Tag Archives: carleton place

Marilyn Robertson Snedden Lanark County Dairy Princess

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Marilyn Robertson Snedden Lanark County Dairy Princess
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Aug 1958, Sat  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jul 1958, Mon  •  Page 16

July 1958

Marilyn Robertson

Marilyn won over the other two contestants, Margaret Blair, Lanark; RR 1 and Carolyn McLenaghan, Perth RR 1. Each girl milked a cow in turn with special stalls set up outside. All the contestants made excellent showings when preparing the cow and equipment, milking and then washing fthe equipment with Marilyn was chosen as winner by the panel of judges, J. Bogaerts, Dairy Inspector from Almonte; C. E. Butterill, Dairy Inspector from Perth and E. T. Rodgers, Cheese Instructor for Lanark from Arnprior.

Marilyn Robertson will represent Lanark County in the Ontario Queen. Finals at the Canadian National Exhibition. Joan Stewart from Lyn, the Dairy Princess from Leeds County was present and presented Marilyn with the “Dairy Princess of Lanark County’’ ribbon. Then Marilyn received a cheque for $50.00 from Mr. Bogaerts on behalf of the committee, $25.00 for placing first and $25.00 for travelling expenses to the C.N.E. Held in conjunction with the Lanark County Holstein Breeders’ Association at their Twilight Meeting at-the farm of John E. James.

Marilyn Robertson was a strong contender for the simple reason that having no brothers she and her sister Rosalyn were their father’s right hand men at their home farms. Each family farm, 10th line of Ramsay received $5.00. The milking stalls, motor, pipeline and most of the equipment were provided by Carson Farm Supplies, Perth.The Perth District Co-Op provided the milker. Assisting with the competition were Carl McIntosh, Almonte RR 5 and James Lowry, Almonte RR 3.

The prize money was donated by all the dairies and creameries in Lanark County along with the main milk producer organizations, Lanark County Federation of Agriculture and Lanark County Junior Farmers’ Association. At the C.N.E. in Toronto she. will be required to milk by machine where time and general efficiency will count. Her father, Mr. George Robertson sold his farm this spring and the family now live on Water Street, Almonte. A ll Marilyn’s friends will be pulling for her, especially during the most trying part where each contestant is interviewed and required to make a short speech on the Dairy Industry in Ontario. Marilyn Robertson will represent Lanark County in the Ontario Queen Finals at the Canadian National Exhibition.

In 4-H Club work, Marilyn has an excellent record, having completed nine 4-H Homemaking Club and five 4-H Agricultural Club projects. This year, Marilyn is Assistant leader of the Cedar Hill 4-H Garden Club and a member of the Almonte 4-H Calf and 4-H Grain Clubs. In 1957 she was chosen as one of five representatives from Lanark to the Provincial 4-H. 

Marilyn has competed in several livestock and seed judging competitions placing fifth in the Intermediate Division of the Lanark County Livestock Judging competition last year and third in the Junior Section o f the County. She is past president of the Pakenham Junior Farmers Girls Club and this year is secretary-treasurer of the Lanark County Junior Farmers’ Association.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Oct 1958, Fri  •  Page 32
ArchivesLanark–Marilyn Snedden (Archive Vice Chair) with historic quilt quilted by a combined effort of the North Lanark Womens Institutes.

Pakenham Photo Marilyn Snedden via the collection of the Argue Family

St. Andrews United Church Pakenham

Photo from the scrapbook of Lucy Connelly Poaps
Marilyn Snedden and Dolly Tolshack

Remembering Rosy Robertson

Banker Snedden —–James Snedden

Old Almonte Photo Collection — In Back of the D. W. Snedden Drugstore 1953

Rosebank, Blakeney, Norway Falls and Snedden’s Station

Bennies Corners and the Snedden Family

The Party Line —-1950s

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The Party Line —-1950s

The Year is 1952

The evil practice of listening in on the rural telephone seems to be increasing in this part of Lanark County. If certain people are called from town the busybodies, mostly of the fair sex, but not always, know the sharp ring of central and then down come the receivers like Niagara Falls.

