Tag Archives: Lanark-County

Next Lanark County Genealogical Society Meeting November 4

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Next Lanark County Genealogical Society Meeting November 4

 

 

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Hosted by Lanark County Genealogical Society

Date/Time
Date(s) November 4, 2017
1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Location
Brunton Community Hall —ADMISSION is FREE

1702 9th Line, corner of Hwy 15 and 9th Line, Blacks Corners, Carleton Place ON.

 

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Guest Speaker – Irene Robillard

Will speak to us on the wealth of genealogical and historical information contained in the “Tweedmuirs of the Women’s Institute in Ontario”, her presentation will also explain how to find and access these collections, both in paper and in digitized format.  Irene is a member of the Women’s Institute and currently the Digitizing Coordinator for Ontario.  She is the author of 3 books on local history in the Ottawa Valley.

Thew Women’s Institute was founded by Adeliade Hunter Hoodless in 1897 after her infant son died from drinking tainted milk.  She vowed that no other families would suffer the same fate and dedicated her life toward the education and development of rural women.

As the Federation Women’s Institutes of Ontario (FWIO) approach its 50th anniversary in 1947, the executive decided part of their celebration should include community histories. In association with Lady Tweedsmuir, the widow of Lord Tweedsmuir (Governor-General 1935 – 1940) the Tweedsmuir History Book project was launched

 

Date/Time
Date(s) November 4, 2017
1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Location

Brunton Community Hall —ADMISSION is FREE

1702 9th Line, corner of Hwy 15 and 9th Line, Blacks Corners, Carleton Place ON.

 

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LANARK COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY CHRISTMAS POT LUCK PARTY

Date/Time
Date(s) – December 9, 2017
12:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Location

Brunton Community Hall —ADMISSION is FREE

1702 9th Line, corner of Hwy 15 and 9th Line, Blacks Corners, Carleton Place ON.

 

Sharing categories of your contribution to the buffet tables including appetizers, main dishes, salads, desserts, non-alcoholic beverages and party goods  Please bring your own cutlery, dinner plate and beverage cup.

Annual General Meeting will follow Pot Luck.  Election for Board of Director Volunteers will take place.

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Back by popular demand,  guest speaker Randy Boswell.
If you missed Randy Bosswell’s presentation earlier this year you really must try to make it to this event.  Randy is an entertaining speaker.  He will be speaking on his historical finds in the old newspaper.  Randy has a wide-ranging career with the Ottawa Citizen and Postmedia News, where he covered city hall, had a business column, wrote a variety of feature stories, served as city editor and developed a national history beat, he became a full-time professor at Carleton University in 2012.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Lanark County Genealogical Society website–click here

 

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Connecting the Bread to Go with Mr. Jelly-Carleton Place Genealogy

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Connecting the Bread to Go with Mr. Jelly-Carleton Place Genealogy

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  02 Aug 1913, Sat,  Page 1

 

The other day I was doing research and came across an unusual name from Carleton Place. The gentleman’s name was either Calvin J. Jelly or Calvin S. Jelly and he was a very talented student from Carleton Place. So being curious, I attempted to put his life together.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 Aug 1913, Mon,  Page 1

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  10 May 1921, Tue,  Page 18

 

 

Calvin Sherwood Jelly was born in Algoma, Ontario, (Elliot Lake area) but because his Uncle Richard Jelly lived in Carleton Place the James Jelly family moved to our  ‘junction town’.

I imagine James moved for work as his brother Richard was a foreman at the Carleton Place C.P. R. yards. James became a roadmaster for the Carleton Place station and the family was listed in the 1901 Carleton Place census. A roadmaster is assigned a territory of track on the railroad to maintain and see that it is kept up to whatever standards the railroad has set forth regarding it.  Calvin Sherwood Jelly was 6 at the time of the 1901 Carleton Place census.

 

1901 Carleton Place (Town), Lanark Census

 

5 6 30 Jelly Calvin 6
5 6 29 Jelly Earnest 12
5 6 27 Jelly Eliza 35
5 6 26 Jelly James 46
5 6 28 Jelly Lloyd 14

 

Calvin S. Jelly went to Carleton Place High School and became a brilliant student as noted in the Ottawa Journal  clippings above in 1913. Later in 1921, after his stint in the service, he resumed his studies and became a chemical engineer in London, Ontario

Canada, Soldiers of the First World War, 1914-1918

Regimental number 1261628
NAME:
Calvin S. Jelly
BIRTH:
Algoma, Algoma Co, Ontario, Canada
RESIDENCE:
Montreal, Canada

 

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*Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum-CPHS possibly taken between 1914-15.

