We Need a Railroad says Ramsayville

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We Need a Railroad says Ramsayville

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Old Time Trains Photo

 

January 11, 1888 Almonte Gazette

The village of *Ramsayville, during the closing months of the year 1852, was perhaps in a more depressed condition than at any time during its previous history. The loss of capital sustained by the burning of the woolen factory and grist mill, at that time its two moat important industries, arrested all progress and prosperity, and hope had in a measure disappeared, and gloomy disappointment broods over the future.

 

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But it frequently happens to nations and towns that the darkest hours of depression precede the DAWN OF PROSPERITY, And such was the experience of the village, for soon a rift appeared in the dark cloud, and the light of an unlooked-for prosperity began to shine and hope sprang up from an unexpected quarter. On the 10th of November that year Parliament passed and the GovernorGeneral assented to the Bill entitled “The Consolidated Loan Fond Act,” for Upper Canada, the provisions of which empowered municipal corporations to borrow money from the fund for specified improvements either within or without their boundaries, to be expended for the I good of the inhabitants. |

The need of a good road from Smith’s Falls to Carleton Place and Ramsayville had long been felt by all business men and farmers along the route, but the money to make such a road was not forthcoming. However, the passing of the Loan Fund Act OPENED U P A PROSPECT Of obtaining the needed funds for that purpose, and Messrs. Wylie, Bell and Shaw announced that a meeting would be held at Franktown for the purpose of organizing a company to build a macadamized road through the townships of Montague, Beckwith and Ramsay.

 

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historicalnotes

 

*First named Shepperd’s Falls and Shipman’s Mills, the town of Almonte, until its industrial growth which started in the eighteen fifties, was a small village which gained the name of Ramsayville.

Then, with the opening of its first woollen mills and  railway transportation, it grew in a period of about thirty years to take a place among the leading centres of the pioneering days of Canadian manufacture of woollen textiles.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

Covered From Head to Toe with “The Beautiful” !! Almonte Train Station

One Night in Almonte or Was it Carleton Place?

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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