Tag Archives: Lanark-County

Appleton–Memories of Arthur Robinson –The Federated Women’s Institutes of Eastern Ontario

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Appleton–Memories of Arthur Robinson –The Federated Women’s Institutes of Eastern Ontario

Also read-Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

Appleton General Store – Names Names Names— Wesley West Appleton and Almonte Merchant

The Appleton General Store and Polly Parrot

Hot off the Press –Old Appleton Post Office & General Store –Sarah More

Snippets– James Wilson and Nelson Syme — Appleton

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Anyone Know About This? Via Dolorosa

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Anyone Know About This? Via Dolorosa

Thank you for not trespassing.

If you read some of Daniel Keating’s rules on Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley

Trespassing is not considered appropriate. It is understood that if we are alerted by a property owner about an area that is owned by them that we will remove your post.We must keep the integrity of the location intact for those that wish to view later.7. Absolutely no vandalism or theft from properties is condoned. Please keep these beautifully abandoned properties in their slowly decaying state.

Linda,

You don’t know me but I follow your posts in the various groups. I live in Beckwith Township and often take rides around the neighborhood. On one such ride I saw this on the side of the road on an old fence. It is located on the Brunton Side Rd. further along where the Beckwith /Montague border is. There is a farm opposite side with a large wooden gateway with a skull and some other stuff (also cool Lol)

Just wondering if you could shed some light on the significance of it relating to the area it is located. I took the photo of the Cross several yrs ago and a friend of mine recently jumped the fence and took the second photo. He did not want to venture any further inside the property as he was alone and probably trespassing. We know it’s religious significance just curious who owns the site etc etc. Any help solving this mystery would be much appreciated. Thanks.

Can anyone help?

The Via Dolorosa (Latin for “Sorrowful Way”, often translated “Way of Suffering”; Hebrew: ויה דולורוזה; Arabic: طريق الآلام‎) is a processional route in the Old City of Jerusalem. It represents the path that Jesus would have taken, forced by the Roman soldiers, on the way to his crucifixion. The winding route from the former Antonia Fortress to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre — a distance of about 600 metres (2,000 feet)— is a celebrated place of Christian pilgrimage. The current route has been established since the 18th century, replacing various earlier versions. It is today marked by nine Stations of the Cross; there have been fourteen stations since the late 15th century, with the remaining five stations being inside the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Wikipedia click here

I assume this is a nature walk for the stations of the cross.. I hope someone knows something about it.But please respect it and keep it safe.

Linda

Have you Ever Seen the Praying Station? The Buchanan Scrapbooks

The Mysterious 5th Line ?????

The Spirit of the 7th Line

Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

The Gnarled Beckwith Oak

So Where is that Gnarled Oak in Beckwith?

Lock Up Your Dogs — Devlin’s Cat Has Rabies 1929

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Lock Up Your Dogs — Devlin’s Cat Has Rabies 1929

November 1929

During the past week says the Carleton Place Herald, a cat belonging to Mr. W. Devlin scratched a couple of the children, a very unusual thing with the pet animal. A day or two later the cat again showed ill-will to the family by biting Mrs. Devlin on the hand. The scratches on the children healed naturally but the bite became alarming and a physician was called.

The history was to prove that the cat had been bitten by a dog some5 days previous. The cat was destroyed and the animal sent to Ottawa for examination when it was found to be a pronounced case of rabies. Those affected are progressing favorably and no serious results are expected. In the meantime the authorities have taken all precautionary measures to stamp out the trouble, and all dogs are ordered to be tied up in the meantime.

In 1911, Philadelphia drug company H. K. Mulford announced a new rabies treatment kit that could be shipped directly to doctors and was simple enough that “physicians who have had no previous experience may successfully apply it.” The kit is a reminder that even the best medicine is of no consequence if it is not available and affordable.

The treatment consisted of 25 injections of rabies vaccine: three on the first day, two on the second, two on the third, and one each day after for 18 days. Each dose was slightly stronger, or more virulent, than the preceding, so that the body could build up immunity. Because the vaccine had to be “fresh” to be effective it could not be stocked by druggists. Subsequent daily doses were shipped directly from Philadelphia in a special Caloris vacuum bottle (not unlike your coffee thermos).

Today the post-exposure treatment for rabies consists of four doses of vaccine given over a two-week period. The injections are usually given in the upper arm.