Second Row L to R; Dorothy Findlay, Annie Mullett, Marjorie Taber

Remembering his Carleton Place roots it seems young Marjorie Taber was still on young Calvin Sherwood’s mind. By the looks of the photo above she was a beauty, so how could be not forget her. She was listed on the marriage documents as being 26 and an organist for one of the local churches. Marjorie Taber and Calvin Sherwood Jelly married on Saturday, October 11, 1924 in Carleton Place, Ontario.

 

 

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Stock photo

Wedding Announcement

13232-1924 Calvin Sherwood JELLY, 30, chemical engineer, Algoma Mills Ont., 385 Waterloo St. in London, s/o James JELLY, b. Grenville Co. Ont & Annie LAWRENCE?, married Marjorie TABER, 26, organist, Carleton Place, same, d/o W.W. TABER, b. Lanark Co & Katie BEST, witn: John & Bernice CHAMBERHOUSE of Eganville, 11 Oct 1924 at Carleton Place

 

The last mention I saw was that they were guests at a wedding in 1934 and lived in Toronto at that point, and Mrs. Jelly’s father’s funeral in 1961.

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  17 Sep 1934, Mon,  Page 10

Chamberhouse Wedding

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  25 Mar 1961, Sat,  Page 22

 

 

historicalnotes

Photo information

*Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum-CPHS possibly taken between 1914-15.

Black and white photograph on grey card backing. It appears to be a school picture from CPHS possibly taken between 1914-15. There are very few boys in the class and one is wearing a military uniform. The photograph was taken by Hammond of Carleton Place.The names listed on the back are:

Front Row L to R; Ethel Weir, Mary McFadden, Millicent Lusher, Elsie Williams, Mary Hill, Bessie McCallum, Wilena McRorie.

Second Row L to R; Dorothy Findlay, Annie Mullett, Marjorie Taber, Irene Lusher, Helen Findlay, Jean Craig, Helen Mullet, Norma Weeks, Gladys Paul.

Third Row L to R; Janet Wilson, Jessie McTavish, Hazel Robertson, Blanche McKim, Alma Hammond, Priscilla McNeely (Form Teacher), Irene Campbell, Millie McIntyre, Jean McLaren, Bulah Leach.

Fourth Row L to R; MacFarlane Neilson, Fraser McDougall, Barnet Armstrong, Orval Gorm, Bill Cram, Joe Corkery, Ernest Hammond.

 

authorsnote)

When I do research every single day if I can’t get rid of the skeletons I might as well make them dance.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Muirhead Gillies and the Boxes Are All Related–Genealogy and Photos

Photos of Austin Bain Gillies— Gillies Family Genealogy

The Sinclair Family Cemetery–Photos by Lawrie Sweet with Sinclair Genealogy Notes

Trodden Wright Genealogy

 

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Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

October 28th The Occomores Valley Grante and Tile Event–730pm-1am Carleton Place arena-Stop by and pick up your tickets for our fundraiser dance for LAWS. They also have tickets for Hometown Hearts event at the Grand Hotel fundraiser

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Home Economic Winners Lanark County Names Names Names– Drummond Centre

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Home Economic Winners Lanark County Names Names Names– Drummond Centre

 

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DCI GIRLS JR. BASKETBALL TEAM 1958 – LANARK COUNTY FINALISTS

Front row, left to right; Martha Church, Pat Stewart, Jackie Mast, June Greer, Beth McPhail, Barb Philips, Barb Saunders. Back row, left to right; Mr. Youngs (principal), Helen Enis, Marilyn Barber, Ivy Moore, Norma Devlin, Eleanor Erwin, Lois McConnell, Mrs. Biewarld (coach).

 

I put this photo here as it was impossible to come up with the 1929 gals and I just loved this photo

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  02 Aug 1929, Fri,  Page 20

 

 

The following is excerpted from an actual 1950’s high school Home Economics textbook:

ADVANCE: How to be a Good Wife

HAVE DINNER READY: Plan ahead, even the night before, to have a delicious meal–on time. This is a way to let him know that you have been thinking about him and are concerned with his needs. Most men are hungry when they come home, and having a good meal ready is part of the warm welcome that is needed.

