Tag Archives: young

The Young Funeral Home Part 2- The Buchanan Scrapbook

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The Young Funeral Home Part 2- The Buchanan Scrapbook
read the one below first and then back up to the second column and then finally number 3

number 3

Also read-The Young Family Funeral Home Lanark County

Colleen MontgomeryDonald Foster was my uncle. May he rest in peace. It was also Uncle Donnie’s horses that were hitched to the hearse during pioneer days
Amanda Grace Emon
February 19  · 

I actually got to see a horse drawn hearse be used last year and it was amazing!
Blair T. Paul, Artist – Canadian and International
September 17, 2020  · 

I presume that J. Young might have been the father of George Young who operated Young’s Funeral Home when I was a boy in Lanark. This old photo looks like the modern day store front still at this site.

In days gone by George Young sold good quality furniture in this store on George St. When my Dad returned from overseas in WWII he went to George and bought everything he could afford to set up house for my Mom. I think he said that George, who was a very kind man, even threw in a free Marconi radio as a thank you.

Linda GemmillGeorge Young has a furniture store as well as a funeral home. This is the furniture location on George St just north of the bridge on left

Judy ArnottGeorge was an amazing man

Barry BatesWhat’s the funeral home back up in past the United Church used for now? (storage)

Michele ScanlanBarry Bates yes there have been countless people that were taken care of at Young’s including many of my family. It is a shame it is no longer used.

Judy ArnottEveryone from the old Lanark TWS was waked st Youngs. They were family, George, Wilson Creighton and Alex Headrick

Michele ScanlanGeorge Young was a very giving man. I saved his planing mill (I think that’s what it was ) from burning and he told me to go and get what ever I needed for the winter from Don Drysdales store. A new pair of boots kept my feet warm that winter

Wanda LabelleEric bought all his furniture there in 67. George let him pay off a little at a time. He still has all the bills from that time

Emily DesjardinsGeorge let me make payments on a kitchen table set l purchased for my Mom and Dads twenty fifth wedding anniversary and delivered it for me.l was so happy and they were really surprised

Rose MarieMy mother-in-law, Barbara Closs, worked as a live-in house keeper for George and Bessie Young in Lanark in the 40’s (her first job as a teenager). Barbara bought their original bedroom set while she lived with them. We still have this beautiful 4 piece set which is made of black walnut.

True story… Young’s Funeral business in downtown Lanark–Terence Miller said:There was a saying in the valley when a funeral director was spotted downtown, ” look alive lads here comes the undertaker”


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Oct 1963, Fri  •  Page 22


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Dec 1939, Wed  •  Page 6
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Mar 1971, Wed  •  Page 5

Also read-The Young Family Funeral Home Lanark County

William Patterson — Patterson’s Funeral Home

A Tale From the Patterson Funeral Home — Carleton Place

How Heavenly Funeral Potatoes Got Their Name

The Last Man to Let you Down? Political Leanings at Local Funeral Homes?

Embalming 1891 – A Local Report

Cemetery or Funeral Cake

The Woman Who Got the Dead End Sign Removed in Carleton Place

Ed Fleming — The First Funeral Parlour in Carleton Place

Funerals With Dignity in Carleton Place – Just a Surrey with a Fringe on Top —- Our Haunted Heritage

Blast From the Past–Remembering Alan Barker– July 4 1979

Quite the photo of one the top funeral folks in Lanark County Lanark Era 1962

Frank Young Almonte Genealogy

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Frank Young Almonte Genealogy

 Now Residing at Almonte, Were Married on April 21, 1885, at Pembroke. Dinner Party Held to Mark Auspicious Occasion.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Young, Almonte, Ont., formerly of North Bay, Ont, and Ottawa, celebrated their golden wedding anniversary quietly at their home, Almonte, Ont., on Sunday, April 21. Mr. and Mrs. Young were married on April 21, 1885, at Pembroke, Ont., by the Rev. Mr. Forsyth, the bride before her marriage being Miss Mary Anne Cattell, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Cattell.

Mr. Young is a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Young, Appleton, Ont., pioneers of Lanark county. ( read Ramsay Settlers 101) For many years Mr. Young worked at his trade in the woollen mills of Almonte, but due to impaired health moved to the North country and entered the employ of the Canadian Pacific Railway.

After seventeen years’ service with that company, with residence at North Bay, he was retired in 1924, afterwards coming to Ottawa and ultimately returning to Almonte. Mr. Young has reached the good age of 77, and Mrs. Young is four years his Junior.