People trying to hear what is being said on a rural line often wonder why the voice of the person in the country is so thin and faint. The eavesdroppers are to blame in 90 percent of the cases. Most people have experienced the shock of calling up some man known to have a voice like a foghorn and hearing him twittering away like a little birdie. If he has a temper he will probably let a few hearty cuss words out of him at his unseen audience.

Clickety click go a dozen receivers and then, lo and behold, the foghorn gentle ­ man regains his normal voice. All jokes aside, cases are now known where people have spent a lot of money to call someone on a rural line. They have placed the call from Vancouver, Halifax, California, Florida or some other far distant point. Generally it is a very serious message occasioned by death or illness. And that is the very time when all the receivers will come down and make it impossible for the expensive call to be heard.

Quite often in such cases the nearest switchboard operator, through which the message passes, has to take it and pass it on the few remaining miles to the party of the second part. Nearly everyone is familiar with the old fable about the Peeping Tom who was struck with blindness in the offending eye. Rural phones were not invented in the days of fairy tales or else there would have been one about the busybody who went deaf in the ear which she applied to calls not her own.

The writer of this item had an old aunt out in Leeds County who used to do a lot of embroidery. She would sit in an easy chair near the rural phone with the receiver tied to the side of her head. It is no wonder that she was regarded as a walking encyclopedia of local information, not to mention scandal.

Sometimes, as her needle worked back and forth through the fabric stretched over its hoops, she lost track of the design. So interested was she in the conversations on her telephone, she took up knitting for creative and safety’s sake.

You always had to be very careful. “You had to put your hand over the mouthpiece or they’d hear you breathing,” explains Amelia Bretzloff. But it paid off. You could hear about so-and-so’s lumbago, that what’s-her-name was seeing what’s-his-name, or that you-know-who was going broke. “Of course, everybody listened in. If you wanted to know the news, you listened in.” It was the early 1920s and telephones were novelties. Nobody had yet heard of a private telephone. The party line linked the neighborhood as surely as if it were stitched together by the thin strands of copper wire on the poles. “You could tell by the ring who was being called,” says Bretzloff, who at 72 years of age now has a private line. Each ring was different: two long, one short; three long, and so on. “Suppose there was somebody with a serious illness in that home. Then you listened to see if someone died, or if they needed help. “Of course, if somebody forgot themselves or they were shocked, they spoke out and gave themselves away.” In those days there was no dial; the operator rang all the numbers. “Oh, and she could hear everything if she wanted to,” says Bretzloff.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
02 Sep 1914, Wed  •  Page 1


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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Nov 1910, Wed  •  Page 7

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
04 Aug 1897, Wed  •  Page 1


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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Aug 1918, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Dec 1908, Wed  •  Page 5


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Feb 1988, Sat  •  Page 82

Mary Cook and her Telephone Pin

Working on the Telephone Lines — Electrocution at Carleton Place

The Devil’s Telephone? The Ouija Board

Smiths Falls in 1955–3,031 Telephones!!

Telephone Tales from 569 South Street

For the Love of a Telephone Table

The Day the Balderson Telephone Co Disappeared

The Telephone and its History in Almonte

But I Can’t Spend my Telephone Money!

Number Please? Carleton Place

Where Did the 257 Telephone Exchange Come From in Carleton Place?

Jenny, Jenny, Who Can I Turn To?

The Telephone and its History in Almonte

1989 Carleton Place Accident Clippings

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1989 Carleton Place Accident Clippings

Photo- Judith Scott-These  came from the Canadian may 31st 1989. 

Comments from “Bus accident in Carleton Place”

Train Accident? Five Bucks and a Free Lunch in Carleton Place Should Settle it

Click Bait– The Accident Stories of Carleton Place

The Accidental Death of Thomas Lowe 1871

Documenting the First Female Councillor in Carleton Place

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Documenting the First Female Councillor in Carleton Place

In 1890 Dr. Preston of Bridge Street, was the first mayor of Carleton Place. I had someone ask me who the first female councillor was. So, who was the first female councillor?