The museum’s rabies vaccine kit, from the early 1920s, contains the following: three ampules of rabies vaccine, doses one, two, and three; 26 syringes with physiological salt solution; 26 needles for the syringes; two metal piston rods and two metal finger rests for the syringes; one two-dram vial of tincture of iodine; two charts for recording cases; one letter of general instructions; two stamped return envelopes; one record-of-treatment blank; and one vial of sterile wires. The treatment at this time had been reduced to only 21 doses to be administered one a day for 21 days, and the Caloris vacuum bottle was replaced with a cardboard mailing tube.

1881 Census before he was married and he worked at a sawmill. His father’s name was Charles so he went by William

DetailSource

Name:Chas W Devlin
Gender:Male
Marital Status:Single
Age:23
Birth Year:abt 1868
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1891
Residence Place:Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Relation to Head:Son
Religion:e c
Occupation:Saw Mill Hand
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
French Canadian:No
Father’s Name:James Devlin
Father’s Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Name:Eliza J Devlin
Mother’s Birth Place:Ontario
Division Number:

1911 Census William worked at Findlay’s

Name:Chas W Devlin
Gender:Male
Race:White
Racial or Tribal Origin:English
Nationality:Canadian
Marital status:Married
Age:33
Birth Date:5 Jan 1868
Birth Place:Ontario
Relation to Head of House:Head
Religion:Church of England
Occupation:Foundry Laborer
Hourly Wage:400
Working at Trade in Factory or in Home:F
Months Employed at Trade in Factory:10
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
Can Speak English:Yes
Province:Ontario
District:Lanark (South/Sud)
District Number:81
Sub-District:Carleton Place (Town/Ville)
Sub-District Number:2
Family Number:49
Neighbors:View others on page
Household Members:NameAgeCharles Devlin33Florence Devlin32Verna W Devlin6Lloyd E. Devlin4

Save

Related reading

Eva L. Devlin Pilot Crashed at Perth Fair

The Devlins and Weldon Armour– Ray Paquette

Dishing up the Memories of The Devlins

What was Puking Fever? Child Bed Fever?  

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

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Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

Last week I wrote about Minnie Dunlop who used to run Darou’s Bakery on the corner of Emily and Bridge Street in Carleton Place. If you had no idea like I and some of the family did: Minnie not only baked her heart out, and ran that part of town like she was in charge, but she was also married to a former mayor from Carleton Place, Andrew Earl Dunlop.

Today, one of the family, Doug Caldwell called me and we had a lovely chat about the town of Carleton Place. He remembers the pool hall really wasn’t the place and Minnie often hauled her son Murray home by the ear after rescuing them from the evils of pool-playing. Oh the horrors! She was a no nonsense woman who believed in the theory that sliced bread was here to stay and purchased one of the first bread sliceing machines to stay ahead of the competition. Doug remembers her telling him to grab a stool and show Carleton Place how its done slicing the bread. He said he was pretty proud doing that job.

Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum- read-In Memory of Mike Moldowan — The Man Behind the Fries

But Doug not only helped Murray, he helped Mike Muldowan at the chip wagon and when he got there early in the morning Mike would give him a large pail of potatoes to peel. I asked him if he ate his weight in chips for payment. He said, “You know I would have, but I remember getting silver coins, Mike never paid in paper!”

His mother Edna Florence Caldwell, was a hairdresser on Bridge Street and his grandmother, Mrs. Jamieson played the organ at St. James Anglican Church, and his two aunts sang in the choir. He also remembers the horse stables in the back of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church. The farmers came to church with their teams and sleighs and it was quite the sight as they parked. When they left they had to unharness everything and regroup, and mumbled and grumbled. But that was not the only place they mumbled in grumbled at St. Andrew’s. In the days that Captain Hooper’s house Raloo Cottage was going to be torn down the citizens of Carleton Place were not happy. Not happy at all! So I asked him,”Did they protest?” He said they protested the way they always did– complaining in front of the churches on Sunday!”

Photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–Around 1950 the southeast corner of Lake Avenue and Moore Streets looked like this. Originally the site of W.A. Nichols’ Sons Lumber, it became W & S Building Supplies around 1948

He also remembers every year the gypsies–(2021 word Romani) and would set up shop on the corner of Lake and Beckwith near where Nichols Planing Mill was. He said it was quite the event as in those days the stream behind it was quite larger than it is today.

So they mumbled and grumbled about the Levine building across the street, and they muttered about the new Fleming Funeral Parlour opening up on Lake Ave West. Because, that’s the way things were done. His grandfather, Will Jaimeson was a CPR railroad man and he did the Ottawa Brockville run which was a very prestigious run in those days.

