Tag Archives: almonte

The Community Wells — Water Water Everywhere?

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The Community Wells — Water Water Everywhere?

Before the waterworks system was introduced, it shows that the civic wells were a great source of trouble to the Councils of our areas. With the growth of the towns there were increasing demands from various parts of our towns for additional wells.

People began to tire of walking too far to draw their water and began to ask for wells closer to their homes. At first the civic wells were all “open” wells of the old oaken bucket type. When pumps came in people began to demand that the wells be covered over and pumps put in. There were good reasons why people wanted pumps instead of the buckets and chains.

The first was a sanitary reason. Mischievous people had a playful habit of dropping dead dogs and cats into the wells, and that wasn’t pleasant. The second reason was that a pump was much easier to operate than a bucket, and the people were beginning to get lazy. The third reason (and an important one) was that the open wells were dangerous. Now and again children fell into them. People were afraid to send their children alone to the wells. But, no child could fall into a pump, so pumps were preferred.

The Town Councils were also bothered by demands for wells to be cleaned out — and chains broke and the buckets were stolen. To cover an open well and put in a pump cost about fifty dollars. To dig a new well cost from $175 to $130 according to depth.

The towns were poor in the 1860s and 1870s and it was hard to find the money for the new wells or the covering of the existing ones. But then the towns had business places which required a considerable amount of water in connection with their businesses and they began to request that they be allowed to tap the wells and run pipes from the bottoms of the wells into their cellars.

One interesting thing was the wells was said to have fine water but the wells were never tested. They may have been, but there is no reference to the fact– nor complaints about the water. In those days, people were used to getting some dirt in their mouths from time to time. They drank out of delivery barrels from the hardware store which were seldom cleaned, and out of their own barrels which were frequently uncovered and subject to dust and contamination. But somehow or other they survived.

The days of the civic wells are gone, never to return, now that we have filtered water. But in the typhoid epidemic of the nineteen hundreds, the people were glad to use the new bored wells.

By the middle of the 1870’s, it was expected that a fashionable home in Carleton Place would have running water and an indoor bathroom.  This was generally accomplished by placing a large water tank in the attic which was usually lead lined — one reason the average life span was shorter back then.

One water pipe usually ran down to a boiler in the kitchen, where it could be heated.  Victorian bathrooms were virtually always located on the second floor and near the back of the house.  This served an esthetic purpose — Victorians definitely believed that bathrooms should be neither seen nor heard — and also placed the bathroom so that water pressure from the attic could conveniently supply the bathtub by pushing hot water up from the kitchen boiler.  The flush toilets of the era also worked off gravity, utilizing flush compartments that were placed as high as eight feet above the toilet, and activated by a long pull chain.

How did they fill the attic water tank in the first place?  Well, with a little luck, from rain water.  Gutters were used to funnel rainwater into the tank (which were built to hold as much as 600 gallons), and if the weather failed, the well-to-do could always depend upon wells and servants with buckets or hand pumps. Then there were the cisterns that are in our homes that I wrote about.

Carleton Place Waterworks
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Mar 1911, Wed  •  Page 2

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Jun 1912, Fri  •  Page 16

Did you know that when they laid the first water pipes in Carleton Place workers were brought in from Romania, Italy and the Baltic states? They all boarded at Leech’s School right next to Barker’s parking lot.

So it has been documented in a few places that there was a community well for years in Carleton Place on Queen Street. Jennifer Fenwick Irwin and I asked Duncan Rogers but he had no idea. So this week I went searching. I  initially thought it was at the bottom of Albert Street between Princess and Queen Street but then I drove up to the top by Coleman Street and I seriously think they were here as they were close to the C.P.R train station as mentioned in the newspapers.

There is also the fact that Mr McRae had his huge plof of Gladiolas in this space and if you look at the photo below this one the location is in the same spot and he the garden was so huge that he had water in a few locations probably from these old wells.

Where Have All the Flowers Gone? Benson McRae

2019

Photos from the McRae family.Where Have All the Flowers Gone? Benson McRae
Almonte Waterworks
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he Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Aug 1919, Sat  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jul 1906, Sat  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Sep 1906, Tue  •  Page 9
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 May 1907, Sat  •  Page 19

A Record of Drowning — River Falls and Cisterns

Tales of the Cistern —- Jan McCarten Sansom

Cisterns I Have Known

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Do You have a Hidden Room in Your Home?

“The Tim Horton’s River” Under my House.. Is That the Way To Fraggle Rock?

William Pattie — Built More Homes Than Any Other Man

Memories of Taylor’s Hardware — Mohra Taylor –

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Jun 1932, Thu  •  Page 5

The Taylor building on the Bridge and Mill Street corner was built in 1888 and bought from Archibald McArthur. It’s one of the few downtown Carleton Place buildings that has not been touched by fire, and one of the largest made from Beckwith limestone and local bricks. After William’s death, the store continued on as Taylor Bros Ltd.,hardware, fuel merchants, and auto dealers under C. Frank R. Taylor (1875-1940) until 1930 ca. Frank was William’s son.This is the largest commercial building in Carleton Place and was known as “Taylor’s Department Store and Garage”.Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12

Linda, thanks for connecting! Hope you’re doing well. I am the great-granddaughter of JD Taylor of hardware store fame. My father, John Donald Laurie Taylor regaled my sybs and me with wonderful tales of the town, the people and the antics he got up to as a boy in Carleton Place.

Your postings about the store have filled in some blanks and the pictures are terrific to have. At the end of March my daughter and I are making a short pilgrimage from Burlington, ON, to CP where I can show her the store and the places my dad lived and “played”. With access to gun powder, nails, mason jars, a willing friend and a boat, the fish in the Mississippi and the boat didn’t stand a chance. When was this kind of fishing outlawed?

My dad was born in 1925 and his sybs, twins, Barbara and David were born in 1930. My grandfather passed in 1972, my grandmother, Hazel, in 1999, my father 7 years ago, my uncle a couple of years after that, and my aunt is still going!! Thank you so much for keeping Carleton Place alive for me. I am truly looking forward to seeing it for the first time. Wishing you good health and happiness,

Mohra Taylor

Taylor’s Hardware was also in Almonte  -

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Sep 1934, Sat  •  Page 8
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Feb 1901, Sat  •  Page 8

We will list some of the business places of that day further along the street, but not all in order. Taber’s Ladies Wear, Merchants Bank and later bought by W. H. Stafford. (It had once been owned and operated by John McKinnon), McLean’s Bakery, Woosley’s Barber Shop, M. R. Young Men’s Wear, Clement Bicycle Shop, Dr. McGregor, dentist, and Taylor Bros. Hardware (they opened a Garage on Bridge St. in 1928 with Cliff Robertson as manager.)

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 May 1936, Sat  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Dec 1947, Mon  •  Page 7

A well known accountant in Ottawa began his career at Taylor’s Hardware. Thomas Dowe worked for 12 years at that very hardware store before going to the government income tax dept and many prestigious accounting firms including the chartered A. A. Crawley in Ottawa.

You Didn’t Go to Taylor’s Hardware Store for Milk

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12

Sir Malcolm Campbell Bluebird for Sale at Taylor’s Garage?

There were Spies Among us in Carleton Place

The Day the Comba Building Sold-Taylor Block

N. S. Lee & Son Hardware Comments and History

Almonte — The Birth of a Friendly Town — A Poem

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Almonte — The Birth of a Friendly Town — A Poem
Birth of a Friendly Town-- Almonte Gazette July 30 , 1970 ( no author mentioned)


T ’was back in 1820 when the air was clear and bright,
A brawny pioneer farmer stopped his wagon for the night.
He kindled his cheery campfire to feed his hungry brood,
And vowed he’d build a cabin on the very spot he stood.
On the banks of the Mississippi, on a tract of government land,
He built his homely hovel, with axe and sweat, so grand.
He cleared his land for planting with mule and old grey mare,
He plowed and tilled and worked it with tender loving care.
His meagre supply of seedlings he spread upon the ground,
He fished the brooks and rivers and hunted the woods around.


