Tag Archives: ww2

Remembering Harry Purdy

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Remembering Harry Purdy

Leslie Manchur —-VETERAN CANADA CHAPTER EUROPE and FRIENDS

February 6, 2021  · Harry Purdy( retired CD MWO RCEME). Served in CFB Lahr ( third tour NATO). The 70/ 80 era: where became known for his contributing volunteer work for the Canadian Forces Network ( CFN). On retirement of The Military; he became a full time radio broadcaster; with CFN. Having the opportunity to represent the Canadian Forces abroad. He did the radio shows such as Country Sunup; the Western Express.

He interviewed so many Artists such as: Dolly Parton; Johnny Cash; Dick Dameron( too many to mention). After Lahr closed in 1994: he came back to Canada( Carleton Place : Ont). He passed at Almonte Gen Hospital; Ont: on the 1 Feb 2020.But never forgotten.he did the circle of life. He passed it on; so I could carry on. As: a Third Generation Soldier: I pass it on to the next generation. Rip. Dad.Respect and gratitude! ❤️( too many to mention).

I was just about to add this to our Carleton Place Military page ” Photos of Those we Remember” on Facebook but decided it needed to be documented and then I will post it..-Linda S

Friday Nights with Brian Murphy

In Memory of Frank Cavers Appleton — Cavers

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In Memory of Frank Cavers Appleton — Cavers

I could not help but notice in your list of those who made the ultimate sacrifice in World War II, an error in a family name That is the name of Frank Cavers, misspelled as Frank (The C Cavers name has become familiar to me because of a visit  to the Cavers family home here in Ramsay recently. The farm holds a great deal of interest for me and I have come to learn a little of the people who lived there. Fortunately their history is fairly recent and easily obtainable. It is through this interest that my attention was drawn to your list of men and noticed that Frank Cavers was not remembered. Please let us give proper credit where it is due. Yours truly, Daphne Stevens Carp

November 1980- Almonte Gazette

Author’s Note: When I came upon this letter to the editor from 1980 I knew Frank Caver had to be documented for posterity.

CANADIAN VIRTUAL WAR MEMORIAL

Robert Franklin Cavers

In memory of:

Warrant Officer Class II Robert Franklin Cavers

March 23, 1943Yarmouth, Nova Scotia

Military Service


Service Number:

R/97637Age:

26Force:

Air ForceUnit:

Royal Canadian Air ForceCitation(s):

1939-45 Star, Atlantic Star, War Medal 1939-45, Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp.

Additional Information


Born:

April 23, 1916
Appleton, OntarioEnlistment:

March 14, 1941
Vancouver, British Columbia

Son of Thomas Edgar and Bessie May (nee McNabb) Cavers, of Almonte, Ontario. Brother of Harold, Melville and Agnes.

Commemorated on Page 145 of the Second World War Book of RemembranceRequest a copy of this page.

Burial Information


Cemetery:

CARLETON PLACE UNITED CEMETERIES
Ontario, CanadaGrave Reference:

Lot 20.


Thomas Edgar Cavers

BIRTH9 Feb 1883Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
DEATH23 Dec 1957 (aged 74)Almonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIALUnited CemeteriesBeckwith, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
MEMORIAL ID204736433 · View Source

1957, Thursday January 10, The Almonte Gazette, page 6
Obituary
THOMAS EDGAR CAVERS
The funeral of Thomas Edgar Cavers took place December 26th from the Fleming Bros. Funeral Home, Lake Ave. West, Carleton Place to the United Cemetery for interment. Rev. J. Ray Anderson of Almonte conducted the service. Mr. Cavers died in the R. M. Hospital, Almonte, on December 23 after a short illness. He was 74 years of age and was born February 9th, 1882 in Ramsay Township, son of the late Thomas Cavers and his wife, Margaret Miller Thom. He had farmed for years in Ramsay and attended Appleton United Church. He was married in June, 1915, to the former Bessie May McNab. Surviving besides his widow are two sons, Harold of Toronto; Melville of Almonte, a daughter (Agnes), Mrs. Tudor of Perth, a brother, James of Carleton Place and a half sister, Miss Margaret Cavers of Almonte. The pallbearers were Messrs. Ollie Stewart, Victor Kellough, Duncan Stewart, Stewart Cavers, John Lowe and Edward Lowe. Among the beautiful floral tributes were pieces from Almonte Legion, Weaving Room of Collie’s mill, Appleton W.I.. Appleton W.A


