Tag Archives: almonte

The Tragic Death of Dr. Mostyn Shocked the People of Almonte

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The Tragic Death of Dr. Mostyn Shocked the People of Almonte

 

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Dr. Mostyn (Michael Dunn photo)

 

Mr. Robert Young, 240 Fifth avenue, was formerly a resident of Almonte. He was born in the township of Ramsay, about 1 mile from Almonte, but went to Almonte to live about the year 1870. He is able to tell some interesting stories about things which happened in and about Almonte in the 1860s-1880s. The first of Mr. Young’s narrations concerns the sad drowning of Dr. Mostyn and a young son of Rev. J. W. Manning in the seventies.

Early in the month of April Dr. Mostyn received a call to Appleton, six miles west, and decided to go by rowboat as the river was open except for ice on the banks.  Dr. Mostyn, who was a very popular physician, arranged with young Manning, who was a clerk in a store in Almonte, to go with him.

The two were seen to leave the village early in the morning, but were not again seen alive by any Almonte people. They appear to have reached Appleton and to have set out for home in the afternoon. Before they left Appleton, a strong wind had got up and the Mississippi was quite choppy. At Gleason’s Bay the wind must have upset the rowboat, as both the bodies were later found there.

Dr. Mostyn’s body was found in the centre of the river, where the boat likely upset. The boy’s body was found near the riverbank that had evidence that he had made a fight for it. Sadly the boy was not able to climb the icy bank. When the two did not return that day a search was made but it was several days before the bodies were found, as the river in the meantime had frozen over. Dr. Mostyn was one of the beloved “family doctor” type,  and the two victims both had large funerals.

 

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The announcement of the death by drowning,
Monday last, of Dr. Mottyn and Jas. W.
Manning, jr., produced a profound feeling of
sadness in Almonte, and made every citizen a
mourner. The melancholy occurrence was so
unexpected, so sudden and startling, that the
Ontario reports were generally discredited; but
when, after investigation, the awful truth was
established the feeling of sorrow and regret that
prevailed was intense and unutterable.
The circumstances are as follows : Dr. Mostyn
was anxious to visit a patient at Appleton on
Saturday last, and owing to the rough state of
the roads, concluded to go up in a row-boat.
Disappointed in getting a’ man to row on
Saturday, he postponed his visit till Monday,
when be was accompanied by Mr. James^ W.
Manning Jr., who took a gun along with him
to have a shot or two on the way.

The skiff used belonged to Mr. Manning; it was short and
narrow, and had been built we believe for
amateur racing. On Monday a high wind was
blowing up the river, and the atmosphere was
raw and cold. The trip was made with safety
to Appleton. Dr. Mostyn visited bis patient and
Mr. Manning made an engagement with the
hotel keeper there to meet him in Almonte on
the following forenoon, on license business. The
unfortunate gentlemen left Appleton on the return
journey about half-past four o ’clock, being
accompanied to the landing place by Mr. Adam Teskey.

This was the last seen of them. Dr.
Mostyn was seated in the stern of the boat, steering
and paddling. Mr. Manning was rowing.
On the following morning, Mrs. Manning,
mother of the deceased, becoming alarmed at
her son’s prolonged absence, made inquiries;
and about noon, when Mr. Arthurs, the Appleton
hotel keeper, arrived and found that be had
not returned, the fears of the friends of the two
gentlemen were aroused.

A number of boats at once proceeded up the river; and they found,
about three and a half miles above Almonte, or
a mile below Appleton, the upturned
boat used, and near by one of the oars. Another
oar was found about two hundred yards below
the boat, and still further down stream, in
Gleeson’s Bay the fur cap worn by Dr. Mostyn
was found floating near the ice. No other evidence was found on
Tuesday, although the search was kept up until
midnight.

On Wednesday seventy-five men
in boats, from Almonte and Carleton Place,
dragged the river unremittingly all day.
The Dr.’s overcoat was pulled up from the
bottom, and some distance below a pair of
gloves worn by Mr. Manning, a paddle and a
briar root pipe were found floating on the water.

 

 

historicalnotes

  1. William Mostyn (June 5, 1836– March 30, 1881) was an Irish-born doctor[1] and political figure in Ontario. He represented Lanark North in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1875 to 1879 as a Conservative member. He drowned at the age of 44.[2]

    Of Welsh descent, he was born in Elphin, County Roscommon and came to Upper Canada with his parents in 1837. Mostyn was educated in Kingston and received his M.D. from Queen’s University in 1858. He served as a surgeon for the militia. Mostyn was president of the North Lanark Agricultural Society. He served three years as reeve of Almonte and 15 years as assistant coroner for Lanark Ontario. Mostyn was also a district Grand Master in the Freemasons.[1]

 

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Clipped from

  1. Ottawa Daily Citizen,
  2. 02 Oct 1874, Fri,
  3. Page 3 -

    Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Citizen,
    2. 30 Jul 1927, Sat,
    3. where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.
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        People from the Potter-Bennett Block Fire– A Shocking Find

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        Robert Drader Bill Shail Saved from Drowning May 28 1957

        HIGH SCHOOL CADETS RESCUE CHILD IN RIVER

        Murder or Accident — Bates & Innes Flume

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The Almonte Legion Little Olympics 1968

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The Almonte Legion Little Olympics 1968

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historicalnotes

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

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Almonte Topics Back in 1893 June 6th

Downtown Almonte 1891 — Thumb Biters Skaters and Widows

Constipation Guaranteed to be Cured in Almonte

The Story of “Old Mitchell,” Who Lived Outside of Almonte

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The Story of “Old Mitchell,” Who Lived Outside of Almonte

 

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In the 1860s there lived outside of Almonte within a short distance, a man who was known by the name of “Old Mitchell,” and who was a real hermit. “Old Mitchell,” as he was called, was a bachelor who lived a lonely life on his own farm.

Although this man lived within a mile or two of Almonte he had not been known to enter Almonte for over 30 years, and had seldom even been off his own farm. His food had, during those 30 years, been brought to him either from the village and from neighbours. Mr. Mitchell had a fine brand of sand on his farm, and his “pit” was much resorted to by Almonte builders, and by farmers who required it.

The hermit grew hay and oats, kept cows and hens, and was pretty well self-contained. People didn’t bother the hermit much except when they went on business, as he kept three rather savage dogs. The hermit, while living a hermit’s life managed to keep pretty well abreast of the news and so it came about that in the spring of 1860 that he learned the Prince of Wales was going to visit Almonte. On the day of the Prince’s arrival much to the surprise of his neighbours the hermit left his farm and walked towards Almonte.

But, he did not go all the way. He stopped at the top or the “Bay Hill” just outside of Almonte, from which point he could get a good view of the road where the Prince was to pass.

One day the hermit died and he was found dead in his shack. A search was made after he had not been seen for some time, and the actions of his dogs and stock had made it apparent that something had happened on the place. There was a general impression among the Almonte people and his neighbours that the old man had a lot of money saved up, and after his death a lot of digging was done all over the farm, but without result.

“Old Mitchell” had no relatives anywhere near Almonte. Mr. Young does not remember what became of his property and says that those who had occasion to visit the old man noticed that the appearance of his shack used to tell that the hermit regularly swept his one room home, but that he used to sweep the dirt into corners and behind cupboards, etc. Every now and then he would have a general cleaning  because as a hermit he knew that he was connected to everything in his life– except maybe housecleaning.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

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Doug Lorimer Almonte Gazette- Kathy Dunbar

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Doug Lorimer Almonte Gazette- Kathy Dunbar

download (86)download (87).jpegThanks to Kathy Dunbar for sending this.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

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Memories of Madeline Moir – Pinecraft Proberts and John Dunn 1978

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Memories of Madeline Moir – Pinecraft Proberts and John Dunn 1978

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jpg109.jpgFrom the scrapbook of Lucy Connelly Poaps

 

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Ted LeMaistre Mayor of CP- Ginny Huether-Harry Probert and Rob Probert- Opening of their store across from the town hall.

Rob Probert= “I remember Madeline quite well. I have one of her charcoal paintings. Very nice lady. Probably a pioneer in the Almonte arts world”

 

historicalnotes

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Obituary for Madeleine Moir

Moir,
Madeleine

Passed away at her residence in Carleton Place on September 14, 2013.

Madeleine
Formerly of Almonte, Age 94 Years.

Beloved wife to the late George Fanais. Predeceased by two siblings, Jean and Malcolm and by her closest friend Doris McCarthy. Madeleine was the last of the Croggon family and was missed by her many friends.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading

Where Was Pinecraft?

If the Falls Could Talk

Clippings of Robbie Probert the Candlestick Maker

Leonard Lee — Newspaper Clippings

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Leonard Lee — Newspaper Clippings

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 25 Jul 2005, Mon,
  3. Page 2
  4. Page 26
  5. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading
  6. N. S. Lee & Son Hardware Comments and History

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    You Didn’t Go to Taylor’s Hardware Store for Milk

Documenting Houses -Almonte — 133 Marshall Street

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Documenting Houses -Almonte — 133 Marshall Street

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133 Marshall Street Almonte now for sale

 

 

This place is now for sale so I put put a 411 on information so we can document it. Thanks john Morrow

John Morrow— I lived next door to this house with my grandparents, Frank and Agnes (Napier) Morrow, at 133 Marshall Street before I started school. My cousin Maureen (Morrow) Dugdale and her husband Jim bought that house from our grandmother shortly after they were married.

 

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When I was living there the house at 143 Marshall Street was owned and occupied by Morley and Louise Parsons and their family of 5 Morley had a huge garden in the open space between the two houses. Their son, Morley Jr.(surprisingly nicknamed “Dick” or Dickie” despite their full names being Harold Morley Parsons in both cases) died in a freak shooting accident trying to unload a gun at a police checkpoint on Wolf Grove Road in September 1968. When my Dad, who was born at 133 Marshall Street, was growing up the owners were Amos and Rose Robinson, parents of Jenny Munro of Clayton.

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historicalnotes

 - Young hunter killed on trip with his girl...

 

 - PARSONS, Harold Morley In nosmtal, Almonte....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 23 Sep 1968, Mon,
  3. Page 26Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

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    Comments Comments Comments–Documenting History

  4. The End of 41 Julian Street — Is That All There Is?

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  6. My Fondest Memories of Almonte –Marty Taylor