Doug remembers being put on top of one of the L carts and having his Grandfather perform a steam show so to speak. His grandfather would holler to start shovelling the coal really fast and once the steam would get up to speed it was a sight to see. So he ran the smaller wheels and then the bigger wheels to show his grandson how much power that Locomotive had. Meanwhile the coal man wasn’t too happy and he would tell young Doug that his grandfather was showing off just because he showed up.

In the end everyone moved away after the war so the family could seek better fortunes, and on October 30th, 2021, the families are all reuniting once again at the Gastro Pub in Carleton Place for a salute to the “Jamieson Daughters”. It’s time for the family to reunite, celebrate and time for the younger generations to know their history. Family reunions are the place where you remember where you came from.

Thanks Doug for the stories!

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

The Almonte Gazette in Manitoba

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How the Almonte Gazette was for many years the only link between certain pioneer settlers of Manitoba and the outside- world, is told by Mr. James McKelvey, who with his wife has been visiting relatives in this district before leaving on a trip to the old land.

Mr. McKelvey tells how the Gazette was the only newspaper which came into their district in these early days. His father was a faithful subscriber and a warm friend of the late Hon. W William Templeman. When the McKelvey family had faithfully perused the contents of the Gazette’s weekly budget of news it was passed on to the nearest neighbor. 

A stream flowed between the two farms, and the neighbour was always on the alert for the first sign that the Gazette had fulfilled its mission on the McKelvey homestead. The creek could not always be forded and there was no boat so the McKelveys used to wrap the newspaper around a stone and fling it across the stream. Neighbor after neighbor read it for miles around and at the end it was so worn that the print was scarcely decipherable. 

‘The district correspondence which appealed to the McKelvey family most was the Middleville news written over half a century ago, as it is now, by Mr. Archie Rankin. It was a strong link which bound them to their old home. Mr. McKelvey  spoke affectionately of the message of cheer and friendship which the Gazette brought, to those people who in earlier days had gone forth to make a home for themselves in the wilderness. 

It is doing the same today, in far places and every little scrap of news about the old home and the old friends and the old associations is eagerly read. Mr. McKelvey is a cousin of Mr. Robert Stead, the novelist, and on his visit here he was accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Stead.

November 1930

Related reading

OFF TO MANITOBA 1879– Local Lads Names

When Crops Failed — Lanark County Went Manitoba Dreamin’

John Neilson – Neilson Family – Chocolate Genealogy

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John Neilson – Neilson Family – Chocolate Genealogy

Name:John Neilson[John F. Neilson]
Gender:Male
Age:78
Birth Date:abt 1850
Birth Place:Ramsay, Ontario
Death Date:4 Nov 1928
Death Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Cause of Death:Stroke Cerebral Hemorrhage With Fanlysie

928, Friday November 9, The Almonte Gazette front page
John Neilson Passes After A Brief Illness
Was One of the Outstanding Citizens of Almonte for Many Years
Was Born on the Pioneer Homestead of the Neilsons in Ramsay.
He was 78 Years of Age. His Wife Died 22 Years Ago.


Almonte has lost a valued and honoured citizen, in the death of Mr John Neilson, who passed away on Sunday evening. His death was a great shock to the town and district, for he had been ill only a few days. Mr Neilson was one of the outstanding citizens of the town, and was held in the highest esteem by a very large circle of friends, both in town and throughout the surrounding district. He was the son of the late Mr and Mrs James Neilson and was in his 79th year. Born in March 1850, in the old pioneer homestead on the 12th line Ramsay, where his grandfather, John Neilson, who came out from Scotland, settled there in the year 1820. Mr Neilson later moved to the 11th line Ramsay, where he successfully followed the occupation of farming for many years until he retired in 1916 and moved to Almonte, where he had since resided.


Active Church Worker
In religion the late Mr Neilson was a staunch Presbyterian. he took an active part in church work, and was a member of the Board of Session for many years. At the time of church union he held the opposite view and adhered to the Continuing body of that denomination and was a member of the Session of that church, up to the time of his death. He was predeceased by his wife, Janet McIlquam, who died twenty-two years ago, in May 1906. He is survived by four sisters, Agnes, Mrs Wilkie, of Toronto, widow of the late Rev John Wilkie, formerly of Indore, India; Marion, Mrs David Forgie, of Cleveland, Ohio; and the Misses Sarah and Jessie, both of whom resided with him at the family home here. Two brothers Matthew and William, and two sisters, Margaret and Mary, died some years ago.