He sent word to friends and relations of the wonderful place he had,
But with the lack of a woman’s company, his wife was very sad.
As the years went by, his family grew, with neighbours all around,
Where once there stood a lonely farm , had turned into a town.
With neighbour lads they took the fish, both with line and spear,
And all around this lonely place -was a friendly atmosphere.


The town it grew and friendliness was never left behind,
The people in this little town, always seemed so kind.
As homes sprang up with shops and stores, everything so grand,
And all the people in the town to lend a helping hand. ….
So from this campfire in the night, arose THE FRIENDLY TOWN,
Our friendliness, it’s said, has spread for miles around.
So why not come to ALMONTE and join in all the cheer.
To have some fun and celebrate our 130th year.


We promise you our friendliness, has grown from year to year,
The only thing we’re lacking is having you came here.
So plan to come and visit us when summer rolls along.
When we celebrate in ALMONTE, our friends can do no wrong

Almonte General Hospital Fairview Manor Foundation

· September 20, 2018 ·  

Sharing Smiles with the kind folks at the Mississippi Mills Animal Hospital. Who have you shared a smile with today?
No photo description available.

Mary Sterling Jarick The first thing I saw when we came from Ireland and landed in Almonte. My father told me he had it done especially for me. lol

Clipped from The Ottawa Citizen, 13 May 1952, Tue, Page 13 

Shirley Flaxman It truly was a friendly town!!! I loved growing up there


Bob Camelon
 Born and Raised

Darlene Monette Me too – in fact still in same house! 🙂 That water tower was our view from the front door!

Ron Finner I climbed to the top of that tower and sat on the ball many times !! 😎🤠

Shirley Flaxman Home is where the heart is💖.

Mary Anne Harrison My grandparents, Jim and Cecelia Carroll lived just in front of the tower on Ottawa street. My uncle Emmett too. I have no doubt 1 or all 5 of my brothers climbed that tower at one time or another.

No photo description available.

Peggy Byrne Yes it was a sad day. Lived for many years beside that tower and saw a few people climb to the top whenever the opportunity arose. Ronald Ford, you will remember the water house at the base of the tank where many residents that didn’t yet have running water in their homes went to fill up their containers – oh wait, maybe you’re too young for that….🤭

Ronald Ford I remember Dad would point it out at the Corkery hill. It was all long time ago. Tree grow a lot 66 yrs

We posted the photo of the 1993 water tower today– Dawn Jones fund This from the Millstone article in 2013.

Water tower slogan: still friendly, but not a town?

September 5, 2013 – 2:21 pm

memories of 1993 thanks to the scrapbooks of Lucy Connelly Poaps
The new water tank 1993

Tower
Rendering of planned ‘rebranding’

by Brent Eades

The Town recently announced that as part of the current cleaning and restoration of the water tower on Paterson Street, “the tower will also be refinished with a new white and blue colour scheme along with a rebranded logo,” approved by Town Council at a meeting on April 16 2013.

A rendering of this logo is available on the Mississippi Mills website. It shows that the decades-old slogan “Almonte The Friendly Town” will be replaced with simply “Friendly Almonte.”

I can see this, I suppose. Strictly speaking we are no longer a “town” — in the purely legalistic sense of the word — but rather a ward of the amalgamated municipality of Mississippi Mills.

But it does seem a pity to lose the slogan that has been welcoming people to our community for generations. We may not be a town as far as the provincial government is concerned, but we surely are in every other sense.

Out of interest I decided to search the online Almonte Gazette archive to find out how long we’ve been “The Friendly Town.” It appears the slogan was chosen sometime prior to March 1953 by the Chamber of Commerce for use in a promotional booklet. Link (story at top-left)

I also found a reference on Google Books, from a 1952 issue of Civic Administration magazine: “As you near the town, the first thing you see is a big steel standpipe jutting skyward above the leafy trees. On it in six-foot letters are the words, WELCOME TO ALMONTE The Friendly Town.”

Marty Taylor

July 17, 2018

Just off the highway. Passed by it coming from or going to Ottawa. Was always a wonderful way to say “hello” when arriving in Almonte.

Ole King Cole of Almonte — Fran Cooper

Almonte Poetry —- Agnes Whitelaw Boyce Almonte

Memories of Dr. A. A. Metcalfe of Almonte– Florence Watt

The Life and Times of Cora Yuill

A Poem about Innisville–By Mrs. Edith Bolton

Alice Katherine Gould– Smiths Falls — Gould Family

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

Annie Patterson — Descendant of John Gemmill

Genealogist Christmas Poem

The Old Saw Mill Poem – Lanark County

Was the Rhyme Ring Around the Rosie Connected to the Plague?

Postage Stamp Flirtation 1903

Headstone of Robert Young Jr — Memories

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Headstone of Robert Young Jr — Memories
found this recently. Maybe you can find out where it belongs.

Friday I received this from an unidentified emailer. Please note he was advised what to do and the headstones are safe.

I believe it may have been taken from the Auld Kirk Cemetery in Almonte where his parents are buried. My thinking is someone, family or church, will know when it may have gone missing. I found it under a deck of a home I am working on.

Headstone of Robert Young, Jr

BIRTH1835Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
DEATH1 Jan 1863 (aged 27–28)Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIALAuld Kirk CemeteryMississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
1898, Friday December 23, The Almonte Gazette, page 8
A Runner Dropped Dead

While going through the eighth line cemetery lately a GAZETTE scribe was struck by a verse on the tablet at the head of the grave of the late Robert Young, which reads as follows:
“My sudden death proclaims aloud
To you, my living friends,
To be prepared to meet your God
When He the summons sends.”
Inquiry as to the cause of the sudden death brought out the particulars, which are worth giving here. On New Year’s Day, 1863, on the Mississippi river between Youngville and Rosebank, there was quite a gathering to witness the sorts, which consisted of trotting races on the ice, the trotters being hitched to buggies. In the afternoon a foot race was got up, the contestants being John Young (blacksmith, Almonte), John Toshack (son of the late James Toshack) and Robert Young (Brother of Messrs P.J. and Wm. Young, Ramsay). They were all young men – two of them Young by name as well as young in years – and, removing their boots, they ran in their sock-feet. Robert Young was ahead as he came to the winning line, and just before crossing the line he dropped on the ice – dead! The late Dr. Mostyn, who happened to be in Rosebank at the time was quickly summoned, but the winner had passed beyond the reach of medical skill. The crowd got a great shock by the event, the sports were cancelled, and there was sadness in the community the balance of that New Year Day
December 23, 1898 Almonte Gazette

the second one mostly likely belonged to his father

New one at Auld Kirk which put in as replacements for the ones missing above

 Robert Young, Jr
The replacement at Auld Kirk

Robert Young, Jr

BIRTH1835Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
DEATH1 Jan 1863 (aged 27–28)Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIALAuld Kirk CemeteryMississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
MEMORIAL ID200644312 · View Source

1898, Friday December 23, The Almonte Gazette, page 8
A Runner Dropped Dead
While going through the eighth line cemetery lately a GAZETTE scribe was struck by a verse on the tablet at the head of the grave of the late Robert Young, which reads as follows:

“My sudden death proclaims aloud
To you, my living friends,
To be prepared to meet your God
When He the summons sends.”

Inquiry as to the cause of the sudden death brought out the particulars, which are worth giving here. On New Year’s Day, 1863, on the Mississippi river between Youngville/ Bennies Corners and Rosebank, there was quite a gathering to witness the sorts, which consisted of trotting races on the ice, the trotters being hitched to buggies.

In the afternoon a foot race was got up, the contestants being John Young (blacksmith, Almonte), John Toshack (son of the late James Toshack) and Robert Young (Brother of Messrs P.J. and Wm. Young, Ramsay). They were all young men – two of them Young by name as well as young in years – and, removing their boots, they ran in their sock-feet.

