Tag Archives: town hall

Two Years After the Lanark Fire 1961

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Two Years After the Lanark Fire 1961

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada13 Jun 1961, Tue  •  Page 36

Also read-Images of the Day After the Lanark Fire June 16 1959–

Images of the Day After the Lanark Fire June 16 1959–

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

June 17 1959– The Day After the Fire in Lanark Village

What Would You Wear to the Carleton Place 1897 Inaugural Ball?

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What Would You Wear to the Carleton Place 1897 Inaugural Ball?

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Jun 1897, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
17 Nov 1897, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Nov 1897, Wed  •  Page 5
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Nov 1897, Wed  •  Page 1

So what did they wear to the Inaugural Ball at the town hall 1897?

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Aug 1896, Sat  •  Page 4

Also read-Shenanigans of the Monday Night Town Hall Opening

Memories Carleton Place- Town Hall

The Building of the First Town Hall Carleton Place

Carleton Place Town Hall Sued For Cupolas!

Why is the Town Hall Stage Slanted? Is it Collapsing?

A Concert at the Town Hall While Small Pox Raged on…. 1901

Shenanigans of the Monday Night Town Hall Opening

What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall 1897

A Concert at the Town Hall While Small Pox Raged on…. 1901

Sarah Marselles the Spirit of the Town Hall Square Park

Saved By The Bell in Carleton Place? What Does the Photo Say?

Things You Did Not Know About the Town Hall….

Memories Carleton Place- Town Hall

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Memories Carleton Place- Town Hall
Photo- Larry Clark 1963

Bill LemayLove this building dances and. Movie’s and library up stairs

Heather DarraghBeautiful picture, We have such a great little town, thanks for sharing this.

Dean BrownHasn’t changed a bit in almost 60 yrs Eh !!

Marlene SpringerMemory, my first kiss happened at the movie night but it was a hit and run! To this day not know what boy❓

Tracy DoddsFun memories of movie nights and Mississippi Mudds rehearsals ♥️

Sylvia GilesTracy Dodds oh the movie nights!!!! The Keyes boys!!! 😘

Laurel TyeMy happy place.

Colleen RobillardLaurel Tye I miss this place more than I thought possible…🙄😔



CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Aug 1896, Sat  •  Page 4
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Nov 1894, Fri  •  Page 5

The Carleton Place Town Hall is an important landmark both historically and architecturally. The land was originally owned by William Morphy, one of the first settlers in the area and for whom the town was originally named Morphy’s Falls. He built a house on the present Town Hall site in the early 1820s.

Designed by George W. King and built by Matthew Ryan, the building is a fine example of the Richardson Romanesque style of architecture, which was popular in North America in the latter quarter of the nineteenth century. Richardson Romanesque style is a North American style, introduced by architect Henry Hobson Richardson, with typical features of rough stone, round-headed windows, semi-circular arches around doors and windows, dormer windows and round towers. The Council Chamber on the interior was originally called the Red Chamber because of the fine pine woodwork with a red satin finish. Other features on the interior include one of the few remaining raked stages in Canada, fine examples of woodwork in pine and ash, decorative pressed metal ceilings and mosaic encaustic flooring.

Sources: Town of Carleton Place Bylaw 42-78; Town Hall Feasibility Study, 1986.

An imprinted line on the back of this CARLETON PLACE Ontario postcard shows that it was originally purchased there … in the variety shop of Miss Sarah Hickson on Bridge Street.From the 1910-15 period, the card presents another view of the street close to the Mississippi River; in the background is the beautiful 1890s town hall at the corner of Mill Street.A message is written on the back side, but the lack of an address/postage stamp indicates the card was sent by cousins inside a protective envelope.

available on etsy click-

Chris Drake Art click

Related reading

The Building of the First Town Hall Carleton Place


Carleton Place Town Hall Sued For Cupolas!

Why is the Town Hall Stage Slanted? Is it Collapsing?

