Tag Archives: Lanark-County

The Dack’s Jewellery Store Checker Table

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The Dack’s Jewellery Store Checker Table

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Dack Family Checker Table

Hi Linda,

I have my great grandfathers checker table was at the Dack’s Jewellery Store in Carleton Place since they opened. During the depression, the other store owners on Bridge Street would come over and play forever on it. They certainly were selling anything!!! lol!!!

I have it in my garage and have no idea what to do with it. So i thought of you!!! Is this something you would like?

Jane Dack McLaughlin

I almost fell on the floor as anyone who knows me knows I run a historical shelter for all things Lanark County. This table for anyone who is counting is 120 years old. I have given it a home and told Jane’s daughter Ava that if she ever decides she wants to have it just to call and come get it. It is such a family memento and I am eternally grateful to look at each day.

rea

Just a few of my local treasures

Last year Blair White gave me a folk art oil painting that George Raeburn did of his and now my home The Morphy Cram House/ High Diddle Day home. George had given it to Blair a good many years ago. When I pass on I want it to go back to the White family and have Blair’s son Ben look after it until he can pass it on to his children.

 

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The history of this little Queen’s Hotel guy is: it was given to Gail Sheen-Macdonald by her late friend Dennis Miller from the Queen’s. It once belonged to his father Bill Miller and graced the entrance of our beloved Queen’s Hotel when Bill owned the establishment. He used to have a wooden cigarette coming out of his mouth so I improvised, and the beer bottle he used to hold has been changed to a bottle of wine for Gail.

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Sandy Baird gave me the late Carleton Place resident’s Joey Cram’s trunk. I can’t possibly tell you what that did to me emotionally. It’s one thing to write about people– but it’s another to own something that once belonged to that person.

 

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Aunt Eva Dunlop and Victorian Mirror bought from the estate sale at the Dunlop House on Townline

 

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The original Balderson cow in the background.. I called her Baldy Walsh– because her udders swing both way. One must have whimsy…

 

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Dack Family Checker Table

Checkers, or Draughts, are two different names for the same board game. One is more commonly used in England, while the other is most common in America. Curiously, in this case, it is the former colonies of England which uses the older name for this seemingly simple game. By the mid-nineteenth century, tournament-level checkers was played around the world, with the first world championship awarded in 1847. However, during the Regency, draughts was still mostly an amusing pastime which was enjoyed by many people, across all classes.

From what I have heard and read the menfolk of Bridge Street in Carleton Place loved themselves a good checker game.

George Leslie who once owned the Leslie/Comba building on Bridge Street was playing a game of checkers with another local merchant one day. A customer came in and paid 50 cents on his account as you could do that in those days. George, not wanting to be bothered never looked up and told the customer just to leave it on the checker board.

Just as the game was ending Reverend McNair of the Seventh Line Kirk congregation made his daily call  and approached the two gents playing with a big smile. Well that smile soon turned into a frown as George Leslie ending the checker game told his opponent quite emphatically,

“You Lost”!

With that George stood up and put the 50 cents in his pocket. It was said after that the the good reverend never visited the store again.

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Dack Family Checker Table

Thanks again Jane for the table. We are who we are because they were who they were.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

relatedreading

The Dacks and the Mysterious Old Anchor

Losing an Institution- Dacks Jewellers

The Story Behind the Clock – Dack’s Jewellers

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

Carleton Place Folk Art from the Queen’s Hotel –The Millers

I Now have Part of Joey Cram

The Dunlop House — Saturday is the End of an Era in Carleton Place

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

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100 Hands Thrown Out of Work –Lanark Village

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100 Hands Thrown Out of Work –Lanark Village

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Photos-Lanark & District Museum 1917

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Jun 1917, Fri,  Page 2

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Photos-Lanark & District Museum

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Jun 1917, Fri,  Page 8

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Photos-Lanark & District Museum

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Clipped from The Winnipeg Tribune,  09 Sep 1916, Sat,  Page 11

 

 

1917

The Clyde Woolen Mills were completely destroyed by fire last Thursday night. Of the large main building in which all the manufacturing was carried on nothing remains but portions of the massive stone walls and a great” heap of smoking debris. The dye-house was also utterly gutted.