Robert Young was ahead as he came to the winning line, and just before crossing the line he dropped on the ice – dead! The late Dr. Mostyn, who happened to be in Rosebank at the time was quickly summoned, but the winner had passed beyond the reach of medical skill. The crowd got a great shock by the event, the sports were cancelled, and there was sadness in the community the balance of that New Year Day


Family Members

Parents

Siblings

An article written long ago by Robert Young, an uncle of M. R. Young, former hardware merchant in Almonte, and his two sisters here, tells of the days at Bennie’s Corners when the school was new.

This lovely stone home, now known as “Stanehive” was built in 1856 by Peter Young and his brother Robert. The quality of the stonework here is very high with cu and dressed stone laid in regular courses. A decorative effect is achieved with contrasting stone used for the quoins and the massive lintels and door surround. The large two-paneled front door is very handsome and the transom above has the uneven division typical of the area.-A TOUR OF BENNIE’S CORNERS (written by Jill Moxley, architectural comments by Julian Smith)

Bennie’s Corners Gave a Fine Surprise To Prince Edward

Village 5 Miles from Almonte had a Big Arch and other Decorations for the Prince – People who accompanied Prince from Arnprior had not expected any demonstration there. A recent reference to Bennie’s Corners by the O.T.S. interested Mr. Robert Young, 240 Fifth avenue, Ottawa, a former Almonte man, who knew Bennie’s Corners when a small boy back in the early sixties. Mr. Young tells the O.T.S. that Bennie’s Corners was one of a few of the smaller villages of the Ottawa district which was honored by a visit from the Prince of Wales (King Edward) in 1860. And the Corners did itself proud on that occasion. It will be recalled that the Prince on the occasion of his visit here in 1860 sailed up the Ottawa river to Fitzroy Harbour, then to Arnprior where he stayed over night with Mr. McLachlin, the lumberman, and the following day drove to Almonte by way of Bennie’s Corners, and from Almonte took the Canada Central Railway on his way back. Almonte was the terminus of the railway at the time.-Edna Gardner Lowry.

Otter Glen Woolen Mills

W 1/2 Lot 24 Conc 9 Ramsay Township.

Peter McDougall, proprietor, operated a custom carding and woolen mill on this location from 1868 – 1872. It was then sold to Stephen Young who operated the mill from at least 1873 – 1876. It then became the Youngville Woolen Mill, owned and operated by Robert and Andrew Young, running at least from at least 1885 but not in operation in 1892.-MVTM

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Feb 1942, Sat  •  Page 6
Canada’s Other Game: Basketball from Naismith to Nash

George Bailey –Headstone– the Cemetery on the Ninth line

Gravestone Tips– Memories and Respect for our Headstone Treasures

A Monument Back in Time –Time Travelling in Lanark County —Part 1

Like a Prayer I left My Mark in Franktown — Part 2

Marvin Arnold Walker — Another Ron Bos Genealogy Mystery

For Brent Eades — Eades Hardware Store and Things

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For Brent Eades — Eades Hardware Store and Things
Photo Brent Eades–On the back of the photo are the names of his team-mates:
(front row, left to right) S. McCuan, R. Griffith, N. Eades, A. Rintoul, D. Dunlop, W. Churchhill
(back row, left to right) G. MacNabb, W. Findlay, C. Findlay, K. Hamilton, J. Hastie
I’d be interested to know what became of any of these players.

Brent Eades sent me this photo the other day that he had posted in The Millstone in 2015.

I came across this photo of my dad with the 1949 CPHS football team (third from the left in the front row)

posted in The Millstone in 2015.

Evelyn Julian I believe my Dad Douglas Kennedy was coach at that time.


Ray Paquette
 Can anyone name the player third front the right in the front row? It looks very much like the nameless baseball player in the picture of the 1953 Optimist Championship team posted earlier…:)

Brent Eades-- Memories

I wish my dad were still around to help you with the Eades Hardware store memories, where he worked starting 1949 for his uncle George. My dad moved in with George to get some Ontario high school education and thus increase his chance of getting into university in Ontario, which was his goal. His dad — my grandfather — died in a farm accident in 1935. I still have dad’s clippings ( see in History) from the Shawville Equity about my grandfather being rushed in a special train to hospital in Ottawa. But he didn’t survive.

One of the first things George told him on arrival was, “Norris, there’s no such thing as “women’s work” in this household. We all share equally in cooking and cleaning and so on.” George was ahead of his time, it seems.

No doubt my dad’s memories were a little imperfect about all this — as are all of ours — but that story has stuck in my mind and I’ve told my daughters it often. Anyway, George was his surrogate father after his own died, and he admired him a lot. Also. my dad did get that Ontario university education and met my mother at Queen’s.

Looking for info on these barrels that were found–Julie Kilpatrick’s dad used to own the Home Hardware which was Eades for years and said that her Dad said they are too big for nail barrels. He recalls nail barrels were about 21 inches high and a different shape. All hardware was sold in barrels in the 1930s and 40s and these were likely used for bolts and chains. Thanks Julie!!!

Thanks Brent– this is for you from our community readers

From the Ryan Goode collection from Eades Store on Bridge Street

No photo description available.
Eades Hardware Specials 1970

Patricia M Mason Leduc Loved going into this store every Saturday morning

Beverley J Wylie We bought a 3 room set 1966..bedroom kitchen living room. And Mr Eades added 2 lamps and 2 sofa pillows and a chenille bedspread….$199.00
Took forever to save…

Gail Grabe We bought our first “French Provincial” living room set from Eades, they had quite a selection of furniture upstairs at the time (1967). That was one of the styles of the day, along with “Early American”.

Doug B. McCarten– Talk about customer service, my Mom once bought a hand mixer for $2 at Eades but didn’t like the colour of the wooden handle so they painted it for her at no additional charge! Now that’s customer service!!Can you load up the comment section about Eades as Brent Eades has given me some great info about the Eades family I am going to put up. Thanks

Dot Smith Remember when if you were doing a home repair job and in a hurry , you parked your bike or later car in the back parking lot and ran in the back door lol they never cared and serve you right away . Great great memories and always asked ( how is the family everyone well ) 🥰🥰

No photo description available.

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston Eades Hardware had the largest staff of one of a kind people anywhere – all special and kind

Ted Hurdis I use to love going to Eades home hardware. The huge back door was like a safe and the smell of the hardwood floor that squeaked with every step
Norma Ford
 One of the best stores in town. Remember the floors?

Valerie Edwards I can still see the aisles & the feel of the wooden floor & also ,if you were very careful, you could go in the side alcove where they had tea cups, cake plates & special items for gifts. But things in there were breakable.

Rodger-Holley Gardiner I was in the store often and never disappointed in the service or selection. The bins made getting the appropriate quantity of items easy.

Ruth Anne Schnupp I always loved going into eades main street location. They had such a great gift section! You could get one for almost any occasion.

Ray Paquette The only place you could get expert advice on how to “salvage” a DIY project as well as buy 1 screw or two bolts or any other minimal quantity of hardware!

Sue Johnston Loved that store…..they had everything and helped you with finding everything…..great staff

Joann Voyce I remember Gerald Haskins worked there.

Ray Paquette Gerald Haskins was the “go to” person when you sent your wife to Eades for that nameless item (you sent her with the broken “thingmajing” needed to finish the home repair you were in the middle of). What I also liked was that you could buy only the hardware you needed, not the pre-package item where you took out the two you needed and discarded the remaining 8.

Janice Tennant Campbell When we were married in 1975 I was able to return duplicate shower or wedding gifts for a store credit. Even if the article wasn’t purchased there but they carried it, I was able to return things. The store credit was really handy when I realized that I didn’t have a peeler, for instance.

Julie Sadler Loved this store. They had everything. Wonderful people.
My first apartment was above the store. Lived there for 6 years.
Always tried to vacuum in the evenings when they were closed!

Ruth Anne Schnupp I always loved going into eades main street location. They had such a great gift section! You could get one for almost any occasion.

1970’s Era Photos from The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Eades Baseball team 

Johnna Ferrill Glover Think that’s my brother Robin Ferrill left front row…haha too cute!

