sibbitt –The Rest of the Story — Lots of Genealogy

How Did A Carleton Place Photo End Up at the Victoria Archives?

Visiting Carleton Place 1893- The Limestone City

Standard
Visiting Carleton Place 1893- The Limestone City
Photos- Carleton Placeand Beckwith Heritage Museum
This photo taken from the south shore of the Mississippi River shows the foundry to the right, with the Findlay family’s boathouse at centre. Foundry buildings took up the whole property, right up to High Street.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The Ottawa Journal

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada02 Jun 1893, Fri  •  Page 1

Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings

Carleton Place Visits Comrie 1994 — Joyce Tennant

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place– Wooly Bully!!!! Part 6

Documenting Homes –353 Lanark — Carleton Place — I Deem this a Historical Building.

Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings

Standard
Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Dec 1910, Wed  •  Page 1

also read-David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

1920s photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Mississippi/ Grand Hotel

Napoleon Lavallee bought the property for $50 in 1869 and opened the hotel in 1872 after he sold the Leland Hotel/ Carleton House on Bridge Street.  The McIlquham family bought it 11 years later in 1883 and when Joe Belisle worked there from 1917-1920 it had ornate woodwork, a grand staircase and the stone facade had wooden white wrap-around verandas. The elegant dining room tables were covered in  fine lace linen and gleaming cutlery, and the Mississippi Hotel became known for its homemade food and attracted travelling salesman from far and wide. The salesmen set up trunks in their rooms offering everything from dishes to clothing that was scooped up by local merchants that came to buy at the hotel. The place was packed daily with fans from Stittsville, Smiths Falls and Perth–and if you talk to Gerald Hastie people came in early for the fresh baked pies, and by noon they were pretty well sold out.The only known photo of Napoleon Lavallee sits on my wall–read-The Napoleon of Carleton Place

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
13 Jan 1897, Wed  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Sep 1919, Fri  •  Page 4
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Dec 1909, Mon  •  Page 3
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
26 Mar 1902, Wed  •  Page 5
Karen LloydIn the 1950s Buck Fraser lived at the Mississippi Hotel. He used to stand out at the front in a white dress shirt having a cigarette. I don’t know where he worked .
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1913, Tue  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Aug 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
Jennifer Fenwick Irwin–Carleton Place Museum This was taken the morning after the fire.
Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire- read-Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Nov 1909, Wed  •  Page 1
Buffalo robe or Sasktchewan Robe

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1899, Sat  •  Page 6
Former dinner plates from the old Mississippi Hotel/ Grand Hotel– **
Adin Wesley Daigle**

November 19 at 11:37 AM ·
📷
A recent addition to the collection , a couple plates from the Mississippi hotel in Carleton place 😍👍

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Sep 1912, Fri  •  Page 9
LIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1914, Sat  •  Page 12
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Jul 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
The Old Side Door of the Mississippi Hotel

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Thieves at the Mississippi Hotel–When Crime Began to Soar

All About Lorraine Lemay –Mississippi Hotel

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

The Napoleon of Carleton Place

Grandma’s Butterscotch Pie

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

In the Mississippi Hotel Mood with Mrs. Glen Miller

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel in 1961

Where Was Linda? A Necromancer Photo Blog -Victorian Seance at the Mississippi Hotel

Spooky Night at the Seccaspina Hotel

Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?

Fumerton Family– Appleton

Standard
Fumerton Family– Appleton

Almonte Gazette

September 15, 1882

Death of an Old Resident – On Sunday last about 10 o’clock Mr. John Fummerton, of Appleton , in his 94th year, passed away and went to “join the majority.” The deceased, was the last but one of the first settlers, Mr. William Hamilton being now the only survivor. Mr. Fummerton was born in Paisley , in Scotland , and was considerable of a traveler in his earlier years, having visited among other countries, Greenland and the West Indies .

It is nearly 70 years since he first settled on the farm on which he died and to which in the early days of the settlement he carried flour and nails all the way from Brockville on his back. Subsequently he sawed the lumber by hand and himself built a boat with which he went to Montreal for provisions. His family consisted of eight children, who are all living but one. Up to within a few days of his death he walked daily to the village of Appleton to get his mail matter, the distance being about one mile. He took his last walk on Thursday the 31st of August, and on returning fell in the lane leading to his house, and on being found was removed thither, where he died on Sunday last.