The Funeral
The funeral took place on Tuesday from the family residence to the Presbyterian Church, and thence to the Auld Kirk Cemetery. Impressive services were conducted by the Rev W.H. McCracken, assisted by Rev George Thom. Mr McCracken made reference to the high character and staunch personality of the deceased elder, and there was a large congregation of mourners, many coming from long distances to pay a final tribute of respect and friendship. There were many floral offerings and messages of sympathy. The pallbearers were: Messrs Stanley Neilson, Montreal; James Neilson, Toronto; John Neilson, Welland; Robert Neilson, Ottawa; George McCallum, Carleton Place, all nephews of deceased, and Mr W. D. Aikenhead, of Pakenham.
Contributor: Gary J Byron (49329383)

Neilsen farm- Appleton side Road-Photo from the North Lanark Regional Museum

ReadWhen Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

Suspended Teacher —Appleton School 1931 — Miss Annie Neilson

Lanark Baptist Church – Elaine Playfair’s Clippings

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Lanark Baptist Church – Elaine Playfair’s Clippings

also read-Lanark’s First Church in the Middle of the Forest

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jun 1954, Fri  •  Page 38

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Nov 1932, Thu  •  Page 3

The Deachman Brothers Revivals of Lanark County

Dont’ bring Home a Baptist Preacher!

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Clippings and a Letter from Sadie Coleman –Robert Keith Duffett Coleman

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Clippings and a Letter from Sadie Coleman –Robert Keith Duffett Coleman
June 1976-From: Robert Keith Duffett Coleman
From: Robert Keith Duffett Coleman
From: Robert Keith Duffett Coleman
Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Read-Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Rob Coleman just posted this in the comments about men’s beards.. “Looks like my great great grandfather’s style. Here he is with my attempt at recreating it. He was from Bruce county. not sure if it counts. My great great grandfather Coleman (from Carleton Place) had pretty awesome facial hair but I have not tried to recreate it. Keep sending those photos in we love them.,
Mayor Coleman said Carleton Place was an important market town with Bridge Street sees a parade of farm vehicles and animals on their way to market. Cattle had a hard enough time moving down to the CPR station in those days–I can’t even imagine if that happened now.
Aug 8 1913
Fifteen head of cattle were killed on the C.P.R. Track about a mile south of Carleton Place after being struck by a train at an early hour this morning. A herd of 175 cattle had been driven into town by the Willow brothers yesterday and placed in the stock pen for shipment. Some time after midnight cattle broke through the fence ad proceeded to travel down different track routes.
A freight train traveling near the 10th and 11 th concessions of Beckwith struck the largest herd and before the locomotive could slow down fifteen cattle were killed or so maimed they had to be destroyed. Two head were also killed on the line west and three east of the station making for a total of 20.
In 1946 George Coleman was Carleton Place’s mayor and the population was just a tad over 4,300. Coleman’s Grandfather operated one of the first grist mills and almost won free land and water for the mill by entering in a competition which required the grinding of one bushel of grain in a given length of time. His Grandfather was unsuccessful and according to the mayor, he was the first Coleman to ever fail, so George said his Grandfather ended up buying the land and water rights.
Once upon a time an elderly Scotsman by the name of John Fraser who used to walk around our fair town brandishing a large sword. When asked if sword play was one of the off season sports of Carleton Place he answered,

“Not at all,” John said, “I’ve got this sword from England. The other one I recieved a short time ago I made into tow fine butcher knives, and this one will go the same way.”
Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Rob Coleman with Carleton Place roots‎ sent this to me at the Lanark County Genealogical Society this morning.Oldest picture I have. Great great great grandparents. Born around 1780 in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Settled in Quebec’s Eastern Townships.

Darla Fisher Giles added the above picture- Thanks Darla!!
This is a picture of my house and Dalton Coleman, where he grew up in Carleton Place. It was taken during Home Week in 1924

This photo of 283 William Street, Carleton Place, was taken in 1923. This was the childhood home of Dalton Corrie Coleman.Coleman worked as private secretary to Senator George Cox in 1897 and as editor of the Belleville Intelligencer before joining the CPR in 1899. He advanced rapidly and before turning 40 was put in charge of CPR’s western lines. In 1934 Coleman became Vice President of CPR, and, as the health of president Sir Edward Beatty deteriorated, increasingly took over his duties. Coleman was appointed president in 1942 and chairman in 1943. The company was then engaged not only in railway work but in war production, shipping and air traffic. Under Coleman, Canadian Pacific Airlines was organized. He retired in 1947. Coleman Street in Carleton Place, site of our CPR railway station, was named in his honour. http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx…

Coleman Family History–Just for Your Records

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Photos of Roy Brown Park — Mark Smith

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Photos of Roy Brown Park — Mark Smith
Please play while viewing

I love these fungi mushrooms and when Mark said he had seen some at Roy Brown Park I asked him to photograph them. Humour me please. 🙂 Roy Brown Park is located behind the MVCA office and is owned and maintained by the Town of Carleton Place. It currently features 0.5km of well-groomed walking trails and an off-leash dog park.

