Constipation Guaranteed to be Cured in Almonte

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Dr Willis Toledo created drugs to cure everything– from constipation to distemper.

Sept 8 1889 Almonte Gazette

We the undersigned do hereby agree to refund the money on a 25 cent bottle of Dr. Willis’ English Pills. Only if after using 3/4 of the contents of the bottle they do not relieve Constipation and Headache. We also warrant that four bottles will permanently cure the obstinate case of constipation. Satisfaction or no pay when Willis English Pills are used.

Signed,
P.C. Dowdall, Chemist and Druggist– Almonte, Ontario and M Patterson Chemist and Druggist Almonte, Ontario.

rectorotor.jpg

This was the other choice- which would you have chosen? Standing at six inches tall, it was claimed that the RECTO ROTOR would “reach your vital spot to such good purpose,” which kind of insinuates that there are some other products out there that reach the “vital spot” with nothing but malevolence in its heart and world domination plans tucked under its arm. I would have gone with the good druggists of Almonte.

Historical Notes:

Druggist P.C. Dowdall opened his Almonte store in 1880, and was was still serving those with constipation in 1935.

Druggist Manassah Patterson (also known as John) 

Manassah was a druggist and owned Patterson’s Drug Store on Mill Street in Almonte. He initially came to Almonte and took a position with Mr. Shaw, a druggist, and shortly afterwards he bought the business and conducted it for a time in the building now occupied by Mr. Therien.

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Lower Mill Street from the roof of the Victoria Mill –Photo from Almonte.com

In later years he built the brick store on Mill Street, which he occupied for nearly thirty years.  He was of a progressive disposition and had from time to time been connected with enterprises outside his regular business as druggist, and at the time he was taken ill he was looking after some mining properties in which he was interested. He also took an intelligent though quiet interest in public matters, and was prevailed upon one or two occasions to accept a position at the council board, which he filled in a most creditable manner.

In the 1880s, the first telephone exchange in Almonte operated from the rear of the drug store. As an agent of the Bell Telephone Company, Manassah used a primitive switchboard to manage the calls from among the original 29 subscribers to the new service.

Manassah Patterson was involved in and promoted horse racing. An article in the Renfrew Mercury July 4, 1884 reported that a proposition had been made whereby Almonte could secure an excellent and convenient driving park and public recreation grounds at a minimum cost. “Mr. M. Patterson proposes, at his own expense, to purchase 20 acres of the Robert McFarlane farm, adjoining the corporation, at to lease it, to an association to be formed for that purpose for a term of years to be agreed on and at a minimal cost.

The association will gradually fit it up with a driving track and suitable grounds for athletic sports. In the fall of 1886, Manassah travelled to the great Glenview horse sale in Kentucky with Dr. Preston, A. C. Burgess of Carleton Place, and Mr. Lawson of Almonte. The group was looking to purchase horses and was impressed by the beauty and strength of the horses in Kentucky. In July, 1889, Manassah was a judge at the Renfrew horse races.

The death of Manassah was reported in the Perth Courier on Friday February 15, 1907 as follows. “M. Patterson, the well known druggist of Almonte died at Cobalt on Saturday of pneumonia.” A more complete obituary was published in the Almonte Gazette on the same date.

Read the Almonte Gazette here.

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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