Tag Archives: carleton place and beckwith heritage museum

Communicating About History with Humour? — Jim Sharp Comments

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Communicating About History with Humour? — Jim Sharp Comments

“I am not amused!”

Comments From Old Ottawa And Bytown Pics October 2021

Jim Sharp--While we’re talking about Carleton Place families, Bill Findlay and his wife were touring Scotland once and ran into the Queen of England who broke down in her Landrover and apparently was invited for tea afterwards.

David Jeanes-–Hey Jim Sharp I thought from the movie “The Queen” that Queen Elizabeth knew how to fix Landrovers from her work as an army driver during World War II.🙂

Jim Sharp–David Jeanes– Guess she didnt have the right wrench

I have been writing and documenting community history for a very long time with over 6,300 blogs about history. I believe humour is important telling history sometimes, as people seem to remember what is written longer. Everybody knows the tragedy of history, yet, there is no denying that the past is often very funny and yesterday Jim Sharp’s comments on Old Ottawa And Bytown Pics not only made me laugh, but I will never forget the story.

Do we think that serious textual stories are better, more “literary,” whereas maybe something in a lighter fare is for the under educated? If so, then we have a problem. Today’s generations are not interested in facts, and to get them, or a lot of other folks to read about history, it has to be interesting. I don’t know about you but reading traditional text really doesn’t inspire me to want to know more, so I decided to take the ‘vanilla’ out of some history. I mean what would you rather read–

“A faintness came over him, and together with the evacuations his bowels protruded, followed by a copious hemorrhage, and the descent of the smaller intestines: moreover portions of his spleen and liver were brought off in the effusion of blood, so that he almost immediately died.”

Well, maybe that is a terrible example–but today, one of the younger generation would ‘text’ that sentence something like this:

“Hey! That man just %^&* out his internal organs and I will never eat Pigs In A Blanket again”.

What about a local lad who was so popular that the crowd at one of our local Ottawa Valley threw so many various items at him out of adoration that he died of asphyxiation? What will you remember? Pie Winners? I don’t think so. But, interesting tidbits sometimes helps you remember the rest of the story.

Mill of Kintail Road off Highway 28

Of course we all remember Brothel Bertie  (King Edward the VII) who probably exercised his prowess around the local Lanark area, including Ottawa. When he visited in 1860 he might have ended dying from bow chicka wow wow when he had a drink at Bennie’s Corners. Apparently, a certain lady from a local Ramsay farm had caught his eye. I don’t know about you, but reading about those “old community spirits” keeps my interests up and makes me want to know more. Read more here-Taking Sexy Back with Brothel Bertie aka Edward the VII

Ice Ice Baby, Ice Ice Baby
All right stop, Collaborate and listen

On the 18th of 1897 Carleton Place was advertising for someone to introduce military drills and exercise in the public schools. For $600 a year the individual they hired was to instill serious discipline into the local school child. It was mentioned that 15 minutes a day plus the occasional ‘polite and necessary’ beating would increase the brain function from all that sitting sideways and slouching forward that a normal child does during the day.

Really? Really?

As Maestro Fresh Wes once said: “Let your backbone slide!”

McKay Street Bakery to the left of me– Peden’s to the right–Here I am stuck in the middle of Bell Street with you. Read-Snippets of Bell Street we Should Not Forget ( photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum)

The Central Canadian newspaper wanted the school system to hire Joseph McKay, son of James McKay, Carleton Place Bell Street baker for the position. He rose in his long militia service here from lieutenant of No. 5 Company in the late 1870’s  to lieutenant colonel of his regiment at the turn of the century. The Rifle Ranges at Carleton Place were constructed during Lieut. Colonel McKay’s command and the newspaper said it would be hard to find a more efficient man for the position. A no nonsense man I believe was quoted in the newspaper.

Black Jack Jonathan Randall- Outlander with a little photoshop

So what else did I remember when I read the newspaper article?

I somehow saw Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Mackay who had risen to Major by that point in time looking something like Black Jack Jonathan Randall from the hit TV show Outlander instructing those Carleton Place children with a snap of his crop.

I don’t think there is a “chance in Inverness” that I will ever forget this story now–nor will you.