Well, I had a list of women, and documented what Mary Cook said about women being in politics in Carleton Place. (read—It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook)

BUT, how many women have been in Carleton Place government? Thanks to Stacey Blair, Town of Carleton Place Clerk, and Jennifer Fenwick Irwin from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum for the help!!!

There were only 8 since 1919 when women were allowed to vote in Ontario and they are:

Linda Seccaspina

 Theresa Fritz

Wendy LeBlanc (mayor)

Linda Schmidt

Melba Baker (mayor)

Barbara Walsh

Trudie Dickie

Geneva Anne Tripp (1952)

That’s 103 years for anyone who is counting LOLOL. Thanks to Deputy Clerk Stacey Blair, she found a Mrs. Tripp who became Carleton Place’s first female councillor in 1952. She was known only as Mrs. Tripp at the Town Hall and Mrs. Homer L. Tripp to everyone else. This was 1952 after all. Doing more research I found out her first name was Geneva and her maiden last name was Wilson.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Dec 1951, Tue  •  Page 20

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada31 Jul 1952, Thu  •  Page 17

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Dec 1951, Mon  •  Page 12

Read- Chamber of Commerce Then and Now in Carleton Place

Thanks to Jennifer fenwick Irwin of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum for the photo.. Carleton Place Council 1952. Councillor Geneva Anne Tripp on the left hand side.

Name:Geneva Anne Tripp
Birth Date:7 Jan 1911
Death Date:7 Oct 2008
Cemetery:United Cemeteries
Burial or Cremation Place:Beckwith, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:N
Spouse:Homer Leroy Tripp
Children:William Guy Tripp

TRIPP, Geneva Anne – Beloved mother of Leroy Tripp (Vija) and Brenda Weinberg (Dick), and dear grandmother of Cathryn Flick (Bill), Guy Tripp (Julia), Leslie McClure (Henry), Jacqueline Anderson (Mark), Eric Tripp (Lisa), and Abbie Weinberg (Grant MacPherson), Geneva died October 7, 2008, in Toronto, at the age of 97. ”Nanny” was a loving great-grandmother to Will, Ryan, and Meredith Flick, Michael (Laura) and Matthew Tripp, David Tripp, Freya and Rowyn Anderson, and Cydney and Kylia Tripp. Geneva will be lovingly remembered by her sister, Isabel Bradley (Bill), her brothers, Kenneth Wilson (Audrey) and Donald Wilson (Shirley), and her many nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her beloved husband, Homer ”Hank” Tripp, her infant son, William, her sisters, Alean Prime, Margaret Davis, Pearl Reynolds, Doonie Richards, and Lola Brown, her brother, Bill Wilson (Connie), and her parents, Annie DeMarse and William Wilson. Geneva was a registered nurse who loved working as a school nurse for North York Public Health Department. A talented artist, she was also the first woman to be elected to the Town Council in Carleton Place, Ontario, where she was born. At Geneva’s request, cremation has taken place. A celebration of her life will take place in Carleton Place on May 30, 2009.

Published by Toronto Star on Oct. 11, 2008


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Feb 1964, Mon  •  

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
15 Oct 1919, Wed  •  Page 1

Carleton Place Ladies Auxiliary — Chamber of Commerce 1987– Mary Cook Archives

Chamber of Commerce Then and Now in Carleton Place

It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

Johnny J. McGregor — Still Buster and Mayor

Outstanding Personalities of Carleton Place – Dr. J.A. Johnston — Billy Nichols– William Barclay

Banker Snedden —–James Snedden

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Banker Snedden —–James Snedden

Almonte Gazette

April 7, 1882

The Late Mr. James Snedden – The chronicler of local events has at no time a sadder duty to perform than when called on to record the death of those well known to the generality of our readers, and who have to a certain extent identified themselves with the history of the locality. No face was more familiar on our streets that that of the gentleman whose death it is our sad duty to record today. Very few indeed of our readers in Almonte and the surrounding neighborhood but can recall the good-humored countenance of the man who was so well and favorably known as “Banker Snedden,” but whose smile will be seen no more.