Bessie May McNabb Cavers

BIRTH23 May 1892Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
DEATH18 Apr 1980 (aged 87)Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIALUnited CemeteriesBeckwith, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
MEMORIAL ID204736554 · View Source

1980, Wednesday May 7, The Almonte Gazette, page 2
Bessie May McNabb Cavers, Nel-Gor Castle Nursing Home, Carleton Place, died April 18, at the age of 87 Mrs Cavers was born May 23, 1892. in Ramsay township, the daughter of the late David McNabb and Agnes Kellough On June 30. 1915, she married the late Thomas Edgar Cavers, a farmer, in Appleton Mrs Cavers was a member of Zion Memorial United Church, a charter member of the Appleton Women’s Institute, and a life member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Royal Canadian Legion, branch 240 She was the mother of the late Frank and Harold Cavers, and the sister of the late David, George, and Welland McNabb. Mrs Cavers is survived by her daughter Agnes Tudor, of Toronto, and her son Melville Cavers, of Almonte A public funeral was held April 21 from the Alan Barker Funeral Home The service was conducted by Reverend Mitchell. Burial took place at the United Cemeteries. Ashton Mrs Cavers pallbearers were Tom Proctor, Delbert Barr, Art Fulton, Doug Stewart, Bert McRae, and Bill Struthers

From the North Lanark Museum ( Appleton)

Only two years after the Collie Woollen Mills began production World War Two began. The war was a major boost to the local economy. The mill shifted to 24 hour a day production in order to fill the military contracts. The mill produced woollens for uniforms, blankets and other military needs.

The war deeply affected the community of Appleton as sons and daughters enlisted to protect their country while families worked extra shifts at the mill

When the war was over, the community prepared an honor roll that hung in the Appleton Community Hall. The honor roll now resides at the North Lanark Regional Museum in Appleton:

This honor roll, which hung in the Appleton Community Hall until it was destroyed by fire, commemorates those Appleton residents who volunteered for active service during World War II. A silver star denotes those soldiers who gave their lives.

Bert Aitken

Stewart Aitken

John Barden

Leslie Barden

Gertrude Blaney

Earle Bridges

Frank Cavers (*)

Harold Cavers

Melville Cavers

John Collie

Jean Collie

Henry Collie

Forest Dezell

Harold Dowdall

Gordon Duncan

Hugh Duncan

Kenneth Duncan

Robert Duncan (*)

William Duncan

Arthur Fee

Elizabeth Fitzpatrick

Leonard Ford

Jack Gallagher

James Galvin

Jack Gladish

Max Gladish

Gordon Hallahan

Rupert Hopkins

William B. Hopkins

Russell James (*)

Hugh Kennedy

Earle Lowe

Stewart Neil

Bernard Pye

James Pye (*)

Keith Salisbury

Clyde Service

Ralph Sinnett

Harold Snedden

Lawrence Spinks

Leonard Spinks

Eric Stead

Neil Stewart

Raymond Struthers

William Struthers

George Walkley

Rank: Warrant Officer Class II
Trade: Air Gunner
Service No: R/97637
Date of Death: 23/03/1943
Age: 26
Regiment/Service: Royal Canadian Air Force, #113 Bomber Reconnaissance Squadron (Yarmouth,, Nova Scotia)
Citation(s): 1939-45 Star, Atlantic Star, War Medal 1939-45, Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp

Killed at Yarmouth airport, N.S., with 3 other aircrew, when their plane crashed after take-off and then exploded. Son of Thomas Edgar and Bessie Cavers, of Almonte.

Date of Birth: 23 Apr 1916
World War II

Find A Grave contributor SJ Hearn:
Warrant Officer Class II Cavers was one of six airmen killed in the crash and resulting explosion of Hudson (#BW 620) aircraft at the aerodrome in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia; the Hudson, with four airmen aboard, had just taken off on an operational patrol. Besides the four crew members, two of the five ground crew members who attempted to assist, also perished in this accident.
The four aircrew members were:-
Sergeant Alexander John BAILLIE,
Warrant Officer Class II Robert Franklin CAVERS,
Warrant Officer Class II Mervin Elwood TARRANT and
Flying Officer Charles Leroy TRIPP.
The two ground aircrew members were:-
Leading Aircraftman Lloyd Edward BRIGGS and
Aircraftman 1st Class Frank HALLEK.