PREPARE YOURSELF: Take fifteen minutes to rest so that you will be refreshed when he arrives. He has just been with a lot of work-weary people. Be a little gay and a little more interesting. His boring day may need a lift. Greet him with a smile.

CLEAR AWAY THE CLUTTER: Make one last trip though the main part of the house just before your husband arrives, gathering up children’s books and toys, papers, etc. Then run a dust cloth over the tables. Your husband will feel he has reached a haven of rest and order, and it will give you lift too.

PREPARE THE CHILDREN: If they are small, wash their hands and faces and comb their hair. They are his little treasures and he would like to see them playing the part.

MINIMIZE ALL NOISE: At the time of his arrival, eliminate all noise from the washer, dryer, or vacuum. Encourage the children to be quiet.

SOME “DO NOT’S”: Don’t greet him with problems and complaints. Don’t complain if he is late for dinner. Count this as a minor problem compared to what he might have gone through that day.

MAKE HIM COMFORTABLE: Have a cool or warm drink ready for him. Have him lean back in a comfortable chair or suggest that he lie down in the bedroom. Arrange his pillow and offer to take off his shoes. Speak in a low, soothing voice. Allow him to relax and unwind.

LISTEN TO HIM: You may have a dozen things to tell him, but the moment of his arrival is not the time. Let him talk first.

MAKE THE EVENING HIS: Never complain if he doesn’t take you to dinner or to other entertainment. Instead, try to understand his world of strain and pressure and his need to unwind and relax.

THE GOAL: TO MAKE YOUR HOME A PLACE OF PEACE AND ORDER WHERE YOUR HUSBAND CAN RELAX IN BODY AND SPIRIT.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

Sunday Morning Breakfast Movie —High School Girls in Trouble —1955

Sunday Breakfast Movie—The Trouble With Women- 1947

Sunday Morning Breakfast Movie -Darn Barbara, Why Can’t You be More like Helen?

Sunday Morning Breakfast Movie

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Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

October 28th The Occomores Valley Grante and Tile Event–730pm-1am Carleton Place arena-Stop by and pick up your tickets for our fundraiser dance for LAWS. They also have tickets for Hometown Hearts event at the Grand Hotel fundraiser

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Carleton Place 1913- A Fire in the China Shop and…

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Carleton Place 1913- A Fire in the China Shop and…

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November 3 1913–Almonte Gazette

It was thought that this fire occurred in 1915 but it was 1913 as I found out yesterday. The china shop was located in the same location Kiddytown was.

 

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November 1913–Almonte Gazette Carleton Place news

Chief Wilson has telephoned to the surrounding towns for a piano tuner who rented a horse and rig a few days ago in Carleton Place and has since failed to return. The animal is a small black mare and was attached to a top buggy.

An Indian arrow head of copper was unearthed by the water works excavators
at the corner of Victoria and Allan streets a few days ago, and is now on exhibition in Dr. McIntosh’s drug store window.

Mr. W.S. Healey, specialist in motor  mechanism, packed up his household effects on Tuesday and moved to Stittsville, a mile and a half from which he has discovered a
grotto in a spruce and balsam woods, where he has erected a little cabin.
There, all alone, he will put in the winter in the hope of curing a deeper seated case of asthma from which he has been a sufferer for some years. He hopes to emerge- in the spring with a recast breathing apparatus, and resume his work in Carleton Place.

Mr. Richard Finners started out this morning on his regular rounds for Mr. Stevens, in apparently good health. He delivered goods at Mr. William Moffatt’s and on the way to
his rig passed some jocular remarks with Mr. R. Dowdall; then stood and watched the engine and spoke with the engineer, Mr. Playfair, when he suddenly lurched forward and fell on his face. Mr. Playfair hastily summoned Dr. McIntosh, but before he arrived
life was extinct. The body was conveyed to Patterson Bros. parlors. Deceased was about twenty-six years of age and was married but a short time ago.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Mar 1913, Mon,  Page 1

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  05 Feb 1913, Wed,  Page 3

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Jun 1913, Fri,  Page 1

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  05 Feb 1913, Wed,  Page 3

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  28 Jul 1913, Mon,  Page 1

 

historicalnotes

This building started out as Leslie’s China Store and was operated by Mrs. Leslie circa 1890.  There was a fire in 1913 but later R.R. Powell operated a grocery at this site. The first of two Powell Grocery locations opened and  chose the Leslie Building, next to Comba’s furniture store.