The funeral took place on Tuesday and the length of the procession, over a mile, testified to the respect in which the deceased was held. The remains were taken first to Appleton Church and thence to Cram’s Cemetery. Comparing the present with the past, what a peaceful revolution was accomplished in the neighborhood in his lifetime.

December 1950 Almonte Gazette

The will in the heart of man to do and dare is not dead nor does life get tedious, not around Appleton anyway, ’tis said. Mr. Howard Fumerton of the 11th line of Beckwith, bought a building from Mr. Elmsley of the 11th line of Ramsay and expressed a desire to move the buiding intact. So with men arid tractors, the procession started. Old Timer ‘Bete’ was noticed standing by sadly shaking his head and murmuring “It can’t be done.”

But through fields, highways and byways the moving proceeded slowly until one afternoon something happened one of the skids and the building settled down in a creek for the night. Mr. Art Fumerton came to the rescue and eventually the building was in Mr. Fumerton’s yard and he firmly believes in the Spirit of Christmas and the old saying “It can’t be done” has changed to “who says it can’t.”

Photo-http://images.ourontario.ca/

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Apr 1930, Tue  •  Page 24
Dunlop		George		Lanark		Ramsay				Farmer					Lanark Co., Canada   
Foley		Michael		Lanark		Ramsay				Farmer					Carlow Co., Ireland   
Fumerton	Archibald W.	Lanark		Ramsay		Appleton	General Merchant; Hotel Proprietor	Ramsay Tp., Canada  
										Appleton
Fumerton	Robert A.	Lanark		Ramsay				Farmer					Ramsay Tp., Canada   

LOWE - FUMERTON
St Paul's Anglican Church, Almonte was the scene of a pretty fall wedding on Friday evening, Nov. 4, 1966, at 7 p.m., when Linda Marion Fumerton, daughter of Donald Ernest and the late Maisie Fumerton (Edwards) was united in marriage to Donald Wayne Lowe, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lowe of Cedar Hill. The Rev. Harry Ploughman officiated at the double ring ceremony. The bride was given in marriage by her uncle, Mr. John Edwards of Carleton Place. She wore a floor-length gown of white silk nylon over taffeta. Her shoulder length veil was held in place by a tiara of rhinestones and she carried a bouquet of red roses with English ivy and white stephanotis. Miss Judy Southwell was maid of honour and Miss Diane Moses and Miss Marilyn Arthur were bridesmaids. They wore A-line floor-length dresses of Old Gold peau de soie trimmed with brown and wore brown accessories.

Their headdresses were of brown with gold net and carried bouquets of gold tinted mums. The little flower girl, Miss Kimberley Harris, cousin of the bride wore an exact replica of the bridesmaids' dresses with brown accessories, and carried a basket of gold tinted mums. The ring bearer, Master Tommy Edwards, cousin of the bride, ably assisted by carrying the ring securely inserted in a white satin heart shaped cushion. The groom was attended by his brother, Mr. Bill Lowe of Cedar Hill, and the ushers were Mr. Brian Fumerton, brother of the bride and Mr. Fred Lowe, cousin of the groom. The choir was assisted by Mrs. Margaret Peppy at the organ, while the bride entered the church to the singing of the hymn, Praise to the Lord, based on 103 psalm. During the signing of the register the choir sang O Perfect Love. A bountiful dinner was served in the church hall to 70 guests by the church Guild and Auxiliary. The Hon. Geo. Gomme acted as Master of Ceremonies and proposed the toast to the bride. Rev. Ploughman made a few timely remarks and Rev. Henley said Grace. A reception sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Art Lowe was held in the Pakenham Community Hall, after the young couple left amid showers of confetti and good wishes a short honeymoon. The bride's travelling suit was a three-piece blue wool with blue fur collar and black accessories. She wore a corsage of pink roses and maiden hair fern. They will reside at 130 Church Street, Almonte.