Warrant Officer Class II Robert Franklin Cavers is commemorated on Page 145 of Canada’s Second World War Book of Remembrance.

Appleton Women’s Institute Tweedsmuir History .click

Family Members

Parents

Spouse

Siblings

Half Siblings

Children

Clippings of the Robertson Warren Family — Gail McDowell

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Clippings of the Robertson Warren Family — Gail McDowell

This is my mother and father at their rental house behind the museum in Carleton Place. I am not sure of the year. Their names were Francis and Isobel (Warren)Robertson. All photos from Gail McDowell- thank you!

In 1908 my grandfather was the main salesperson for mount forest company here in mount forest ontario.He was a long time resident of Carleton Place.his name was W.J.Warren.

My uncle was killed in action and i have photos of him. His name was James (Jim) Warren from Carleton Place.

James (Jim) Snedden Warren

 Second World War Book of Remembrance

Born—May 25, 1913
Carleton Place, OntarioEnlistment:

July 19, 1940
Ottawa, Ontario

Son of William James Warren and Isobel Snedden (nee Cochrane) Warren of Carleton Place, Ontario; husband of Ordelia Giles (nee West) Warren of Ottawa, Ontario. Brother of Isobel, Jack and William, predeceased brother David. On Wednesday, September 17, 1941, Miss Hilda Cram’s class held a remembrance service in Memorial Park in Carleton Place, Ontario. All of the pupils placed flowers at the base of the cenotaph’s single shaft. Prayers were said and the oath of remembrance prayer was recited. Leonard Baird sounded ‘Last Post’ and ‘Reveille’ on the trumpet. The class was the students taught by Jimmy Warren before his enlistment for overseas service. The Town of Carleton Place remembered Sergeant Warren by naming a street in his honour.

Commemorated on Page 47 of the Second World War Book of RemembranceRequest a copy of this page.

Ordelia Giles West Early 1950s —Renfrew, Ontario, Canada- Wife

Ordelia Giles West lived in Carleton Place, Ontario, in April 1941. Ordelia Giles West married James Snedden Warren in Ottawa, Ontario, on March 18, 1941, when she was 24 years old. Her husband James Snedden passed away on June 17, 1941, in Devon, England, at the age of 28. They had been married 3 months.

James Snedden Warren - The Canadian Virtual War Memorial - Veterans Affairs  Canada

This was my grandmother,also a CP resident Isobel Robertson

When Isobel Cochrane Snedden was born on August 4, 1883, in Lanark, Ontario, her father, David, was 28, and her mother, Ellen, was 25. She married William James Warren on August 16, 1911, in her hometown. They had five children during their marriage. She died in 1983 in Ontario at the age of 100, and was buried in Almonte, Ontario. Her son James Snedden passed away on June 17, 1941, in Devon, England, at the age of 28. (see above)

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Dec 1983, Wed  •  Page 37
Warren Family Grave

Newspaper Clipping– Remembered on the pages of the Ottawa Journal. Submitted for the project, Operation Picture Me
James Snedden Warren - The Canadian Virtual War Memorial - Veterans Affairs  Canada
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Jun 1941, Mon  •  Page 12

The Winnipeg Tribune
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
30 Jun 1941, Mon  •  Page 12

Genealogy Clippings Foy Almonte

Clippings of Earl Blakeley from Frank Blakeley

Clippings from Faye Campbell — Cathy Campbell 1978

Newspaper Clippings – Bittle McGlade Kane Stinson Kelley Family Genealogy — Nikki Bittle

Musings and Clippings About the McFadden’s

Lanark Village 1913 — Clippings Old Boys Week

The Ward Family — William Harrison Ward and Doris Christine Ward — thanks to Mark Ward

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The Ward Family — William Harrison Ward and Doris Christine Ward — thanks to Mark Ward

Hello Linda: I am enclosing a couple pictures and wondering if you could insert them for me in the Tales of Almonte– Mark Ward– Greatly appreciated.