Mr. Powell was the Sunday School Superintendent and he had three main interests in life: his business, his family, and the Methodist Church (Zion Memorial), which he attended regularly and was a lay preacher. It was a family run store and each helped in the store and he also employed Roy Whyte of Lake Ave East as a delivery boy. The oldest girl was Gladys. (Mrs. John Lashley and her sister Olive was a very popular CPHS teacher) Fern worked as a civil servant and Bert went to college and never returned to Carleton Place. Read more at:  Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

The Winners of The Lanark Fair 1913

It’s Your Balderson News 1913

Just Like Internet Dating?— Circa 1913

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Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

October 28th The Occomores Valley Grante and Tile Event–730pm-1am Carleton Place arena-Stop by and pick up your tickets for our fundraiser dance for LAWS. They also have tickets for Hometown Hearts event at the Grand Hotel fundraiser

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Paradise in Hopetown

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Paradise in Hopetown

 

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Photo from1973

 

Deep in Lanark County, in the township of Darling, Pollock and Dora McDougall’s rose garden was the talk of the area. Located a hop, skip , and a jump near Wilson’s Corners 100’s of tourists used to visit this rose garden each year.

Local history dictates that owner Pollock McDougall was born right on this property which was originally a crown grant to original settler Ned Conroy that are buried in the family plot on the farm. Pollock’s Dad bought the property in 1886 and it consisted of over 100 acres.

In 1893 the family was stricken with Diphtheria that was being going around Lanark County and a child was lost. William McDougall saw fit to burn down the original home down after that. After exorcising the evil spirits he thought caused the Diphtheria he built a large new clapboard home and painted it yellow. In 1921 Pollock raised a band new home for his new bride Dora White of Poland, Ontario.

Stories are abound about this area and how settlers walked all that way  from Perth with their meagre belongings strapped to their back. There were three main families who settled in this are first: the Conroys, Eastons, and Shields. When the McDougalls retired from farming that was when their first cluster of Red Wonder Roses were planted and they never looked back.

In 1973 there were 415 rose bushes and he decided to specialize in Peace Roses and all were said to be of exhibition quality. There was no doubt that Pollock was proud of his roses and boasted about how many tourists from ‘out of the country’ they used to get. With his still Scottish “burr” it was assumed that there was never anything more impressive than a Scotsman and his roses as he would never be bothered by your thorns no matter what your temperament was.

authorsnote)

No matter how hard I looked I could not find any recent photos of this home or any more information. Can anyone add to this? Thank you!

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 Sep 1922, Thu,  Page 17

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  28 Mar 1950, Tue,  Page 24

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  17 Dec 1932, Sat,  Page 4

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Oct 1950, Mon,  Page 3

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Aug 1980, Thu,  Final Edition,  Page 3

 

Taylor Lake is a small lake connected to Clayton Lake. To get there, go west from Union Hall (junction of County Roads 9&16) three kms to Lanark Conc. 12. Turn north to the end of this road (about 11/2 km) to the end of the road at the lake. Launch your canoe at the small boat launch and circumnavigate the lake. Watch out for stumps in the bays. This lake was raised considerably two decades ago, with the reconstruction of the dam at Clayton. On the first point to your left as you launch, you can see a path of downed, dead trees, which were felled by a tornado a few years ago. Directly in a line across the lake from the boat launch is a road leaving the shore. Connecting these two points was a famous floating bridge. It was wiped out by hurricane Connie in 1964 and many of the logs can be seen on the bottom on the lake. There are several places to stop to have lunch (with permission of property owners).

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

 

Slander You Say in Hopetown? Divorce in Rosetta?

Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

 

Honey and the Andersons of Hopetown

 

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Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

October 28th The Occomores Valley Grante and Tile Event–730pm-1am Carleton Place arena-Stop by and pick up your tickets for our fundraiser dance for LAWS. They also have tickets for Hometown Hearts event at the Grand Hotel fundraiser

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Looking for Information– Nichols Family History

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Looking for Information– Nichols Family History

 

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Photo from the John Armour photo collection

John Armour–This is a picture of Abner Nichols, (very early 1900’s) from my late Grandfather Walter Armour’s collection. Abner Nichols married Eliza McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation James McNeely). My Great Grandfather, Robert Armour married Jessie McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation McNeely, Thomas Moore)

 

 