1894 Jan. 2 Carleton Place Herald
District News – Appleton
“On Wednesday afternoon last the residence of Mr. R. W. Fum?erton was alive
with guests, the occasion being the marriage of his daughter, Miss Jennie M.to Mr. Alex. McRae, of Carleton Place. Rev. G. T. Bayne performed the
ceremony. Miss Bella Fumerton, sister of the bride, acted as bridesmaid, an
Mr. J. A. McGregor discharged the duties of groom’s man. After the ceremony
the happy couple with their friends sat down to a sumptuous repast. The
bride was very popular and was the recipient of over fifty beautiful and cost presents. To Mr. and Mrs. McRae we extend the congratulations of a host of friends here”

Remembering Harry Purdy

Standard
Remembering Harry Purdy

Leslie Manchur —-VETERAN CANADA CHAPTER EUROPE and FRIENDS

February 6, 2021  · Harry Purdy( retired CD MWO RCEME). Served in CFB Lahr ( third tour NATO). The 70/ 80 era: where became known for his contributing volunteer work for the Canadian Forces Network ( CFN). On retirement of The Military; he became a full time radio broadcaster; with CFN. Having the opportunity to represent the Canadian Forces abroad. He did the radio shows such as Country Sunup; the Western Express.

He interviewed so many Artists such as: Dolly Parton; Johnny Cash; Dick Dameron( too many to mention). After Lahr closed in 1994: he came back to Canada( Carleton Place : Ont). He passed at Almonte Gen Hospital; Ont: on the 1 Feb 2020.But never forgotten.he did the circle of life. He passed it on; so I could carry on. As: a Third Generation Soldier: I pass it on to the next generation. Rip. Dad.Respect and gratitude! ❤️( too many to mention).

I was just about to add this to our Carleton Place Military page ” Photos of Those we Remember” on Facebook but decided it needed to be documented and then I will post it..-Linda S

Friday Nights with Brian Murphy

We Are No Longer in Gnome Man’s Land — Do You Gnome What I am Saying?

Standard
We Are No Longer in Gnome Man’s Land — Do You Gnome What I am Saying?
There’s no place like Gnome; and they are popping up all over Ottawa. 
Finding one could be good luck for you.
Miniature Gnomes, about the size of a loonie, are making themselves at home all throughout Ottawa.
There have been over 400 since last June, according to their creator; who is asking to remain anonymous.
“I try to put one out every day,” they tell CTV News Ottawa.
You could call it Ottawa’s own Gnomey Banksy, but the creator laughs when asked. Read the rest here– click

Thursday January 6th, 2022.

For years I have asked– no begged for someone to do this.. It began in Oakland California when I lived there

To those interested in gnomeourism here is how Oakland did it.

DSC_0034.jpeg

From a posting I did in 2013—

There are now over 2,300 gnomes that now populate the hills and flats of Gnome Mans Land, California (Oakland). Until recently, they had pretty much managed to keep their presence a secret but then word got out in 2013 and there were fears that even Gnomeland Security might get into the act.

Word on the street is this population was descended from a shipment of gnomes bound for Oakland’s famous Fairyland in 1928 and escaped when the delivery truck tipped over.  But really, gnobody gnows where they came from. You can find them at the bases of telephone poles and they gnever gather in groups. They hate low altitudes and heavy traffic, and live off the energy found in the telephone wires.

oakland-gnomes.jpg

More than a year ago, a mysterious man wanted to do something nice for his neighbours near Lake Merritt in Gnomelandia. He found some scrap wood from old fences and cut them into wooden blocks 6 inches tall, and painted the mythical creatures on them. Then he anonymously screwed (not nailed) the guerrilla installations to wooden utility poles (never trees), at sidewalk level.

W1siZiIsInVwbG9hZHMvcGxhY2VfaW1hZ2VzLzNlODgzNDVmNWI5ZWE2MGI3OF9mMjRjMGFkNzI3ZjczYmQzNjc4N2E3MTVlYTEzMjM3Yi5qcGciXSxbInAiLCJ0aHV.jpeg
The first batch of about two dozen went up in January, 2012. The artist’s greatest joy is walking the streets of Oakland (“tending herd” as he calls it) to make sure none have been removed.