Shenanigans of the Monday Night Town Hall Opening

What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall 1897

A Concert at the Town Hall While Small Pox Raged on…. 1901

Sarah Marselles the Spirit of the Town Hall Square Park

Saved By The Bell in Carleton Place? What Does the Photo Say?

The History of the Carleton Place Library

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The History of the Carleton Place Library

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A HISTORY OF THE CARLETON PLACE PUBLIC LIBRARY

A History of the Carleton Place Public Libraryclick here

In honour of Janet Baril’s Retirement, Head Librarian 1984-2013

Starting in 1829, the Ramsay and Lanark Circulation Library originally served the townspeople of Carleton Place.  It had over 500 volumes, and was located in the Anglican Church which stood at Lot 16, 1st Con. Ramsay, opposite the Union Hall and schoolhouse.

Our present library began on March 14, 1846, as a Subscription Library with 65 original members.  The entry fee was 2 shillings and the yearly fee was 5 shillings.  The subscription list continued until 1850.  By 1851, the Carleton Place library was operating out of the school house on Bridge Street, later Central School, which became the site of the post office.  Some pages are missing until a partial list appears in 1864 when the record ends.

The officers and directors of the Carleton Place Library and Mechanics’ Institute for 1851 were:

President:  James Duncan (blacksmith); Vice President:  William Peden (merchant); Treasurer:  Robert Bell, M.P.P. ; Secretary:  David Lawson (store clerk, postmaster) ; Librarian:  Johnston Neilson (schoolmaster) ; Directors:  George Dunnet (merchant), Duncan McGregor, James C. Poole (newspaper publisher), Thomas Patterson (Ramsay farmer), John McCarton (Ramsay farmer).

April 5, 1865:  “The Carleton Place Library will be open on Monday next, and on the first Monday of every month hereafter.  Person wishing to read can on payment of .25 cent per quarter of a year.”

Interest in the library seemed to have dwindled until 1883 with the formation of the Carleton Place Mechanics Institute.  The object of this Association was to:  “establish a reading room and library, procure suitable apartments (sic) and deliver courses or lectures on useful and interesting subjects, as well as supply its members with the means of instruction in Arts, Sciences, Literature and General knowledge.”  They housed the library wherever there was an empty building, or an individual would take it to their home.  The Mechanics Institute looked after the library until 1895, when legislation was passed in Ontario whereby the Mechanics Institute became the Public Library, free of subscription dues.  The Town by-law taking over the Library was not passed in its’ complete form until January, 1897.  Upon completion of the Town Hall in that year, the Public Library began its’ long stay there.  At this time the book collection was 2,458 volumes, and the number of books taken out during the year was 4,418. 

In 1897, the Art Loan Exhibit, an exhibit of Lanark and Renfrew’s social and natural history was put together by the library at the Opera Hall in the new Town Hall.

Information from 1956 shows that “At present there are about 1,000 borrowers, approximately 8,000 volumes to choose from, and a yearly and growing circulation of over 20,000…on the library tables there is an excellent range of daily papers as well as periodicals of Canadian, English and U.S. origin, which can be read in the quiet and well-lighted main room…the library is housed in the town hall main floor, a central and convenient place for its users…”

In 1966 the Eastern Ontario Regional Library System was set up.  This allowed for a pooling of book resources and interests of all Public Libraries in the ten counties of Eastern Ontario. 

In 1970 the new library was built on land donated by the Town and funded by private individuals.  It measured 3200 sq. ft., four times the size of the Town Hall library.  Once again, in 1979, the Library needed more space and was expanded to double its’ size.

Then in September, 1986, the Library was vandalized and set on fire, destroying the adult fiction collection and causing water and smoke damage to the rest of the collection.  The library was moved to temporary quarters in the Mews Professional Building on Lansdowne Avenue, until the library was rebuilt and the fire damage cleaned up.  The Library returned to its’ home in February, 1987, with an official opening on May 23, 1987.

In 1994, the Library held 35,569 volumes and 93,040 volumes circulated during the year.  Also, 910 volumes were loaned to other libraries in Ontario and 966 volumes were borrowed from them.