Name: William Harrison Ward Enlisted: Oct,15,1940 Discharged: Feb. 25,1946 Service Unit: Royal Canadian Airforce, Enlisted Oct. 27,1952 Discharged Dec.30,1962, Service Unit: Canadian Army ( Militia ) 5th Ordnance Battalion (London Ont) Governor General Foot Guards ( Ottawa Ont.) Service: Wartime, Regular Force, Allied Forces.A picture of my father and his Service Book. This is greatly appreciated. Mark Ward

Doris Christine Ward served on active service with the Royal Canadian Air Force from September 3, 1942 and was honourably released and transferred to the Reserve Class “E” on the Fourth day of April 1946.” When a new style of uniform came out my mother was 1 of the ladies asked to model it. Mark Ward

Howard John Rattray — Memories of WW 2

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Howard John Rattray — Memories of WW 2
Picture of my mom and dad . My dad met my mom in England as she was serving in the woman’s Air Force . They married and my mom came to Canada after the war as a war bride Photo Roger Rattray

90 Day Fiance and Mail Order and War Brides

The centre item is a telegram to my Grandma letting her know he arrived in Europe OK and of course send some cigarettes :)- Roger Rattray

Hi Linda : I found this in the my dads old scrapbook and thought it was a good time to send it just prior to Remembrance Day . I found my dad in both articles as he served with the RCAF in England . Roger Rattray

Sandra Rattray My husband ‘s father, Howard Rattray, and his father, John Rattray and their predecessors, owned part of Indians’ Landing. The story that was passed down was that the Indians used to trade their furs in there (at the former Patterson’s Furniture Store and Funeral Home or embalming room) This was common knowledge to many of the older locals-The Little Door by the River

Other reading-A Beckwith Will and James and Eliza Rattray

Carleton Place Boys in Uniform World War 2 — Names Names Names –Roger Rattray

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Carleton Place Boys in Uniform World War 2 — Names Names Names –Roger Rattray
Photo Roger Rattray

Hi Linda : I found this in the my dads old scrapbook and thought it was a good time to send it just prior to Remembrance Day . I found my dad in both articles as he served with the RCAF in England . Roger Rattray

 Carleton Place soldier is welcomed. Left to right: Irwin Crampton, brother; Mrs. T. A. G. Crampton, wife; Pte. T. A. G. Crampton; Mrs. I. Crampton, sister-in-law.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Mar 1945, Fri  •  Page 14

Picture of my mom and dad Howard Rattray . My dad met my mom in England as she was serving in the woman’s Air Force . They married and my mom came to Canada after the war as a war bride Photo Roger Rattray

American Corp

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Let’ s Remember Rationing Coupons

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Let’ s Remember Rationing Coupons
property of Adin Wesley Daigle

To help people stay healthy while rationing food, the government put together Canada’s Official Food Rules, that told people how much of each of the six food groups — milk, cereals and bread, meat, fruits and vegetables, fish and eggs — they should eat every day. You know it today as the Canada Food Guide.

These cards above permitted Mrs. McColl of Carleton Place to purchase rationed food from a local shop. Eleven million ration cards (lead image) were issued in Canada. Inside there were coupons issued for such things as sugar, butter and meat

People were willing to deal with it because we were very clearly attacked by another nation’s military and were presented and for Canadians, it was the ultimate exercise in sharing. Since Great Britain was virtually cut off, our food exports provided an essential lifeline to the mother country. By the end of the war Canadian exports accounted for 57 per cent of all wheat and flour, 39 percent of bacon, 24 percent of cheese, and 15 percent of eggs consumed in Britain.

I don’t think vegetables were rationed as they didn’t require much resources to cultivate them (no grain to feed them, etc), and they started the dig for victory project which increased the amount of ground growing food dramatically (basically anywhere that was a decent patch of soil was use for planting). People got inventive, things like carrot cake were popular (grow your own carrots).

Weekly ration for 1 adult (~1944)

FoodAmount
Bacon & Ham4 oz
Meat~ 1/2 lb minced beef
Butter2 oz
Cheese2 oz
Margarine4 oz
Cooking fat4 oz
Milk3 pints
Sugar8 oz
Preserves1 lb every 2 months
Tea2 oz
Eggs1 fresh egg per week
Sweets/Candy12 oz every 4 weeks

Here, the past, and its culinary turns, could be more instructive then we might think. Certainly puts things into perspective, doesn’t it?

193 Wartime Recipes–https://the1940sexperiment.com/100-wartime-recipes/

The 1940’s Experiment

Frugal Wartime Recipes to See You Through Challenging Times!

