Tag Archives: world war 2

A Gift for a Teacher 1939 Larry Clark

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A Gift for a Teacher 1939 Larry Clark

I was going thru some of my junk and re-discovered this item. I just now realized that this is possibly a Christmas gift to a teacher. The interesting part is that while this is a not so interesting pattern, the manufacturer was of some importance and would have been fairly expensive to purchase. As you can see this would have been purchased shortly after the start of WWII and to that extent someone (the storeowner, purchaser) loved the bowl but not the fact that it was made in Germany and so obliterated that fact. I have googled both names but drew a blank. I haven’t heard of this practise or seen some such as this before. Perhaps it was a normal practise at the time. The mark is that of Reinhold & Schlegelmilch, Germany with the “Germany” portion covered up.

Larry Clark

Has anyone seen this before??

Thought you might like a better photo! I don’t know what he/she used to print on the plate but it is obviously permanent ink of some kind-no markers in those days?Larry

Reinhold Schlegelmilch was a porcelain manufacturer in SuhlGermany, founded in the 19th century. The factory mark was the initials “RS” in red encircled by a green wreath beneath a red five-pointed star. Reinhold Schlegelmilch had two sons, Arnold Schlegelmilch and Ehrhard Schlegelmilch.

Ehrhard Schlegelmilch operated the factory in Suhl, and during this period, most of the pieces exported to the United States bore the “RS Prussia” mark stamped in red. Arnold Schlegelmilch started a factory in Tillowitz, then Germany (now Tułowice), Poland. In 1910, the Tillowitz factory began using the “RS Germany” mark stamped in green. The Tillowitz factory kept producing porcelain through the Second World War. The company was taken over by the Polish state in 1946 and privatized in 1995 under the name Fabryka Porcelitu Tułowice SA. The production in 2011 concentrated on sanitary and building ceramics including tiles. These two operations produced the majority of their products for export beginning in 1892 until the beginning of World War I.

For almost 100 years, 1869 to 1956, Reinhold Schlegelmilch’s initials, RS, appeared in various marks on fine German porcelain. Probably today’s most desired pieces are those marked RS Prussia. Rare blanks with rare decorations, such as animals or portraits, of RS Prussia can bring $3,000-$8,000. More common floral pieces have routinely sold for $75-$350. Other sought after marks include RS Germany, RS Suhl, and RS Poland.

Due to it’s higher value, the RS Prussia mark has been forged and copied since the late 1960s . New RS Suhl appeared in the early 1990s, and now, in 1998, RS Germany and RS Poland are being reproduced. This article will review the new and forged RS marks and compare them to original markings. It will also look at other ways fakers attempt to enhance or imitate RS porcelain. Read more here click

Leslie China Hall Fire

Gwladys Williams Menzies– Celebrating a Local Girl who Made Good

The Carleton Place Airport that Got Away- 1940 and the R101 Airship

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The Carleton Place Airport that Got Away- 1940 and the R101 Airship

Tony Percy told a story that he remembered as a boy in 1930 ( July 1930) the British R101 Airship flew over Carleton Place on its way from Ottawa to Toronto. The airship was a on a tour of Canada and the United States. Tony remembered the airship sailing over Carleton Place in the early evening and he could see the lights of the passenger compartment.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Oct 1930, Mon  •  Page 2The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Oct 1930, Mon  •  Page 2

Not long after Tony told Gary Strike this story he had a man visit him from Ottawa one day. He told me as a young man he grew up in Carleton Place and then his family moved to Ottawa. He remembered his father coming home after a local Carleton Place and that our council had been in favour of the Royal Canadian Air Force constructing an airfield near Carleton Place for the war effort. The reason given was because there was concern that young service men would be roaming the streets of Carleton Place at night.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Aug 1940, Sat  •  Page 20

He never heard anything more about it but a couple of years ago I found an article in a 1940s Ottawa newspaper stating that surveyors had been out to Carleton Place to survey land for Carleton Place. It turned out the Air Force relocated to Arnprior and we lost the opportunity for an airfield here in Carleton Place. During World War II, the airport hosted No. 3 Flying Instructor School for the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. Arnprior/South Renfrew Municipal Airport was the original location of the National Research Council of Canada Flight Research Laboratory until 1954 when it moved to its current location at the Ottawa International Airport in Ottawa.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 May 1940, Sat  •  Page 12

On October 5, 1930, the British airship R.101 crashed on a hill in Beauvais, France. The impact was gentle and survivable but the ship was inflated with hydrogen, and the resulting fire incinerated 46 of the passengers and crew. Two additional crew members died of their injuries soon after. Read the here…

The Yonkers Herald
Yonkers, New York
06 Oct 1930, Mon  •  Page 2

The Franktown Airport Debacle

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place –Part 5–Fly Me to the Moon

The Spirit of Carleton Place -Shotgun with the Sky Pilots of Carleton Place PT.1

The Carleton Place Airport: You are clear to land it for $2.5 million

Update to the Charles Lindbergh Story — Larry Clark

Tales You Did Not Know About—Charles Lindbergh Landed in Carleton Place