Computerization came to the library in 1992 in the form of an automated system.  No more card catalogues, or hand-written patron library cards.  The future had arrived!

As a millennium project, the library underwent a massive renovation starting in

June 1999, and ending in February 2000.  At that time, the large Barbara Walsh meeting room on the east side of the building was turned into a much needed larger children’s area, with a new and smaller Barbara Walsh room added to the front of the building.  Glass fronted offices were added close to the new circulation desk, along with public internet access terminals and storage areas.  A local history/microfilm room was located near the Beckwith Street side of the building.

In December 2010, the library began to provide access to e-books through  Southern Ontario Library Service, for all Carleton Place and area patrons.  Ancestry Library Edition also became available early in 2011 for local family history buffs.

Statistics from 2011 show the Library holding approximately 63,000 items, with 108,280 circulating throughout the year.  As well, patrons borrowed approximately 2,440 e-books, and Ancestry Library Edition saw approximately 11,691 research hits.  Also, 1,273 volumes were loaned to other libraries in Ontario and 1,245 volumes were borrowed from them.

Librarians:

 David Lawson          1846-1851

Johnston Neilson    1851-1887

Peter McRostie       1887-1909

Emma McRostie     1909-1941

Louise Elliott           1941-1960

Barbara Walsh        1960-1984

Janet Baril                1984-2013

Carleton Place 200th fact-Thanks to Laura @Restovation — we now have this complete photo on file and available for all to look at online. Thank you. Downtown Carleton Place 1909—Built on the south side of the Mississippi riverbanks the new town hall was just about to be opened. The building which faced Bridge Street was to house “a joint” town hall, fire and police station, concert hall and new library.It was advertised as a building that would astonish strangers by its proportions and ornateness. The cost was currently at $25,000 and there were still yet bills to be settled. There was a good many ratepayers that were furious that the cost was above and beyond of the initial quote of $12,000 and they swore that council would be held responsible for such monstrous costs at the next election. In fact the media wrote that the council was said to have run away with their duties to their constituents, and it was built solely as a monument to them.

Read–

Carleton Place Library 110th Anniversary — Comments About the Old Library

What If Books Were Banned in the Carleton Place Library? It’s Banned Book Week!

I Wish Adults Knew —– Bad Art Night at the Carleton Place Library

Did You Know? The Oldest Library in Lanark County

Did You Know About the Rules of the Dalhousie Library? 1828 –The Library Pioneers

The Lanark Library and Florence Bowes

Carleton Place Library 110th Anniversary — Comments About the Old Library

Elizabeth Kelly — Mary Cook News Archives

A Concert at the Town Hall While Small Pox Raged on…. 1901

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A Concert at the Town Hall While Small Pox Raged on…. 1901

Feb 22, 1901

Mr. Conklin elocutionist and Impersonator assisted by local talent and also by Mr. Hinchcliffe of Carleton Place gave an entertainment In the town hall last evening under the auspices of the Methodist Church. The entertainment received fair patronage, although the widespread sickness and fear of small pox in town at present surely contributed to the low attendance.

David Garrick undoubtedly was his best effort, an opportunity being given him to display his versatility of talent. His rapid change of face, form and manner, and particularly his adaptability to the varied character which be portrayed. were particularly entertaining. His other selections were more humourous and appeared to be pleasing to a large portion of the audience. Mr. Hinchcliffe rendered some vocal numbers with good effect.

Miss Sanderson contributed some calisthenic exercises for which she was warmly applauded. The entertainment taken altogether, was excellent although its promoters will not be much in pocket by their venture.

The church at 299 Bridge Street was a frame structure at its early beginnings, large enough to seat 250 persons. It was more than likely sold to the Baptists by the Wesleyan Methodists when they decided to move in 1888. According to some historical writings in newspaper archives the chapel was used as a grammar school in the early days as well as a church. In 1871, the wooden church was moved (*would love to know where it was moved to) and the present brick church on Bridge Street was built by Wesleyan Methodists, not the Baptists. When the Methodist’s congregation became larger they built and moved to a new church at the corner of Beckwith and Albert Streets. (Zion-Memorial United Church)

Small Pox Epidemic — Asks Council to Reimburse Burned Clothes

Things You Did Not Know About the Town Hall….