Mr. and Mrs. Young have two surviving children, a daughter, Mrs. J. A. Campbell, Regina, Sask., and a son V. M. Young, of Ottawa. Their eldest son, Herbert Cecil, passed away some years ago. In addition there is three grandchildren, Miss Vivien Campbell, and the Misses Constance and Betty-Anne Young.

Mr. Young has four surviving sisters, Mrs. Marion Reid, Ottawa, Mrs. Wm. France, Marcellus, N.Y., Mrs. Agnes Munroe, Carleton Place, and Mrs. Robert McNaughton, Lacombe, Alta. Mrs. Young has one sister and a brother living, Mrs. Wm. McQuestion. North Bay, Ont., and Mr. Wm. Cattell, Redlands, California.

Owing to the unavoidable absence of their daughter, plans for a formal reception for the occasion were postponed. A small dinner party was held, which in addition to the immediate members of their family, included the Rev. A. J, Fowley, and Mrs. Fowley, pastor of St. John’s Presbyterian church, Almonte, of which Mr. Young is a member of the board of managers.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1935, Mon  •  Page 15

Young—Died, at Almonte on Wed., 1st Aug., William Young, late of Appleton.  (no age given.) Perth Courier, August 10, 1883. William Young had a tailor shop , and a wagon shop in Appleton 

Family Heirlooms and Antiques of Mississippi Mills — Golden Jubilee 1937

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Family Heirlooms and Antiques of Mississippi Mills — Golden Jubilee 1937

Heirlooms and antiques, the property of old families in the Ottawa district, were brought together in one of the most interesting exhibits of the Ottawa Exhibition Golden Jubilee program. This exhibit, which will be located In the women’s handicrafts building in 1937. The exhibition was in the form of a parlor in a well-to-do home of 1887. To give a contrast there was another exhibit, that of a modern living room, with all the comforts and conveniences

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1887 living room

The Ottawa Citizen i
Location:
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Issue Date:
Wednesday, August 18, 1937

As the exhibition was celebrating its 50th birthday, the idea of having an exhibit to show what the “properly equipped” parlor of the year 1887 when the exhibition was first held in Ottawa, and another exhibit to show the great strides made in style and furnishings for a home, was developed by the exhibition management with the co-operation of Mrs. J. K. Kelly, of Almonte.

World Of Mirth Carnival Vintages 1960 Pictorial Program With Route ...
World Of Mirth Authentic Carnival Poster (c.1955) 50 Rail Cars ...

To Mrs. Kelly went the credit for finding the magnificent heirlooms and antiques which were used to furnish the “parlor of 50 years ago.” Among the first settlers in what is known as Blakeney or Snedden’s Station, were members of the Snedden family who came from Rosebank, Scotland. They named the place where they settled Rosebank and it is still known by that name in that vicinity.

Burns -

Among the treasures the Snedden family brought from Scotland were brass candlesticks, brass curtain tics, pictures of Robert Burns, ‘the poet’, and of Rev. Robert Burns, who was the Presbyterian minister in the kirk where the Snedden family worshipped, a chair worked in needlepoint, a small Brussels rug and a table cover.

New Deals on One-of-a-Kind Brussels Medallion Persian Hand-Knotted ...

All these treasures were loaned by the Snedden family to help furnish the parlor. Another Scottish family coming from Braehead, near Glasgow, was the Young family. Their contribution to the parlor was a mantel clock, well over 100 years old and still keeping good time; a farmer’s seed wreath made by a granddaughter 85 years ago and a needlepoint cushion, beautifully worked. The farmer’s wreath was a work of art and few of them are in existence today.

From the descendants of James Stewart, Scottish blacksmith, the exhibition received the loan of wonderful samplers, old family pictures, walnut what-not, curtains knit years ago by a granddaughter, Jessie Stewart, and several other articles including an old family Bible. The curtains were made of cotton warp twisted and a yarn, homespun and home-dyed by another granddaughter.

The Bible originally belonged to the Tyner family of Toronto and was a wedding gift from Mrs. Robert Knowles, mother of the well known novelist. Mrs. Bower Henry, wife of the immediate past president of the Central Canada Exhibition Association contributed a fireplace almost 100 years old, which was built into the original home on the Silver Springs farm, the Henry home on the Richmond road.

A lovely student’s lamp, an outstanding example of old craftsmanship, was loaned by Mrs. Rose of Pakenham. This lamp was brought here from Baltimore more than 50 years ago.