The Superintendent’s house also fell prey to the flames, but the office and shipping room, store houses and a few other outhouses were saved by the excellent and effective work of the firemen. The damage amounts to one hundred thousand dollars, covered by insurance to the extent of fifty-one thousand dollars. The fire originated at about 9.45 p.m. in the boiler house, and was first noticed by Mr. Ben Cardinal, night watchman, on. his return from one’ of his hourly rounds. He had just returned to his waiting quarters in the boiler room and had gone to an adjoining department for a handful of waste with which to wipe the engine. When he came back he saw a small smouldering fire in a wood pile which stands in reserve in the boiler room., Deciding that he could extinguish thfe blaze quite easily with a sprinkling, of water, he went to procure a pailful and found upon his return that the flames had developed out of control, reaching high up the walls and all around the boiler room.

The alarm was given and help quickly at hand, but so sudden and furious had the burning developed that it was impossible to do anything of an effective nature. The mill fire-fighting plant was situated inside the building, near at hand, but the raging flames prevented this being brought into service. In a few minutes devastation had spread east and upwards to the spinning and carding departments and westward to the finishing room. The last room of all to come to ruin was the weaving.

Bursting from their confinement in the interior of the building, the flames passed out and over to the dye house and curled on in the direction of Mr. Grierson’s house. At the rear of the main building are a number of storehouses in which are kept large stocks of wool and other raw material. In line with these stands the picker house, and just south of it the office and ship-‘ ping room, where quantities of valuable finished goods were shelved.

The cloth from the shipping room was all removed to places of safety. Danger to the wool houses was immediate and serious, and as.the firemen had all they could do to hold down the danger at the east and north ends, the chances of cutting off the wool losses seemed remote.

Extra precautionary measures were taken in this direction and all in readiness with men and teams to remove the wool in short order. The arrival of the Perth fire brigade relieved the situation. They had been summoned and made the journey from Perth by means of relays of teams at points along every few miles in one hour and twenty minutes. In the mill itself large quantities of prepared wool were stored and considerable quantities of goods throughout the mill in various stages of manufacture. In the scouring house downstairs a miscellaneous assortment of goods were ready for the machines, and these were not recovered.

Dye stuffs valued at  many thousands of dollars were in stock in the dyehouse and these are part of the important losses, as they were bought in the early stages of the war and had greatly enhanced in value as well as being very difficult to replace. The destruction is so complete that all the order and form and plan of this industry, which was at once. Lanark’s pride and main ’support, has passed back into the elements, and nothing remains but the slag of the ruin.

In the meantime plans have been advanced for recovering as far as possible the break in production. Appleton will take care of the finishing until machinery can be installed in the Perth plant. The Aberdeen mill in Lanark will be doubled up in capacity by overtime. The citizens of Lanark fully realize their loss. The character of the man at the head of the industry which has suffered has impressed itself upon and is reflected in every department of village life. It would be a matter of universal regret were no way found to approach an adjustment and restoration of conditions under the old order of things.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US)

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

 

relatedreading

 

 

 

A Walk through Lanark Village in 1871

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

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Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

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Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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The History of Doors Open Ontario

Every year, Doors Open Ontario attracts large crowds across Ontario. From April to October, residents and visitors are invited to discover first-hand Ontario’s hidden heritage treasures, some of which have never been open to the public.

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Photo– The Grand Hotel

September 16, 2017 – September 17, 2017

Join us for Doors Open Carleton Place!

Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m

Canadian Co-operative Wool Growers Limited

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Carleton Place Town Hall

Masonic Temple

Grand Hotel, The

Hawthorne Mill – South Shore Landing Inc.

Keyes Block Apartments

 

I will be doing a walking tour Saturday 16 (rain date the 17th) beginning at 11 am at the Domino’s Parking Lot. I will stop for 10 minutes at:

Grand Hotel, The

Masonic Temple

Keyes Block Apartments

Carleton Place Town Hall (ending)

So come along for the informational and fun walk and I will stop at these above places for 10 minutes. If you want to stay longer than 10 minutes or even come back and visit them after the tour all good. It’s about about local history and open doors– so come have fun!!

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores.

