Halloween Time Warp

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Halloween Time Warp

 

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1972 Photo of me in the background at Trinity Anglican Church in Cowansville, Quebec. I thought I had a halo on but does not look like that:)

 

 

In the 50s and 60s when I grew up in Cowansville, Quebec socks were darned, baths shared, kids roamed wild, and we licked the cream off the paper tops of milk bottles. As a kid, my mother and I spent the entire month of October, being excited for Halloween and costumes were planned. There was happiness in the air Halloween night with lots of “thank you,” and “please come again” as doorbells were rang and the words “Trick or Treat” were heard in the air.

Most of the kids that lived on Albert Street climbed the big hill to William Street first as word on the street was “the best candy in town” was located there. It was the first place I ever saw treat-size chocolate bars and you could barely move because there were so many children.

In 1962 I officially became a Beatnik at the age of 11. There were no official notices, no immediate black clothing; I just got up one morning and started to write bad poetry, and that was that. The primary inspiration was the fact that my father said that Jack Kerouac was a bad influence on young people, and that was enough for me.


That year my Halloween costume was a green wool sweater that barely covered my derriere, thick red tights, and a red beret. Yes, I was dressed as part of the Beat Generation. As one of my friends said it was Halloween and everyone was entitled to one good scare– and I was it.


High school came and It was now that part of my life where I wanted to be accepted. Unfortunately fitting in on Halloween included toilet paper, soap and shaving cream. We teepeed quite a few houses with one ply and eggs were thrown. I knew repenting later would not cure mischief, so I declined to participate. Thankfully nowadays, deer destroy the carved pumpkins and eggs are hopefully being celebrated with a local food drive.


In my 20s I became a fashion designer and because I was so eclectic everyday became Halloween for me and I never really looked back. Some people just didn’t get my thoughts on style and still don’t. My thoughts? If  the broom fits, keep on riding it.

Nowadays kids seldom know the past joys of trick or treating we enjoyed. Along with non-flammable costumes they only accept gluten free, non GMO, and locally sourced candy. There’s no “App” for the past to portray the scary plastic costumes of witches, vampires or ghouls of days gone by. They are now only part of our past memories.  Maybe it’s a good thing, because at this point in the month of October my blood type is now registered as Pumpkin Spice. Now that’s scary!

rob

A very long time ago Halloween was special when my late sister and I used to trick or treat together. The best candy- as it was told- was on William Street in Cowansville, Quebec, and the kids flocked there because they were giving out something new..bite size chocolate bars. Here is my late sister Robin Anne Knight Nutbrown and our neighbour and long time family friend Brian Rychard.

 

perr

 

Halloween in the 80s and 90s was huge at our home. I am sure my sons Schuyleur and Perry are looking at this picture and saying,“Mum what were you thinking?” Well guys, she probably wasn’t.

 

relatedreading

 

Last Night I Saw Someone I Loved at the Halloween Parade

 

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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