Miss Annie Arthur, donated a feather wreath which she made when a young girl. The colors were well blended and the flowers-still had a natural appearance. This is an art which is almost lost today. Miss Arthur also loaned an organ, which was one of the first In the Almonte district and was over 85 years of age. The tone was still mellow and true.

One of the smaller ‘ pieces, a little pitcher, well over 125 years old, and a work basket, were loaned by Miss Arthur. Another pitcher and curtain poles were loaned by Mrs. Toshark. Miss K. McDougall was contributing a footstool in needlepoint, very old and beautifully worked. All the items loaned for that Golden Jubilee in 1937 were examples of a pioneer industry or art which had practically disappeared at that point.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Aug 1937, Fri  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Aug 1937, Fri  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jan 1933, Sat  •  Page 2

Headstone of Robert Young Jr — Memories

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Headstone of Robert Young Jr — Memories
found this recently. Maybe you can find out where it belongs.

Friday I received this from an unidentified emailer. Please note he was advised what to do and the headstones are safe.

I believe it may have been taken from the Auld Kirk Cemetery in Almonte where his parents are buried. My thinking is someone, family or church, will know when it may have gone missing. I found it under a deck of a home I am working on.

Headstone of Robert Young, Jr

BIRTH1835Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
DEATH1 Jan 1863 (aged 27–28)Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIALAuld Kirk CemeteryMississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
1898, Friday December 23, The Almonte Gazette, page 8
A Runner Dropped Dead

While going through the eighth line cemetery lately a GAZETTE scribe was struck by a verse on the tablet at the head of the grave of the late Robert Young, which reads as follows:
“My sudden death proclaims aloud
To you, my living friends,
To be prepared to meet your God
When He the summons sends.”
Inquiry as to the cause of the sudden death brought out the particulars, which are worth giving here. On New Year’s Day, 1863, on the Mississippi river between Youngville and Rosebank, there was quite a gathering to witness the sorts, which consisted of trotting races on the ice, the trotters being hitched to buggies. In the afternoon a foot race was got up, the contestants being John Young (blacksmith, Almonte), John Toshack (son of the late James Toshack) and Robert Young (Brother of Messrs P.J. and Wm. Young, Ramsay). They were all young men – two of them Young by name as well as young in years – and, removing their boots, they ran in their sock-feet. Robert Young was ahead as he came to the winning line, and just before crossing the line he dropped on the ice – dead! The late Dr. Mostyn, who happened to be in Rosebank at the time was quickly summoned, but the winner had passed beyond the reach of medical skill. The crowd got a great shock by the event, the sports were cancelled, and there was sadness in the community the balance of that New Year Day
December 23, 1898 Almonte Gazette

the second one mostly likely belonged to his father

New one at Auld Kirk which put in as replacements for the ones missing above

 Robert Young, Jr
The replacement at Auld Kirk

Robert Young, Jr

BIRTH1835Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
DEATH1 Jan 1863 (aged 27–28)Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIALAuld Kirk CemeteryMississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
MEMORIAL ID200644312 · View Source

1898, Friday December 23, The Almonte Gazette, page 8
A Runner Dropped Dead
While going through the eighth line cemetery lately a GAZETTE scribe was struck by a verse on the tablet at the head of the grave of the late Robert Young, which reads as follows:

“My sudden death proclaims aloud
To you, my living friends,
To be prepared to meet your God
When He the summons sends.”

Inquiry as to the cause of the sudden death brought out the particulars, which are worth giving here. On New Year’s Day, 1863, on the Mississippi river between Youngville/ Bennies Corners and Rosebank, there was quite a gathering to witness the sorts, which consisted of trotting races on the ice, the trotters being hitched to buggies.

In the afternoon a foot race was got up, the contestants being John Young (blacksmith, Almonte), John Toshack (son of the late James Toshack) and Robert Young (Brother of Messrs P.J. and Wm. Young, Ramsay). They were all young men – two of them Young by name as well as young in years – and, removing their boots, they ran in their sock-feet.

Robert Young was ahead as he came to the winning line, and just before crossing the line he dropped on the ice – dead! The late Dr. Mostyn, who happened to be in Rosebank at the time was quickly summoned, but the winner had passed beyond the reach of medical skill. The crowd got a great shock by the event, the sports were cancelled, and there was sadness in the community the balance of that New Year Day


Family Members

Parents

Siblings

An article written long ago by Robert Young, an uncle of M. R. Young, former hardware merchant in Almonte, and his two sisters here, tells of the days at Bennie’s Corners when the school was new.

