Tag Archives: Vintage

Things Borrowed from my Grandmother — Human Hair Nets

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Things Borrowed from my Grandmother — Human Hair Nets

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Apr 1923, Sat  •  Page 23

Hair nets were made either from combings collected from men’s plaits by local barbers or from whole plaits which flooded the market in the years around the revolution of 1911. … With the advent of nylon the global demand for human hair nets plummeted.

I used to borrow two things from my grandmother- Her hairnets and her tie up shoes with cuban heels in mesmerising brown !!! I wore those shoes until they died and wore her hairnets as a snood. She just shook her head LOL

In the late 19th century fashionable ladies in Europe began to replace their silk hair nets with hair nets that were hand-knotted out of human hair. Initially these were made by poor women and children in the rural villages of Alsace and Bohemia but production later spread to the Shantung province of China which became the most important centre of hair net manufacture, employing as many as 500,000 workers. By the early 1920s the human hair net had become an item of mass consumption, with American women consuming over 180 million nets in the year 1921-22. The appeal of the human hair net was that it was invisible, blending with or adding subtle highlights to a woman’s own hair.

1923

What is interesting is that wherever they were produced the nets were made exclusively from Chinese hair – much of it collected up from men’s combings. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries most Chinese men wore their hair shaved at the front and in a long plait or ‘pigtail’ at the back in a style which had been imposed by the ruling Manchu dynasty two and a half centuries earlier under penalty of death. When itinerant barbers tended to these pigtails, they saved the combings many of which ended up recycled into hairnets for the Western market. ‘No other hair possesses the right degree of coarseness and resilience to give that peculiar elastic spring to the mesh that a good hairnet requires’ argued the Textile Mercury in 1912, suggesting that the hair of the northern blonde races was too fine and soft, the hair of Italians and Spaniards a little more suitable owing to its coarser texture, the hair of the Japanese too stiff and the hair of yaks inadequate.

However when the bob became a fashionable hair style in Europe and America the hair net industry in China suffered a severe blow. Attempts were made to revive it with some success in the 1930s and 1940s when double mesh hair nets became popular. Using two rather than one hair at a time these nets were longer lasting and some of them were designed specifically for bobbed hair styles. But soon this fragile and ephemeral artefact, which had always been valued largely for its invisibility, had disappeared from European and American heads, replaced in many cases by nylon alternatives. Emma Tarlo

Did you know?

Ena Sharples, a character in the UK soap opera Coronation Street between 1960 and 1980, was famous for wearing a hairnet;  the original hairnet was brought in by the character’s actress, Violet Carson, to stop the make-up women from altering her hair.

Food service workers often wear it to prevent hair from contaminating the food, even though there has never been any scientific or anecdotal evidence that hair poses any health hazard. The man who started the trend of hairnets for food service workers admittedly lied about the dangers of hair in food, and his hairnet manufacturing company profited greatly from the propaganda and new regulations.

Hairnets are part of normal attire for female horse riders, and are worn in most equestrian disciplines, including dressage, eventing, show jumping, and hunting. Organizations such as the Pony Club encourage their young members to become accustomed to wearing hairnets when around horses, not only to ensure a neat and elegant appearance, but also to eliminate any danger of scalping, should the rider fall off and the horse tread on loose hair.

Ballet dancers typically wear one at the crown of the head covered in a fine hairnet.

Chattanooga Daily Times
Chattanooga, Tennessee
11 Feb 1923, Sun  •  Page 11

Scents of the Heart — Evening in Paris

Just about every home in the world had a bottle of  “Evening in Paris” somewhere in the house. Even the perfume machines in women’s restrooms had them. If you put in a coin and pushed the buttons a big squirt of perfume would come out.  My Grandmother would always get a bottle for a gift when I was a kid and she never said she didn’t like it. My Grandfather would always take one of us girls to Varins drug store on South Street on Christmas Eve to but a gift for her. We would come home reeking of many perfumes he had tried on me but he always bought Evening In Paris. You could get the set of powder and the beautiful cobalt blue bottle of cologne for a mere $3.98.

How wonderful I felt when Grammy dabbed it on my wrists and behind my ears before sending me off to school. I also remember her wearing her full length coat when the vial shattered and spilled on her coat —-you could smell her long before she approached you in the preceding months. Evening in Paris will always remind me of Grammy Knight and feeling safe, secure and being loved.

One of my favourite flowers Lily of the Valley grew everywhere around her headstone, and after my Mother died they sent home her belongings in a blue Samsonite suitcase. When I opened it a bottle of her favourite perfume Coty’s Lily of the Valley had broken inside. For years, each time I opened that suitcase, I relived the rare hours spent with my Mother, in the many hospitals she lived in during my childhood before she died.

Nothing is more memorable than a smell, sometimes it’s the key to our memories. Linda’s Nickel Opinions — Blasts From the Past — Part 10

Additional reading..

How Many Times Should You Bathe?

Being a Tombstone Tourist

Know Your Travelling Salesmen!- Professor Dorenwend

Searching for A Good Hair Day — Linda Knight Seccaspina

The Stack Perm or the Disco Wedge ? 1970s Hair Fashion

Should Girls Speak to Strange Men in Uniform? 1917

Lois Lyman–A Hair of a Blunder!

To Die Dying Your Hair

Why Were These Folks Facing Backwards?

Scrapbook Clippings of Wampole

The Sears Roebuck Nursery Chair

The Best Little Chin Hair Post on the Prairie

As the Carleton Place Barber Pole Spins

Whose Barbershop Chair was This?

Victorian Surgery — Beware of Content Ahead!!! Seriously!

Vintage Easter and Bunny Cake Recipes from the 60s and 70s

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Vintage Easter and Bunny Cake Recipes from the 60s and 70s

1. Easter Bunny Cake recipe (1950)

1953 Easter egg cake recipe

A feather in your Easter bonnet — this luscious Easter bunny cake… Best cake you’ve baked in a month of Easter Sundays… and you… yes, you… can take all the glory!

Ingredients

1/2 cup Dexo (shortening)
2-1/4 cups sifted cake flour
3 teaspoons double-action baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1% cups sugar
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 eggs, unbeaten

Directions

Measure shortening into bowl. Sift dry ingredients onto shortening. Add vanilla to milk. Add 2/3 of the milk.

Blend and beat 1 minute (count at least 150 strokes per minute). Add remaining 1/3 milk. Add eggs. Beat 2 minutes. Bake in two greased and floured deep 8-inch layer pans in moderate oven, 375° F for 25 to 30 minutes.

When cool, frost with butter frosting. Color coconut green, using vegetable coloring. Place on top of cake.

Arrange Easter candy bunny on coconut. Decorate with colored jelly beans.

Vintage Easter bunny cake recipe from 1950

Bake Swan’s Down Yellow Cake Mix in two 8-inch layers, following directions on package. Make Easy Chocolate Frosting, using the recipe on the back of the blue and yellow package of Baker’s Unsweetened Chocolate.

1. Cut each cake layer in two, about 1/4-inch off-center. This will make two large and two smaller pieces.

2. Place these four pieces together with frosting between them, the smaller pieces on the outside. Stand them upright, cut sides down, on a cake plate.

3. Trim the outside pieces at the top outer edges to help round off sides of cake for egg shape.

4. Then trim off lower ends of outside pieces, slicing diagonally, to give cake an oval shape at base.

Cover the whole mound with remaining frosting, filling in to make an egg shape. Decorate with white and tinted frosting and jelly beans. Make a nest of green-tinted Baker’s Coconut around egg. To serve, cut across the egg, making four-layer slices of cake.

When I go to a family reunion, or maybe church homecoming, THIS is the type of Coconut Cake I want to see on the dessert table.  One look, and you can tell it was made by a dear, older Mother or Grandmother, that’s been baking for years.  Sure, she wants it to look good, but she’s more concerned about how it tastes.

There might have been a day, years ago, when she could make her cake look like something in a bakery window.  Now, the years have taken a toll on her body.  Her hands shake a bit these days, as she adjusts layers and spreads the icing.  Her legs just don’t have the strength to stand at her table, and work and fuss with it like she once did. She has to take frequent breaks lately, just to rest awhile, so she can work on it a little bit more.

As a young child, she learned how to make this cake standing beside her own mother.  She’s never used a recipe, but now, her mind continues to wonder if she’s somehow forgotten a key ingredient.

All through the years, she’s heard people talk about how great her cakes are.  She just smiles, often looking downward as if embarrassed, but her heart is made happy as she tenderly says, “Thank You.”

Out the corner of their eye, everybody seems to watch when they realize her cake is being brought in. Some even strain their neck a bit, to see exactly where it gets placed among the others on the long table. You know hers will be the first empty cake plate on that table, and you have already schemed up a plan to get a slice.  Heaven forbid if someone should take the last piece before you get yours.

My mother made a great Coconut Cake, one that was similar to this one. Her icing was more of a clear type and you could clearly see the layers beneath that frosting and the layer of coconut spread on top. In the earlier years, she always used a fresh coconut, grating it by hand. She would always hand me the small leftover pieces that she didn’t grate, and that was like pure candy in my book.

Cake Ingredients: Sungold Coconut Cake

  • 2 cups Sugar
  • 1 cup Butter, at room temperature
  • 4 Eggs, separated
  • 1 cup Evaporated Milk
  • 3 cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 3 teaspoons Baking Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • Pinch of Salt

Coconut Cream Icing

  • 3 cups Coconut
  • 3 cups Confectioners’ Sugar
  • 8 Tablespoons Heavy Cream, approximately.
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350ºF.

  1. Place flour, baking powder, and pinch of salt, in a sifter.
  2. Sift three times. Set aside.
  3. Place butter in a large mixing bowl.
  4. Add Sugar.
  5. Beat butter and sugar to a smooth cream consistency.
  6. Separate the egg yolks from the whites, set whites aside.
  7. Beat the egg yolks well.
  8. Add egg yolks to the butter and sugar mixture and beat until very light.
  9. Add the sifted flour, alternating with the milk, to the first mixture, mix to combine.
  10. Beat the egg whites to a stiff froth.
  11. Add the vanilla extract to the batter mixture.
  12. Gently fold in the egg whites to the batter.
  13. Butter and flour two 9 inch cake layer pans.
  14. Divide the batter between the two pans.
  15. Bake at 350ºF for 20-25 minutes, or until done.
  16. Insert a wooden toothpick or skewer in the center of the baked layer. If it pulls out clean, cake is done.
  17. Remove from oven, place on a wire rack, let cool for 10 minutes before removing from pan.
  18. Let layers cool completely.
  19. Prepare layers as desired before frosting.

To Make The Icing and Assemble The Cake

  1. Place sugar in a medium size mixing bowl.
  2. Add the cream, a little at a time, beating steadily.
  3. Add Vanilla.
  4. When icing is of the right consistency, spread over the top of the layer.
  5. Sprinkle a good layer of coconut on top of layer.
  6. Repeat with the next layer.
  7. Ice the final layer and sides of the cake.
  8. Cover the entire cake with remaining coconut.
  9. Serve and Enjoy!

ow to make an Easter Bunny cake:

This is a cake that my mom used to make for us on Easter Saturday from a pattern she found in a magazine back in the early 70’s. It’s simple and clever: one round cake serves as the bunny face and two simple slices in a second cake create the ears and a bow tie. You then frost, cover the imperfections with coconut (that’s what I do), and decorate with goodies.

Bunny cake diagram

This is the diagram from the old magazine clipping.

Bunny cake diagram


Mom used to frost the cake with boiled icing which looks lovely and bunny-like. I haven’t yet learned to make boiled frosting so use a simple white frosting instead. You’ll need a good 4 cups of icing to ice the cake.

Make your bunny cake with this molasses devil’s food cake

Easy creamy icing

1/4 cup soft butter

3 Tbsp milk

1 tsp vanilla

3-4 cups of icing sugar

Cream the butter with the milk and vanilla. Add the icing sugar one cup at a time until you get a spreadable consistency.

**You’ll need to double the recipe to fully frost a layer cake.

Related reading

‘Pet De Soeurs’ or Nun’s Pastries

“Get it On” — Banging Cookies Recipe–This Will Feel Wrong, but Trust Me!

The Invincible Ginger Snap Cookies of Carleton Place

Memories of Woolworths and Chicken in a Van

Slow Cooker Boston Baked Beans–Lanark County Recipes

Easy Christmas Cake- Lanark County Recipes

Holiday Popcorn– Lanark County Recipes

Granny’s Maple Fudge —Lanark County Recipes

Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

Gum Drop Cake — Lanark County Holiday Recipe

Gluten Free–

Who Stole the Cookies from the Cookie Jar? Pastry Chef Ben White

“Sex in the Pan” Memories – A RIP Fashion Violation Photo Essay

Katherine Hepburn Did Eat Brownies

What Did You Use MIR Dish Soap For?

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What Did You Use MIR Dish Soap For?
Dan Sparling
November 27 at 4:32 PM  · 

My toy bottle in 1965!

I hated MIR dish washing soap. It wasn’t because it was a bad soap; it probably was very good at what it was advertised for. What I could not stand was sitting at my Grandmother’s tiny kitchen table eating lunch or dinner and staring at the Yellow bottle ( it came in a few colours) while I ate as it stood as a loan sentinel on the side of the sink caked in dry soap. My Grandmother always the dishes done and the stove stoked but she never seemed to clean off that bottle– and that bottle looked like a wax candle after a week.

However I had no idea now or way back then that women used dish soap to get rid of greasy hair. Apparently, it has been going on since Little House on the Prairie.

Wild Poppy—Oh…do I remember this! And the same way my mother pronounced “mirror.”

Darlene MacDonaldThis was the best shampoo ever!

Linda Seccaspina— shampoo????? really? My grandmother used it to wash dishes.. tell me more..🙂

Darlene MacDonaldLinda Seccaspina Yes this was our everyday dish washing liquid soap. When shampoo was scarce we used this as well. 😁

Dawn JonesDarlene MacDonald yep. Made your hair clean! And no conditioner in those days!

Peggy ByrneTwo to a package – was a deal

Karen SmithDarlene MacDonald I can barely remember it, jeez so long ago.

Wild PoppyDawn Jones still remember the nice smell of Mir.

Sandra HoustonMy Nanny used this dish soap

Kathy DevlinIn a house of 4 females we often ran out of shampoo and used sunlight dish soap. No greasy hair in our house but lots of shine!

Darlene MacDonaldLila Leach-James It was dish detergent. We used it as both 😁

Bev FergussonDarlene MacDonald so did we when needed. Those were days of making do with what you had!

Brenda BridgewaterYes dish soap Lila you don’t remember guess you didn’t do dishes !!!!

Lila Leach-JamesBrenda Bridgewater oh Jesus and had to bring the water up from the pump house! Glad those days are behind me! Yes, I guess we used it for shampoo also

Donna SmithMy mom used this didnt care for the smell myself

Kayla GleesonI remember these, my mom made crafts with them

Kayla GleesonLinda Seccaspina I remember them with doll heads on them??

Russ ThompsonTasted like crap lol

D Christopher VaughanYou shouldn’t have said that word then.😉

I will Wash Your Mouth Out with Soap!

Remember Halo Shampoo?

Peter McCallum — From Brown and Wylie Mill Employee to The King of Mack’s No Rub Laundry Soap

What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

As the World Turns in Carleton Place — Soap and Ground Beef

Who was Cody the Kid in Carleton Place? — Soap Box Memories

As the Cell Phone Turns – a Soap Opera

How Many Times Should You Bathe?

When Everything Else Fails…

She Said Yes to her Grandmother’s Dress

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She Said Yes to her Grandmother’s  Dress

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Zion-Memorial United Church

September 5 at 10:53 PM · 

“SHE SAID YES TO THE DRESS” – was on Sep. 30th @ The United Church in Carleton Place This was a fashion show of wedding dresses – 120 years right up to the present hosted by Jan Ferguson and the ladies of the United Church, and it was so well done.

 

 

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Model- Gracey Patterson
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It’s pretty commonplace nowadays for brides to opt for a vintage wedding dress over a brand new gown. There’s something just a little bit magical about stepping into a piece of clothing that has a whole other history of its own. Not to mention it’s usually a heck of a lot cheaper. But would you ever consider recycling your grandmother’s wedding dress for your own day? Let’s face it, fashion’s completely changed since our grandparents were young. Plus – is it just me, or have you noticed how tiny women’s waists seemed to be back in those days?!

All things considered, choosing to make part of your wedding day less about what you want and more about honouring a treasured family member, be it your grandma or your mum, could end up meaning so much more than any new dress.

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This blue-ivory dress in the picture above that was featured at the United Church Fashion show was owned by Meghan Lavergne who took the top off of her Grandmothers wedding dress and made this keepsake dress. Her Grandmother was Norah Day nee Moffat.

 

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Some of the dresses that were in the show.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

  1. relatedreading

    The Wedding of Rosanna Ouellette

  2. If You Can’t Wear a Princess Dress on Monday — Then When Can You?

  3. An “Absolutely Fabulous” White Wedding Day — May 19th!

  4. Linda’s Countdown to the Royal Wedding–May 18 –Day 7—“Let Them Eat Cake” said Queen Victoria

The Way We Wore — Thrift Shopping from Almonte to the UK — Almonte

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Please play while reading

This is a tale of two Vicki’s–One is Vicki Racey from Almonte, Ontario and the other is Victoria Norris from the UK. Vicki Racey owns one of the largest vintage stores around in the heart of Almonte called Vintagewear. You will also see a few of her live mannequin models at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum place precariously among the exhibits after the tea at Ladies Who Lunch June 6th in Carleton Place. Victoria Norris lives in Ely, England and is one of our contributors to the Tales of Carleton Place.

I give you Vicki Racey

 achip3

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Mem’ries,
Light the corners of my mind

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Misty water-colored memories
Of the way we were

(furniture by Dave Goodings)

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Scattered pictures,
Of the smiles we left behind

(lamps by Dave Goodings)

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Smiles we gave to one another
For the way we were

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Can it be that it was all so simple then?
Or has time re-written every line?

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If we had the chance to do it all again
Tell me, would we? Could we?

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If we had the chance to do it all again
Tell me, would we? Could we?

achip

We simply choose to forget
So it’s the laughter

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We will remember
Whenever we remember…

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The way we were…

aice

The way we were… There is still ice cream… but in memory of Petersen’s Ice Cream where many a wonderful summer night visit was spent.

Take care of all your memories. For you cannot relive them.
Bob Dylan

avicgood

No Union Jack here but this is my very favourite picture of Vicki— as it show the love and passion she has for the things that we once wore.

The UK Blog

achip1arche

63 Mill Street – on the way to the Barley Mow through the arches- look for the green door
Almonte, Ontario