Tag Archives: yuill

Conversations with Agatha Yuill –The Buchanan Scrapbook

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Conversations with Agatha Yuill –The Buchanan Scrapbook

The Buchanan ScrapbooksWith files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

From the Buchanan scrapbook–

Walter Mather Yuill — Died at age 28
The Robbing of the Honey Pot- Andrew Cochrane Ramsay Yuill
Clippings of Mrs. Joseph Yuill – Margaret Yuill
Ralph and Iris Yuill
The Hart Children of Lanark — Laurie Yuill
The Life and Times of Cora Yuill
Notes on Alexander and Joseph Yuill
Mrs. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay Makes Butter
Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill
Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎
The Old Lionel Barr Sawmill Middleville 1941 — Laurie Yuill
HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION–70 YEARS OLD  –Laurie Yuill Part 1
HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 2 
HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”
Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill
HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Turning Back to the Clock Agnes “Aggie” Yuill– The Buchanan Scrapbook

Archie Yuill –The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Archie Yuill –The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

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Archie Yuill –The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

From the Buchanan scrapbook–

Walter Mather Yuill — Died at age 28
The Robbing of the Honey Pot- Andrew Cochrane Ramsay Yuill
Clippings of Mrs. Joseph Yuill – Margaret Yuill
Ralph and Iris Yuill
The Hart Children of Lanark — Laurie Yuill
The Life and Times of Cora Yuill
Notes on Alexander and Joseph Yuill
Mrs. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay Makes Butter
Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill
Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎
The Old Lionel Barr Sawmill Middleville 1941 — Laurie Yuill
HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION–70 YEARS OLD  –Laurie Yuill Part 1
HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 2 
HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”
Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill
HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Notes on Alexander and Joseph Yuill

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Notes on Alexander and Joseph Yuill
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Before and after–Black and white photograph from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum of 56 Front Street. Known as the Joseph Yuill house from: Standing on Front Street

Mr. Yuill was one of the founders of the Patrons of Industry, a fluent speaker and an ardent worker, while Mrs. Yuill helped establish the first Women’s Institute organizations in this district. She spoke from many platforms throughout Ontario, was the first president of the Carleton Place branch, and latterly was honorary president of the district of North Lanark. She did splendid work for the W. I. and the Red Cross and in 1917 both organizations presented her with life membership badges.

She was also a valued member of the United Farm Board. For a time the Yuill farm was a government fattening station where fowl were prepared for the British market and in the summer of 1901 Mr.- and Mrs. Yuill visited on the Old Country and studied the needs of that market.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Dec 1893, Thu  •  Page 3
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Oct 1893, Wed  •  Page 6

Joseph Yuill was a Canadian farmer and educator.

Yuill was born to Alexander Yuill and Ellen Aitkenhead in Ramsay Township, Upper Canada in 1838. His father had emigrated there from Glasgow in 1821, and started farming grains, as well as cattle, pigs and sheep. When his father retired from farming, Joseph inherited the farm, which he named Meadowside. On March 10th, 1864, Yuill married Margaret Cochrane. The pair would have a total of nine children.

Name:Alexander B Yuill
Gender:Male
Event Type:Death
Death Date:6 Apr 1978
Death Place:Carleton Place, Ontario

The Yuills began breeding Shropshire sheepBerkshire hogs, and Barred Plymouth Rock chickens, but the most important animals raised on their farm were Ayrshire cattle, which they began breeding in 1868. At the time, most farmers preferred cattle breeds useful for both meat and dairy, while Ayrshire cattle are dairy cows. The Yuills’ Ayrshires’ began winning prizes at local fairs, and at exhibitions in Toronto and Ottawa.[2] The farm eventually had a herd of 75 Ayrshires, which Yuill claimed was the largest in Canada. In 1893, one of the Yuills bulls won first prize at the Columbian exposition in Chicago.