Sandy Dobie Believe the older gentleman is Sandy Docker.

Toby Randell Chris Bryce, Andrew Kennedy and I believe Ian Docker with the coach being his dad.

Gavin Mccullough No way I can forget that place! I remember going in as a kid and being fascinated by everything they had!


Llew Lloyd
 Remember when you could buy nails, screws etc. by the pound?

Sue Johnston Loved that store…..they had everything and helped you with finding everything…..great staff

Susan Mary Risk I gave always loved Eades. They used to cut glass for me, practically for free, and let me hand sand the edges on site. I loved Fred the manager, and his wife Lise.


Linda Nilson-Rogers
 As a teen I put many gifts on lay-away there! Always kind service!

Here’s his brief bio on Brent’s dad he sent.

1000x1301-baker-copy
Norris Eades (1932-2009) became a partner of the firm in 1969.
Mr. Eades received a degree in Applied Science in Chemical Engineering from Queen’s University, Canada and subsequently became a registered Canadian and US patent agent. He was also a Registered Professional Engineer in Ontario.
Among Mr. Eades’ many achievements, he was a past Vice-President of the Licensing Executives Society (USA and Canada), and an active member of the International Association for the Protection of Intellectual Property (AIPPI). Mr. Eades also enjoyed passing on his wealth of knowledge through teaching, and was an instructor for the IPIC Patent Agent Training Course.

Here’s a clipping about my grandfather Mervin Ead
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 May 1950, Mon  •  Page 11

Eades Hardware of Carleton Place-Allen Wrenches Toilet Seats and Electric Heaters

James Morton — Mary Agnes Waddell- Helen ARGUE-MONTGOMERY Genealogy

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James Morton — Mary Agnes Waddell-  Helen ARGUE-MONTGOMERY Genealogy
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Jul 1959, Fri  •  Page 25

1909- 012722-09 (Lanark Co.) James MORTON, 26, farmer, of Almonte, s/o John MORTON & Maria LEWIS, married Mary Agnes WADDELL, 36, of Almonte, d/o John WADDELL & Jane BOWES, wtn: Thomas MORTON & Janes WADDELL, both of Almonte, on July 9, 1909, at Almonte

Helen Morton ARGUE-MONTGOMERY— daughter

Ray Paquette The secretary is Mrs. Helen Argue, my nemesis, when I was sent to the principal’s office to be reprimanded by the principal, Jack Ross, for misbehaving in class. I should know the cafeteria staff as my mother was part of the staff for a few years….

Helen Morton Argue-Mary Ann Gagnon– Judy and Bill’s mum was Helen Argue….she was the secretary at the high school for years before and during my dad’s reign there…

Doug B. McCarten OMG we had one of those at home! Chess and Helen were terrific friends of our family! Helen was my Dad’s secretary for many years!! Who knew?? Lol

Judy Sturgis My Mom ,Helen Argue , was Jack’s secretary at the high school . Our families remained friends for many years !

Ray Paquette I remember being sent to the Principal’s office on many occasions, Mr. Motherwell, Mr. MacIlwain, Mr. Ross, but the real condemnation came from Mrs. Argue, the secretary. Being ushered into the principal’s office was a relief because that ended the criticism…😂

ARGUE-MONTGOMERY, Helen Mary
Peacefully at Woodhaven Long Term Care Center, Markham, ON, on Wednesday December 14, 2011 at the age of 101. Predeceased by her husband Chester Argue. Loving mother of William Argue (Gail) and Judith Sturgis (Bev). Proud grandmother of William Argue, Joanne Byrne, Katherine Thomas, Julia Klingenberg and David Sturgis. Great-grandmother of 11. She will be missed by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her brother John Morton. Friends may call at the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home, 19 McArthur Ave., Carleton Place, on Friday December 16, 2011 from 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service Saturday in the chapel at 11:00 a.m. Interment to follow at Pinecrest Cemetery, Ottawa. For those who wish, a donation to the Carleton Place Hospital Foundation would be appreciated by the family.–


Helen ARGUE-MONTGOMERY

ARGUE-MONTGOMERY, Helen Mary
Peacefully at Woodhaven Long Term Care Center, Markham, ON, on Wednesday December 14, 2011 at the age of 101. Predeceased by her husband Chester Argue. Loving mother of William Argue (Gail) and Judith Sturgis (Bev). Proud grandmother of William Argue, Joanne Byrne, Katherine Thomas, Julia Klingenberg and David Sturgis. Great-grandmother of 11. She will be missed by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her brother John Morton. Friends may call at the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home, 19 McArthur Ave., Carleton Place, on Friday December 16, 2011 from 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service Saturday in the chapel at 11:00 a.m. Interment to follow at Pinecrest Cemetery, Ottawa. For those who wish, a donation to the Carleton Place Hospital Foundation would be appreciated by the family.
www.barkerfh.com—Published on December 15, 2011

The Argue Hardware Ruler Comments

Memories of Argue’s Food Market?

The Unusual Schwerdtfegers — Genealogy

Rothwell and Sheppard Genealogy Ferguson Falls

Harvey’s Mills — Plus Gillan Genealogy

Innisville Cameron Genealogy

Guthrie Genealogy — Tatlock

Fanny Elizabeth Black McPhail — Genealogy

enealogy — History of the McKay Family

The Lea Family of Almonte — Genealogy Snippets

Foley Almonte — Genealogy

The Sad Tale of the Foley Family–Foley, Harper, Sly, Bowes & Elliott

More Box Family Genealogy Clippings — Becky Robinson

Genealogy Chatter- Willard and Margaret E Simpson Cram

More About George Jones — Vicki Lowe

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More About George Jones — Vicki Lowe
Hi Linda, here is an article about my great grandfather, George Jones.  He lived at 321 Ottawa st.  I moved in in 1974 at age 4 with my Mom, Sharon (Boal) Libbey and Dad, to the same house, where he second wife Ila Munro was still living.  He taught piano lessons to some people still living in town. 

In 2017 I wrote about the Almonte One Man Band George Jones-Scrapbook Clippings of George Jones-The One Man Band from Almonte His great great granddaughter Vicki Lowe sent me this information so we could document it. Thanks Vicki. Keepin community history alive.

Scrapbook Clippings of George Jones-The One Man Band from Almonte

Musical Notes About the Rosetta Violin

A Musical Thief– Hector G. Dallimore and Isobel Brown

Tales About the Travelling Musical Troupes

Good Old Lanark County Music–From the 70s to now

The Heirlooms- Ferguson Violin

Dueling Shoes and Fiddles and Step Dancing Contest July 15 1974

Notes of Lanark County Dances and Fiddlers

Fiddling in Lanark County by David Ennis

Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

The Story of a Local Family -Finlayson- Richard Finlayson

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The Story of a Local Family -Finlayson- Richard Finlayson

Aunt Lucinda May Raeburn is in the middle. My grandfather Charles is on the left next to his father James. Catherine (Ruttle) Finlayson is holding my Great Uncle Edgar. I hope to find the location of their farm and would like to know if the home still exists. _ Rick Finlayson (see history below)

Thank you to Rick’s wife Kathleen Finlayson for joining us together.

Text by Richard Finlayson

This all started with my 32 year old corporate attorney daughter visiting us this weekend. My 88 year-old mother, Gloria, had recently given me the Finlayson family portrait above which we believe was taken in 1917.  That was a year that the Spanish flu was devastating North America and it allowed me to give my daughter a historical perspective and how it relates to Covid 19.  She was to be married in Chicago in May but we have postponed the wedding to next year. I told her the stories of the people in the photo.  Your home, Springside Hall in Carleton Place, was a prominent piece of May Raeburn’s (Finlayson) story.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Jul 1913, Thu  •  Page 10

(Editor’s note– there was a dry spell in 1913 only to have it finally rain on July 25, 1913 the day after the fire. On the 26th there was a hail storm but no damages recorded. “The dry spell has been broken”– Almonte Gazette July 1913 (see more in ‘history’)
.

My grandfather, Charles Mitchell Finlayson was born in 1898 and grew up on a farm in Lanark. He was the oldest of six children. He left the Finlayson family farm and attended the University of Toronto graduating from the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1922.  At that time his goal was to be a doctor but he needed to study an extra year and did not have the funds to complete that extra year. He immigrated to the United States after marrying my grandmother, Gladys Rogers, who was working as a piano teacher and model in Toronto. I actually have some of her work from a Toronto newspaper. She really was quite beautiful.

They had one child, my father, Charles Albert Finlayson who was born in 1930. Gladys Finlayson passed away in 1952 and my grandfather was heartbroken.  I have always felt a deep spiritual connection to my grandfather who passed away in 1961 from a heart attack after running his own pharmacy (with a soda fountain) in Detroit,Michigan.

Rowntree - KitKat - Kit Kat - 10-cent candy bar wrapper - … | Flickr

I am one of three brothers and my memory of our grandfather was one of him being incredibly kind and he loved playing with us and sneaking chocolate Kit Kat bars when our parents weren’t looking. When he passed away, my parents learned from his customers that for years  (especially during the depression) he would nurse patients in the back of his store who couldn’t afford to see a doctor. He had actually set some broken bones and in his own way was an urban country doctor.

As a child I remember visiting Carleton Place at least four times. My parents had a small travel trailer and we would camp on the shores of the Mississippi River. We would rent a boat and fish during the day.  The fishing there was always phenomenal and my brothers and I were always in competition to catch the biggest and the most perch.

This photo was taken in the summer of 1948 by my father  (Charles) who would have been 18 years old at the time. We think that is George Raeburn on the porch. 

 Your home Springside Hall on Lake Ave. East was one that leaves a lifelong impression. In my mind it was a mansion. The fine woodworking and huge porch with the large front yard was awe-inspiring!  My Aunt May was a very prim and proper woman and she had dinners in the formal dining room. She would serve with fine china and silver and linen napkins (serviettes?) Our mother would give us instructions on how to be gentlemen, something we were definitely not used to! To be honest, it felt like we were visiting the Queen and King of England.  I remember there being a secret stairway that was almost like a tunnel ( more on that tomorrow).  For a child that house would be an amazing place. 

I am a very recently retired Captain for American Airlines. My very first flight for American took me to Ottawa and I was amazed that there is an intersection on a primary airway named Lanark.  I could feel the spiritual connection every time I flew over that intersection knowing that all of my Finlayson relatives are there.  Every flight out of Chicago for the next 33 years on my way to London or somewhere else in Europe brought the memories of Carleton Place. 

Heritage Carleton Place
Carleton Place as Rick would remember it.. Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Can You Fix Downtown Carleton Place by Rebranding? An Op-Ed ...
Carleton Place today Photo- Linda Seccaspina

In 2007 you ( Linda Seccaspina) and I came very close to meeting in person. I had taken a motorcycle trip of Ontario with a group of friends. We overnighted in Ottawa and my friends stayed up late in the Casino there. I got up early by myself and rode highway 7 in an attempt to find the cemetery where my relatives are all buried. My wife and I attended a family reunion in 1981 in Carleton Place and had visited the church where the cemetery was located. I could not find it. I stopped in a Mom and Pop gas station on the edge of town and filled my motorcycle. I asked the man who took my money if he knew of a church that is close by that had an adjoining cemetery . He said, “Yes, you passed one on the way in and  it sits off the road at the top of the curve.  Are you looking for a grave there?” I said, ” Yes, all of my relatives are buried there.” “Whats the last name?” I said Finlayson.  He smiled and said,” Oh yes we know of them. That’s the right one.”

Boyd's Methodist Cemetery in Boyds, Ontario - Find A Grave Cemetery
Boyd’s cemetery

I was amazed that he knew of my family. It made me feel instantly at home. I rode over to the Boyds cemetery and visited with all the members of my family buried there. I sat there on a beautiful sunny day watching the butterflies flying around the headstones and I could feel their spirits. My great Uncle Edgar (my grandfather’s  youngest brother) had been buried there in 1991. I sat there for an hour contemplating. I then got on my motorcycle and rode in to Carleton Place. It had changed so much since 1981. I was determined to find your home if it still existed.

I knew that finding the railroad track was key to my finding Springside Hall. I found the track and parked my Harley and started walking. When I found your home I gasped. It was the home but it looked so different from my memory, the architecturally correct addition you had built was amazing. Of course the limestone fencing threw me for a loop. I walked slowly around the perimeter taking in the home. I stood at the front gate and admired your English garden and the front of Aunt May’s old home. I hadn’t noticed you gardening and when you stood up it startled me as I could tell I probably startled you. I uttered a quick hello and kept walking. An tall American standing and staring at a house in motorcycle garb could be disconcerting at the least. I went back to my bike and rode past your house once more. I told my wife I was a bit angry at myself for not asking the woman in the garden if you knew of my Aunt May and Uncle George. I am thankful to know that you do.

Kind regards,

Rick Finlayson 

Tomorrow!!!–The Case of the Disappearing Back Staircase — Springside Hall — Finlayson Series

When we bought the house in 1981 it was important for me to know about the history and it has taken me years and years to find out. I was lucky to meet May Reaburn at the Fairview Manor with Muriel Simpson one Saturday afternoon in 1982. We did not have cell phones in the 80s and wish I had taken a photo– but we just didn’t do that in those days. I was having a tea at my house and I thought it would be wonderful if May came. Mary Cook and the neighbourhood ladies were going to be there and I knew she would enjoy it. Alas she got sick that day and could not come. I never saw her again, except when I went to her funeral. I was also fortunate to meet Edgar Finlayson a few times also. Thanks to Rosemary Sarsfield our local Clayton and Mississippi Mills historian and author of we found the farm. (author of Clayton history-Whispers From the Past-Clayton Store, Millstreet Books in Almonte and from rose@sarsfield.ca of we found the farm)

Richard Finlayson

 I believe this is a picture of my great grandparents farm home  (James and Catherine Agnes FInlayson) in Ramsey, Ontario taken by my father in 1948. Richard Finlayson



Richard Finlayson
We just put together that this must be the same house that my father took a picture of in 1948. Guessing that my grandfather must have grown up here. I hope this house still stands.



I hope to find the location of their farm and would like to know if the home still exists. _ Rick Finlayson

I found the original farm was lost in a fire in a 1913 fire. Clippings below

Almonte Gazette July 26 1913

Thanks to Rosemary Sarsfield historian and author of Clayton history-Whispers From the Past-Clayton Store, Millstreet Books in Almonte and from rose@sarsfield.ca of we found the farm

After a very successful book launch my... - Clayton Ontario ...
Rose Mary Sarsfield from Almonte High School - Classmates

The one in Bowland’s cemetery would be my uncle Tom Finlayson. He was married to my father’s sister Annie Richards… I should know where they lived but will have to look it up. It was on the Old Perth Road but we were down there a couple of weeks ago and I could not see the old house. I actually was never there when I was young because my aunt was dead before I was born and I think Uncle Tom lived with one of his nephews. They only had one child Meda and she died when she was five.

So here is the land info:Charles and James Finlayson had WLot 8 Con 2 Ramsay and All of Lot !0 Con 2 There may have been two Charles, I am not sure, but Lot 10 went from Charles to James and then to Edgar who was unmarried. My uncle Tom was a brother of Edgar and Tom owned WLot 10 Con 3 Ramsay.–Thanks to Rosemary Sarsfield historian and author of Clayton history-Whispers From the Past-Clayton Store, Millstreet Books in Almonte and from rose@sarsfield.ca of we found the farm.

Ramsay Township,
Lanark County, Ont.
1918 Directory

Names are listed in the order published — most of them are in alphabetical order by first letter only, but some may be completely out of order. Please use the “Search” function of your browser to look for all occurrences of a name. Obvious errors have been noted at the end of the line [in square brackets], but numerals, especially “5” and “6”, are sometimes impossible to tell apart in the photocopies.


SCHEDULE OF POST OFFICES
         for
   RAMSAY TOWNSHIP

  1. Almonte
  2. Appleton
  4. Blakeney
  5. Clayton
  6. Carleton Place



NAME                No  P.O. DES. CON.  LOT
Aiken John           1   1    O   12      2
Aikenhead Matthew    2   1    O    9  10-11
Aitken James Jr.     3   1    O   12      2
Aitken James         4   2    O   11      1
Aitken Duncan        5   1    O   10     14
Allen William        6   1    O    8     15
Anderson Wm.         7   1    O    8     12
Andrews John         8   1    O    9     13
Armstrong Wm.        9   1    O   10     21
Armstrong John W.   10   1    T    6     24
Arthur Orel         11   4    O   11     26
Arthur Thos. S.     12   1    O    8      5
Arthur James M.     13   6    O    1      5
Arthur Wm. G.       14   1    O   10     24
Bain Daniel Jr.     15   1    O    3     16
Bain Daniel Sr.     16   1    O    4     16
Baird Robert M.     17   2    O   10      3
Barr Thomas         18   5    O    2     23
Barker James A.     19   4    O   10     25
Barker Robert       20   1    O    7     21
Barker Alex.        21   4    O    9     27
Bell Edgar          22   2    O    8      3
Bellamy John E.     23   5    O    2     23
Bickford W. H.      24   1    O    9     13
Bingham Oswald      25   4    O   10     26
Black John          26   2    O   10      3
Black Daniel J.     27   1    O    5     10
Blaney Walter       28   1    O   12      9
Boaz Charles        29   5    O    2     22  [name might be "Boes"]
Bowes John          30   1    O    8     22
Bowes James         31   1    O    7     15
Bowes Thomas        32   1    O    7     11
Bowland H. M.       33   5    O    1     17
Bowland Wm. J.      34   6    O    3      1
Brydges Charles     35   1    O   12     10
Brydges Wllbert     36   1    O   12     12
Buchanan John A.    37   4    O   10     25
Buchanan G. W.      38   2    O   10      2
Bulger Justis       39   5    O    1     22
Burke Charles       40   1    O    8     19
Burns Wm. J. [?]    41   6    T    6      5  [possibly a second blotted initial]
Camelon James       42   1    T    7     16
Camelon Arch        43   1    T    7     17
Camelon David       44   6    O    4      6
Camelon David       45   1    T    7     19
Camelon John        46   4    T    9     24
Cannon John         47   1    O    7     12
Carnochan Wm.       48   1    T    8     21
Carnohan Robert     49   6    O    3      7
Cavers Edgar        50   2    O   12      4
Chapman Joseph      51   1    O    8      6
Chapman George T.   52   6    O    8      4
Cochrane Alex. A.   53   1    T    7     22
Cochrane Peter      54   1    O    6     23
Cochrane Wm. L.     55   1    O    5     24
Code Matthew        56   6    O    2      7
Coleman Wm.         57   6    O    8      6
Colquhoun Arch      58   1    T   11     21
Corkery James       59   1    O    3     10
Coulter Charles     60   5    O    2     25
Cox Wm.             61   4    T    9     25
Cox W. H.           62   6    O    7      3
Craig Thos. Sr.     63   1    T    8     18
Craig Adams         64   1    O   10     11
Cunningham John     65   6    O    7      1
Curtis Thomas       66   6    T    1      6
Darling Fred A.C.   67   1    O   11     16
Devine Edward       68   6    O    9      2
Devine Hugh B.      69   6    O    7      7
Dezell James        70   6    O    1      1
Doherty Ernest      71   1    O   10     13
Donaldson David     72   6    T    7      4
Doucett Geo. H.     73   6    O    3      5
Dowdall Jas. E.     74   2    O   10      3
Dowdall Hiram       75   6    O    3      6
Dowdall Charles     76   6    O    2      3
Drummond Sam        77   1    O   12      9
Drynan James        78   1    O    9      7
Drynan John         79   1    O   10     15
Drynan Wm. J.       80   5    O    3     27
Drynan James        81   5    O    2     26
Duncan Edmund       82   1    O   11     10
Duncan Alex. S.     83   1    O   10     11
Duncan Wm. J.       84   1    O   11      9
Dunlop W. G.        85   1    O    1     16
Elliott Philip J.   86   1    O    1     13
Erskine John L.     87   5    O    1     23
Evans Richard       88   5    T    2     22
Evans Abraham       89   5    O    1     20
Fenlon John         90   4    O   10     25
Finlayson Thos. W.  91   1    O    2      8
Finlayson Chas.     92   1    O    2     10

James Finlayson was born on May 9 1866, in Ramsay Township, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada. Catherine was born on September 21 1867, in Drummond Township, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada.Charles had 5 siblings: Verna Agnes Finlayson, Thomas Albert Finlayson and 3 other siblings. 

Charles married Gladys Irene Finlayson (born Rogers) on Wednesday January 14,1925, at age 26 in York, Ontario. Gladys was born in 1906, in Bristol, Somerset, England.They had one son: Charles A. Finlayson.

1087-25 Charles Mitchell FINLAYSON, 26, druggist, Ontario, 51 Harcourt Ave., s/o James FINLAYSON (b. Ont) & Catherine Agnes RUTTLE, married Gladys Irene ROGERS, 18, music teacher, England, 34 Wiley Ave., d/o Albert ROGERS (b. England) & Daisy Lydia TONKIN, witn: James R. GARVIN of 85 Boulton Ave & Evelyn UNDERWOOD of 20 Earlscourt Ave., 14 Jan 1925

8260-97 John M. FINLAYSON, 33, farmer, Ramsay twp., Drummond twp., s/o Charles FINLAYSON & Mary SMITH, married Maria A. RUTTLE, 33, Drummond, same, d/o Thomas RUTTLE & Lucinda MARTIN, witn: Charles FINLAYSON of Ramsay twp & Emma RUTTLE of Drummond, 28 April 1897 at Drummond twp

6638-95 (Lanark Co): James FINLAYSON, 29, farmer, Ramsay twp., same, s/o Charles & Mary, married Catherine RUTTLE, 28, Drummond, same, d/o Thomas & Lucinda, witn: John M. FINLAYSON of Almonte & Maria RUTTLE of Innisville, 23 Oct 1895 at Drummond twp

#006650-95 (Lanark Co): Thomas R. WATCHORN, 23, yeoman, Lanark twp., same, s/o Henry WATCHORN & Nancy TAYLOR, married Mary A. FINLAYSON, 16, Lanark twp., same, d/o William FINLAYSON & Amelia CUNNINGHAM, witn: Ethel CODE of Carleton Place & Charlie FINLAYSON of Ramsay twp., 13 Nov 1895 at Lanark twp

James Finlayson– Boyd’s Cemetery Drummond

For more Finlayson’s click here

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Jan 1991, Fri  •  Page 65

S.S. No. 14 Ramsay – Greig’s School

In 1826, a long builting was found on Rea’s lot. Early teachers, Mr. Huggart and Joseph Rea, lived in a house in Greig’s field. James Greig sold one quarter acre on the eighth line, Lot 10, Concession 7, Ramsay for $4.00 and  a frame building was put up. Andrew Greig sold another quarter acre of land in 1878 to enlarge the school grounds. Mrs. Pearl McCann created history when she became the first married female teacher in 1942. When S.S. No. 5 only had 5 pupils, the Board decided to amalgamate the two schools from 1945-1947. In 1963, the school was destroyed by fire and students had to temporarily attend S.S. No. 2 Ramsay. On June 30, 1960, many former students and teachers celebrated the 100th anniversary of the school. In 1970, pupils from S.S. No. 14 moved to Naismith Memorial in Almonte and the school property was sold to Edgar Finlayson for $4,500.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Jul 1983, Sat  •  Page 65

The Grieg School– The Fire and Mrs. Pearl McCann

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Jul 1976, Mon  •  Page 30
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
1961

