Tag Archives: wayne richards

More than Words- Mural is Almost Finished!

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Shaun McInnis, mural artist, is busy working on Wandering Wayne’s/ Wayne Richardson’s mural located on Allan St at the end of the Queen’s Hotel. It should be finished today and he told me this morning the interest in this mural was mindboggling. That makes me so happy.

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Come see all the murals in Carleton Place and those of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum too

Please keep donating to the gofundmepage or drop in and see Cathie at Downtown BIA office

RELATED READING:

Just Like Mount Rushmore…

It’s Back On Like Donkey Kong!-Wandering Wayne

Wayne Richards -You’ll Never Walk Alone Again

The Eating Place! You’ve Got to Eat in Carleton Place!

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Time Travel- Is that Wandering Wayne in this 1930 Photo?

Christmas in April – (Wandering) Wayne Richards

 

Just Like Mount Rushmore…

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Nearly three million people visit Mount Rushmore each year. South Dakota historian Doane Robinson is credited with conceiving the idea of carving the likenesses of famous people into the Black Hills region of South Dakota in order to promote tourism in the region.

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Mount Rushmore has become an iconic symbol of the United States, and now we too have another tribute to Carleton Place and the iconic people that believed in our town. Shaun McInnis, mural artist, is busy working on Wandering Wayne’s/ Wayne Richardson’s mural located on Allan St at the end of the Queen’s Hotel..

McInnis’s  work is all over the Town of Carleton Place, which has commissioned him to do many murals in recent years. Councillor Jerry Flynn, mural project co-ordinator, has nothing but praise for McInnis as a person and artist. “I couldn’t have asked for anyone better than Shaun McInnis.”

I am sure Wayne would have waved his hand and walked on when he saw Shaun painting his likeness– but beneath that cap on his head I’d like to think a smile would have appeared on his face as he continued his journey on the streets of Carleton Place.

 

Wayne Richards (1935-2016)

Wayne believed that one step at a time was good for the soul and he will forever be  known as Wandering Wayne to each and every person of Carleton Place. He was the last milkman that delivered door to door on a horse drawn wagon from the Carleton Place Dairy on Moore Street.  If you took the time to talk to him he could tell you more about the town and your family then you ever thought possible. Wayne requested the best of each of us in our little town and hopefully  for the most part we all met his expectations. Thanks Wayne for always reminding us to take the time to be kind–may you be walking the clouds in heaven. 

Come see all the murals in Carleton Place and those of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum too

Please keep donating to the gofundmepage created by Linda Young or drop in and see Cathie at Downtown BIA office

RELATED READING:

It’s Back On Like Donkey Kong!-Wandering Wayne

Wayne Richards -You’ll Never Walk Alone Again

The Eating Place! You’ve Got to Eat in Carleton Place!

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Time Travel- Is that Wandering Wayne in this 1930 Photo?

Christmas in April – (Wandering) Wayne Richards

It’s Back On Like Donkey Kong!-Wandering Wayne

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Photo by Lisa Stanley Sheehan
Sometimes Things go Down- But Then They Come Up Again!
The Gofundme page for Wayne Richards was not functioning properly, and to all those that had patience thank you- just a note to say:
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The Gofundme Page for the Wayne Richards mural has raised  $1,540 of $3,000 of what we need, and Cathie Hawkins McOrmond has collected another $217 at the Downtown BIA office on Bridge Street in Carleton Place.
So where is the mural going? Deputy Mayor Jerry Flynn sent me this email:
“I have been given permission to use the wall of the Queen’s Hotel facing Allen St for the Wayne Richard’s Mural. The mural will be Wayne silhouetted by a milk wagon”.
 

Jerry

Please donate to the gofundmepage or drop in and see Cathie at Downtown BIA office

 

RELATED READING:

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Time Travel- Is that Wandering Wayne in this 1930 Photo?

Christmas in April – (Wandering) Wayne Richards

 

Christmas in April – (Wandering) Wayne Richards

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Sometimes in the Spring in Northern California I would see random Christmas tress thrown on the side of the road. In San Francisco, I’m sure they make a game out of it every year. I believe last years winner was in July, but I’m pretty sure I’ve seen later ones. I imagined-is someone too old, sick? This has always been a perplexing question and clearly an ongoing national pandemic.
But, what is not a pandemic, is any picture of Wayne Richards. He has only be gone a few months and everyone still talks about him, and will forever. John Morin sent me a picture the other day of Wayne. We may not want to see Christmas trees in April, but you can show me a picture of Wayne any day, festive season or not.
The story was that Gail who worked at The Eating Place, organized along with the customers of the Eating Place, collected money to purchase a new Winter coat for Wayne, as his was worn out. A presentation from The Eating Place took place at breakfast in 2014. When I saw the picture I thought to myself:
“It’s beginning to feel a lot like Christmas”
Still raising money for the mural

 

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Credits: Gail fundraiser organizer and photo John D Morin

RELATED READING

Please donate to the gofundmepage or drop in and see Cathie at Downtown BIA office

RELATED READING:

 

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Time Travel- Is that Wandering Wayne in this 1930 Photo?

 

Time Travelling in Lanark County?

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Yesterday I wrote about the late great Wayne Richards and wondered if it was him standing in the 1930 picture. Was it a time-travel picture I fantasized? Some even said it was the way Wayne carried a newspaper under his arm. It got me thinking—

In 1950, a man with mutton chop sideburns and Victorian-era duds popped up in Times Square. Witnesses said he looked startled, and then a minute later, he was hit by a car and killed.

On his person, the police found 19th-century money, a letter dated 1876 and business cards with his name – Rudolph Fentz. None of these items showed signs of aging. A Mrs. Rudolph Fentz was tracked down. She was the widow of Rudolph Fentz, Jr., and the story went that junior’s dad disappeared mysteriously in 1876. Weird, right? Eventually it was discovered that this urban legend originated from a 1950 short story written by Jack Finney. Finney would go on to write the classics Invasion of the Body Snatchers and Time and Again.

In the video below there is no sound but  a woman walks through a film premiere crowd in Los Angeles talking on her cell. Not so remarkable. Until you consider the year is 1928. The clip, from bonus material on a DVD of Charlie Chaplin’s The Circus, hit the internet in 2010. Never mind the obvious questions about non-existent satellites and cell towers back in the jazz age. The device was most likely an early hearing aid. Still, the clip is mind-teasingly fun to watch.

Here is another;

Time Traveller Caught In 1938 Film? 2013 1080p Available

Related Reading:

Time Travel- Is that Wandering Wayne in this 1930 Photo?

 

 

Wayne Richards -You’ll Never Walk Alone Again

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Read the rest of Wednesday’s Posts in The Carleton Place daily-click here

 

PLEASE PLAY THIS WHILE VIEWING PICTURES

PLEASE PLAY THIS WHILE VIEWING PICTURES

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Photo by Lisa Stanley Sheehan

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Photo by Michael Gauthier Freedom Photography

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UPDATE– A GOFUNDME page has been started  to create a mural for Wayne- click on this link

Wayne left us this week and left a dark void in our area. The people of Carleton Place turned out today at the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home , Wednesday March 16, 2016, at 10:00 to honour Wayne. Interment will be later in the spring, with his family at United Cemeteries.

For those who wish a donation to the Carleton Place Hospital Foundation would be appreciated.

Wayne was ever thankful to the staff at The Eating Place, and all who helped him, especially assisting him when walking and crossing the street became difficult. I personally think a shout out also goes to the Queen’s Hotel too where Wayne lived for a very long time.

Many thanks to the people of Carleton Place who turned out today, and who also signed the Barker guest book and left comments on my blogs. Thanks also go to the Wayne Bennett & John Bowes of the Alan Barker Funeral Home for allowing me to spread Wayne’s flowers by Erica Zwicker. One of them went to the Century 21 office where Wayne used to pay his rent each month. For anyone that did not know, Ralph Shaw took care of Wayne’s needs after his sister died. There are also flowers that sit on my counter that I will keep for posterity to remind me each day that:

 There is never any need to have it all-just make the best of what you have. 

Like Wayne Richards did.

 

RELATED READING

GOFUNDME PAGE

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

 

Memorial for Wayne Richards Wednesday 10 am.

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Photo by Laura Amey‎

UPDATE– A GOFUNDME page has been started  to create a mural for Wayne- click on this link

Wayne left us this week and left a dark void in Carleton Place. Let us bring the light to him next Wednesday. Also, please take time to sign the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home guest book.

A memorial service to honour Wayne will take place at the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home 19 McArthur Avenue, Carleton Place on Wednesday March 16, 2016, at 10:00 a.m. Interment later in the spring, with his family at United Cemeteries.

For those who wish a donation to the Carleton Place Hospital Foundation would be appreciated.

Wayne was ever thankful to the staff at the Eating Place, and all who helped him, especially assisting him when walking and crossing the street became difficult. Wayne worked at the Ottawa Civic Hospital in housekeeping, and was a quiet icon in Carleton Place for 81 years. He was one of the last “milkmen’ in Carleton Place that delivered milk by horse. You and your stories will always be remembered Wayne by your friends.

He will always be the unofficial mayor of Carleton Place to me.

Related Reading

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

 

 

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

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Rest in peace Wayne, hope you don’t mind me sharing this picture. I work across the street and one day had my new camera and was finding inspiration and there you were. Photo and comment by Lisa Stanley Sheehan

 

UPDATE– A GOFUNDME page has been started  to create a mural for Wayne- click on this link

A memorial service will be held Wednesday at 10 am for Wayne will take place at the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home 19 McArthur Avenue, Carleton Place on Wednesday March 16, 2016, at 10:00 a.m.

 

Written with the thoughts and comments of the people of Carleton Place

There isn’t a day that I don’t look out my window and see the little white frame house on the corner of Lake Ave East and Argyle and think of Wayne Richards, who was fondly known as Wandering Wayne in Carleton Place. I always knew it was his childhood home, and for years I have asked Wayne to tell me his life story, but he was reluctant. Wayne was a humble man, and as we often passed in the streets he never forgot to smile and nod back. If you took the time to talk to him he could tell you more about the town of Carleton Place and your family then you ever thought possible.

Like everyone else in town I have watched Wayne deteriorate the past few years. Instead of walking, he now stood in the doorway of the Queen’s Hotel watching the world go by. Wayne knew that the beauty of Carleton Place still surrounded him and he was content with that.

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Photo by Michael Gauthier

To tell you the truth I never thought Wayne was going to die,even though he was in his 80s (1935-2016) as he was such an iconic part of Carleton Place. When I heard the news I, like all of you, shed a few tears. As Ted Hurdis said, if we could have put a fit bit on Wayne years ago it would have been really interesting to see how many hundreds of miles he walked. He was as close to Forrest Gump as we are ever going to see.

But, how much did we really know about Wayne Richards? Wayne once delivered milk and butter from the Carleton Place Dairy. He also worked at Leigh Instruments in the plastic shop for awhile in the 1960s. When Lynda Hartley worked as a nurse at the Civic Hospital, Wayne worked in the house keeping department. He had a sister Donna, and Margaret Sovey, a member of St. Andrews Church, who passed away in 2014 and an older brother Donald. His parents were Ernest and Idena Richards, but if you really think about it, the town of Carleton Place became Wayne’s family.

Lila Leach-James knew Wayne’s family very well and said he had endured many hardships in his lifetime. However, Wayne held down a good job in the city for a long time and traveled somewhat, in particular, boarding a bus and spending weekends in Toronto doing walkabouts. He was very clever, and quite a history buff, and was determined to remain on his own. There was also a story of a man that was hired to map every dwelling in Carleton Place, the surrounding area and talk to homeowners. There were many times he had to stop by the Queen’s Hotel for Wayne’s assistance as he was quite knowledgeable about the people in our community.

But surprisingly enough, what a lot of people remember about Wayne were his eating habits. When Amanda Wark worked at Subway in the mid to late nineties, Wayne used to come in almost every weekend and order a 6″ meatball sub, doing this for weeks and weeks and then suddenly he’d throw a curveball and get a steak and cheese instead. He got a real kick out of confusing them.

Holly’s parents ran the local Dixie Lee and every single day, at the same time, he would come and order the same meal. Wayne loved The Eating Place and he ate there every day at four o’clock on the dot, ordering the sandwich special.  John Daniel Morin said Wayne often talked to him there and he was a walking encyclopedia on various topics, in particular hockey statistics. Lynne Johnson used to leave money for meals at the Eating Place for Wayne, which was the idea of the Guthries. The staff were great to collect it for him and Gwen the waitress helped him with his breakfast in the morning.

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But was he just a downtown icon? Wayne really lived up to his nickname Wandering Wayne. One minute you would see him downtown, and a few hours later you might run in to him in Smith Falls, or at the arena eating a hot dog on hockey nights. Or, you might run into him in Home Hardware when it was on Bridge Street watching TV.

Lyndy Rylott said after her husband Gary retired, he always had to go to town for something and would drive from their home in Ashton into Carleton Place. Occasionally the weather would be cold and raining and often he would pick Wayne up on the edge of town and drop him off downtown. Unfortunately, she never knew of these drives until just before her husband died. When she saw Wayne out for his walk, he told her of their little trips. Wayne believed that one step at a time is good for the soul and another thing he will be greatly missed for is asking everyone for the time during the day.

Bud Hamilton, a life time resident of Carleton Place, said he knew Wayne all his life and offered many times to drive him to Smith Falls to have cataracts removed but he wanted no part of that– he would just say thank you and that he was fine. At one time Wayne used to walk a return trip to Ottawa each day and as some have said if Wayne had been a dog walker he would have become a millionaire!

Erin S. Albright came to Carleton Place in the Spring of 2012 with a friend, to get cheaper gas. At $1.07 a liter at the time, it was worth the drive in from Ottawa. They went into the diner next to the gas station for some lunch. Wayne walked over, asked how they were and how their day was going. They had a great chat and he let them know where the ice cream place was (sadly still closed for the season). When they were getting ready to leave, Erin impulsively gave him a hug. He had moved on to chat to other people, but she had to tell him how he made Carleton Place a very welcoming place. Erin didn’t know him long, but he made a day without that awesome dairy fresh ice cream they had been looking forward to special and friendlier.  It reminded her why she would truly prefer to live in a small town.

I often wonder if Wayne ever realized how famous and well liked he was. Even as Wayne got a little older, got a little sicker, he kept on walking and the townsfolk of Carleton Place helped him with his daily journeys. Wandering Wayne was a Carleton Place icon as everyone knew who he was, even if they never met him personally. Wayne Richards brought our community together in a very special way. As Faye Lavergne said,

“Wayne requested the best of each of us in our little town. and hopefully  for the most part we all met his expectations”.

Thanks Wayne for always reminding us to take the time to be kind, and you will be greatly missed.  When walking through the ‘valley of shadows’ remember, a shadow is cast by a Light and as Curtis Geroux said, “I know this immortal man is still trekkin’ somewhere”.

May you be walking the clouds in heaven.

To the town of Carleton Place–Let’s get a mural going– bronze a pair of his shoes.. anything for a man who loved us so much!

Thanks Tara Taylor for telling me about this picture on —Carleton Place Meet Me on the Mississippi site COMMUNITY PHOTO ALBUM–

 

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Llew Lloyd— Nice pic of a very nice man. I’ve known Wayne going all the way back to when he delivered milk door to door in a horse drawn wagon. Loved chatting with him every time I saw him . He never forgot a name and could tell you stories about sport’s teams that would astound you. He was a walking encylopedia. Books could have been written about the history of Carleton Place if someone had taken the time to listen and record all his memories. Many of us have some great ones. Now he’s gone ,but not forgotten.

Deputy Mayor Jerry Flynn– Like Llew Lloyd, I have known Wayne Richards all my life, with first memories being of the horse drawn milk wagon, and the day the horse and wagon ended up down by the river at the end of Joseph street, after the horse decided to take off without Wayne while he was delivering our milk at 244 Flora St.. Wayne was a C.P historian and walking encyclopedia, being much more worldly than some would think. I heard many of his stories of travel over the years, with his trip to Yankee Stadium being one of my favorites. We have had many memorable individuals, in my time, frequent our Main St., but none who matched the demeanor of Wayne. Anybody who has known Wayne Richards has been blessed to have crossed his path.

It has been said that His story, and his many stories and recollections of Carleton Place, should have been documented. Well, just so everyone knows, I made an attempt a few years ago when Jeff Maguire and I conducted several interviews with residents of C.P. In no uncertain terms was that going to happen, with Wayne cutting the conversation very short. What Wayne did leave us, was our memories of a kind and gentle man who was somewhat iconic, reminding us that we don’t need a lot of extravagance, or a lot of possessions to make our mark in life. Wayne lived a simple life, and left this world a better place.
Jerry Flynn

 

 I  I don’t know if we each have a destiny, or if we’re all just floatin’ around accidental-like on a breeze. But I, I think maybe it’s both. We miss you already Wayne. If there’s anything you need, we won’t be far away. Forrest Gump