Hi Linda,

I was on line and reading some of your stories about early life in Carleton Place.. really enjoyed them and found them very interesting. I have connections to Carleton Place as follows:
My Great Great Grandfather was Abner Nichols – 1836-1905
My Great Grandfather William Abner 1870-1933
My Grandmother Eliza May Nichols 1895-1932 who was my fathers mother ( she married George Albert Clark 1878-1949)
My father son of Eliza and George – George Clark is 91  now he has a lot of stories about Carleton Place and a great memory. I took him to the Carleton Place Museum and he was very pleased to see the exhibit about the Nichols Lumber Mill. He spent a lot of time in Carleton Place as a young boy and would take the train from Ottawa.
My Name is Mandy Clark.
The reason for this email is that I am working on the Nichols family history but have run into trouble going back any farther than Anber Nichols. I do not seem to be able to find any record of his (Abner’s)  parents and was wondering if you knew the information or have ideas about where I can find it.
I am on ancestry.ca but have found nothing.
Thanks for any information you may have,
Sincerely,
Mandy Clark
I told Mandy to contact the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum to see if Jennifer had anything– but do any of you out there in cyber land have any info?
authorsnote).png
I found a few things below with the first  newspaper article and it contains quite a bit of information. Abner was actually born in Kemptville to American parents and lived for 10 years of his early life in the United States.
historicalnotes
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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  19 Nov 1930, Wed,  Page 7

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Sep 1906, Mon,  Page 4

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Sep 1906, Mon,  Page 4

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Jan 1898, Fri,  Page 7

 

One of the most reliable place to find the names of the parents of an individual is in the marriage record. Insofar as Abner’s marriage was prior to civil registration of marriages in Ontario (1869-present), the place to look is in the church records of the faith in which the marriage was performed.
To determine the likely faith of Abner, I checked his son William’s marriage (in civil registration records) to see what faith he was at the time of his marriage. The result is Church of England which is the Anglican Church… that leaves the potential that Abner was also Anglican.
If that is the case, Abner’s church marriage record will be at the archives of the Anglican Diocese in Ottawa. The archive is at Christ Church Cathedral. They do church register look ups for a small fee that is used to keep the archives public.
It s very likely that, if the marriage was Anglican, that the record will contain the names of Abner’s and his bride’s parents.
The archivist’s name is Glenn Lockwood. You can reach them at: http://www.ottawa.anglican.ca/Archives.html
Hope this helps more than confuses 🙂
Rick Roberts

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

The World of William Abner Nichols

An Amusing Abner Nichols and His Boat

Before and After at Centennial Park

Splinters of Sinders Nichols and Brides

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

 

 

relatedreading

Searching for Information: J.A. Stevenson and Robert and Jane Ross of Lanark

 

 

 

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Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

October 28th The Occomores Valley Grante and Tile Event–730pm-1am Carleton Place arena-Stop by and pick up your tickets for our fundraiser dance for LAWS. They also have tickets for Hometown Hearts event at the Grand Hotel fundraiser

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Lost Souls –Herron’s Mills

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Lost Souls –Herron’s Mills

 

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What once was at Herron’s Mills. Photo taken at Middleville & District Museum 

Herron’s Mills, originally known as Gillies Mills, is a ghost town in the municipality of Lanark Highlands, Lanark County in Eastern Ontario, Canada, near the community of Lanark.

Image may contain: sky, house, cloud, outdoor and nature

That same road in all its splendour in the oil painting looked like this years ago when I used to go travel there with my kids. The little yellow house fell apart and they tore it down and we used to call it the Ghost House.

This is one of the old houses that used to make up the village of Herron’s Mills. This house and out the buildings have since been torn down and it is unknown who lived there, except that possibly people who once worked in the Herron Mills Woollen Factory. across the road.

I like old buildings, and wish they would stay up forever. Each time I see an old structure get torn down, I always feel sad inside as I feel they are getting rid of the history of the area.

I don’t understand why a lot of people don’t feel the same way I do about older buildings, or why kids today buy Ikea branded items instead of antiques. There is no doubt that the older buildings and family homes have a soul. Walk inside and you can feel the change in the atmosphere, like you’re stepping back in time and leaving the modern world behind.

I believe that when people die a part of their energy is imprinted in houses or on personal belongings. John Gillies, from the House of Gillies, as I call them had to make a decision and sell his most cherished holdings which was Gillies Mills on May 18th, 1871 and henceforth after it was called Herron’s Mills. I have no idea how he did that and as I write this utter grief fills me. There is something about a place that was once busy but has since been vacant and I know much of what is weighing me down right now is not mine to carry. But as Winston Churchhill said: “We shape our buildings therefore they shape us.”

