Tag Archives: train station

The Removal of the CPR Train Station– Almonte –1978

Standard
The Removal of the CPR Train Station– Almonte –1978

November 1978 Almonte Gazette

Following recent publicity in regard to the impending demolition of the Almonte Railway Station, a group of local citizens whose interests lie in the area of the preservation of buildings of historical or heritage value have embarked on a campaign to have the 75-year-old building saved from the demolishers hammer.

A special meeting was held at the Continuing Learning/Office last Wednesday evening >ahd it was learned that the C.P.R. had taken back ownership of the building from Mr. Brian Meloche when Mr. Meloche was unable to come up with a definite plan to move the building from its present site – a requirement of the sale. As the situation stands now, the station is still scheduled for demolition by December 1st, 1978. However, the local group has been investigating other means of saving the building and a second meeting, scheduled for tomorrow evening (Thursday), 7.30 at the Continuing Learning Office at 88 Mill Street, may shed some light on the means to bring this about.

Among those expected to be present will be Dr. Harold Kalman who has worked in co-operation with the Ontario Heritage Foundation of the Ministry of Culture and Recreation, doing feasibility studies on old railway stations – among them the Almonte station. Hope has been expressed that help can be sought from the Ontario Heritage Foundation for a restoration program. Another guest who has been invited to the meeting is Mr. Harry Gow who is deeply involved with Transport 2000. This group has been busy with attempts to save some of these old unused railway stations and restore them for use as flag stops for the Via rail system in short haul commuter type travel. Some success has been achieved along this line and the possibility will be investigated here.

Although Almonte’s situation in regard to commuter travel between here and Ottawa would seem to be suited to such a scheme, a definite need for this type of service would have to be established before any steps could be taken. Representatives are also expected to be on hand from the Ontario Heritage Foundation. Unfortunately, the meeting falls on the same night as the All Candidates’ Meeting at the Town Hall but those not planning to attend that meeting are urged to attend the one at the Continuing Learning Office.

Attempts to save the Almonte Railway Station from demolition came to an abrupt end last Thursday morning when a Stittsville firm contracted by the C.P.R. moved in with heavy equipment and reduced the 75- year-old building to a pile of rubble. Surprised members of a heritage minded group of individuals from the Almonte area, many of them members of the North Lanark Historical Society, cancelled a meeting that was planned for Thursday evening to discuss various methods that could be used to preserve the landmark which served the area well for so many years.

Representatives from Heritage Canada, Transport 2000 and the Ministry of Transportation and Communications had been invited to Thursday’s meeting. Meeting organizer, Sandra Way said that her group was unaware that plans to demolish the building had already been finalized with Stacey Construction of Stittsville when the date for the meeting was announced last week. Attempts to have the building saved from the demolisher’s hammer began in earnest following discussions at the Ottawa Valley Heritage Conference in Arnprior recently, in the wake of publicity surrounding attempts by Mr. Brian Meloche of R.R.2, Carp, to secure financial help to move the building to another site, a proposition that proved to be far too costly, apparently.

The C.P.R.’s position was that they simply wanted the building away from its former site before winter set in and when no concrete proposals were put forth to move the building, they cancelled the purchase offer by Mr. Meloche and went ahead with demolition plans. Stacey Construction planned to salvage as much of the cut limestone as possible and the Town secured a quantity large enough to serve as a facia or a small commemorative wall at the proposed new public library which is to be constructed near the former station site.

November 1978

Covered From Head to Toe with “The Beautiful” !! Almonte Train Station

The McKellar Train Derailment 1913

The Almonte Wreck Poem George Millar Dec 29 1942

The Almonte Railway – Memories

Fred Gauthier Survivor — 6 Months 1 Day –1942 Almonte Train Wreck – Vern Barr

Rosebank, Blakeney, Norway Falls and Snedden’s Station

The Carleton Place Train Station 1991

Standard
The Carleton Place Train Station 1991
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Oct 1991, Fri  •  Page 4

The old limestone train station here near the entrance of town is the last of its kind in the upper Ottawa Valley. But many years of neglect and bouts of vandalism have taken their toll on the former Canadian Pacific Railway station. Its roof is sagging and the rows of long, rectangular windows are boarded up. Even the tracks that once stretched past the back of the building are gone. Yet local heritage enthusiasts are hopeful the 70-year-old building may soon reopen. Along with 21 other stations across Canada, it was recently designated heritage under the federal Heritage Railway Stations Protection Act. Heather Lebeau thinks it’s a godsend. “It means (the station) is saved from demolition,” says Lebeau, a member of the Local Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee. “It’s quite an achievement,” she says.