Tales of the Queen’s Underwear and all those “Accidents”

Why Am I SOOOOOOO Obsessed with History?

Taking Sexy Back with Brothel Bertie aka Edward the VII

Maybe We Should Film Oak Island in Carleton Place? The Day the Money Disappeared

Living In Constant Sorrow in a Lanark Swamp — Soggy Bottom Gal

A Gift for a Teacher 1939 Larry Clark

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A Gift for a Teacher 1939 Larry Clark

I was going thru some of my junk and re-discovered this item. I just now realized that this is possibly a Christmas gift to a teacher. The interesting part is that while this is a not so interesting pattern, the manufacturer was of some importance and would have been fairly expensive to purchase. As you can see this would have been purchased shortly after the start of WWII and to that extent someone (the storeowner, purchaser) loved the bowl but not the fact that it was made in Germany and so obliterated that fact. I have googled both names but drew a blank. I haven’t heard of this practise or seen some such as this before. Perhaps it was a normal practise at the time. The mark is that of Reinhold & Schlegelmilch, Germany with the “Germany” portion covered up.

Larry Clark

Has anyone seen this before??

Thought you might like a better photo! I don’t know what he/she used to print on the plate but it is obviously permanent ink of some kind-no markers in those days?Larry

Reinhold Schlegelmilch was a porcelain manufacturer in SuhlGermany, founded in the 19th century. The factory mark was the initials “RS” in red encircled by a green wreath beneath a red five-pointed star. Reinhold Schlegelmilch had two sons, Arnold Schlegelmilch and Ehrhard Schlegelmilch.

Ehrhard Schlegelmilch operated the factory in Suhl, and during this period, most of the pieces exported to the United States bore the “RS Prussia” mark stamped in red. Arnold Schlegelmilch started a factory in Tillowitz, then Germany (now Tułowice), Poland. In 1910, the Tillowitz factory began using the “RS Germany” mark stamped in green. The Tillowitz factory kept producing porcelain through the Second World War. The company was taken over by the Polish state in 1946 and privatized in 1995 under the name Fabryka Porcelitu Tułowice SA. The production in 2011 concentrated on sanitary and building ceramics including tiles. These two operations produced the majority of their products for export beginning in 1892 until the beginning of World War I.

For almost 100 years, 1869 to 1956, Reinhold Schlegelmilch’s initials, RS, appeared in various marks on fine German porcelain. Probably today’s most desired pieces are those marked RS Prussia. Rare blanks with rare decorations, such as animals or portraits, of RS Prussia can bring $3,000-$8,000. More common floral pieces have routinely sold for $75-$350. Other sought after marks include RS Germany, RS Suhl, and RS Poland.

Due to it’s higher value, the RS Prussia mark has been forged and copied since the late 1960s . New RS Suhl appeared in the early 1990s, and now, in 1998, RS Germany and RS Poland are being reproduced. This article will review the new and forged RS marks and compare them to original markings. It will also look at other ways fakers attempt to enhance or imitate RS porcelain. Read more here click

Leslie China Hall Fire

Gwladys Williams Menzies– Celebrating a Local Girl who Made Good

The Thing about Schools in Carleton Place

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The Thing about Schools in Carleton Place

Among public school inspectors in Lanark County a record of long service was made by F. S. Michell who continued in that capacity from 1880 to 1921.  Near the beginning of his forty years of duty he reported his views and findings on teachers’ prevailing salaries:

“The headmasters of the Public Schools in Carleton Place and Pakenham received the highest salaries paid teachers in this County – $550.  Male teachers salaries of 1884 ranged from $300 to $550, averaging $337.50.  Female teachers received from $150 to $350, the average for 1884 being $193.  Even the princely sum of $550 is but poor inducement for a man to undertake the ordeal of preparation in High, Model and Normal Schools and the harass and responsibility of a large graded school.  While the false economy of cheap teachers is the rule, the work must remain largely in the hands of students and school girls who intend to teach until something better presents itself.”

Twenty-five years later Carleton Place appointed a new public school principal to teach the senior class and supervise the operation of two schools and the work of thirteen other teachers.  The opening salary was $800.  Teachers were: Misses McCallum, Shaw, Burke, Anderson, O’Donnell, Caswell, Sturgeon, Sinclair, McLaren, Fife, Flegg, Morris, Cornell, and Mr. R. J. Robertson, principal.