A woman posted on a Facebook page:

“We need some Gnomes in East Oakland around Eastmont Mall!! Magic is something that can grow.”  Her neighborhood?  When one hears about shootings in Oakland, probably 1/3 are within twenty blocks of her home. And there’s an elementary school there with four telephone poles in front of it, two on its side.  They are getting every gnome [in stock].  She deserves them for believing in magic.”

gnome.jpg

At Fairyroom.com they figured out that “the gnomes on the streets close to the lake’s edge are wearing pants. But as the streets angle up the hill, the gnomes on the telephone poles change their wardrobe to kilts. The gnomes of Oakland’s higher elevations are plainly Highlanders, a bit of dry humor everyone heartily appreciates.”

Then one day San Francisco Chronicle reporter Carolyn Jones blew their cover. PG&E (Pacific Gas & Electric) spokesman Jason King said he had never noticed them on their utility poles, although he jogs around the lake. Sticking to the company playbook, he told her a crew would be dispatched to remove them from gnome mans land.

gnom.jpeg
His exact words: “We can’t have anything that would compromise the integrity of our equipment. The concern is that the gnomes could inspire additional people to place things on our property.”

“Save the Lake Merritt Gnomes” Facebook page popped up. Calls poured in. The Twittersphere exploded. Negotiations ensued.

We are holding peace talks for the 2300 gnomes in a secret mushroom patch near the Rose Garden,” said Zac Wald, chief of staff to City Councilwoman Lynette McElhaney, whose district includes the preponderance of the gnome population. “People love the gnomes, and they are District Three residents.”

At the end of January there was a positive win for the little people:


“We received a great deal of public feedback, so we’re declaring the poles gnome-man’s land. We’re not going to remove them,” PG&E spokesman Jason King said.

I think the gnomes are a sweet reminder that a little magic can go a long way. I’m looking forward to the story spreading beyond Oakland – but for now, the magic remains in Oakland– because– that’s where the Gnomes are. They made my life in Oakland wonderful.

Also read- Remember those mysterious Oakland gnomes? A new batch of coronavirus-inspired characters are popping up

2016 — Almonte, Mississippi Mills, Ontario

14199771_10154253898771886_8862151772274481800_n.jpg

Last week gazing at the Mississippi River in Almonte I spotted something. No, it couldn’t be! But it was!

14232486_10154253906126886_2253002340429209379_n.jpg

There, all my himself was a lone gnome in the middle of the dam looking for a pirate ship to escape in because of all the Enerdu construction. I don’t blame him! It instantly reminded me of my former hometown of Oakland, California where the gnomes took over the town and became a tourist attraction in 2013. Could the same thing be happening to Almonte!?

a2a456a0de1a98668d2f0be99d7b6822.jpg
Carleton Place Library Gnome

The proof is in the pudding my friends–the Gnomes are afoot!

April 18th 2022

Just another Easter Monday– looking for smiles– some ridiculousness, some insanity to make me smile…and I just got a comment on WordPress– I am smiling, I am giggling…I am thrilled…

From-“Me

9 hr. ago

Just in case you were wondering, I moved from Oakland to the land of my forefathers… Oklahoma…six years ago and have been periodically busy: there are little towns all over Oklahoma with many telephone poles in need of magic too. What’s an algorithmic painter like me supposed to do? Ok Gnomes on Facebook will fill in the rest.

2013

OK Gnomes
April 24, 2016  · 

A beautiful day to visit another Oklahoma town.
OK Gnomes
July 7, 2019  · 

I put gnomes on telephone poles. Originally in Oakland, CA, now, slowly, all over Oklahoma. Why? My way of trying to make the world just a little better

High Steppers Dance 1900

Standard
High Steppers Dance 1900

Photo from Jaimeson/ Caldwell–Remember When? Jamiesons — Now and Then-Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 5

 High steppers were considered a contemporary precision dance and drill troupe – performing dance steps, military drill maneuvers, marching steps and choreographed street dance to percussion accompaniment. I could not find anything pertaining these high steppers from Carleton Place but I did find this mention of ‘steppers’ in the Lanark Era.

The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
02 Apr 1919, Wed  •  Page 1

Never Miss a Chance to Dance!

No one in this world wanted to take over tap dancer Ann Miller’s job more than I did. After 70 long years of random attempts, all that remains is a pair of silver tap shoes tucked away in a cupboard long forgotten. I used to wear them on a day to day basis for many years as I always believed one should be on call if someone had the odd tap dancing job. In life I have always winged it: life, eyeliner, just everything.

As a child my mother told my father that I had natural rhythm and would probably belong to a professional dance troupe. Actually, what she really wanted me to be was one of the dancers on American Bandstand, but I had other goals in mind. When I was eight I wanted to fluff out my tutu and be the Sugar Plum Fairy so badly that I accidentally bumped the reigning fairy off the stage during practice. Seeing the stage was a foot off the ground, she was luckily not hurt, and I was to remain a Waltzing Flower forever.

At 17 I had my first “break”. I became one of the regular “crowd” dancers on a Montreal based TV show called “Like Young”. Every Saturday afternoon I lined up outside CFCF-TV sporting my grandmother’s orthopedic brown lace up shoes, ready to dance. Those borrowed shoes were just super for dancing and they looked fabulous with my floor dusting Le Chateau gabardine pants. I was nothing but double-trouble on the dance floor. Read the rest here..

Cruisin Through the Dance Halls- From Carleton Place and Beyond!! Larry Clark

More on Grandma Majaury — Mother Bread Maker Midwife and Step Dancer

Fire Engines of Carleton Place

Standard
Fire Engines of Carleton Place

May 1910 Carleton Place

The town has two fire engines which were located on the bridge at the rear of the town hall on the hank of the Mississippi river. Each engine had two streams of over one thousand feet each. During the earlier part of the fire the older engine was disabled and the new engine was left alone. Meanwhile private streams were put Into commission and manned by vol unteers did excellent service. One stream was laid from the pump at the Carleton Place Electric Light company’s plant and one from Brown’s grist mill, both being directed to the center of the fire area.

Another stream from W. A. Nichol’s planing mill on Lake avenue did very effective work. This mill is situated next to the Mississippi Hotel, and the stream it laid along Beckwlth street attacked the fire from the southeast side and played a valuable part in checking it In that district. Mr. Findlay McEwen’s residence was burned. Another important point was the knitting and pulp mills of Bates and Innes, limited, situated In the path of the fire. Time and again the place caught fire but was saved by the company’s own stream. The tower and flag pole were destroyed but the mill, which is a very important Industry, was saved.–The Lost Photos & Words- Carleton Place Fire 1910

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
April 1, 2016  · 

The parade ended at Riverside Park, where the Ocean Wave fire truck was all decked out!
— in Carleton Place, Ontario.
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
October 8  ·–On parade in front of the Carleton Place Town Hall is the newly purchased 1923 Reo Speedwagon, the first motorized vehicle purchased by the OWFC.
The Reo has been honourably retired from duty, but was used in 2015 to honour the life of Ab Hurdis, a 40 year veteran firefighter with the Ocean Wave Fire Company. 
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
November 30, 2012  · 




Members of the Ocean Wave Fire Company pose proudly in their 1923 REO Speedwagon. Seated are Lloyd Tatlock, and Willard Morris.
Also note the firefighter on horseback and the father and daughter watching from the sidewalk!
Kelley Crampton– in front of the town hall– the Ocean Wave moved into the town hall in 1902.

Ocean Wave Firemen Getting Uniforms

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Update to the Smiths Falls Fire — Ed Larmour

William McIlquaham From The Theatre to the Fire

Fires in Carleton Place–James Gillies House

William McIlquaham From The Theatre to the Fire

Bennett Family Photos — Thanks to Kelley Crampton

Photos of Beckwith Township Fire Dept 1970s

Beckwith Fire Department 1965 Names Names Names

The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Help Thy Neighbour in Carleton Place- Ronnie Waugh Fire 1959

News of Butter– Fireman— and Women of Stamina in Carleton Place

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
06 Oct 1897, Wed  •  Page 1