Herron’s Mills, having now almost entirely disappeared save for a couple original buildings, was once one of the more flourishing industrial centres of this area. Though some remnants of the former village can still be found, almost all traces of this once bustling location have been lost to time

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 May 1943, Sat,  Page 18

 

 

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It was 1821 and 10-year-old John Gillies found himself aboard the David of London along with his parents, James and Helen. Their ship was making its way from Greenock, Scotland to Quebec, Canada. Three of the 364 Scottish passengers died during the trip, while another four were born. The passengers had paid their own way to Canada to become part of the Canadian government’s immigration plan which offered immigrants 100 acres of land and free transportation to it from Quebec City.

Fourty days later, the Gillies had made it by boat, foot and cart, to New Lanark. There, John Gillies learned how to clear the land and build a home as his family began building their future in Canada.

By 1840, John Gillies had a plan. He obtained his own land plot near the Clyde River and 100 adjoining acres. It was here that he and his wife Mary built a home and sawmill. Some say that he travelled the 55 miles from Brockville to Lanark with the 90-pound saw on his back.

Gillies dammed the water to allow for enough flow to power his saw. He would sell his lumber for anywhere from $6 to $12 per 1000 feet. His site grew to include a grist and oat mills. On the other side of the river he built a carding mill to process sheeps wool.

Gillies bought a large circular saw and took contracts to cut lumber. One such contract was to supply 3″ thick wood to be used in the construction of the Plank Road between Perth, Balderson and Lanark. He would later claim that he was not paid for this contract.

In 1861 he built a large home for himself and his family which by now counted nine children.

It was about this time that John Gillies had to deal with an inevitable problem. He had cut most of the pine trees from the area and required a new supply for his mill. He had to bring in lumber from other forests. Gillies decided to buy the Gilmour Mill located in Carleton Place and in 1864, Gillies Mill went up for sale.

Gillies eventually sold the mill in 1871 to brothers James and John Herron who purchased 104 acres of land and the mill. They established a company named the J & J Herron Company and the site soon became known as Herron’s Mills. A stone bakehouse was added and used to bake unhulled oats or unshelled peas. From there they were bagged and then ground into grade to be used in oatmeal and pea brose (a Scottish dish).

The mill grew to include barns and stables, homes for the workers and John Munroe’s tannery. For the worker’s children, a school was constructed. Teachers would be given board with local families as part of their payment.

James Herron opened a post office in 1891 that was located in their home. It continued to operate until 1915.

At its peak, Herron’s Mill was producing over 8000 feet of lumber per day. In 1919 the brothers passed ownership of the mill down to James’ son, Alexander. When Alexander died in 1946, his sister Mary continued to run the mill for five more years. By 1951 the mill sat in silence.

One small building remains, the mill has lost the roof and one wall but still stands with some of the original machinery inside. A couple of collapsed buildings remain as well. I never did find the old home pictured on the cover of Ghost Towns of Ontario, volume 2. Perhaps the most fascinating part was the stone bridge which was built over the Clyde River. The water still continues to flow underneath it.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Aug 1980, Thu,  Final Edition,  Page 3

 

 

 

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Photo taken at Middleville & District Museum 

 

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J. Herron’s home at Herron’s Mills, Mrs. David Gillies in black skirt. ca. 1912. Item. 
Copied container number: PA-059347.

 

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John Gillies Sr. Home at Herron Mills  PA 1912-Copied container number: PA-059347

 

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Photo taken at Middleville & District Museum 

 

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The broken bridge and remainder of a mill at Herron’s Mills.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  26 Nov 1954, Fri,  Page 41

 

 

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Photo taken at Middleville & District Museum 

 

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Photo taken at Middleville & District Museum 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 Nov 1969, Fri,  Page 46

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  17 Jul 1979, Tue,  [First] Revision,  Page 3

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

 

Burning Down the House — Literally in Lanark County

The Gillies Home in the Ghost Town of Herron’s Mills

 

Visiting the Neighbours — Middleville Ontario and Down the 511

The Ghost Towns of Eastern Ontario

Photographer Finds Money in a Local Abandoned Home

 

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Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

October 28th The Occomores Valley Grante and Tile Event–730pm-1am Carleton Place arena-Stop by and pick up your tickets for our fundraiser dance for LAWS. They also have tickets for Hometown Hearts event at the Grand Hotel fundraiser

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