This lovely stone home, now known as “Stanehive” was built in 1856 by Peter Young and his brother Robert. The quality of the stonework here is very high with cu and dressed stone laid in regular courses. A decorative effect is achieved with contrasting stone used for the quoins and the massive lintels and door surround. The large two-paneled front door is very handsome and the transom above has the uneven division typical of the area.-A TOUR OF BENNIE’S CORNERS (written by Jill Moxley, architectural comments by Julian Smith)

Bennie’s Corners Gave a Fine Surprise To Prince Edward

Village 5 Miles from Almonte had a Big Arch and other Decorations for the Prince – People who accompanied Prince from Arnprior had not expected any demonstration there. A recent reference to Bennie’s Corners by the O.T.S. interested Mr. Robert Young, 240 Fifth avenue, Ottawa, a former Almonte man, who knew Bennie’s Corners when a small boy back in the early sixties. Mr. Young tells the O.T.S. that Bennie’s Corners was one of a few of the smaller villages of the Ottawa district which was honored by a visit from the Prince of Wales (King Edward) in 1860. And the Corners did itself proud on that occasion. It will be recalled that the Prince on the occasion of his visit here in 1860 sailed up the Ottawa river to Fitzroy Harbour, then to Arnprior where he stayed over night with Mr. McLachlin, the lumberman, and the following day drove to Almonte by way of Bennie’s Corners, and from Almonte took the Canada Central Railway on his way back. Almonte was the terminus of the railway at the time.-Edna Gardner Lowry.

Otter Glen Woolen Mills

W 1/2 Lot 24 Conc 9 Ramsay Township.

Peter McDougall, proprietor, operated a custom carding and woolen mill on this location from 1868 – 1872. It was then sold to Stephen Young who operated the mill from at least 1873 – 1876. It then became the Youngville Woolen Mill, owned and operated by Robert and Andrew Young, running at least from at least 1885 but not in operation in 1892.-MVTM

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Feb 1942, Sat  •  Page 6
Canada’s Other Game: Basketball from Naismith to Nash

George Bailey –Headstone– the Cemetery on the Ninth line

Gravestone Tips– Memories and Respect for our Headstone Treasures

A Monument Back in Time –Time Travelling in Lanark County —Part 1

Like a Prayer I left My Mark in Franktown — Part 2

Marvin Arnold Walker — Another Ron Bos Genealogy Mystery

The Young Family Funeral Home Lanark County

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The Young Family Funeral Home Lanark County

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One of my joys this year in 2017 was visiting the Middleville & District Museum in the heart of Lanark County. I could not believe this place– it was everything I ever wished for in history displays. (Did you Know we have a “World Class Museum” right in Lanark County?)

These photos of the hearse from the Middleville Museum was used for funerals around Lanark County by the Young family Funeral Home in the Village of Lanark, Ontario. A team of black horses pulled it for the funeral, and if  a child had passed, the black horses were switched for white ones. A hearse and horses laden with ostrich plumes were indicative of a person’s wealth and often families hired extra horses festooned with plumes. Two plumes meant that the deceased was of modest means while three to four meant that he or she was better off. If you could afford five or six plumes you were wealthy, but having seven plumes was reserved for the truly rich.

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There was a detachable black wooded cross for Roman Catholic funerals, and in the winter the hearse was mounted on runners to master those rural winter roads. For the poor, about $8 Canadian today, one could have a hearse with one horse, a mourning coach also with one horse, an elm coffin covered in black with handles, mattress, pillow, side sheets and a coachmen with a black crepe band.

The deceased were waked in their homes in those days before embalming. The family placed wide black crepe roses with matching black ribbons on their front door to warn visitors it was a house of mourning. Friends and family gathered in the parlour to support the family and pay their respects. In the summer buckets of ice were placed under the coffin to keep the corpse cool.

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The hearse came to the home to pick up the coffin that was covered with the floral tributes and sometimes sheaves of grain were used to honour the deceased. The procession made its way from the deceased person’s house towards the cemetery but often made a detour through a busy part of town to get the maximum effect for the money spent. Once the trip through town was complete, the procession moved into a brisk trot until the cemetery gates were reached and then a sedate walk was in order towards the chapel for the ceremony. The burial itself was witnessed by the men only and then the whole group returned to the house for a meal.This particular hearse was last used for the funeral of Mrs James Dodd in 1944.

 

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Photos- Linda Seccaspina with Files from the Middleville Museum

historicalnotes

Perth Courier, Jan. 8, 1897

Pepper—Died, at Lanark on Thursday, Dec. 24, Eliza Taylor Pepper, relict of the late William Pepper, aged 86(?).