The late Mr. James Snedden was born in the 11th line of Beckwith in 1821. About fifty-five years ago the father of the deceased removed to Ramsay, settling at Rosebank, and building the grist mill there, afterwards going into the lumbering business, and dying at Quebec of cholera about 1834. At the time of his father’s death James, who was the eldest son, was about fourteen years of age, and from that time he acted as a father to his brothers and sisters. Three brothers, James, William and John, continued to work harmoniously together until the youngest was about thirty years of age, but although they were then working each for himself, the elder brother never lost his fatherly interest in their well being.

Like his father, the deceased engaged in lumbering and speculation of other kinds, and was very fortunate in his pursuits, but the hard times in the lumber trade and a heavy expenditure he had been led into to improve the passage from his timber limits, caused him heavy losses. It must not, however, be supposed that he was straightened in his resources, as the widow and family are left well provided for. The deceased attended church at Rosebank on Sunday, as usual, and on Monday morning he harnessed his horse to come to Almonte. He went into the house to wash his hands, and coming out of the washroom he placed his hand on his head and exclaiming “Oh! My head!” fell on the floor in an apoplectic fit, and only rallied for a brief time in the evening, and died on Tuesday morning about six o’clock, in the 61st year of his age.

The deceased was borne to the 8th line cemetery on Thursday afternoon, the funeral being attended by a large concourse of friends and neighbors, who were unanimous in the opinion that a good husband, a loving father, a kind brother and worthy neighbor has been called away. The family have the sympathy of the entire neighborhood in their bereavement.

James died on Apirl 4, 1882 and Christina died on the 9th of Novemember 1883.

The brick house they lived in in Bennie’s Corners was made on the homestead in the brick yard owned by James. Their furniture was made by the inmates at the Kingston Penitentary.

The eldest son, David Bain Snedden after farming at Bennie’s Corners moved to Carleton Place and operated a hotel next to the train station. (with files from: from The Snedden Saga: From Lanarkshire to Lanark County Paperback – Jan. 1 1994)

Snedden Hotel on Moore Street (Franktown Road)– the building across the street used to house a rag business and was The Grand Central Hotel.. Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

In 1904 Carleton Place’s eight hotels were:

James Lee’s The Leland

Walter McIlquham’s The Mississippi Hotel

Albert Salter’s Queens Hotel

The Revere House- formerly The British Hotel

J. E. Rathwell’s Royal Hotel, formerly the Wilson House

D. B. Snedden’s

P. J. O’Briens

Victoria House

P. Salter’s Queen’s Royal at Lake Park

Read-The Old Morgan House — Ray Paquette and Gord Cross Memories

Old Almonte Photo Collection — In Back of the D. W. Snedden Drugstore 1953

Rosebank, Blakeney, Norway Falls and Snedden’s Station

Bennies Corners and the Snedden Family

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Photos- The Sibbett Family– From Rita Sibbett-Davidson

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Photos- The Sibbett Family– From Rita Sibbett-Davidson

From Rita Sibbett-Davidson=These I just found while packing for a move. My great grandfather Sibbitt and his wife.

Mary Morphy
Mary Morphy

CLIPPED FROMKemptville TelegramKemptville, Ontario, Canada19 Mar 1908, Thu  •  Page 1

Alexander Sibbitt The Summitt Store Collectables – Adin Daigle

Norman Cram and Ed Sibbitt –The Rest of the Story — Lots of Genealogy

How Did A Carleton Place Photo End Up at the Victoria Archives?

Visiting Carleton Place 1893- The Limestone City

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Visiting Carleton Place 1893- The Limestone City
Photos- Carleton Placeand Beckwith Heritage Museum
This photo taken from the south shore of the Mississippi River shows the foundry to the right, with the Findlay family’s boathouse at centre. Foundry buildings took up the whole property, right up to High Street.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The Ottawa Journal

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada02 Jun 1893, Fri  •  Page 1

Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings

Carleton Place Visits Comrie 1994 — Joyce Tennant

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place– Wooly Bully!!!! Part 6

Documenting Homes –353 Lanark — Carleton Place — I Deem this a Historical Building.

Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings

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Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Dec 1910, Wed  •  Page 1

also read-David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

1920s photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Mississippi/ Grand Hotel

Napoleon Lavallee bought the property for $50 in 1869 and opened the hotel in 1872 after he sold the Leland Hotel/ Carleton House on Bridge Street.  The McIlquham family bought it 11 years later in 1883 and when Joe Belisle worked there from 1917-1920 it had ornate woodwork, a grand staircase and the stone facade had wooden white wrap-around verandas. The elegant dining room tables were covered in  fine lace linen and gleaming cutlery, and the Mississippi Hotel became known for its homemade food and attracted travelling salesman from far and wide. The salesmen set up trunks in their rooms offering everything from dishes to clothing that was scooped up by local merchants that came to buy at the hotel. The place was packed daily with fans from Stittsville, Smiths Falls and Perth–and if you talk to Gerald Hastie people came in early for the fresh baked pies, and by noon they were pretty well sold out.The only known photo of Napoleon Lavallee sits on my wall–read-The Napoleon of Carleton Place

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
13 Jan 1897, Wed  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Sep 1919, Fri  •  Page 4
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Dec 1909, Mon  •  Page 3
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
26 Mar 1902, Wed  •  Page 5
Karen LloydIn the 1950s Buck Fraser lived at the Mississippi Hotel. He used to stand out at the front in a white dress shirt having a cigarette. I don’t know where he worked .
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1913, Tue  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Aug 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
Jennifer Fenwick Irwin–Carleton Place Museum This was taken the morning after the fire.
Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire- read-Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Nov 1909, Wed  •  Page 1
Buffalo robe or Sasktchewan Robe

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1899, Sat  •  Page 6
Former dinner plates from the old Mississippi Hotel/ Grand Hotel– **
Adin Wesley Daigle**

November 19 at 11:37 AM ·
📷
A recent addition to the collection , a couple plates from the Mississippi hotel in Carleton place 😍👍

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Sep 1912, Fri  •  Page 9
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1914, Sat  •  Page 12
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Jul 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
The Old Side Door of the Mississippi Hotel

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Thieves at the Mississippi Hotel–When Crime Began to Soar

All About Lorraine Lemay –Mississippi Hotel

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

The Napoleon of Carleton Place

Grandma’s Butterscotch Pie

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

In the Mississippi Hotel Mood with Mrs. Glen Miller

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel in 1961

Where Was Linda? A Necromancer Photo Blog -Victorian Seance at the Mississippi Hotel

Spooky Night at the Seccaspina Hotel

Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?

Fumerton Family– Appleton

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Fumerton Family– Appleton

Almonte Gazette

September 15, 1882

Death of an Old Resident – On Sunday last about 10 o’clock Mr. John Fummerton, of Appleton , in his 94th year, passed away and went to “join the majority.” The deceased, was the last but one of the first settlers, Mr. William Hamilton being now the only survivor. Mr. Fummerton was born in Paisley , in Scotland , and was considerable of a traveler in his earlier years, having visited among other countries, Greenland and the West Indies .

It is nearly 70 years since he first settled on the farm on which he died and to which in the early days of the settlement he carried flour and nails all the way from Brockville on his back. Subsequently he sawed the lumber by hand and himself built a boat with which he went to Montreal for provisions. His family consisted of eight children, who are all living but one. Up to within a few days of his death he walked daily to the village of Appleton to get his mail matter, the distance being about one mile. He took his last walk on Thursday the 31st of August, and on returning fell in the lane leading to his house, and on being found was removed thither, where he died on Sunday last.

The funeral took place on Tuesday and the length of the procession, over a mile, testified to the respect in which the deceased was held. The remains were taken first to Appleton Church and thence to Cram’s Cemetery. Comparing the present with the past, what a peaceful revolution was accomplished in the neighborhood in his lifetime.