Public school teachers of 1917 as listed by R. J. Robertson, principal, were Misses V. Leach, H. Cram, Laura Anderson, A. L. Anderson, I. H. Caswell, M. E. Sturgeon, Lizzie McLaren, Kate McNab, S. P. May, M. I. Mullett, C. Mallinson, M. M. McCallum and Mary Cornell. 

An item of juvenile training of this period was the Carleton Place curfew bylaw passed to protect youth or public order from the post-war perils of 1919.  It provided for ringing of a curfew bell at 9 p.m. standard time.  After this hour children under 16 years unless accompanied by a parent or guardian were required by law to remain indoors.

An earlier list of Carleton Place public school teachers available is that of 1890 :  Misses Munro, Nellie Garland, Shaw, Cram, Flegg, Garland, Smitherman, Lowe, Suter, Ferguson, McCallum, Mr. Neil McDonald (who transferred to the high school in 1890), and T. B. Caswell, principal.  Public school principal preceding Mr. Caswell was John A. Goth.  The local school board in 1890 comprised of Robert Bell, chairman; board members, McDonald, Struthers, Taylor, Donald, Begley, Kelly, Wylie, Breckenridge and, until his death in 1890, David Findlay, Sr.  In the same period J. R. Johnston, M.A. (Queens) was high school principal, with D. E. Sheppard, barrister, as assistant.

This is the last grade 13 graduation from the old  Carleton Placer High School 1918
Photo Thelma Dowdall

The story of high schools in Carleton Place is a lengthy one with many interesting sidelights.

The corner stone of the present High School (Prince of Wales High School) was laid in 1923 and under it was placed a scroll containing the following information:

The High School has made many moves since it was started about 75 years ago (about 1848) as a Grammar School. . Mr. Nelson, a highly educated gentleman, was the first teacher.  The first building used was a frame one on the Central School grounds.

The Most Photographed Home in Carleton Place Hurd’s Hall

From there it was moved to Hurd’s Hall on Bell Street, being the upper flat of the building for many years known as McKay’s Bakery.  After that the present Holiness Church on the corner of Bridge and Herriott Streets, was used for a short time.  Then the north-east room in the present Central School was used.

Newman’s Hall Bridge Street

From here it was moved to Newman’s Hall, in the rooms now occupied as temporary quarters for a High and a Public School class.  This school went back again to the Central School building for a short time, until the present used building on High Street was ready for occupation in 1882.

Note: Newman’s Hall is the building now occupied by the Brewers’ Retail Store and the school on High Street is the present Prince of Wales School.

For nearly 30 years the people of Carleton Place were considering the question of better school accommodation, but owing to the exigencies of the times, such as loss of population, removal of industries and expenditures on other public undertakings, small progress was made.

However, with the rapid growth of the rising generation during the past few years, we have become convinced that more school accommodation should be provided.

Early in 1922 it was decided to build a High School.  Messrs. Richards & Abra of Ottawa were selected as architects, a plan was adopted, the estimated cost being placed at $100,000.  A building committee was appointed composed of J. M. Brown, chairman, A. E. Cram, Alfred McNeely and W. J. Muirhead.

On the 12th of June, 1922, the Council submitted the question to the electorate who pronounced in favor of granting the aforesaid sum by a vote of 412 for to 79 against.

The scroll concluded with a list of the contractors.

On January 3, 1924, the present High School was opened at an impressive ceremony.

The history files recount some of the turbulence that accompanied building of schools, including a riot which once decided the place for the town hall.  read-The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place and Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory of the Coming of the Prince of Wales School

Howard M. Brown, who has written countless articles on the early history of the town, records that in the 1870’s came municipal incorporation, the building of a town hall on Edmund Street (now Victoria School) and finally the provision of a High School on High Street. read-Back to School at the Victoria School in Carleton Place 1919

The school was built in 1877 by the Board of Education.  The succeeding administration, supporting objections to its location refused to accept the school and in 1879 began converting the town hall into classrooms.  After public and private litigation and a long and bitter municipal feud the High School was occupied as such.