 - http://The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 06 Aug 1971, Fri • Page 29
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Sep 1946, Fri  •  Page 19
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 May 1954, Mon  •  Page 18

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Mar 1940, Sat  •  Page 14
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 May 1922, Sat  •  Page 3
Finlayson – Richards(10 September 1924)A charming wedding was solemnized at St. George’s church, Clayton, on Wednesday of this week, the ceremony taking place at 5 o’clock in the afternoon. At that hour, Mr. Thos. W. Finlayson, a prosperous young farmer of the 2nd line of Ramsay, led to the altar Miss Alice Annie Richards, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Richards, who reside a couple of miles or so from the groom’s home. Mr. H. E. Goode, of Ottawa, was groomsman, while Miss Rath, a cousin of the bride, gracefully performed the duties of bridesmaid. Rev. Robt. Turley, incumbent of the church, tied the Gordian knot in the presence of relatives of both families and a number of personal friends. At the conclusion of the ceremony an adjournment was made to the home of the bride’s parents, where a sumptuous wedding dinner awaited them, which was done full justice to. At the conclusion a couple of hours or so were spent in pleasant social intercourse, and later the newly wedded couple repaired to their home, accompanied by the goof wishes of the company for a long and prosperous voyage o’er the matrimonial sea. The gifts to the bride, who is popular with a large circle of friends, were numerous, many of them costly, and all of them useful. Since the above was place in type a Clayton correspondent sends the following additional particulars;  The bride, who was tastefully dressed in white silk with an over dress of point d’esprit and white hat to match and carrying a bouquet of cream roses, entered the church leaning on the arm of her father. She was followed by her bridesmaid, Miss Mildred Rath, who wore a pretty dress of white batiste trimmed with lace and insertion and large leghorn hat, and carried a bouquet of pink roses. The groomsman was Mr. Goode of Ottawa. After the ceremony the bridal party and guests, which numbered about fifty, drove to the home of the bride’s parents, where a sumptuous dinner was served. A toast was proposed by Rev. R. Turley to which the groom replied. The bride’s going away dress was brown eoline with hat to match.

Meda Finlayson

On Saturday morning, Jan. 1st., the brittle thread of life which binds the soul and body were severed and death took from our midst dear little Anna Meda (Finlayson), only child of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Finlayson of Ramsay. She was only 5 years and 9 months old, and her sudden passing away was a tremendous shock to both parents and community, as she was just three days ill. She was a very bright, cheerful and cunning child, and a great favorite with those who knew her. Just before death she repeated every word of a little prayer her mother had taught her. The funeral took place Monday, Jan. 3rd, from her father’s residence to St. George’s cemetery. The service at the house was conducted by Rev. Mr. Merrilees and at the grave by Rev. Mr. Brunet. In spite of the inclemency of the weather there was a very large funeral over seventy carriages being in the cortege. The floral tributes were: Wreaths, from Mr. and Mrs. Finlayson, parents of deceased; spray, from Mr. and Mrs. Mack Richards, spray from Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Finlayson and James and Mack Richards, uncles of deceased. The sympathy of the community goes out to Mr. and Mrs. Finlayson in their bereavement. Tender Shepherd thou hast stilled, Now Thy little lamb’s brief weeping, Oh, how peaceful, pure and mild, In Thy loving arms ’tis sleeping, And no sign of anguish sore, Heaves that little bosom more.

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A Houseful of Whimsy- Springside Hall 1982

Do You have a Hidden Room in Your Home?

What Did Adam Dowdall Find in My Carleton Place Yard?

The Sundial of Springside Hall

Then and Now Springside Hall 1920s-1930s Photos

Reusing the Past of Carleton Place — The Morphy’s and the McCann’s

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

My Neighbours –Photos of the Cliff- McCann House and Springside Hall

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers — Part 2 — To Hell and Back

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers

Dumbwaiter Calamities of Crockery

While You Were Sleeping —-The Storyland Bunny Moves to the Hi Diddle Day House

Baird Baird and Baird

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Baird Baird and Baird
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Aug 1900, Thu  •  Page 8

photo from Almonte.com- photo from the top of Victoria Mills

In Almonte there was a 200 acre Crown reserve and south of it were the farms of Robert Baird and William Baird, Lanark society settlers of 1821. John Baird’s land, including Farm Street and Brea Street (now Brae), was surveyed in 1861. John Baird kept a general store, ran a flour mill ( Mill of Kintail) and sent supplies to the lumbermen. Mr. Baird was known as a very exact and honest man when he was in Bennie’s Mills. When he weighed goods they were weighed to the fraction of an ounce. He never gave more nor less. Mr. Baird later went to Almonte and ran a woolen mill there. The old Baird’s Mill site was on the river, adjacent to the former Victoria Woollen Mill. (the old Peterson’s Ice Cream Plant)

Messrs. Baird & Co. (who like the rest of the brother manufacturers were staunch adherents to protection principles) showed his black broadcloth to those who visited the mills in 1877. The texture and finish was equal to any of those manufactured in England. The Bairds gave the credit to their superintendent Joseph Boothroyd who had come to Almonte from Huddersfield, England.

Carding machine, 19th century - Stock Image - C022/9413 - Science ...

The Baird mill at that time employed 40 hands, men and women. The ground floor was occupied by the finishing room, dye house and scouring room complete with excellent machinery. The first floor was the carding room complete with one american carding machine and the other a Holroyd machine from England. On the floor above was a spinning jack, spooling room, and ten looms all busy and turning out fabric quickly.

Our Hattersley looms – McLean & Co.

The looms were all attended by women and girls and it was wonderful to watch their quick fingers in the operation of weaving. The women and girls were immaculate, almost similar to a Quakerness, and visitors always said the factory girls of Almonte were way more impressive than their sisterhood in Manchester. They also spoke proper English and that’s what they didn’t do in Lancashire and Yorkshire in the old country.

There was also another feature in Baird’s Mill and that was the precaution for fire. There was a large pump in the basement with a big hose leading to all parts of the factory. The mill although compact was something to behold. Long may they weave!

The East side of Mill Street from the Post office down (the old Post office) was another story. Along the riverbank many crowded to the river for water and waterpower. Properties constantly changed hands and not one is now in existence with the exception of the “Yorkshire” building which was, in 1867, but three stories high. Fortunes were won and lost there over power rights, but that is another story. No doubt a book could be written about that stubborn Scottish family, the Baird Brothers, the owners of one of these powers (above mentioned) who fought for their rights without compromise, not only against the Rosamond interest but also against the Elliotts – fought till their money was exhausted.

Trivia

Baird , William , Almonte , Ontario , Canada– had a patent on a spinning and twisting machine 1886 and on

Cotton-spinning machinery - Wikipedia
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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Dec 1879, Thu  •  Page 4

Nearby were William and John Baird’s flour mill, Greville Toshack’s carding mill and Stephen Young’s barley mill, all on the Indian River ; and on the Mississippi the similar industries of Blakeney.  The Baird mill, restored as a century old structure in 1930 by Dr. R. Tait McKenzie, sculptor, surgeon and native son of the manse, is now well known as the Mill of Kintail, repository of examples of his works and local historical exhibits.  It was described by its owners in 1860 as:

Back in the 1870s Almonte’s woollen mills were: No. 1, on the island, conducted by B. and W. Rosamond; No. 2, on Mill street, by Elliott, Routh and Sheard; Gilbert Cannon’s mill, down on the bay, Just below the hill; John Baird and Company, on Mill street near McLean’s grist mill; the Anchor Knitting Mill, on the island, and William Thoburn’s mill, on Little Bridge street. In later years Judge Jamie-son’s son married Miss Annie Thoburn and became proprietor of the mill.  Rosamond’s No. 1 mill was the largest manufacturing plant in the town; it employed about 300 hands.