December 1950 Almonte Gazette

The will in the heart of man to do and dare is not dead nor does life get tedious, not around Appleton anyway, ’tis said. Mr. Howard Fumerton of the 11th line of Beckwith, bought a building from Mr. Elmsley of the 11th line of Ramsay and expressed a desire to move the buiding intact. So with men arid tractors, the procession started. Old Timer ‘Bete’ was noticed standing by sadly shaking his head and murmuring “It can’t be done.”

But through fields, highways and byways the moving proceeded slowly until one afternoon something happened one of the skids and the building settled down in a creek for the night. Mr. Art Fumerton came to the rescue and eventually the building was in Mr. Fumerton’s yard and he firmly believes in the Spirit of Christmas and the old saying “It can’t be done” has changed to “who says it can’t.”

Photo-http://images.ourontario.ca/

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Apr 1930, Tue  •  Page 24
Dunlop		George		Lanark		Ramsay				Farmer					Lanark Co., Canada   
Foley		Michael		Lanark		Ramsay				Farmer					Carlow Co., Ireland   
Fumerton	Archibald W.	Lanark		Ramsay		Appleton	General Merchant; Hotel Proprietor	Ramsay Tp., Canada  
										Appleton
Fumerton	Robert A.	Lanark		Ramsay				Farmer					Ramsay Tp., Canada   

LOWE - FUMERTON
St Paul's Anglican Church, Almonte was the scene of a pretty fall wedding on Friday evening, Nov. 4, 1966, at 7 p.m., when Linda Marion Fumerton, daughter of Donald Ernest and the late Maisie Fumerton (Edwards) was united in marriage to Donald Wayne Lowe, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lowe of Cedar Hill. The Rev. Harry Ploughman officiated at the double ring ceremony. The bride was given in marriage by her uncle, Mr. John Edwards of Carleton Place. She wore a floor-length gown of white silk nylon over taffeta. Her shoulder length veil was held in place by a tiara of rhinestones and she carried a bouquet of red roses with English ivy and white stephanotis. Miss Judy Southwell was maid of honour and Miss Diane Moses and Miss Marilyn Arthur were bridesmaids. They wore A-line floor-length dresses of Old Gold peau de soie trimmed with brown and wore brown accessories.

Their headdresses were of brown with gold net and carried bouquets of gold tinted mums. The little flower girl, Miss Kimberley Harris, cousin of the bride wore an exact replica of the bridesmaids' dresses with brown accessories, and carried a basket of gold tinted mums. The ring bearer, Master Tommy Edwards, cousin of the bride, ably assisted by carrying the ring securely inserted in a white satin heart shaped cushion. The groom was attended by his brother, Mr. Bill Lowe of Cedar Hill, and the ushers were Mr. Brian Fumerton, brother of the bride and Mr. Fred Lowe, cousin of the groom. The choir was assisted by Mrs. Margaret Peppy at the organ, while the bride entered the church to the singing of the hymn, Praise to the Lord, based on 103 psalm. During the signing of the register the choir sang O Perfect Love. A bountiful dinner was served in the church hall to 70 guests by the church Guild and Auxiliary. The Hon. Geo. Gomme acted as Master of Ceremonies and proposed the toast to the bride. Rev. Ploughman made a few timely remarks and Rev. Henley said Grace. A reception sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Art Lowe was held in the Pakenham Community Hall, after the young couple left amid showers of confetti and good wishes a short honeymoon. The bride's travelling suit was a three-piece blue wool with blue fur collar and black accessories. She wore a corsage of pink roses and maiden hair fern. They will reside at 130 Church Street, Almonte.


1894 Jan. 2 Carleton Place Herald
District News – Appleton
“On Wednesday afternoon last the residence of Mr. R. W. Fum?erton was alive
with guests, the occasion being the marriage of his daughter, Miss Jennie M.to Mr. Alex. McRae, of Carleton Place. Rev. G. T. Bayne performed the
ceremony. Miss Bella Fumerton, sister of the bride, acted as bridesmaid, an
Mr. J. A. McGregor discharged the duties of groom’s man. After the ceremony
the happy couple with their friends sat down to a sumptuous repast. The
bride was very popular and was the recipient of over fifty beautiful and cost presents. To Mr. and Mrs. McRae we extend the congratulations of a host of friends here”