This is a recipe for simple currant spiced buns that turned out so absolutely tasty and yummy and easy to make that I simply called them GLORIOUS..
They are not only economical but taste sooo good!–https://the1940sexperiment.com/2009/11/12/glory-buns/

The more I think about it the more I think it’s a terrible, terrible thing. I think about war a lot and I think about how all over our world it has effected every day families regardless of colour or creed.

I made these WWII ‘Glory Buns’ today after I had observed the Remembrance Day silence and while I listened to the full Remembrance Day service from Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, on my local radio station, CKBW.

First of all I listened to Pierre Allaine

Pierre Allaine: Was a 14 year old when war broke out. He used to ferry people, lying flat on a barge during the night, across the river, by pushing the barge silently with a long pole to the free side of France. Pierre recited Flanders Field at the service in Bridgewater today.

Next I watched Frank Hammond who shared his thoughts… Quote: Conflicts today are not being resolved through power and the only real way is through negotiation…

And then Bert Eagle… Quote: Bert Eagle: There should NEVER be another war again, EVER, yet if I were a young man again and we went to war I would serve my country gladly…..

Above all I’ve been thinking of the BRAVE men and women who have taken part in a war and lived through it or given their lives and the BRAVE families at home battling to keep their children safe and fed and holding things together…

And the Glory Buns? It was such a glorious day that it needed to be celebrated with simple glorious food on my best glorious tray….. it reminded me just how lucky we really are.

Recipe for Glory Buns

  • 12 oz of wholewheat flour (or white)
  • 2 oz margarine
  • 2 oz sultanas/currants/raisins (optional)
  • 2 oz sugar
  • 8 fl oz warm water
  • 3 teaspoons of quick rise dried yeast
  • 1 teaspoon dried cinnamon powder
  • pinch salt

To glaze:

  • 3 tablespoons water
  • 3 tablespoons sugar

Method
Place all the dried ingredients in a bowl (apart from dried fruit) and stir
Rub in the margarine
Mix in the dried fruit
Add in the warm water
Knead well (use extra flour if mixture is too sticky)
Divide dough into 12 balls
Place on greased deep sided tray (I like to use the 8 x 8 inch foil trays and place 4 balls in each)
Cover with plastic film or plastic bag
Leave to rise somewhere warm for an hour or so
When risen place in oven at 180 C for 15 minutes or so until golden brown
When cooked remove from oven onto a wire rack to cool
When cool prepare glaze by heating the water and sugar together until dissolved
Using a pastry brush apply the glaze generously


https://www.elinorflorence.com/blog/rationing/

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

Guess What I Found?–A Purchase from the Yard Goods Store

Memories of Gold Bond Stamps?

Ration Cards from Gord Cross’s family

Did you Know that this one of the Malta Flying Aces Was a Doctor in Lanark?

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Did you Know that this one of the Malta Flying Aces Was a Doctor in Lanark?

 

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Anyone know the name of the former Lanark Doctor this 1952 news article is referring too? The article mentions some of the things found in Lanark such at Glenayr Kitten sweaters.

Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC)

 

The Malta Aces

Squadron Leader Irving ‘Hap’ Kennedy was a Canadian fighter pilot. He flew Spitfires in Europe and Malta and Sicily and Whirlwinds and an American Kittyhawk in an amusing adventure in North Africa. He was shot down in France after the Normandy invasion and escaped.

One of the last of the future Canadian aces on Malta was a man with matinee idol good looks: Irving “Hap” Kennedy, who arrived in December 1942. His seven months of operations from Malta with 249 Squadron netted him five of his 12 victories. Like MacLennan, Hap wanted no more to do with war, and returned to the small town outside of Ottawa where he had grown up.

He became a much-loved country doctor first in Lanark Village and then back to Cumberland. “There was a need,” he says. “There were few doctors. I wanted to be a country doctor.”

His father had been Cumberland Township’s clerk treasurer. He was also a First World War veteran wounded at Vimy Ridge. For 37 years, Dr. Hap delivered babies at a rate that made him lose count He was the only doctor in the middle delivering hundreds of babies and making a powerful yet peaceful contribution to his hometown of Cumberland, Ontario, for decades.

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They are out there. But soon they will all be gone. Perhaps you think of them as simply that older gentleman that walks his small dog down your street every day, the elderly fellow fumbling with his wallet ahead of you at the check out, that quiet guy who wears a badged blazer to church on Sundays, or that wonderfully kind, retired doctor who tends his garden. They live among us, blend in, live quietly and in the end they face the inevitable with dignity and quiet strength. To most neighbours and passersby, they are largely invisible, but once they were the boldest hearts, the fastest warriors, the most dashing and handsome of men, the most steadfast of comrades.