The World’s Columbian Exposition (the official shortened name for the World’s Fair: Columbian Exposition, also known as the Chicago World’s Fair and Chicago Columbian Exposition) was a world’s fair held in Chicago in 1893 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’s arrival in the New World in 1492

Margaret supervised the dairy, which began producing high-quality butter that attracted notice. The farm produced 1,500 pounds (680 kg) of butter a year.[3] The pair created Ontario’s first “travelling dairy”, giving seminars and lectures on butter making.[1] This began when Aaron Abel Wright, a Renfrew merchant and butter-dealer suggested the pair give a lesson at a Farmers’ Institute meeting in his hometown. The first such lesson attracted more than 600 attendees, and Wright financed a week-long series of such lessons, with two a day. The couple started regularly giving such lessons, to groups at Farmers’ Institutes, the Ontario Agricultural and Experimental Union and the Dairymen’s Association of Eastern Ontario. These would cover subjects such as milk handling, butter making, raising calves and winter care of chickens. Joseph also wrote articles in agricultural journals. He was the president of the Dominion Ayrshire Breeders’ Association from 1891 to 1893.

When Yuill died in 1905, his farm covered 600 acres (2.4 km2), and included two large stock barns and a windmill. The farm Meadowside was left to his son Alexander, and a second farm in Elmhurst was left to his son Andrew. He died on the farm Meadowside, the same place he had been born, and his body was buried in Auld Kirk Cemetery near Almonte, Ontario.

also read-

When the Cheese Crashed Through the Floor

Walter Mather Yuill — Died at age 28

The Robbing of the Honey Pot- Andrew Cochrane Ramsay Yuill

Clippings of Mrs. Joseph Yuill – Margaret Yuill

Ralph and Iris Yuill

Mrs. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay Makes Butter

Middleville Photos — Laurie Yuill

  1. Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

The Old Lionel Barr Sawmill Middleville 1941 — Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION–70 YEARS OLD  –Laurie Yuill Part 1

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 2 

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 3-“There is no use in my joining the Society, as I have nothing to exhibit”

Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Photos of Men at Work – 1920s — Don’t Forget About Me!

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Photos of Men at Work – 1920s — Don’t Forget About Me!

All these photos came from the Playfair family in the Lanark/ Middleville/Playfair area. Thanks to local historian Laurie Yuill. All circa 1920s except for the corduroy road photo second to last– That photo is earlier. Some look like railroads and some do not–

All these photos came from the Playfair family in the Lanark/ Middleville/Playfair area. Thanks to local historian Laurie Yuill. All circa 1920s except for the corduroy road photo second to last– That photo is earlier. Some look like railroads and some do not–

Canada’s first provincial Dept of Highways was created by Québec in 1914. Two years later Ontario, which had had a provincial instructor in charge of roadmaking attached to the Dept of Agriculture since 1896, formed its own separate highways department.

Through the 1920s cars became cheaper and their numbers multiplied; registration of motor vehicles increased from 408 790 to nearly 1.62 million by the end of the decade. Good roads associations, national and provincial, led the crusade for improved road travel, and expenditures on roads by all governments tripled. By 1930 the annual outlay was $94 million. Methods and technology for building roads improved as horse-drawn scrapers and graders gave way to steam power for shovels and rollers. However, road building in most provinces ceased and maintenance was reduced during the Great Depression and WWII as men and materials were urgently needed in the war effort. The few good paved roads that had been built were almost completely destroyed by heavy wartime traffic, particularly in industrial areas. The Canadian Encyclopedia

For Whom the Toll Gates Tolled– Revised

The Lanark County Back Roads Tour

Stories of the Mississippi River — Elk, Rice Beds, and Corduroy Roads

The Toll Gates of Lanark County on Roads that Were Not Fit for Corpses

almonte gazette 1930

Genealogy — History of the McKay Family

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Genealogy — History of the McKay Family

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All clippings and photos from the scrapbook of Elaine Playfair thanks to Laurie Yuill

 

 

 

The Lea Family of Almonte — Genealogy Snippets

Documenting Don Lea .. “The Old Pucker”