All photos from Mark Smith with thanks

All photos from Mark Smith with thanks

October 13th 2021

Last night our council passed a bylaw for tree conservation. Very Very proud

Read more about the fungi here..

Oddities — Lanark County Puffball Mushrooms

Beware of the Lanark County Fairy Rings
The Faeries of McArthur Island- Dedicated to the Bagg Children

Read more about parks here.

1963 Riverside Park — Stills from a 8 MM Movie Camera — Larry Clark

Riverside Park Comments Larry Clark ‘The Dip’

St. Mary’s and Riverside Park 1969

What Justin Bieber is Missing by Not Coming to Carleton Place

When Were Some of the Trees Planted in Riverside Park?

The Carleton Place Riverside Park Booth Etc. Etc.

The Secret Sanctuary of a Carleton Place Neighbourhood

The Mysterious Shoe Trees

Let’s Build Cabins at Riverside Park!

When the Circus came to Carleton Place

Tug of War 1970’s Riverside and Centennial Park Carleton Place

Just Beat It! Carnival Riot in Carleton Place at Riverside Park

Before and After at Centennial Park

So What Did You Do in Riverside Park?

It was the Boathouse that Went On and On….

The Carleton Place Riverside Park Booth Etc. Etc.

Catching Ghosts– or Can You?

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Catching Ghosts– or Can You?
Photo found by Lizzie Brunton

The dwelling at the end of the lane has almost been forgotten in time.The fog dances along the walls and seeps through the hardwood floors. There is a small but tidy yard, but the owner’s preoccupation is with his home. He believes the house is haunted. The visitor sets up a video camera at the end of the hallway and places a digital audio recorder on a ledge near the kitchen. Finally, he brings out a device called a Mel Meter, an instrument that measures electromagnetic fields and temperature. These are the tools of a ghost hunter, he says and he is ready to document the disembodied eerie voices.

There are many moving lights and strange floating orbs and none of it can be explained. You have to be open to believing, but you also have to be skeptical as well. You can believe almost anything you want to, but this paranormal investigation is hoping to provide the evidence the owner needs. But are all these noises and sightings real? Who knows, they both say.

The duo started off by visiting the local cemetery down the road, where they say they caught something on tape. The investigator was walking by himself when his camera, but not his digital recorder, picked up a strange voice. It was really weird because the sound of it was really strong, and it was one of the first pieces of evidence that was captured.

Which brings us to the alleged haunted dwelling down the lane. The duo began by moving throughout the house. The owner, who had been renovating the property, says several of his tenants have complained of ghostly activities. One claimed she witnessed her child’s toys moving on their own. She left after a few weeks and wouldn’t stay the night, she admited, claiming she has seen various items fall over by themselves.

Next they turn off the lights and move from room to room. “If you are here, knock like this”, the investigator booms, pounding his fist on the drywall. The answering silence is both a relief and a disappointment. The Mel-Meter tells a different story. The device seems to have picked up a spike of energy. The lights blink on and off wildly before subsiding. When asked what it means, the investigator shrugs as the Mel-Meter isnt an exact science, but for those who are willing to believe, it does make for a creepy encounter.

The Mel-Meter

Next, a Ghost-box, a device that uses radio waves to talk to ghosts. The box sweeps through radio stations at a tenth of a second, he says. The idea is that it may pick up voices and not of the living. After an hour, the Ghostbox hasn’t spoken and the Mel-Meter is no longer registering any energy spikes. The night doesnt feel like a complete loss. The investigator and the owner of the house have hours of video footage to review. You’re lucky to catch what you catch, the investigator says. Ghost hunting is a lot like fishing. You can use the same lures and never catch a thing.

“Only certain ghosts will talk through a Spirit Box when asked a question with your voice. Make sure the lights are off.”


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Jul 1926, Sat  •  Page 26

More Ghosts on William Street 1910

The Attic Ghost of William Street?

The Continuing Curse of William Street in Carleton Place

Ghosts Imagined by Minds Soaked by Too Much Whiskey?

The Ghosts of the Mill of Kintail

Love, Lanark Legends and Ghosts

Walking With Ghosts — The Accidental Addiction

Walking With Ghosts — The Hauntings of Ida Moore