If You Can’t Wear a Princess Dress on Monday — Then When Can You?

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If You Can’t Wear a Princess Dress on Monday — Then When Can You?

 

 

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Verna Wilson Hadlock wedding September 1959- I am on the left front- my late sister Robin Knight Nutbrown is on the right. (see clipping below)

 

I loved the fancy dresses my Mother made me as a child, but when I was growing up in the 50s, you had to keep the nice things for “good” as it was said on numerous occasions. That meant if somehow “the Pope” came to Trinity Anglican Church in Cowansville, Quebec where I lived, you got to wear your good dress. Of course that never happened, and in time you outgrew the the ‘good clothes’ and that was the end of that.

I used to argue why couldn’t you wear exactly what you wanted to, on let’s say Monday morning.  I was told that I might be “breaking the law” during many of those mother daughter primal, visceral fashion dialogues. That was another one of those ‘bad seed’ Old Wives Tales, and I can tell you that one never became an urban legend.

 

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Sophia and Tenley 

When I watch my granddaughters dress up in their princess dresses today I am envious. Everything these kids find and wear as dress-up, they can wear anytime they want– without the message that others may judge you. That’s not shallow; that’s about transformation. There’s nothing wrong with wearing a pink taffeta dresses and heading off to the sandbox in my mind. Nothing at all, as I hear Tide has many formats these days!

 

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Me and William Blais at the Royal Crossroads Tearoom Wedding Tea

Mind you, the way I dress on different occasions now, people probably think I’m in fancy dress too. I have no fear, or any restrictions anymore, and keep nothing for good. Okay, wearing clothing from Forever 21 does not keep me “forever 21”- but they make me look as though I wished I were.  But truth be told, these days, I don’t, but that’s okay. I have been seen on occasion wrestling one of my clothing items like a top hat decorated in many fancy plumes caught in a tree in Almonte as I passed under it. Loads of experience was learned that fateful fall day on how to approach a tree sorting fancy millinery.

I am so grateful that it really isn’t about what others think anymore. This grandmother is proud and delighted about the imaginative ways my granddaughters put together outfits as they enjoy it, and that makes me happy.

Jean Paul Gaultier once said,

“It’s always the badly dressed people who are the most interesting.”

If that’s the case, then these future children will become the most interesting people in the whole world – hands down!

 

 

historicalnotes

 - Hadlock -Wilson -Wilson Wedding Held In...

Clipped from

  1. The Gazette,
  2. 08 Sep 1959, Tue,
  3. Page 26
  4. Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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