Foley Almonte — Genealogy

The Sad Tale of the Foley Family–Foley, Harper, Sly, Bowes & Elliott

More Box Family Genealogy Clippings — Becky Robinson

Genealogy Chatter- Willard and Margaret E Simpson Cram

Ralph and Iris Yuill

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Ralph and Iris Yuill

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YUILL, Ralph Ballantyne Peacefully in hospital at Almonte with his family at his side on Thursday, September 16, 2004. Ralph Yuill of Clayton, age 77 years. Beloved husband of Iris L. Eady and much loved father of Gwen, Gail, Beth, Heather and Bill. Dear brother of Guy, Lois and Ronald Yuill. Predeceased by his brother, Elmer. Also survived by 10 grandchildren and 1 great-granddaughter. Friends may call at the C.R. GAMBLE FUNERAL HOME & CHAPEL 127 Church Street, Almonte for visiting on Sunday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 PM and where Service will be held in the Chapel on Monday at 11 AM. Interment Guthrie United Cemetery, Clayton

Ralph Ballantyne Yuill & Iris Lavina Eady

 Ralph Ballantyne Yuill (details suppressed for this person)

 Iris Lavina Eady (details suppressed for this person)

         Father: Robert Henry Eady (1885-1968)
         Mother: Marion Louise Ferguson (1889-1978)

 Children:

1 F Gwen Lavinia Yuill (details suppressed for this person)

         Spouse: Murray Louis Wark (living)

2 F Gail Louise Yuill (details suppressed for this person)

         Spouse: Blair Price (living)

3 F Elizabeth Ariel Yuill (details suppressed for this person)

4 F Heather Edie Yuill (details suppressed for this person)

5 M William Robert Ralph Yuill (details suppressed for this person)

 

relatedreading

The Life and Times of Cora Yuill

Mrs. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay Makes Butter

The S.S. #6 Middleville School

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The S.S. #6 Middleville School

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Middleville Public School in 1908– Photo by Laurie Yuill

 

Agnes Yuill began attending the Middleville School in 1900 and sat at a two seater desk and wrote on a slate. There were 50 other children in that school packed on the upper floor, and the room was so full someone had to sit on a globe box. But you have to remember that classes were large in those days as everyone had a large family and at one point there were over 100 young children attending that school. There wasn’t any electricity back then, so light came from the windows and a few lamps. The schoolhouses were heated by large metal stoves that burned wood. Parents in the school district were expected to chip in to provide wood for the school, so lots of times kids might walk to school carrying a log or two!

 

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Can you imagine what it was like to walk to school in the winter? They used to have two stoves running: an upstairs stove made by James Brothers of Perth and downstairs a Findlay Stove and the schoolhouse was always warm with the two stoves going.

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 Photo by Laurie Yuill

 

Jim Bowes, Agnes Yuill, Jane Yuill, & Alex Buchanan Yuill in Hopetown, July 1913
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1977 Perth Courier

 

Paper and books were hard to get, so textbooks were often shared. To do math problems or write out answers, students used slates during class. For big exams or to practice handwriting, paper and pens would be used, but the pens back then were very different.

They were often made out of quills from birds and were dipped in pots of ink in order to write. That could lead to things getting messy! Ink spills and stains can really mess up a test! Even using pencils was tricky — the pencils had to be sharpened with knives! In the country and small towns, schools went up to Grade 8. High schools — or as they was called then, grammar schools — were in cities or big towns. So usually only children with rich parents got to go to school past Grade 8.

 

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In the country and small towns, schools went up to Grade 8. High schools — or as they was called then, grammar schools — were in cities or big towns. So usually only children with rich parents got to go to school past Grade 8.

When kids did get to go to school, they were expected to memorize lots of things, standing in front of the schoolroom to recite their lessons. The subjects were mainly reading, math and writing, with others like geography added to the curriculum in 1850 and history in 1860.

 

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Kids hardly ever got perfect attendance. Bad weather kept everyone away, and when students’ families lived on farms, they were expected to help out and stay home from school when things got busy. The reason we have summer vacation today is because summer is when everything’s growing and the family was needed in the fields.

The Middleville school became what is now the Middleville Museum and the Museum has catalogued the history of the school which was one of 10 school sections in the township from 1822 until the last class in 1969.  Although the building was built in 1869 the first school house was built in 1822 when a log house was erected on the site where the old Presbyterian manse had stood.

Some favourite teachers that came out of the Middleville School was: Libie Rogers, a teacher at the school, was one of the 40 Canadians selected to go to Africa to instruct Boer children in concentration camps. J. H. McFarlane who also taught in Carleton Place taught there. His son was Leslie McFarland author of the Hardy Boys book series. Situated on a small mound the history that lies in that building will be passed on to future generations.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading.jpg

Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family

Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

Middleville– Yuill- Photos Laurie Yuill

Did you Know we have a “World Class Museum” right in Lanark County?

When the Middleville Folks Went to Jackfish — Ontario Ghost Town

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When the Middleville Folks Went to Jackfish — Ontario Ghost Town

 

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Aggie Yuill’s photo album–by Middleville,Ontario historian Laurie Yuill

I found two photos in the photos from Aggie Yuill’s photo album supplied to me by Middleville,Ontario historian Laurie Yuill. I had no idea where this place but the photos were dated 1914. so I began to dig and found out it was not only a shipping port but also a summer destination for tourists connected by the CPR Railroad. In fact, there were even 6 daily passenger trains to Thunder Bay, and back until the 1960’s.

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Photo –Aggie Yuill’s photo album– Photo from Middleville Historian Laurie Yuill 1914

 

Jackfish, Ontario: Memories of a Ghost Town

Nichol Family Collection — Looks like the same spot as Aggie Yuill’s Photo 1914

 

The Lakeview Hotel at Jackfish, built at the end of the 19th century, remained a popular stopping place during the summer for a number of years. The hotel burned down in 1960. By September, 1963 two families remained in Jackfish and they moved out of the town a month later. Hence,the town site was totally abandoned by 1963. Now, the village is overgrown with just remnants its history remaining.  At one time, trains used to be an all day occurrence at Jackfish.

 

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At the Jackfish railway tunnel, you can see and appreciate how much of the line was chiselled into the rocky shoreusing the technology of the 1880s. Read more here.. CLICK PADDLE BY A PIECE OF CANADIAN HISTORY

 

“Jackfish, Ontario, is a real ghost town. When I visit, I imagine the wind whistling through the bulkheads of the old coal freighters that once plied Lake Superior to get there. The town came and left, it seems, on the rails, and my family history is tied to those tracks, still active, and the town, now mostly disappeared.

The history of Jackfish as a bustling community stretches from the 1880s to the arrival of the diesel engine in the late 1940s when Jackfish lost its stopover role. Diesel engines did not need to stop for coal and water on their long run along the rugged north shore.

 A new technology – engines powered by diesel fuel – ended those boat arrivals permanently in 1948. By the early 1950s, there was no need for the train to stop for coal at all and soon thereafter even the passenger stops at the local station ended. By 1964, the permanent residents had left town and a seasonal population continued for a time.

Jackfish continues to be listed in travel guides as an authentic ghost town. Consequently, the site remains a destination for the curious and the passionate. To get there from our Thunder Bay home, we drive three hours east on Highway 17 and through Terrace Bay. About 25 kilometres later (15.5 miles), past the large highway hill that runs up from Jackfish Lake, the village’s namesake, a gravel road heads down to Lake Superior. At the end of this road, an overgrown yet passable bush trail takes us right into Jackfish. This is the recommended route. I can remember my father and a group of men pitching in to carve this road out of the bush.” Read more here.. Jackfish, Ontario: Memories of a Lake Superior Ghost Town

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

The Ghost Towns of Eastern Ontario

Halls Mills Ghost Town- Another W. H. Wylie Connection

The Gillies Home in the Ghost Town of Herron’s Mills

Did you Know Old Burnside has a Ghostly Horse?

Photographer Finds Money in a Local Abandoned Home

Gold in Dem Dar Hills of Lanark

Have you Ever Heard about Doran? Here Come da’ Judge!

Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

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Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

 

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October 8, 1937. S.S.#6 Middleville School

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October 8, 1937. S.S.#6 Middleville School. Back row 3rd one from left is Roy Yuill — with Roy Yuill.

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Middleville Public School in 1908– Photo by Laurie Yuill

 

Middleville 1885

Middleville school still stands today. Photo Middleville & District Museum

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family

Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