They are the fighter pilots of the Second World War. They are the ordinary men who stood up in the face of abject evil, prevailed and returned to live and love. They are the reason for our freedom. They are the lucky ones. Many did not return and those that did, lived their lives to the best of their abilities as tribute to their fallen brothers.

No one did more during their time in the RCAF, nor lived the remainder of their hard fought life with more dignity, contribution and gentleness than Cumberland, Ontario native Irving Farmer Kennedy. Known as “Hap” to his air force friends and “Bus” to his local community, Kennedy died on Thursday, January 6th, 2011 at the age of 91.

Mike Potter, Founder of Vintage Wings of Canada, had much the same thoughts when it came to describing the priviledge of his friendship with Kennedy:

“We are occasionally reminded that there are giants that walk among us, but sometimes they are heavily disguised. Hap Kennedy, as he was in his 80s when I had the privilege to meet him on several occasions, was a soft-spoken, friendly, modest and courteous gentleman, a father, grandfather, country doctor, and a strikingly handsome man in his old age. The few photos we have of him as a young man show him as the kind of clean-cut handsome young man you hope your daughter will bring home to introduce to the family, but they do not tell the whole story.

But here, behind the handsome face, is one of Canada’s magnificent warriors – a man who voluntarily entered some of the toughest and most dangerous fighting of recent times, where every engagement was the modern equivalent of hand-to-hand combat. Simply surviving Hap Kennedy’s war would have been an accomplishment, Malta in ’42, Sicily in ’43, D-Day in ’44.  But to chalk up victory after victory and become one of Canada’s most celebrated Aces of the war sets him apart. READ more here– CLICK

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kennedy

Irving Farmer “Hap” Kennedy

RCAF   S/L

DFC   &   Bar

Click Here

 

 

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Jan 2011, Sat  •  Page 41

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Dec 1994, Mon  •  Page 17

 

Black-Crosses

 

Black Crosses off my Wingtip– click here.. Burnstown Publishing

The Kitten Factory 1953

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Jan 1953, Thu  •  Page 11

Jessie Leach Gemmill -The “Claire Fraser” of Lanark

Another Lanark Mystery– Paris Green

When I was 17- The Kitten- Glenayr Knitting Mills Reunion

How Much is that Kitten Sweater in the Window?

Stories from the Old Kitten Mill

Down by the Old Kitten Mill

Linda’s Mail Bag– Do You Have any Info on my Blanket?

You’re from the Village of Lanark You Say?

Tom Troughton Escaped Capture 1944

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Tom Troughton Escaped Capture 1944

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Jun 1944, Tue  •  Page 11

 

peg001

Pegasus Bridge

 

 

relatedreading

 

May 8 1945 V. E. Day in Almonte – Photos

Unveiling of George E. Eccles Monument Photos

George Eccles Almonte Hero!

Eddie Malone

There was Just Something About Gerald Poaps Photo — People of Almonte

Bert Prendergast Carleton Place

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Bert Prendergast Carleton Place

 

ww2107.jpg

 

Military Service
Service Number:
R/82744

Age:
27

Force:
Air Force

Unit:
Royal Canadian Air Force

Division:
115 (R.A.F.) Sqdn

Citation(s):
1939-45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, Defence Medal, War Medal 1939-45, Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp.

Additional Information
Born:
July 9, 1915
Carleton Place, Ontario

Enlistment:
February 1, 1941
Ottawa, Ontario

Son of James Henry and Sarah Anne (nee Beach) Prendergast of Carleton Place, Ontario. Brother of Wilfred, James, William, Harold, Helen, Ivy, Norah and Margaret. The ‘Canadian’ wrote: He was a fine type of young Canadian manhood, honest and upright, pleasant and courteous, and highly respected by his elders. When the call for duty came, Bert gave his services voluntarily to his King and country and last week gave his life for freedom. The ‘Canadian’ wrote: He was a fine type of young Canadian manhood, honest and upright, pleasant and courteous, and highly respected by his elders. When the call for duty came, Bert gave his services voluntarily to his King and country and last week gave his life for freedom.

 

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Ocotber 30–1942

Cemetery:

BECK ROW (ST. JOHN) CHURCHYARD
Suffolk, United Kingdom

Grave Reference: