Tag Archives: watson’s corners

Have you Seen one of These Lately? The Update from the Lanark Village Community Group

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Have you Seen one of These Lately? The Update from the Lanark Village Community Group
I just found this in the Buchanan scrapbook so I thought Id post this giggle today—- Kerith Bellefeuille I’m originally from that general area and also remember the stories. My father swore he saw the famous jackelope. However I feel the need to state he was on his way to the Windsong hotel with family so his ability to recall those events may be questionable due to previous bevies. Lol– With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

Read-So…. We drove by Kangaroo Crescent

Fun Fact #1 — Kangaroo Sighting in Watsons CornersHave you seen one of these lately? Local character Herb Butts swore he had seen a Kangaroo by his woodshed. Herb by the way was the only person to ever see this Kangaroo!! Local Game Wardens were out tracking but to no avail! Anyone know Wayne Rostad (of Country Report at the time)? – Well he showed up wearing an Australian Bush hat checking all kinds of leads in this case. Watsons Corners became known as the Kangaroo Capital of Canada! Thanks goes to the Lanark Era – March 28, 1985-Lanark & District 200th Settlement Anniversary

Thanks to all the peeps on the beloved

Lanark Village Community Group

Darlene MacDonaldWayne Rostad wrote/sang a song about this!

Pat G13 hours

I remember hearing about this. My dad thought it might be due to the bootleg whiskey Dan Hannah was rumoured to be selling out of his store.

It was sad to see the slow decline in customers that put him out of business. We would try to buy something from him every visit.

Rasa ElliottI saw a small deer by the side of the road a couple of days ago facing away from me and looking back, looked exactly like a kangaroo.

Beverly PillonRemember the T-shirts

Bev JacksonKen Jackson and Brian Parsons wrote the original version of the song It was sang many a time at local house gatherings I must say they did a great job !!

Nora CromwellThey did a great job on this song, Bev. I still catch myself singing it every once in a while. My sister Barb and I were singing it last Sunday.

Anna ElizabethI went into the Watsons corners hall with some friends once and they looked at all the kangaroo decor and said “what’s with the all the kangaroos?” I looked at them and all I said was “this is the kangaroo Capitol of Canada.” Sometimes I forget that people dont know the story. Fun fact, I was one of the kangaroo mascots at the winter carnival when I was a kid.

Anna Elizabeth

Wendy WarkWhat quite a story at one time !!!

Rose Lathan–There’s actually a lot of people who claim to have seen kangaroos all over Canada Peter Zoskia CBC did a show on it

Tammy MacKenzieI suspect this links to poor Wendell the wallaby, who was missing from Saunders’ for some time after a storm broke the fencing, and was sighted in many areas. Lots of people were following up on sightings, and I remember doing so for one. That was late 2008. read-So…. We drove by Kangaroo Crescent

Marcie TompkinsNow I know why people asked us if we’d seen any kangaroos. Not being from the area, we had no idea what the story was. But my husband pointed out one night that a deer doing it’s business could look like a kangaroo if you’d had too much to drink

Wesley Parsons– I spent a lot of time in Watsons Corners as a young lad – and this story was well known, I spent many car rides looking out the windows on those backwoods for any sign of a Roo. From what I recall – there were at least two farmers that had been known to bring in foreign animals without a clue how to keep them contained and the animals usually wandered off.I remember one old guy wanted his own Buffalo so he bought one and had it delivered. The next day the Buffalo headed west and just walked through the fencing of every farm in it’s path for several miles – a buffalo will push a fence down and keep going – a cow will just turn and head another direction.Things like that are not uncommon – just last week someones peacocks got loose in Almonte – they’re native to India but it’s not uncommon to see them on a farm in Ontario. Kangaroos have the ability to acclimatize as well – lots of places in Australia get snow – they develop a heavier coat and they graze eat like deer so it’s possible for them to survive through our winters…I never saw any in Watsons Corners myself but many claim that they did.

K P I don’t mind to tell you that 40 years ago I got lost in the bush between Robertson Lake and Watson’s Corners and I was never so happy when I emerged and saw the ghost sign on a building that said Kangaroo something-or-other. Prior to that I thought I was going to be a permanent resident in the woods. I didn’t care how or why it had that name, I was just happy to see sunlight, and a sign that let me know humans had once been here

Wildlife officers have examined tracks found in the area. They were five inches long, more than two inches wide and about seven inches apart. Bruce Turner, an Ontario predator control officer, said the tracks were too old for a full analysis but they may have belonged to a large jackrabbit or three-legged coyote. “Anything is possible,” he said. Meanwhile, rumors abound about a Frontenac County man who imported several kangaroos a few years ago and kept them on his farm. They all escaped. “I wouldn’t be surprised if a kangaroo was out there,” said a spokesman for the Australian high commission in Ottawa. “They could probably hang on for a while unless caught in a large snowdrift or something.” Watsons Corners is about 45 miles south of Ottawa.

They’re very hardy in Australia,” said a spokesman for the Australian High Commission. “They don’t live above the snowline but they’re, pretty tough creatures.” . Federal government have reported no ‘requests from Australian kangaroos for landed immigrant status, so how did this thing get her? .- –‘ No kangaroo farms in the’, area, you say. – – . – A Frontenac County man imported three of four of them a few years ago and penned them, on his- farm near Sharbot Lake All got away.” And as for the Lanark County mystery? Deer, jackrabbit, coyote or Ottawa Valley Sasquatch … it just might be a kangaroo at that .The Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, CanadaThu, Jan 03, 1974 · Page 4

Kangaroo WATSONS CORNERS (CP) Herb Butt says he saw a kangaroo bouncing through the bush near here and not everyone is laughing at him. Mr. Butt, a local farmer, says he saw the animal several times in the fall and again the last few weeks when he was cutting Christmas trees. He says the animal was about four feet tall with a small face and large round eyes. “It had two long ears, a small nose, white strips in back of the ears and it moved on its back feet only,” says Mr. Butt. “It didn’t look like anything I’ve ever seen before. It’s ears were as long as the distance from my hand to my elbow.” Wildlife officers have examined tracks found in the area. They were five inches long, more than two inches wide and about seven inches apart. Bruce Turner, an Ontario predator control officer, said the tracks were too old for a full analysis but they may have belonged to a large jackrabbit or three-legged coyote. “Anything is possible,” he said. Meanwhile, ‘ rumors abound about a Frontenac County man who imported several kangaroos a few years ago and kept them on his farm. They all escaped and were never found.The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jan 1974, Fri  •  Page 3

Jeff and wife Bev and children Sally (10), Luke, (8) and Ben (3) visited the Corners and its focal point Hannah’s General Store. ; They came away sporting T-shirts with a ‘ legend bearing witness to their visit to the “Kangaroo Capital of Canada.” The Morrises are returning to Sydney after a three-year tour of duty in Ottawa sadly, because they’ve become addicted to this place. At a farewell dinner given by some of; his friends, Jeff was presented with a tankard saluting his successful attempts to introduce more Canadians to the glory of Australia’s Swan Lager. To top it off, up stepped Don Hueston with the toy kangaroo a gift from the folks of the Kangaroo Capital. In return, Geoff promised to seek out a Watson’s Corners in Australia for twinning ceremonies. The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Aug 1977, Tue  •  Page 45

NO, I do not sell these– I found them online-https://www.teepublic.com/pin/16595423-watsons-corners

If you check below the picture they have mugs, shirts, masks etc etc.

So…. We drove by Kangaroo Crescent

More Photos of the Watson’s Corners Kangaroos – Thanks to Connie Jackson

Tie Me Jackelope Down Boy–Tie Me Jackelope Down!

The Valley Calendar 1976– Cindy Duncan–Watson’s Corners

When Researching — Tragedy Somehow Shows Up- Fair Family- Watson’s Corners

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When Researching  — Tragedy Somehow Shows Up- Fair Family- Watson’s Corners

Died, at Watson’s Corners on Sunday, Feb. 7, the beloved wife of George Fair, aged 51.

When Marion Agnes Craig was born in 1845 in Lanark, Ontario, her father, Alexander, was 30, and her mother, Agnes, was 24. She married George Fair on August 26, 1870, in her hometown. She died on February 4, 1897, in Lanark, Ontario, at the age of 52, and was buried in Watsons Corners, Ontario. Agnes Craig married George Fair in Lanark, Ontario, on August 26, 1870, when she was 25 years old.

Perth Courier, Feb. 19, 1897

Watson’s Corners:  It becomes our sad duty this week to record the death of Mrs. George Fair which took place at her late home on Sabbath morning, 7th inst. After suffering intensely from cancer for months.  On December 15 the deceased underwent an operation and had what was supposed to be at the time all the cancer removed but as time went on it was found that her system was full of cancer which eventually caused her death.  

Deceased, whose maiden name was Agnes Craig, was born in Dalhousie 51 years ago.  Twenty six years ago she married George Fair who survives her and came to live in our village where she has resided ever since with the exception of a few years she spent in Michigan.  The deceased was of a kind and loving disposition and made friends with all with whom she came into contact. 

 During her illness her sufferings were such as pen would fail to describe.  Some time previous to the end she called her loved ones to her bedside and bade them a loving farewell telling them she was going to the home prepared for God’s children where there would be no more pain or sorrow.  

The funeral on Tuesday was very large the church literally packed while many had to remain outside.  Rev. J.A. Leitch preached a very appropriate sermon after which the remains were conveyed to the cemetery and deposited in their last resting place to await the resurrection morning.  Deceased was a member of Zion Church, the Ladies Aid Society and Christian Endeavor Society and also a teacher in the Sabbath School.

Name:Mrs George Fair ( Marion Agnes Craig)
Gender:Female
Age:51
Birth Date:abt 1846
Birth Place:Dalhousie
Death Date:4 Feb 1897
Death Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Religion:Presbyterian
Cause of Death:Cancer

Her husband George Fair was born on October 25, 1830, in New York, USA. He married Agnes Craig on August 26, 1870, in Lanark, Ontario. He died on October 30, 1913, in Palmerston, Ontario, having lived a long life of 83 years, and was buried in Watsons Corners, Ontario.

Her youngest son was accidentally killed in 1901.

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The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
21 Oct 1901, Mon  •  Page 5
Name:George Levi Fair
Gender:Male
Age:15
Birth Date:abt 1886
Birth Place:Dalhousie
Death Date:18 Oct 1901
Death Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Religion:Presbyterian
Cause of Death:Accidentally Shot Died Instanlty

When George Levi Fair was born on April 22, 1886, in Lanark, Ontario, his father, George, was 55 and his mother, Marion Agnes, was 40. He had four siblings. He died as a teenager on October 18, 1901, in Watsons Corners, Ontario, and was buried there.

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Pollock and Dora McDougall’s Rose Garden — 47 years later …..

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Pollock and Dora McDougall’s Rose Garden — 47 years later …..
Paradise in Hopetown 1973

Deep in Lanark County, in the township of Dalhousie, Pollock and Dora McDougall’s rose garden was the talk of the area. Located a hop, skip , and a jump near Watson’s Corners 100’s of tourists used to visit this rose garden each year. In 1973 there were 415 rose bushes and McDougall decided to specialize in Peace Roses and all were said to be of exhibition quality.–Paradise in Hopetown

In the end I never found Wilson’s Corners where the McDougall House was –Posted on October 23, 2017 

Until today June 7th, 2020– a few years later-– Today, Jennifer Ferris drove me to see the former McDougall property. There was nary a rose bush 47 years later–instead it was overgrown, but they did have a lovely garden and they were growing hops.

Dozens of farmers in the Canadian province of Ontario dove into growing hops in recent years, encouraged by an explosion of local craft breweries. Hops are an incredibly difficult crop to grow. To do it very well, you really need to babysit it as it’s a very assertive plant. I wonder what this place will look like in another 47 years.

TWO YEARS LATER

2020- house behind trees on right unvisible
growing hops now

RELATED READING

Paradise in Hopetown

Lost in Hopetown — A Photo Essay

Did Anyone Ever Collect this Bounty?

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Did Anyone Ever Collect this Bounty?

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Hunters! Stop shooting cows, cars and each other. Aim for something different: kangaroos! Of course I’m serious. Why, even the New Era, a weekly paper in Lanark, has an ad in its classified section proclaiming: “Attention hunters. We offer $25 for any kangaroo hide caught in the Watsons Corners area. Please call Jim Closs or Bobby Neilson.”

New Era publisher Dennis Schroeder is offering a bounty too. In a front page story the paper declares: “Apparently the famous kangaroo of Watsons Corners, which was believed to have been mercifully laid to rest several years ago, has again been seen hopping through the cow pastures and corn fields. ”

A sign posted on County Road 8 about three miles from Watsons Corners last week warned motorists to beware of kangaroo crossing. The sign has since mysteriously disappeared. Presumably someone was just one hop ahead of the law, realizing that, if apprehended, he could face charges in a kangaroo court. “To enter into the spirit of the thing, the New Era is willing to offer a reward to anyone who can bring absolute clear proof of a kangaroo in the Watsons Corners area.

The reward?

“A one way ticket to the Australian outback. Schroeder may pay dearly for such cynicism! In the meantime, it won’t shake faith in the existence of Lanark marsupials among the 16 members: – Geoff Johnson bears of an exclusive order called The Company of Gentlemen of the Kangaroo Court, who meet twice a year at a certain liquor store before adjourning, fully armed for the hunt, to Don Houston’s kangaroo-country cottage.

There were at one time 17 members, which was really a bunch of guys what one in Lanark County is called “telling tales.” So my question is. Did anyone ever get that bounty?

Wesley Parsons I spent a lot of time in Watsons Corners as a young lad – and this story was well known, I spent many car rides looking out the windows on those backwoods for any sign of a Roo. From what I recall – there were at least two farmers that had been known to bring in foreign animals without a clue how to keep them contained and the animals usually wandered off.

I remember one old guy wanted his own Buffalo so he bought one and had it delivered. The next day the Buffalo headed west and just walked through the fencing of every farm in it’s path for several miles – a buffalo will push a fence down and keep going – a cow will just turn and head another direction.

Things like that are not uncommon – just last week someones peacocks got loose in Almonte – they’re native to India but it’s not uncommon to see them on a farm in Ontario. Kangaroos have the ability to acclimatize as well – lots of places in Australia get snow – they develop a heavier coat and they graze eat like deer so it’s possible for them to survive through our winters…I never saw any in Watsons Corners myself but many claim that they did.

I say— “And Maybe the Dingo Ate Your Baby!”

relatedreading

Did They Ever Find the Kangaroo from Lanark County?

More Photos of the Watson’s Corners Kangaroos – Thanks to Connie Jackson

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More Photos of the Watson’s Corners Kangaroos – Thanks to Connie Jackson

69619212_416305695662490_2928131260133933056_n.jpgOn the Bench Junior Kangaroos at McDonalds Corners. L to Right. Keith Creighton, Chris Chard, Ed Fair, ? , Cindy Duncan, Bill Fair –Thanks Connie! All photos sent by Connie Jackson. Pictures taken by Marilyn Jackson

 

69516272_614458302415108_8870812052860436480_nBruce McOuatt, Catcher. Lanark team on bench.

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Chris Chard, Catcher Bill Harper. In McDonalds Corners

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Bill Fair

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Cindy Duncan

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Chris Chard

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Lee McOuatt First Base.

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Bobby Duncan

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Bruce McOuatt catcher, unknown Lanark batter

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Neale McOuatt

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Connie Jackson

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Keith Creighton

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Keith Creighton

 

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Bruce McOuatt

Pictures taken by Marilyn Jackson

where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

 

relatedreading

The Valley Calendar 1976– Cindy Duncan–Watson’s Corners

Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

More about Cindy Duncan – Thanks to Connie Jackson

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More about Cindy Duncan – Thanks to Connie Jackson

 

 

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Hi Linda,

I was Just forwarded a clip about Cindy Duncan and the Watsons Corners Kangaroo baseball team. When I saw lots of posting of baseball teams I meant to forward these pics as not many have seen them. Thanks Connie! All photos sent by Connie Jackson. Pictures taken by Marilyn Jackson

Photo above-Back row L to R Alan Fair, Neale McOuatt, David White, Bruce McOuatt, Chris Chard, Billy Fair Bottom row Tim? Nagle, Cindy Duncan and Connie Jackson ...

 

 

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Cindy winding up in Lanark. I was 2nd base

 

First year we didn’t have our shirts. Hannah’s Store and members of the team fundraised for shirts following season. Our home Field games was in Bobby Duncam’s cow pasture on top of Fiddlers Hill. My Dad I believe donated chicken wire and the the lumber to put up a backstop. There was a few cow paddies to manipulate through.

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Bobby is back row

 

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70250541_570321060460214_7569348752134111232_n.jpgI have more But the article was about Cindy

Pictures taken by Marilyn Jackson

 

historicalnotes

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Aug 1945, Sat  •  Page 13

 

 

 

where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

 

relatedreading

The Valley Calendar 1976– Cindy Duncan–Watson’s Corners

More Photos of the Watson’s Corners Kangaroos – Thanks to Connie Jackson

Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

Watson’s Corners School

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Watson’s Corners School

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Wintertime may have afforded more time to be devoted to educating the young in terms of reading and writing. Farm labour during the summer may have precluded much in the way of instruction. Inevitably there would probably have been a wide variation in the level and quality of instruction.

 

 

 

relatedreading

The Valley Calendar 1976– Cindy Duncan–Watson’s Corners

It’s the Watson’s Corners News 1895!

Social Notes from Watson’s Corners

All the Single Ladies?

It’s the Watson’s Corners News 1895!

Did They Ever Find the Kangaroo from Lanark County?

Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

What’s in Your Walls? A Concealed Shoe?

Tie Me Jackelope Down Boy–Tie Me Jackelope Down!

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Tie Me Jackelope Down Boy–Tie Me Jackelope Down!

 

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Photo by Joel Barter– Bury, Quebec–“When I arrived 15 deer were there but by the time I took the photo they were on the run. I took quite a few shots and once I looked at them. This was definitely my favorite. I was shooting up the hill just trying to get the silhouette’s.”

 

Tom Standish posted this photo above on the People of the Eastern Townships ll  on Facebook and said:

“Kind of curious about this photo. Can you explain how this took place?”

Joel Barter had posted this photo online and it had caught my eye right away the first time I saw it. What was that creature on the far left?

Was it? Could it be?

I asked Joel where he took it and he said Brookbury, Bury, Quebec, and he too had wondered why the ears were so big on that curious animal. That’s the mystery he said– but to the ex Eastern Townships ‘pat’ now living in Lanark County, Ontario I knew immediately what is.

I am not a zoologist, and I know kangaroos don’t live in Ontario or Quebec – but, in 1974 a kangaroo had allegedly been spotted in the Lanark County area. The natural resources officials were at a loss for words when something similar to the Australian hopper had been spotted hoofing it through the outback near Watson’s Corners about 60 miles from Ottawa.

One of the local farmers, Herb Butt, who had spotted the critter, said it was about 4 feet tall with a small face and large round eyes. It had two long ears, a small nose and it moved on the back of its feet. He said he had seen the animal several times late in the fall and again when cutting Christmas trees. Of course a few of his neighbours thought he was crazy but Natural Resource Conservation officers thought he might have been right. Actually, there were no jokes coming from the professional wildlife men.

Bruce Turner, predator control officer, said the tracks were too old for a full analysis, but theorized they might have belonged to a large jack rabbit or a three-legged coyote. A three-legged coyote? What on earth were they drinking to come to that fact?

Of course folks said there just might have been a chance that a kangaroo or its bush cousin, the wallaby, might be loose in Lanark County.  Mr. Butt was certain it was not a deer, as he had hunted them for over 40 years, and he ought to know one when he sees one he said. After his interview, the story gained a life of its own in all of Eastern Ontario.

In 1980 the kangaroo was spotted once again by Brenda Johnson. Brenda was driving towards the village of Lanark when she thought she spotted a hitchhiker. It wasn’t– it was an animal with two legs. As her car approached “the thing with the two legs” hopped across the road and jumped the fence. She wondered if it had been a deformed deer whose legs had been shot off by hunters.

Local history has records of a game farm at the turn of the century in that area and it had kangaroos. Or–was this animal from a former Frontenac County farm whose owner had imported a few kangaroos and they all escaped.

Since Butt’s now infamous phrase, “I seen what I seen”, Watson’s Corners, Ontario has embraced the unusual title of kangaroo capital on road signs and event advertisements. Look at the photo closely above.

Is this what Joel Barter photographed that one dark evening in Brookbury? You tell me. Is that why no one has seen this creature ever again in Lanark County? Did it just get fed up and move his family lock stock and barrel to the Eastern Townships?

They say the traditional method of catching jackalopes is to lure them with whiskey, since they are extremely fond of this drink. Once intoxicated, the animal becomes slower and easier to hunt. Too bad photographer Joel Barter didn’t have a flask that night. He would have become the National Geographic Photographer of the year with that shot. We might never know what that animal was in Joel Barter’s photo — but the story about the kangaroo in Watson’s Corners is true. Their move to Quebec? Not so sure!

 

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Photo is of the Texas Jackalope not to be confused with the unseen Lanark County one.

 

comments

Wesley Parsons I spent a lot of time in Watsons Corners as a young lad – and this story was well known, I spent many car rides looking out the windows on those backwoods for any sign of a Roo. From what I recall – there were at least two farmers that had been known to bring in foreign animals without a clue how to keep them contained and the animals usually wandered off.

I remember one old guy wanted his own Buffalo so he bought one and had it delivered. The next day the Buffalo headed west and just walked through the fencing of every farm in it’s path for several miles – a buffalo will push a fence down and keep going – a cow will just turn and head another direction.

Things like that are not uncommon – just last week someones peacocks got loose in Almonte – they’re native to India but it’s not uncommon to see them on a farm in Ontario. Kangaroos have the ability to acclimatize as well – lots of places in Australia get snow – they develop a heavier coat and they graze eat like deer so it’s possible for them to survive through our winters…I never saw any in Watsons Corners myself but many claim that they did.

 

Kerith Bellefeuille I’m originally from that general area and also remember the stories. My father swore he saw the famous jackelope. However I feel the need to state he was on his way to the Windsong hotel with family so his ability to recall those events may be questionable due to previous bevies. Lol

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

Did You Know this About Smiths Falls? Believe it or Not!!

Tales of the Mississippi Lake- Believe it or Not!

Carleton Place Was Once Featured in Ripley’s Believe it or Not! Our Haunted Heritage

Outside Looking in at The Eccentric Family of Henry Stafford — Our Haunted Heritage

Could the Giant Pike of Carleton Place Have Turned Into the Lake Memphremagog Monster?

Time Travel- Is that Wandering Wayne in this 1930 Photo?

Lanark County Shoe Socials? A Past Fetish or Party Game?

“The Doug Gilmour Car”- Believe it or Not Carleton Place?

Believe it or Not? More Strange Canadian Stories

Believe it or Not! Tales from Caldwell Elementary School

 

The Wedding of Stanley Alexander Jackson and Margaret Elizabeth Forbes

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The Wedding of Stanley Alexander Jackson and Margaret Elizabeth Forbes

 

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Photo Lanark & District Museum- Lanark Village

On Wednesday June 23rd in the year 1926 a wedding took place at the home of Mr. and Mrs. James Forbes Dalhousie Township. The bridegroom was Mr. Stanley Jackson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alex Jackson of Watson’s Corners. The bride Miss Margaret Elizabeth was the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Forbes. the bride looked charming in her gown which was whirlpool blue crepe-de-chine, and was wearing a crown of orange blossoms and carrying a bouquet of pretty mixed flowers.

At 4:30 pm the bride and groom entered the parlour to the strains of the wedding march played by her best friend Miss Edith Stead. Mr. Del Storie was Jackson’s best man while the bride’s sister Miss Blanche Forbes  waited on the bride. The cermony was conducted by the Rev. J. T. Caswell standing in front of plants and flowers overhung with bunting and wedding bells. Mr David Forbes, grandfather of the bride was present and led the way congratulating the pair.

The bridegroom’s gift to the bride was a wristwatch and to the bridesmaid and pianist pretty bracelets. At the close of the ceremony Mr. Del Storie sang a wedding hymn. After the signing of the register the bride and groom led the way to the dining room where a sumptuous feast was displayed and the wedding crowd did ample justice. The bride officiated at the carving of the cake with a few nervous tremors which could be expected under the circumstances. The toast to the bride was proposed by Rev. J. T. Caswell and suitably responded to by Dr. Droft followed by witty speeches from Mr. David Forbes and Mrs. Alex Jackson. The presents were handsome and numerous consisting of silver, glass and china wear and household linens. The young couple will settle down at Watson’s Corners where the bridegroom is a farmer.

 

 

historicalnotes

Stanley Jackson—My father Stanley Jackson (Watson’s Corners) is on the list for “granted an exemption” but did enlist in Nov 1917. He spoke of returning from training in Ottawa so he could help on the farm on weekends and return to training on Monday-Alice Gilchrist–The Names of the Exempt of Lanark County- WW1

 

 

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Saunders Family Photos and Genealogy Carleton Place and Area –Debora Cloutier

Chalmers Family Genealogy- Smiths Falls Nancy-Johnnie Baldwin

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

Did You Know About the Rules of the Dalhousie Library? 1828 –The Library Pioneers

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Did You Know About the Rules of the Dalhousie Library? 1828 –The Library Pioneers

At a meeting held in the #12 schoolhouse on the third concession of Dalhousie, April 1, 1828 Mr. Thomas Scott resolved to establish the public library if everyone paid the following sums and held up the rules.

Each subscriber if they pay __ shillings shall be a member. The annual payment must be paid on or before the first Saturday of ___ for the use of the Library.

If a donor donate 5 pounds he will be exempted from annual payments

The business of the Library shall be conducted by a Committee of 12 or more. They with a president and secretary to be chosen at the annual meeting which shall be held in the #12 Schoohouse third concession, Dalhousie, on the first Saturday in March to audit accounts, to prepare a list of books from which the Committee are to make purchases of the following year, and to enact such regulations as may appear necessary.

Every controversy shall be determined by a plurality of voices, the president being allowed to vote as a member, and in case of an equality, again as President.

The Library shall attain a sufficient number of books and at one o’clock on the first Saturday of the month give out to the members in rotation such a number or volume as may from time to time agreed on by said quorum, which are no to be kept for more than 4 weeks.

The Secretary shall keep a cash book, a minute book, and a journal of the books lent out, and the condition they were in when returned if damaged.

Subscribers losing or injuring a volume shall either replace it, or pay the price of the book.

Subscribers are not to keep a volume beyond the time prescribed in article 5th, under the penalty of one shilling for each month longer kept.

Subscribers are not to lend the books of the library to non-subscribers, under the penalties of five shillings for each such offence.

The individual share of members can on no account be drawn, but may descend to his heir, or be transferred to another provided the new member be approved.

No member of the Committee to be absent either from a general or trustee meeting under the penalty of sixpence for each offence.

No subscriber shall be entitled to any of the priviledges of the library until he has paid his fines and annual contribution, unless he be from home at work; then he shall be allowed__ months.

No alteration or amendment shall be made to these Rules and Regulations, except at a general meeting.

 

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The interior of the Dalhousie Library 1925

 

The Dalhousie Library was originally in a log building called St. Andrew’s Hall. For every 70 years it remained a landmark as the faithful subscribers gathered in the hall and sought to gratify the longing of intellectual hunger.

The log building had a large fireplace and all that remains now is a stump.  The building was put to a variety of uses and it was numbered as one of the early schoolhouse and it was also the first church. St. Andrew. Thomas Scott was the first president and guide of the Dalhousie Library Society from 1828-1854 when his place was taken by Hugh Hunter who held another 15 years. Other names were: John Monro, James Reid, Andrew McInnes, John J. Paul, John Cumming, William Boyd and James Park. James Park built the first bookcases at the Dalhousie Library. The boards were made out of the great pines from neighbouring hills and manufactured in a sawpit in the forest.

 

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1925 Photo of the location of the library at Watson’s Corners

 

Every Library Day St. Andrew’s Hall was packed from morning until nightfall and members made long treks through the woods to get books for the next few months. For another 50 years or so the Library lived on. In the late 1800s the interest began to dwindle. By 1900 the membership had fallen to 12 and the books numbered just about 350. The St. Andrew’s Hall disappeared and was housed in any convenient place, at one time was above an open public horse shed.

The library exists today in the back of the Watson’s Corners Community Hall (behind the barred window that you can see near the cache), with books and artifacts from the village’s history along the original pine shelves built in the village in 1827. It contains a number of the library’s original books, including many of the 120 books stamped with the Earl of Dalhousie’s Coat of Arms and others that made the journey from Scotland to the Watson’s Corners area with their original owners.

 

The Dalhousie Library

In 1828, eight years after the original settlement of this area, the St. Andrew’s Philanthropic Society founded the first public library within the old Bathurst District. A log building, known as St. Andrew’s Hall, housed the library for many years. The Earl of Dalhousie, Governor-in-Chief of Canada (1820-28), subscribed money for its support and donated a number of books. Thomas Scott, a pioneer settler, was the first president, and among the distinguished citizens who subscribed were the Right Reverend Charles Stewart, Anglican Bishop of Quebec, and Archdeacon John Strachan, later first Anglican Bishop of Toronto. The library was incorporated in 1852 and a number of the original books are in the present community hall that was built in 1847.

 

historicalnotes

 

 - UNVEIL PLAQUE Commemorate 1828 Library Near...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 27 Jun 1964, Sat,
  3. Page 36

Did You Know? The Oldest Library in Lanark County