The town hall settled into service as a combination Public School and village lock-up.

Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory of the Coming of the Prince of Wales School

The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place

The Donneybrooks of Carleton Place-Number 3

Comments About a Picture–Prince of Wales School

And the Walls Came Tumbling Down-Prince of Wales School High Street

Just Beat It! Carnival Riot in Carleton Place at Riverside Park

And the Walls Came Tumbling Down-Prince of Wales School High Street

Before and After in Carleton Place — Be True to your School

What Will 50 Cents Get You at the Prince of Wales School?

More on Springside Hall– Other Owners

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More on Springside Hall– Other Owners
Photo thanks to Jennifer Fenwick Irwin and the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

For a long time we have all know there were other folks that lived in this house beside the Morphys, Crams and Reaburns, but we could not figure out who. Until this morning, thanks to the kindness of Jennifer and the museum. First of all it was The Raeburns not George Ray Burn in the article. Then we find out the other owners were the Morphy’s, Merricks, Johnsons and then the Crams, and finally the Reaburns. I have lived in Springside Hall since 1981.

Thanks Jennifer for adding on more info that was not known.

Moving Doorways– How Houses Change — Springside Hall Then and Now — Finlayson Series

The Hidden Dumbwaiter in Springside Hall –Finlayson Series

The Story of a Local Family -Finlayson- Richard Finlayson

The Case of the Disappearing Back Staircase — Springside Hall — Finlayson Series

A Houseful of Whimsy- Springside Hall 1982

Do You have a Hidden Room in Your Home?

What Did Adam Dowdall Find in My Carleton Place Yard?

The Sundial of Springside Hall

Then and Now Springside Hall 1920s-1930s Photos

Reusing the Past of Carleton Place — The Morphy’s and the McCann’s

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

My Neighbours –Photos of the Cliff- McCann House and Springside Hall

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers — Part 2 — To Hell and Back

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers

Dumbwaiter Calamities of Crockery

While You Were Sleeping —-The Storyland Bunny Moves to the Hi Diddle Day House

31 Herriott Street and other Homes

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31 Herriott Street and other Homes
31 HERRIOTT STREET, Carleton Place, Ontario K7C2A4

Kerry Lynn CrawfordIt was in my family for many years. I even owned it with my father and sister Kelly for a few years after my grandmother Ethel Crawford left it to us in the 1990s. Previous to that, it was the Simpson house, Great-aunt Ethel Simpson (my grand father’s aunt who raised him) and her husband Nelson ran it as as a retirement/care home maybe 1950s or 1960s. I am not sure exactly of the time frame. It always had an apartment upstairs. I recognize the clawfoot tub, curved banister, big front porch and rear view of the condos. There had been a sulkie track where the condos now reside, I would watch a man train his horse at noon and after school

Paul HodginsI remember Wally Crawford lived there. I worked for Wally at Leigh Instruments Awesome boss.That would be in the 80s

Craig WilsonWe rented the upstairs apartment in the late 90’s from an awesome couple Merv and John. They had 4 or 5 Papillon dogs. It’s definitely not a 2 bedroom apartment. Large bedroom and smallish living room. A few fun times were had trying to push the lushes up those stairs after a night at the Queens…

Chris GordonWe lived there from spring ’66 to spring ’67. At that time we had the upstairs apartment (which included the front room downstairs). It was our first home in Canada. IIRC Bob Cox and his family lived downstairs in the back apartment. We had a small garden in the back yard.

Other Herriot Street Homes

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

August 25, 2020  · 84 Herriott Street

Carole FlintNote the roof ladder in the old photo. These were made of folding steel pieces. And ready for common chimney fires! Bill Flint

Karen DormanI lived across the street growing up. Mrs. Clyde Emerson lived there.

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
April 9  · 

It’s Photo Friday!
Larry Clark sent us this cute photo of little Beth Slade, taken about 1940. We were able to pinpoint the location for him. It was taken on Herriott Street, between Thomas and Bridge Streets, looking east. The barn is long gone.
Sara Simpson16 Herriott….This is the house I lived in from 1979-1989/90. I’m pretty sure the tree was planted when I was born (1979). Jody Tubman…..right?

Jody TubmanSara Simpson Yeah, your birth was celebrated with a tree-planting…🙄😂But I think we moved in the Fall of 1988. I remember being almost 16, and complaining that any remote chance at a social life was being yanked from me at 16. Mom also started work at Mike Fair’s earlier that year (which was the reason for moving to Franktown – equal commutes for the parental units)I think I have the bill of sale/mortgage papers for 16 Herriott in a box here.

Stacey McSheffreyHey! That’s my old house too. I hate what they did in the front. They ripped up all my mom’s gardens and took out the covered porch. Too bad–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Herriott Street History — Rachel McRae Joann Voyce

War Time Homes Carleton Place 1946

The Building of the First Town Hall Carleton Place

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The Building of the First Town Hall Carleton Place
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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Dec 1872, Fri  •  Pag

Carleton Place Town Hall. ‘Our thriving neighbour— Carleton Place— is going to build a town hall,  and to cost about $6,000 or $7,000. We understand that our townsman, Mr. Wm. Willoughby, has got the contract, and will begin work as soon as the snow disappears next spring. The new building will be erected on the north side of the river, and in rear o f Mr. Wm. Glover’s property.

Almonte Gazette–Oct 27 1871

The riot in the Town Hall

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Oct 1879, Thu  •  Page 1

Victoria School Museum

267, Edmund Street, Town of Carleton Place, Ontario, K7C, Canada

Formally Recognized: 1978/04/17

The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.
​Erected in 1872, our beautiful stone building served the community of Carleton Place as the Town Hall and lock up until 1879, and then as Victoria School for 90 years until 1969.

The museum is run by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Historical Society with assistance from the Town of Carleton Place and the Township of Beckwith.Opening as the Victoria School Museum in 1985, the name was changed in 2011 to reflect the scope of our collection and our communities.


Carleton Place Town Hall Sued For Cupolas!

Why is the Town Hall Stage Slanted? Is it Collapsing?

Shenanigans of the Monday Night Town Hall Opening

What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall 1897

We Don’t Live in Lanark County — We Live in Hallmark County

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We Don’t Live in Lanark County — We  Live in Hallmark County

Some days I look at Steve and say that I wished we lived in one of those Hallmark movies, or even in the town of *Middleton where Cassie The Good Witch lives. I guess I didn’t realize it until Saturday that I really do live in the midst of Hallmark emotions and sights. If the Hallmark channel folks had come here Saturday, we could have created a whole movie for them. There would be no script needed trust me.

*Wendy Kennedy Middleville was originally named Middleton. Look no further! 😉

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Carleton Place had their Pumpkinfest— To be honest, I have a hard time walking on uneven ground now since my fall so I sent Steve to investigate, and I did see it up closeup and was so happy. Kate Murray, Jessica Hansen & Amanda Blakeley Charania! So well done.. so well done.

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Off to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum for their Vintage Sale today and picked up an old Captain Kangaroo and some other great things. Stay tuned– something coming up on October 27th that you should be aware of. And I got to see their Chamber of Commerce nomination sign today too. Congratulations!!

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We were on our way to Clayton so we stopped for lunch at the North Market Cafe on Mill Street in Almonte. One amazing place and we had the fried green tomatoes and the pekoras and of course their  Nanaimo bars, which the flavour of the week was Pink Peppercorn.

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Fried Green Tomatoes with corn relish and spicy crema

Look at the people we met there. People that do good for our community. Can you name them?

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Then another smile came…

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Then it was off to Rose Mary Sarsfield’s book event today. Rose Mary who also does  the Clayton History Page has been working a long time on this history book and this book can be bought now at the Clayton General Store or email Rose Mary at rose@sarsfield.ca or call 613-621-9300

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Then we had to say adieu to the sunshine, the fall colours and the wonderful people.

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I said to Steve on the way home:

” You know I miss Berkeley a lot, but today I realized this is where I belong”.

As Faith Hill once said: “I don’t want to sound like a Hallmark card, but to be able to wake up each day with food and shelter, that alone is good. Forget aging and the fact that my butt is becoming a little more familiar with my knees than my tailbone. If you are six feet above ground it’s a good day. So, give me more!”