John McIntosh and Allan McDonald and Samuel Reid operated the carding mill from 1847 – 1854 on Lot 19 Mill St Almonte. From 1854 – 1865 it was operated as a custom carding and woolen mill by Almonte woolen Manufactory under McIntosh and Reid, and after 1858, under McIntosh alone. John McIntosh built his second mill on Lot 7 Little Bridge St, Almonte in 1862 and operated the Almonte Woolen Manufactory in it until 1865. From 1865 – 1867 McIntosh was superintendent of the mill at Sly’s Rapids under the proprietorship of D McIntosh. McIntosh declared bankruptcy in 1867. In 1871 John McIntosh then became the superintendent of the woolen mill of John Baird and Company, Lots 20 and 21 Mill St Almonte.

In 1871 John Baird and Company leased another woolen mill on Lot 20 Mill St, Almonte which he subsequently purchased it in 1879. He then leased the mill to James Wylie in 1881 and sold it to him in 1897.

Gilbert Cannon (former employee of John McIntosh from 1854 – 1865 at the McIntosh mill on Lot 19, Mills St, Almonte) and Thomas Watchorn operated the custom carding and woolen mill on Lot 21 Mill St in Almonte from 1865 to 1867 under the proprietorship of John Baird, when Watchorn left for Lanark and Cannon continued the operation alone until 1870. In 1869 he purchased Lot F at the foot of Mill St Almonte where he built a new woolen mill in 1870. In 1871 he sold his equipment and leased the mill to William Wylie until 1877. Gilbert Cannon also operated a woolen mill in Arnprior (dates?)


Thomas Watchorn was a cloth finisher and dyer in Almonte employed by the Rosamonds at their mill on Lot 21 Mill St Almonte. The he and Gilbert Cannon operated the custom carding and woolen mill on Lot 21 Mill St in Almonte from 1865 to 1867 under the proprietorship of John Baird, when Watchorn left for Lanark . Thomas Watchorn and Boyd Caldwell established the Clyde Woolen Mill at Lot 2 George St in Lanark 1867. In 1875 Watchorn leased the woolen mill in Merrickville in partnership with his brother Robert.–https://mvtm.ca/biographies/

Clayton had its origin little more than a year later than Almonte when Edward Bellamy, who recently had come to Grenville County from Vermont, obtained the water privilege of the falls on the Indian River there and opened a sawmill and grist mill to serve a section of the new townships.  Among the other communities of Ramsay township, Blakeney, once the location of several  manufacturing concerns, came next in time of origin as Snedden’s Mills.  Not far from Snedden’s the small hamlet of Bennie’s Corners appeared on the scene of the eighteen thirties, adjoined on the Indian River by Toshack’s carding mill and Baird’s grist mill.  The Baird mill, now known as the Mill of Kintail, has been preserved by a private owner for public historical uses and as a residence.

“Woodside Mills, consisting of a Flour Mill with two runs of burr stones, a superior Smut Machine and an Oatmeal Mill with two runs of Stones, one of which is a Burr.  The Mill is three and a half stories high and most substantially built.  There are also on the premises a kiln capable of drying from 120 to 200 bushels of oats at a time, a frame House for a Miller, a Blacksmith Shop with tools complete, two Stone Buildings and outbuildings, with Stabling for eleven horses.”

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Apr 1955, Sat  •  Page 18
1894

6622-94 Robert BAIRD, 38, merchant, Ramsay, Pilot Mound Manitoba, s/o John BAIRD & Christena BRYSON, married Mary Ann WILSON, 28, Ottawa, Appleton, d/o George WILSON & Mary Ann McKEE, witn: George T. WILSON of Appleton & Maggie R. BAIRD of al, 16 Aug 1894 at Ramsay006522-94 (Lanark Co) John S. BAIRD, 25, farmer, Fitzroy, Fitzroy s/o John & June BAIRD married Ida E. GROVES, 19, Fitzroy, Fitzroy d/o William & Eliza GROVES wtn: Spurgeon BAIRD of Montreal & Minnie GROVES of Fitzroy, 25 July 1894 at Pakenham
 
6626-94 Alexander CAVERS, 29, farmer, Canada, Beckwith, s/o Thomas & Margaret C., married Catherine Elizabeth HISLOP, 24, Canada, Carleton Place, d/o Neil & Isabella, witn: Robert BAIRD of Ramsay & Maggie HISLOP of Smith Falls, 31 Jan 1894 at Beckwith

006573-94 Allan MORRIS, 22, lumber business, Middleville, same, s/o Peter & Agnes, married Minnie McFARLANE, 21, Lanark, same, d/o Robert & Bella, witn: Charles BAIRD of Lanark & Katie MORRIS of Middleville on Oct. 24, 1894 at Dalhousie

6534-94 Neil MUNRO, 35, farmer, Appleton, Ramsay, s/o John & Sarah, married Sarah BROWN, 32, widow, Griffith, Carleton Place, d/o William & Lizzie ADAMS, witn: Robert BAIRD of Appleton & Sarah HATTON of Ottawa, 28 Feb 1894 at Carleton Place

6582-94 James REID, 19, laborer, Middleville, Clyde Forks, s/o Matthew REID & Mary BAIRD, married Susannah CAMERON, 19, Folger Station, same, d/o Hugh CAMERON & Susannah McQUILTY, witn: David REID of Clyde Forks & Victor Ann CAMERON of Folger Station, 7 May 1894 at Clyde Fork

The Invincible Margaret Baird of Lanark

I Now have Part of Joey Cram — In Memory of Sandy Baird

The Bairds of Bennie’s Corners

John Baird the Carriage Maker

The Leaky Chancery Dam –The Forgie’s of Almonte Part 2

What do McLean’s Bakery and Morris Green Have in Common?

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What do McLean’s Bakery and Morris Green Have in Common?

 

McLean Bakery -Almonte.com

Archibald McLean was one of the last surviving veterans in the district from the Fenian Raid. McLean’s bake shop was operated in 1862 by Archie McLean and for several years he was the oldest resident of the town who had been born in Almonte.

Almonte Brass Band– Photo-Almonte.com

Archie was succeeded by his brother “A.J.” commonly known as “Sid” who died only a few years ago. He was the old stand-by in the early Almonte “Brass Bands” and later with his sons Alec and James. Sid played the kettle drum and all the boys competed for the honour of carrying the musicians’ music into the N.L.A.S. grounds during the fair.

Next to McLean’s Bake Shop was Stafford’s grocery and liquor store and further down John McKinnon’s grocery and liquor store. In April of 1954 McLean’s bakery and confectionery business which had operated in the town of Almonte for over 65 years on Mill Street had come to an end.

almontegree.jpg
Photo- Linda Seccaspina editing from a photo from Up the Line by Steve Evans

The store and residence long owned by Albert J. McLean has been sold to William J. Green. Mr. McLean, Sid as he was familiarly known, established his baking business in a frame building on the corner of Mill and Brae Streets years ago. He later moved and erected the brick’ residence and store occupied by the family ever since he opened for business in 1907.

Two sons, Alex and Jim, became associated in the business after they left school. Jim recalls the days when he delivered bread with a horse and sleigh. The streets were not plowed then and he had to trudge many blocks through snow drifts with a basket on his arm to distribute the loaves and other products of the bakery to his customers.

Bread sold then at six cents a loaf or 17 tickets for a dollar. The new tenants of the Mill Street house and store were the William Green family. Mr. Green was a retired insurance salesman. Mrs. Green and two sons, Don and Morris were engaged in the upholstery business which would be carried on in the lower section of the newly-acquired property.

5368-79 Archibald McLEAN, 28, baker, Almonte, same, s/o Alexander McLEAN & Catherine LAWSON, married Ellen RALPH, 28, Joliette Que., Almonte, d/o Richard TAYLOR (sic) & Eliza, witn: Richard SHILSON & Margaret BOWES, both of Almonte, 13 March 1879 at Almonte

Adding to the Past- Morris Green from Almonte

Almonte 1859 Business Directory

A Name on a Sign –Thomas J. Reid Almonte

Mr. Young and Mr. Bond- Almonte History 1870s

McAdams Store Almonte

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Comments about the Canadian Cafe Almonte — Low Family