About 18 months ago, the heritage group submitted a report to the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada asking that the building be considered for heritage designation. Lebeau says the condition of the abandoned depot was getting worse. If it was going to be saved, the designation was needed as soon as possible, she says. “Our main concern is that the history of the building remains intact. Our concerns (were) about its bad repair.” Tim Campbell, chairman of the committee, says under the heritage act, the building can’t be destroyed or altered” in any way without approval from the federal cabinet. “I’m very pleased about it,” says Campbell, who plans to make heritage an issue in this year’s municipal election. He’s running for council. “I would like to see it preserved.”

The station is among three heritage landmarks in town that risked being torn down. The historic Mississippi Hotel in the downtown core and the century-old auditorium on the second floor of the town hall are also in need of great repair. Between the 1920s and 1950s, about 30 freight trains and a dozen passenger cars pulled into the Carleton Place station daily. Saturday mornings were especially hectic when as many as 150 people traipsed through the station. But by the early 1960s, freight trains were losing a lot of business to transport trucks. And Carleton Place felt the squeeze. Cargo service dropped significantly and fewer passengers came through town. By the 1970s, passenger service to Carleton Place was discontinued altogether. It returned briefly in the late 1980s, but finally stopped in December 1989. The tracks were lifted a month later. Lebeau believes the building, still owned by CP, has a lot of potential. It’s sturdy and large and could have many uses, she says. There’s been talk of converting it into a restaurant, a local museum or community centre.

photo Tom Edwards 1920s
The original Carleton Place Subdivision in 1966-67

Canadian Pacific’s history in Ottawa goes back to the late 1800s, although there isn’t much that the casual observer will see of the railway’s legacy in this city today. However, if you dig deep enough, there are some fascinating hints of Canadian Pacific’s past in Ottawa, including a number of spots where you can spot the old Carleton Place Subdivision, a line that dates back to 1870 when it belonged the broad-gage Canada Central Railway. Let’s go digging. READ here
https://www.insideottawavalley.com/news-story/10041455-carleton-place-public-library-is-on-the-move-temporarily/ 2020

Clippings from the Train Stations in Carleton Place

Train Station and Bank of Nova Scotia-Old and New

The Mystery Streets of Carleton Place– Where was the First Train Station?

Clippings of the Almonte Library

Standard
Clippings of the Almonte Library

Screenshot 2020-05-02 at 11.32.37Screenshot 2020-05-02 at 11.33.241980 Almonte Gazette

 -

 

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jun 1981, Thu  •  Page 47

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Mar 1941, Sat  •  Page 9

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Feb 1980, Mon  •  Page 38

 

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Dec 1965, Wed  •  Page 9

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Apr 1908, Thu  •  Page 7

 -

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Nov 1907, Fri  •  Page 12

 -

 

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Mar 1965, Sat  •  Page 32

 -

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Mar 1900, Sat  •  Page 7

 -

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Sep 1910, Thu  •  Page 7

townhall1_orig

The Almonte Town Hall (circa 1910 pictured) was the original home of the Almonte branch of the library.

 

12819221_512061568966419_1696383715451058967_o

· March 8, 2016 

The Elizabeth Kelly Foundation Inc. (EKLF) is named after Elizabeth Kelly, a devoted and much loved librarian of the original Mississippi Mills Public Library. The Foundation was established in 1985 to financially support education and literacy.

The Foundation supports literacy and learning within Mississippi Mills, in the greater Ottawa area when there is a tie-in with our local community and farther afield by supporting Canadian charities working internationally.

The Foundation is a registered charitable (not-for-profit) corporation in Ontario, Canada.

 

Elizabeth Kelly — Mary Cook News Archives

Covered From Head to Toe with “The Beautiful” !! Almonte Train Station

 

Clippings from the Train Stations in Carleton Place

Standard
Clippings from the Train Stations in Carleton Place

 

carletonplace_3.jpg

Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Did you know that prior to 1923, anyone taking the train in Carleton Place would have left from this station? It was known as the Carleton Junction and was located on Franktown Road, right where Tim Horton’s is today. The stone station across the street that’s now the home of The Ginger Cafe was not built until 1923. The Mystery Streets of Carleton Place– Where was the First Train Station?

I will keep adding to this as I go through my newspaper archives.

 

6128387008_d74a1a3fac_b.jpg

Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

 

Image may contain: sky, house, tree and outdoor

Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

You could even catch a stagecoach ride to the Mississippi Hotel–Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

 - The C. P. R. haa mde some interior slter.tlon....