You gave me so much more on Saturday Lanark County– more than I could handle so I had to share. Thank you.

 

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relatedreading

The Seven Wonders of Lanark County

“The Mounties Will Arrest You if You Step on a Trillium”

Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

An “Absolutely Fabulous” White Wedding Day — May 19th!

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An “Absolutely Fabulous” White Wedding Day — May 19th!

I spent 13 hours on Saturday celebrating The Royal Wedding. Am I crazy? Maybe, but I have loved Queen Elizabeth II for over six decades, and she’s made some pretty bad ass moves during that time. She has spearheaded a history-making trip to Ghana, ordered divorces, and even critiqued episodes of Downton Abbey for historical accuracy. But, I figured at my age this was the last time I was going to see a Royal Wedding, so I was going to enjoy each minute of the day. I was in full countdown mode.

Patsy from Absolutely Fabulous: ‘Full countdown mode? ?! I’ll be the judge of that.’

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When I took all my necklaces off at the end of the day it looked like small mice had crawled over my neck LOL- red marks everywhere. The hat that I made was thanks to Martha Stewart Christmas ornaments trim from a Games of Thrones hat and a lot of work. Looks like I lost a rhinestone somewhere LOL

 

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Welcome to the world Elia (eleeia) Angelo Seccaspina– Friday am May 18th around 1 am

 

Four a.m came quickly Saturday morning after celebrating the new arrival of my grandson Elia May 18th. You know what they say–‘life comes in bunches!‘ But, I had chosen my clothes the night before and got dressed while cranking up the volume of the TV to hear mundane tidbits about the upcoming wedding at the crack of dawn.

I walked around in my complete outfit except for my billowing tulle long skirt. I have been taught all my life to make you sure you potty before you go anywhere and did not want to deal with a skirt hanging in the toilet, so this seemed like it was a good idea.

Patsy from Absolutely Fabulous: ‘Darling, if you want to talk bollocks and discover the meaning of life, you’re better off downing a bottle of whiskey. At least that way, you’re unconscious by the time you start to take yourself seriously.’ 

First stop- The Hub’s Royal Wedding Event held at the Civitan Hall in Almonte.

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It was an event well done, and the homemade wedding cakes and photo booth in front of “Buckingham Palace” was genius. Rico Falsetto from Carleton Place was there and working his magic. Who but CBC drops the feed just as Meghan the bride gets out of the  car? LOL The Hub

They created magic and I was so impressed. Well done ladies!

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What a gal!!

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Me and Steve at their wonderful event.

Meanwhile back in Carleton Place

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Sylvia Giles was practising being a bridesmaid while watching The Royal Wedding with a few of the women from St. James Anglican Church.

Second Stop–Under Pressure Cafe in the Carleton Place Mews

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(not their cake but it looked like this)

They were serving Victoria Sponge, Fruit Trifle & New Royal Chocolate Biscuit Cake in honour of the Royal Wedding so I picked up a couple of slices of the Victoria Sponge for Jennifer and Steve. Everything is awesome at the Under Pressure Coffee House!

Third Stop– Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

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Third Stop– Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. Saturday was their opening day of the the “Paddles UP!” exhibit, celebrating the 125th anniversary of the Carleton Place Canoe Club.

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The famous Baldy Welsh

The Carleton Place Canoe Club is the oldest continually operating club in the country and is the only surviving charter member of the Canadian Canoe Association. The club has consistently produced athletes who qualify for the highest levels of competition at the provincial, national and international level. These range from Ontario team members to Canada Summer Games team members, Junior World Championship competitors to Senior National Team members, Pan Am Games to the Olympic Games.

Fourth stop– Lanark & District Museum–Lanark Village

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 They were showing local wedding dresses in honour of the Royal Wedding. If you have not been to the Lanark & District Museum or the Middleville Museum–run don’t walk. A pure joy!! Put it on your summer visiting list! Come on in an see great historical mementos and sit down for a spell and have a chat.

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Fifth Stop– Crossroads Tearoom Royal Wedding Tea 

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Driving really isn’t my friend these days after the heart attacks last year and parking is a nightmare for me. I couldn’t figure out from the sign if I could park in the locale as “only guests and visitors” could park there. #Confusion!

