Looking for Memories of Harold Linton’s Gas Station

Standard

 

gasaa

Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Howard McLinton’s Gas Station. Was it was up at the end of High Street on the left as you are going toward Highway 7. Now it is a private home — Looking for memories please?

memroies

 

From Heritage Carleton Place

McLinton’s Service Station and Korner Bar

Address: 386 High Street, Carleton Place, Ontario

 

We have all heard of old schoolhouses and churches losing their ‘clientele’ over time and being given a new lease on life as residences. Would you believe that an old service station could be as charmed?

 

Before the Highway 7 bypass was built, truckers and vacationers alike would have to come down Bridge Street and High Street, making McLinton’s service station and snack bar a popular spot to stop for pie and ice cream.

 

David Lemuel ‘Lemmy’ McLinton and his eldest son, Russell, could fill your tank with Supertest gasoline, make your car hum again if it needed fixing (and this without computer-assisted diagnostics), and they also provided that now rarely seen commodity, a phone booth for their traveling guests or teenage sweethearts needing to touch base and coo privately.

With the bypass rerouting traffic, and the novelty that was ‘soft ice cream’ being served downtown, the McLintons eventually closed shop.

Can you see the ghost of the old service station and snack bar in the current residence?

historicalnotes

Carleton Place Girl remembers: As a teenager, we walked there many an evening for a chocolate bar and a pop.Sometimes we walked through the Bates and the Findlay apple orchards and helped ourselves to a few apples on the way back. Our greatest danger in those days was getting caught in someones clothes line after dark LOL

Related reading:

One of the 7 Wonders in Carleton Place

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

6 responses »

  1. As a teenager, we walked there many an evening for a chocolate bar and a pop.Sometimes we walked through the Bates and the Findlay apple orchards and helped ourselves to a few apples on the way back. Our greatest danger in those days was getting caught in someones clothes line after dark LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I remember a girl that lived there when we were in our early teens. Her name was Angela Turtin (not sure about the spelling). This would have been ’62 or ’63 I think. I don’t know if they did the conversion but I think so. The bridge for the bypass was completed in ’59.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s