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  19 Feb 1906, Mon,  Page 5

 

 - Held on Charges Of Shopbreaking At Carleton...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Dec 1939, Sat,  Page 32

 

 - Carleton Place Carleton Place, Aug. 29. There...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 Aug 1899, Tue,  Page 3

 

 - 10 Tons of Pig Iron Stolen From Flat Car In...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  17 Dec 1948, Fri,  Page 1

 

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Fri, Aug 19, 1898 – Page 7
31781811_10155244670687312_5951521231286042624_n
The 2 men on the right were retired CPR Trainmen. Horace St. Germaine and Ted Voyce– Photo Joann Voyce
31879838_1095204810627604_4693970359093821440_n
Photo Ted Hurdis.. 
Image may contain: one or more people, snow and outdoor
Carleton Place station

 

June 6 1882–The keeper of the refreshment room of the CPR at Carleton Place has applied for a beer license and -a lucky bidder at a sale of unclaimed goods at the C. P. R. station got 1,100 yards of dress goods for $12 50. Photo–1901-Carleton Place Train Station

 

March 22 1872- J. L. Murphy is selling at Carleton Place, 72 village lots, near Canada Central .Station. .Sale April 2, Tuesday, at Cornell’s Hotel. .J. A. Wright, auctioneer

 

Image may contain: tree and outdoor

Llew Lloyd—View from Bell Street 1957
Image may contain: text

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 19 Feb 1906, Mon, Page 5

Marge Mitchell —My Aunt lived on Judson Street and the train tracks were about 60 feet from her house…there were so many trains whizzing by everyday. We loved seeing them and ran up to the station and sat on the benches and watched these mighty iron beasts. Such a fabulous memory of old time Carleton Place.

 

 

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

James Fanning– Robert Nolan– Train Accident

Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks?

Train Accident? Five Bucks and a Free Lunch in Carleton Place Should Settle it

The Men That Road the Rails

The Mystery Streets of Carleton Place– Where was the First Train Station?

Memories of When Rail was King- Carleton Place

Tragedy and Suffering in Lanark County-Trains and Cellar Stairs

I was Born a Boxcar Child- Tales of the Railroad

The Lanark County “Carpetbaggers”–Lanark Electric Railway

The Titanic of a Railway Disaster — Dr. Allan McLellan of Carleton Place

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Memories from Carleton Place–Llew Lloyd and Peter Iveson

Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge

Perils of the Cows of Carleton Place or Where’s the Beefalo?

Clippings of The Old Perth Train Station

Standard
Clippings of The Old Perth Train Station

 

12801309_792765417490233_9107365483900057790_n.jpg

Photo from Perth Remembered

The train station was at the end of Herriott Street beside the Brown Shoe Factory building. I have a great memory of catching the midnight train in Perth enroute to Montreal to watch the Montreal Canadiens play the Detroit Red Wings with Perth’s own Floyd Smith playing for the Wings in the early 60’s.  Perth Remembered

In 1881 flat and boxcars were made at the Perth CPR car shops located in the now empty bush, but in 1905  the CPR moved all its equipment to Montreal. Livestock sheds housed cattle and other animals were soon to be shipped by train to all parts in Canada.

In 1859 the first train of the Brockville & Ottawa Railway Co. took nearly ten hours in 40 degree weather to reach Perth from Brockville. There are now few remnants of the old train station that was built from mottled stone from the Otty Lake area.

 

Clippings of memories

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal26 Mar 1974, Tue[Second Edition]Page 21

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal11 Oct 1979, ThuValley EditionPage 3

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal09 May 1968, ThuPage 8

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal25 Apr 1952, FriPage 10

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

The Glen Tay Train Wrecks of Lanark County

Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks?

Tragedy and Suffering in Lanark County-Trains and Cellar Stairs

I was Born a Boxcar Child- Tales of the Railroad

The Lanark County “Carpetbaggers”–Lanark Electric Railway

The Titanic of a Railway Disaster — Dr. Allan McLellan of Carleton Place

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Memories from Carleton Place–Llew Lloyd and Peter Iveson

Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

The trial of W. H. S. Simpson the Railway Mail Clerk

55 years ago–One of the Most Tragic Accidents in the History of Almonte

The Kick and Push Town of Folger

Train Accident? Five Bucks and a Free Lunch in Carleton Place Should Settle it

The Men That Road the Rails

The Mystery Streets of Carleton Place– Where was the First Train Station?

Memories of When Rail was King- Carleton Place

Memories from Carleton Place–Llew Lloyd and Peter Iveson

Standard
Memories from Carleton Place–Llew Lloyd and Peter Iveson

18342292_1532123026826723_4442228267646351442_n (1).jpg

 

Llew Lloyd

By 1948 I think my dad had his own business. Here’s a pic of Mom , Pat , Gwen , David and Dad Llewellyn ( L, W. Lloyd ). I’m thinking early 50’s . Might be a new ( to him ) truck as well .

I have another picture somewhere which shows L,W. Lloyd on the door of the truck . Mom was Margaret but known by many as Dolly. Going to public school in Carleton Place in those days it seemed to become a fad to be called by your dad’s name. In my case it stuck, but now I’d guess it’s half and half between David and Llew. A good example of the nickname trend would be to research how many Ossie McNeelys there are in town.

 

 

16265548_1335997323123825_397125850206126594_n (2)

A.C. Burgess “Dining Hall Carleton Place” 1885

Arthur Burgess Closes Carleton Place C.P.R. Restaurant

Peter Iveson

I think Mr.Burgess’s CPR restaurants were in the old CPR carleton junction station before the new station was built in 1923. There was never a restaurant in the 1923 new station other than a peanut dispenser and a coke machine.

People used to have long waits in the uncomfortable station waiting room changing trains. I heard one horrible story where some people going to Deep River went up the main street to find a restaurant open after their Toronto train arrived in Carleton Place at 9:30 PM.  The Dominion going up the Valley left at 11.51 PM and they got caught waiting for a freight train to clear the other crossing,they nearly missed the Dominion.

 

13932921_10154370638432086_1197264381487784655_n-1

 

1901-Carleton Place Train Station– Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum actually has two photographs taken during the Royal Visit.

Arthur Burgess Closes Carleton Place C.P.R. Restaurant

Standard

16265548_1335997323123825_397125850206126594_n.jpg

ARTHUR BURGESS SOLD RESTAURANTS– Owned Ten C. P. R. Restaurants but Will Now Look After Other Interests

January 1920-Almonte Gazette

Mr. G. Arthur Burgess, according to the Carleton Place Herald, has sold his restaurants and will devote his time to other interests. Since his boyhood Mr. Burgess has been associated with the C.P.R. restaurants, beginning first with the Canada Central, his brothers: John, Robert and Cecil, being alternately the lessees.

 

13932921_10154370638432086_1197264381487784655_n (1).jpg

1901-Carleton Place Train Station– Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum actually has two photographs taken during the Royal Visit.

He succeeded them and extended the system until he owned and controlled ten different restaurants at many divisional points. He has disposed of his furnishings and equipment and goodwill to the company, the  compensation being arranged by mutual agreement.

 

16298654_10154621435396886_4230877440921854727_n

Newspaper —Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum — 

 

The new train station was built in Carleton Place in 1921. Did he know that change was coming and decided to close the C.P.R. restaurant before things changed?  Or, had he already decided that he was going to run for *mayor again and win in 1922? According to long time resident Marjorie Whyte, the station burned down. She remembered the horse drawn fire engines rushing to the fire.

I guess we will never know as one could never ever figure out what his next move was– and *he listened to no one.

historicalnotes

 *Arthur Burgess was Mayor of Carleton Place in 1903 and in 1922.

December 10-1920-Mr. G. Arthur Burgess has installed a bit of celestial architecture in his Thompson Block— a window brought across from the church in Almonte which he recently purchased.— Central Canadian

Perth Courier, Feb. 1, 1889

Golden Wedding—On Tuesday a large company of friends assembled at Mr. and Mrs. James Halliday of this town to celebrate their golden wedding.  On the 29th day of January, 1839 Mr. Halliday was united in marriage to Miss Jessie Allan, daughter of the late Francis Allan and sister of James Allan of this town, all then lived on the Scotch Line.  All their children we believe are yet living and number eight.  Of these, seven attended the golden wedding celebration, namely William, James and Matthew, all of Cheasley, Ontario; Mrs. Arthur Burgess; Mrs. Somerville, Carleton Place; Mrs. Donlan and Miss Jennie Halliday of Perth. Mrs. Halliday’s mother, Mrs. Fraser, an aged lady of 91 years, was there and had one of her great-grandchildren, forming at either end four generations.  A number of presents and keepsakes to commemorate the day and event were handed to the golden wedded pair and a pleasant time was spent until the 51st year had taken place of the 50th

 

*George Arthur Burgess, mayor of Carleton Place in 1903 and 1921, and at times a stormy petrel in municipal affairs, installed a small hydro electric plant at Arklan in 1909 and for about a year supplied a part of the town’s power for electric lighting purposes, leasing his installations in 1912 to the town’s other supplier of electric power.

 

13692583_10154134474771886_5994409125990508417_n (1).jpg

Newspaper —Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum 

img (5).jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 18 May 1940, SatPage 14

The Crazy Town World of Mr. George Arthur Burgess of Carleton Place

Before The Carleton Place Mews?

Who Was John Boland? Chatterton House/Queen’s Hotel Registry — The Burgess Family Dynasty

 

The Auction of the Year in Carleton Place

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Covered From Head to Toe with “The Beautiful” !! Almonte Train Station

Standard

 

almonte (2).jpg

 

On Monday afternoon a snow plow passed through here at a high rate of speed, sending the snow flying in all directions. As it was passing the station the snow was thrown with such force against the window that the glass was broken and the desk and floor covered with snow and broken glass. All the pens, ink and paper were buried in the avalanche.

Mr. J . Camochan and Mr. F. Nunn, the operator, had a narrow escape, the latter being literally covered from head to foot with “the beautiful.” The telegraph instruments were so disarranged that it was some time before they could be got into working order again.

 February 1887–Almonte Gazette

almonte-1

LOCAL TRAIN STATION FIRES

Almonte  CPR station fire – 16 May 1911.

Carleton Place CPR carpenters shop – 27 July 1897. {4}
Carleton Place CPR roundhouse roof – 12 December 1911.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

Train Station and Bank of Nova Scotia-Old and New

Standard

13692583_10154134474771886_5994409125990508417_n.jpg

Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Old–New Railway- Howard Morton Brown Notes

James C. Poole, editor of the Carleton Place Herald, announced the coming of the railroad in the July 21st, 1853 edition of his newspaper:

“We rejoice to be able to announce that the By-law of the County Council, loaning the credit of the County to the Brockville and Ottawa Railway Company, has been heartily supported by the people in the different municipalities.

The inhabitants of this ‘city’, elated at the success which had attended the railroad scheme thus far, turned out en masse and had a regular rejoicing.

With the advent of the railway, and the establishment of industries like Findlay Foundry, Carleton Place saw major expansion in the 1860’s. Some ads in the Carleton Place Herald of 1859 reveal the sudden realization by local merchants and men of industry of the commercial advantages of using rail service to both obtain and deliver their goods:

“First Arrival by Railway Direct to Carleton Place!  Teas, Teas, part of the Cargo of the Ship ‘Gauntlet’, from China, 112 Boxes and 48 Catties – Also a large stock of Harvest Tools – Also by the same conveyance a further supply of fancy and staple Dry Goods and a very full assortment of Shelf Hardware, Crockery, etc. – A. McArthur, June 30, 1859.”

Beginning in 1859 with a railway link established between Brockville and Carleton Place, and again in 1870 with a link from Ottawa, the town and surrounding area was becoming an attractive and cheap recreational destination:

“Cheap Excursion to Brockville on Thursday August 25th.  Fare from Almonte, Carleton Place, Franktown, and back, only One Dollar! Leave Almonte 7:30 a.m., Carleton Place 8:00 a.m., Smiths Falls 9:15 a.m., arriving at Brockville 11 a.m. Returning will leave Brockville at 4:45 p.m., reaching Almonte at 8 p.m. – Robert Watson, Managing Director, Brockville & Ottawa Railway

Canada Central Railway.  The section of this railway between Ottawa and Carleton Place, forming with its connections a through Broad Gauge route between Ottawa and the west, will be open for traffic on September 16, 1870.

H. Abbott, Managing Director, Ottawa.

Long ago twilight brought out Harry Tetlock to light the switch and semaphore lamps on the CPR yard tracks.  He was always smiling and walked fast.

Mr. Hamilton, a painter, father of John R., a C.P.R. conductor was a veteran of the Crimean war as was my grand uncle who was a V.S. (Farrier Sgt. In army parlance); he was at the Charge of the Light Brigade, although not actually in the charge, took care of the horses.

New-Little Bit O’ Soul in Carleton Place -The Ginger Cafe “Magnifies”!

 

Bank of Nova Scotia

Old-“The Moffatt Brothers have secured tender for the new bank at Carleton Place.  Associated with them for the masonry is Levi Brian.  The price is about $7,000.   Central Canadian

Putting a Face to Levi Brian, Stonemason, of Carleton Place

The Carleton Place Nova Scotia Bank on Bridge Street- read more about it here.

bank

1940’s

The staff of the Carleton Place Nova Scotia Bank in 1971

scotia

 

 

New

scoAnn Rawson –I believe my husband Dave Rawson is the fellow kneeling down on the right side of the photo.