Doin’ the Funky Chicken in Lanark County

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Photo by  the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–This ad was found in the Dec. 6, 1956 edition of the Carleton Place Canadian.

 

January 27 1911-Almonte Gazette

Over 300 birds have been entered for the Carleton Place Poultry Show, open Thursday evening and Friday all day and evening. Some of the handsome prizes are on exhibition in Mr. F. C. McDiarmid’s show window.

The poultry show in Carleton Place last Thursday and Friday brought a couple of Almonters to the front with the birds of Mr. Fred Blake 1 and Mr. Jas. Gilmour winning several prizes. Mr. Blake was successful in capturing the Wm. Thobum cup, besides winning five firsts, five seconds. Mr. Gilmour won the Robertson cup, two firsts and three seconds. Mr. Blake has entered 2 I twelve birds in the poultry show at Gananoque this week.

 

Perth Courier, December 21, 1888

Perth Poultry Fair—The quantity of poultry that changed hands at the fair at Perth this year was much smaller than that of last December.  For a variety of reasons there was less raised by the farmers this season that usual while last year’s product was an exceptionally large one.  The amount bought this year was about 40 tons.  Of this, Messrs. A. Meighen Brothers and Messrs. A.R. McIntyre & Co. secured 11 tons and Wilson and Noonan 7 tons.  However, a carload of live turkeys were shipped earlier in the season to New York by various buyers and other lots were shipped up the C.P.R. by A. Meighen Brothers, etc., so that the whole product this year would probably aggregate 60 tons.

But if the quantity this year was smaller the quality and price this year were better than last.  The second day figure for turkeys was 12 cents and 13 cents and a few choice lots brought 14 cents.  Geese brought the highest prices of the average.  There were more buyers here than at the fair but some were so scared at the prices that they never bought a pound of stuff.

On the whole, the fair was a good one and profitable to the farmers.  Mr. Robert Lawson, Jr., of Middleville sold to Messrs Meighen and McIntyre 662 pounds of turkey at 13 cents and 131 pounds at ten cents.  Mr. Thomas Frances near Lanark Village got 14 cents a pound for his lot of turkeys.  Mr. William Purdon, Jr., Dalhousie had another fine lot of poultry one of his turkeys weighed 22 pounds.  Mr. David Ferguson, 1st Concession Drummond, sold 38 turkeys to a private party in town at 14.5 cents a pound.  He sold ten besides at $3 each for brooking purposes next year.  He lost about 50 young turkeys this year through foxes.  Mr. John Doyle, Drummond, sold his geese for 12 cents a pound.  This is the best we have heard.

 

Maberly News:  Mr. Rigney took in and shipped a large quantity of turkeys and other fowl last week.  —  Thomas Strong had a turkey shoot on Thursday.

 

Perth Courier, October 29, 1897

Lanark Links:  The sleighing has been very fine for a few days and as a result business has been quite brisk.  The farmers are taking advantage of it and the streets of our village are thronged with sleighs.  Should this snow remain Friday will be a very busy day being the one appointed for the turkey fair here.  Generally that day is a very important one for the ladies of the surrounding country and they may be seen with their loads of poultry trying to secure the best possible returns for their labors in that line during the summer.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

 

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About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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