Death of Mrs. Peter McIntyre—The subject of the following sketch, whose maidenname was Christina Craig, and who died on Thursday, Dec. 31, was born near Lochearnhead, Paisley, Scotland, in 1810.  She was married in 1830 and with her husband emigrated to this country in 1831 when they settled in Drummond on the farm now occupied by Archibald McTavish where they remained until 1840 when they removed to her home in Bathurst near Balderson.  Deceased was greatly respected  and much beloved by all who knew her. She was a devout Christian and a member of the Presbyterian Church.  It was always a joy to her to fulfill the divine injunction to feed the hungry, clothe the naked and to minister to the afflicted.  Her family, which consisted of six children, are:  Findlay, deceased, who was at one time a bookkeeper for the late Boyd Caldwell of Lanark; and Duncan who died at the age of five years.  Those who survive are:  Mrs. Ansley(?) Keyes of this town; Lizzie C. and John P. on the homestead and Peter on his farm adjoining.  The funeral took place Sunday afternoon, Jan. 3 when Rev. J.S. McIlraith conducted the services and gave an appropriate address from Isaiah 57-1, the righteous perish and no man layeth it to heart.  A large assembly accompanied the remains of the departed to Elmwood.  May He who wept at the grave of Lazarus be the consolation of the aged and bereaved husband and his family and may they through Him be united in the mansion beyond.

Perth Courier, Feb. 5, 1897

The Era says:  “On Thursday morning of last week death brought relief to the sufferings of Mrs. Robert Stone, widow of the late Robert Stone of Dalhousie.  Deceased was 72 years of age.  She leaves a family of seven, three sons and four daughters.  Deceased had been ailing for some months and her daughters Mrs. George Manahan of Gilbert P – alns(?) and Mrs. George Buffam of Eganville wee called home a few weeks ago.  The three sons, Messrs. Johnston, Robert and William and two daughters Miss Mary and Miss Lizzie reside on the homestead.  The funeral took place on Satuirday from her late residence to the Lanark Village Cemetery.”

Perth Courier, Feb. 19, 1897

Spence—Died, at Lanark on Friday, Feb. 12, Jane McDougall Spence, beloved wife of Jas. Spence, aged 43(?) 45(?).

Lanark Links:  We regret to record the death of Jane McDougall, wife of James Spence of this village. She had been ill for over nine weeks and during her sickness suffered severely yet showed great patience.  She leaves a husband and five little children to mourn her loss.

Lanark Links:  We have to record the death of another of our citizens, Mrs. John Manahan.  She had been ill for a long time and manifested a Christian patience during her illness.  Being beloved by all who knew her, the funeral on Monday was largely attended.

Perth Courier, April 23, 1897

Those members of the Lanark County Council of 15 years ago will learn with sorrow of the death of a much respected member of that body, Daniel Drummond.  The Gazette of April 16 says:  “The township of Ramsay has lost one of its oldest and most highly respected residents by the death of Daniel Drummond which took place on Friday, at his home in Clayton at the age of 70(?).  Deceased had been ailing with a heart affliction for the past two years and in consequence had not been able during that time either to take an active part in public affairs or paying much attention to his own private business.  The late Mr. Drummond was born in Ramsay in 1826 and removed to Clayton about 30 years ago where he bought a grist mill and saw mill which he continued to work until the time of his death.  Mr. Drummond was a man of strict integrity, upright in all his dealings and of a kind and genial disposition.  He was a man of more than ordinary intellect and this was early recognized by his friends and neighbors in the vicinity and he was for many years the respected and efficient reeve of Ramsay.  In religion he was an active member of the Presbyterian Church as long as his health permitted him to do active work.  In politics he was a Liberal.

Tennant—Died, at Lanark, on Thursday, April 1, Lloyd Tennant, only son of Edward Tennant, aged 15.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

The Woman Who Got the Dead End Sign Removed in Carleton Place

Ed Fleming — The First Funeral Parlour in Carleton Place

Funerals With Dignity in Carleton Place – Just a Surrey with a Fringe on Top —- Our Haunted Heritage

Blast From the Past–Remembering Alan Barker– July 4 1979

Dead Ringers –To Live and Die in Morbid Times

The Ashton Funeral to end all Funerals

The Last Man to Let you Down? Political Leanings at Local Funeral Homes?

Embalming 1891 – A Local Report

What was one of the Largest Funerals in Lanark County?

Things You Just Don’t say at a Funeral— Even if you Are a Professional Mourner

A Tale From the Patterson Funeral Home — Carleton Place