This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

 

relatedreading

Have You Been to the Keyes Building? Here is Your Chance

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place– Wooly Bully!!!! Part 6

Preserving the Past With Love Without Embalming It — Photos of the Carleton Place Museum 2011

What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall 1897

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Hawthorne Mill–The Early Years– 1874 -1927

Mysteries at the Carleton Place Masonic Lodge

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

 

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Have You Been to the Keyes Building? Here is Your Chance

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Have You Been to the Keyes Building? Here is Your Chance

 

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina- Jennifer Fenwick Irwin and Mark Lovell

 

Have you ever been inside the Keyes building on Bridge Street in Carleton Place? Here is your chance! The upstairs of the Keyes building will be open for Doors Open Ontario on the day of my walking tour , September 16, thanks to owner Mark Lovell  along with other buildings. On my walking tour we will stop, and you will have a chance to go upstairs and see it. Thanks Mark!! Information is at the bottom.

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

 

relatedreading

Under Lock and Keyes- Keyes Building

Sometimes You Need to Just Walk Your Potatoe

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Sometimes You Need to Just Walk Your Potatoe

 

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This photo is probably one of my favourite photos of all time. This little girl is standing directly in front of what is now (was in 1991) Don Drysdale’s store in the village of Lanark, Ontario 

 

I  don’t think I was much older than this week gal when I used to be sent to Bonneau’s grocery store on the corner of Albert and Main Street in Cowansville, Quebec every week. Things were different in those days and communities were safe and most grocery stores looked the same in every village or town. Stores had a human element, and there was nothing you couldn’t buy in the family-run stores. There was always fresh bread, gossip, and the grocery store was arguably one of the most important businesses in town. Each store had a wooden counter that people shared conversation around. The grocer always had a pencil behind his ear, a smile, and quick precision as he wrapped a piece of fresh meat, in brown paper tied with string

The penny candy in the grocery store was always a favourite of mine even though a neighbour informed me that her Grandfather had warned her that such candy could spread polio. In those days everything “caused polio”, but candy was supposed to be the number one culprit. No doubt some mindful parent had began the rumour to keep her children away from the sweets.

My favourite penny candy was a pair of big red wax lips. Every summer day I would sit on the edge of the Cowansville public pool kicking my legs in the water with the wax lips that were slowly melting in the hot sun. If they were not available I would buy the little wax bottles and bite off the top and drink the liquid that was probably heavy on Red #40 food colouring. The bottles were made of edible wax, but all everyone did was chew on them forever and then spit them out after the juice was consumed.

 

Cowansville Swimming Pool -photo thanks to Claudia Allen

Our favourite hang out away from my grandmother’s eyes was Dion’s lumber yard next door to my home on Albert Street. I would go to Mayheu’s corner store and with 10 pennies come out with a paper bag full of potato chips, marshmallow filled mini ice cream cones, wax lips, and Popeye candy cigarettes.

“Smoking” on our candy cigarettes, my friends and I would sit on the top of the piles of lumber and have earth shattering conversations about why I cut my bangs so short like Bette Davis.  I explained that you can’t control everything in  life, but your hair was put on your head to remind you of that.

My mother was in a wheel chair so I was sent every few days to buy things needed for meals. Eggs were not sold in a dozen and one by one they were placed in a small brown paper bags–but I could handle getting those suckers home. Potatoes on the other hand were another matter. They were put into larger bags and usually I brought my sisters baby carriage along as they were too heavy to carry. One day I thought I was too cool for school to bring that carriage and thought I could handle the situation all by myself.

I made it down half a block until my arms began to ache and I began to worry how I was going to get that heavy bag home until I had an idea. Every few steps I threw a potatoe out in the neighbour’s yards and thought my Mother would never notice. Once I got home I only had half a bag left and of course she thought the grocer had made a mistake. Upon calling the grocer he insisted I had left with 10 pounds and could not understand how I got home with 5 pounds, so I had to fess up. After I confessed she laughed and said that everyone on Albert Street was probably having potatoes for lunch. For years the vision of hot mashed potatoes being served to all my neighbours has haunted  me each time I have bought 10 pounds of potatoes. In all honesty I wish I had done things differently but as they say, hindsight is common and as bland as boiled potatoes.



historicalnotes

This wee gal is standing directly in front of what is now (was in 1991) Don Drysdale’s store on the village of Lanark, Ontario across from where Dave Hornell believes the “new” post office is. She’s probably 250′ south of the olde towne hall and the store with the awning (upper right of photo) is on the current site of LCBO store (It was E.C. Pace’s until 1945, then my father’s store until the fire of ’59).

 

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US)

Screenshot 2017-08-15 at 18.jpg

I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

 

relatedreading

 

Hobos, Apple Pie, and the Depression–Tales from 569 South Street

Ashes to Ashes and Spins of the Washing Machine

The Days of Smocking and Spanish Bar Cake

Been Caught Stealing– Bank of Montreal

Angry Mobs, Wolves and Bloodsuckers –Selby Lake

Memories of UFO’s Earthquake Lights and Gale Pond

Misty Glen Mountain Snow Bunny Hop

Music in the 60s- Memories of Herman’s Hermits

Back to The Future — Twisting Your Dignity Away

Groovy Hints on How to Catch and Keep a Boy – 60’s style

The Dreams of a Sugar Plum Fairy

I Was A Free Range Child

Scrapbook Photos of Cowansville

6 Seconds of Cowansville High School – Our Miss Phelps

The Benefits of Having a Large Human Chassis for Traction

Linda and Christmas Cards– and the Lack off–This is Your Christmas Letter:)

 

The Solar Eclipse of 1918

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The Solar Eclipse of 1918

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Photo Linda Seccaspina Berkeley Ca. 2012

 

 

Almonte  June 7 1918

The solar eclipse on Saturday evening was the centre of attraction of all those astronomical and otherwise Inclined- , It was rather cloudy about the time the eclipse was taking place. However, some of the clouds passed and about 7 o’clock a
fairly good glimpse was obtainable. Then the disc of the sun was about two-thirds covered. The eclipse; was not a total one from a Canadian viewpoint and the nearest Canadian point of totality was at Victoria, B.C.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 May 1918, Sat,  Page 18

 

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Clipped from The Salt Lake Herald-Republican,  08 Jul 1918, Mon,  Page 4

 

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Photo Linda Seccaspina Berkeley Ca 2012

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

 

Screenshot 2017-08-15 at 18.jpg

I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

relatedreading

 

The Hysteria and Overbooking of Hayley’s Comet 1910

From January to June–The Year of Earthquakes 1897

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!- Volume 1- Part 2

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The Ghosts of the Mill of Kintail

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They say that the old Mill of Kintail next to the Indian River is haunted.  Dr. Robert Tait McKenzie, one of Canada’s best known doctors and artists, purchased the Baird property and converted the old mill into a summer home for himself and his wife Ethel in 1932. The mill had been abandoned for 100 years when Dr. McKenzie came back in 1930 to visit friends and family where he was born in Ramsay Township.

If you think you are alone in the mill when you visit the art exhibits and the Naismith Museum you would be wrong. It is said that the ghost of his wife Ethel McKenzie has been spotted several times within the mill. Her spirit became disturbed when her old bedroom closet and washroom were renovated and turned into a studio for local area artists.  Paranormal activity will suddenly appear when someone starts renovations on anything. Home renovations could awaken a ghost that has been dormant for years; in many cases the ghost will be that of a former owner who doesn’t want changes made to what they perceive to be their home. In other cases, the ghost will become very excited because the home is being taken care of.

 


Mill of Kintail– Linda Seccaspina

 

A renovation ghost that is unhappy with the work being done may hide and/or move tools and building supplies, knock over ladders, try to scare the workmen to prevent them from doing the work, etc. A ghost that is happy the work is being done may also move tools and supplies, and mistakenly scare the workers. Or, alternatively, they may try to help in some way with the renovations.

In some cases the renovation ghost may not bother the work site at all, but show its pleasure or displeasure in other ways by causing paranormal activity in another part of the house or building. They could be doing this to try to get your attention in order to express their feelings about the renovations.

It seems that there is double trouble at the Mill of Kintail as the surgeon sculptor Tait McKenzie is said to also return at night to guard his old domain. Many times previous owners will come back to the home after death. Normally when this happens a lot of paranormal activity will occur in a building. The ghost could be confused and, in some cases, frustrated because strangers are living in “their” home. This type of ghost may have come back to the house because that’s where they were the happiest– like the Tait McKenzies.

Pack a lunch and explore the mill and the area and fall in love with it all like they did–you will not regret it.

Mill of Kintail Conservation Area– click here

 

historicalnotes

 

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Dr. Robert Tait McKenzie Click here

 

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August 1931

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 Aug 1973, Tue,  Page 61

 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

 

Screenshot 2017-08-15 at 18.jpg

I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

relatedreading

The Mill of Kintail–Running With Scissors From Bears – Again

The Seven Wonders of Lanark County

 

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