Does that mean I can’t if I am going to a tea there? I took a chance and left a note with a Union Jack flag on top of it. By this time I was getting tired so I threw caution to the wind.

 

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William (Billy) Blais- who plays at Crossroads Tearoom also.

It was a lovely affair — as it always is if you have ever been to Crossroads Tearoom in Perth. If you haven’t– put that on your visit list this summer– you won’t regret it! I had great conversation with complete strangers and learned you can’t call the British flag a Union Jack anymore across the pond. In fact they get downright upset.

Sometime around 1674 the British flag became formally known as the ‘Union Jack’ when mounted on a warship and the ship was not in harbour. At the same time the British flag was referred to as the ‘Union flag’ on land. Brits insist it should called the Union Flag now.  It was the lovely British gals from Merrickville that set me straight– so: mark that one down!

Eddy  from Absolutely Fabulous on the liberal elite: “When somebody deliberately over-educates themselves out of the possibility of useful employment, I take issue.”

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Exhausted and pouring rain outside I walk back to the parking lot to see my car is indeed still there  but– someone has parked right next to it like second skin so I cannot get into the driver’s side of the car. That’s right, with a huge billowing skirt, accessories galore, and that big hat I have to slide into the passenger seat and roll across the transmission to get to the driver’s seat. Please note there are no photos of this “Absolutely Fabulous” moment!

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Friends since the 70s William (Billy) Blais and me at the Crossroads event

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So, to those wee “plucky” granddaughters of mine who want to be a princess. My advice to you now? It seems as though you have to be a stunning gal on a hit TV show, and the next day you are a princess. Maybe I am wrong, but this is how this event happened and I would just stick with Disney for now. Gammy insists my sweet loves!

The Royal Wedding was fun, but now all I want to see is the Burger King marry the Dairy Queen– the definition to eternity.

Patsy from Absolutely Fabulous on her kind of day out: “I thought a little mosey down Bond Street, a little sniff around Gucci, sidle up to Ralph Lauren, pass through Browns and on to Quags for a light lunch.”

Thanks so much to Crossroads tearoom for the lovely prize for my hat. It will be consumed with delight.

It was a nice day for a white wedding and a nice day to start again!”

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

Funniest Memory– Photos Of the Canadian Gazette Museum Collection

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Funniest Memory– Photos Of the Canadian Gazette Museum Collection

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I would like to thank everyone for helping to identify the 1970s photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. We have about 18 photos left, and we have identified over 70% of them thanks to you.

I have seen a lot of funny photos and thanks to you recognized a lot of people from families past, but yesterday I thought this comment was quite the story I would love to hear more about– or maybe not??

The lad on the right was identified was Billy McGregor who lived on McArthur Ave “who put a hole in Kory’s armpit with a couch leg”

Now that is a story that will travel Lanark County for years and be told to generations to come as far as I am concerned!

Anyone want to elaborate on this story– or is it one best kept under lock and key?

Maybe it’s best to bury it in history…

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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Carleton Place Photos 1920s

Old Photos from Carleton Place

Photos of Beckwith Township Fire Dept 1970s

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Photos of Beckwith Township Fire Dept 1970s

 

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All Photos are from the Canadian newspaper files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

 - j ! ' j 15. Cards el Thank GRENON We wish to...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 05 Apr 1972, Wed,
  3. Page 50

 

 

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 - '' . House in Beckwith Is Destroyed by Fire...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 29 Oct 1935, Tue,
  3. Page 16

 

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marina.jpeg

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 22 Jun 1970, Mon,
  3. Page 5

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img.jpeg

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 15 Sep 1969, Mon,
  3. Page 4

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 - V 5 ft ' if 4i m 1 1 To Beckwith Township...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 23 Jan 1975, Thu,
  3. Page 17

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if you can identify any of these firemen let me know..

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historicalnotes

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All Photos are from the Canadian newspaper files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. I do think these two photos from the 70s are from Carleton Place due to the uniforms on them. I could be wrong.

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)relatedreading

Beckwith Fire Department 1965 Names Names Names

The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Help Thy Neighbour in Carleton Place- Ronnie Waugh Fire 1959

News of Butter– Fireman— and Women of Stamina in Carleton Place