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Things You Did Not Know About the Town Hall….
1997

Did you know that the late great former Mayor of Carleton Place Brian Costello’s father and mother once were the caretakers of the town hall and lived in a former basement apartment?

When Brian’s children came to visit their grandparents thought they lived in the biggest house in Carleton Place.

Frank and Gertie Costello were on duty 7 days a week 24 hours a day just in case of a fire call. The caretaker’s role included the fire dispatcher’s job.

On some nights the Costellos could hear the drunks who sometimes inhabited the the cells behind the bedroom walls and the police would come and go at all hours.

One Christmas his Frank Costello felt sorry for prisoners who were away from their families and invited them from their cells to share in the season of a fine meal at the Costellos.

When Gertie Costello would bake– she would make two pies: one for the family and another for the police and the prisoners.

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage  Museum-by Blaine Cornell

When Ray McIsaac began as police chief in 1953 the police station consisted of two desks in a room sandwiched between the library and the fire hall, with cells for prisoners downstairs. The council chambers doubled as the courtroom and on Thursday morning court was in session.

The Fireman’s Ball was held in the town hall auditorium. Held the last Friday in January the event attracted 1,100 to 1,200 people and the ball would not end until the wee hours of the morning.

The CFRA Happy Wanderers also performed every Saturday night in the auditorium for 4-5 years. Attracting 600-800 people the whole police force would be working which was 4 men.

Once in awhile the police would bring in someone for questioning and people in the library would try and eavesdrop. The late great Barbara Walsh used to go up to them and tap them on the shoulder and tell them to move along. When Walsh started in 1960 she was one of only two women in the building along with the clerk’s assistant Isobel Shail. Thing have changed but —- do you know there have been only 7 women elected to council/mayor since 1905? The building was full of men and they had a smoking room set aside across from the clerks office where they could discuss matters during breaks.

The library moved out in 1970 to the present library on Beckwith Street. The Fire Department also was in the same building until the move to Coleman Street in 1997. The town hall used to be jammed with trucks and equipment and used to be crammed pretty tight. They used to put the old ladders through the old windows at the back from time to time. All this from a former wee house sitting on a piece of land once owned by William Morphy in 1820.

Photo- Linda Seccaspina

Dan Williams

When I was a kid the town hall including the auditorium was wide open. You could go in and discover stuff!. The balcony was a great place to go, or behind the stage which was pretty much unused spaced sort of like the attic in an old house. You could however make your way to the tower! Fun times! The other thing I remember about the auditorium is the annual Fireman’s Ball. I was just a kid but I remember being there and hanging around in front of the stage listening to some country band playing “On the wings of a snow white dove”. I hated country!

Forgotten Mill Street

The Building of the First Town Hall Carleton Place

What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall 1897
Carleton Place Town Hall Sued For Cupolas!

Why is the Town Hall Stage Slanted? Is it Collapsing?

Shenanigans of the Monday Night Town Hall Opening

What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall 1897

Sarah Marselles the Spirit of the Town Hall Square Park

Shenanigans of the Monday Night Town Hall Opening

Saved By The Bell in Carleton Place? What Does the Photo Say?

The Building of the First Town Hall Carleton Place

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The Building of the First Town Hall Carleton Place
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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Dec 1872, Fri  •  Pag

Carleton Place Town Hall. ‘Our thriving neighbour— Carleton Place— is going to build a town hall,  and to cost about $6,000 or $7,000. We understand that our townsman, Mr. Wm. Willoughby, has got the contract, and will begin work as soon as the snow disappears next spring. The new building will be erected on the north side of the river, and in rear o f Mr. Wm. Glover’s property.

Almonte Gazette–Oct 27 1871

The riot in the Town Hall

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Oct 1879, Thu  •  Page 1

Victoria School Museum

267, Edmund Street, Town of Carleton Place, Ontario, K7C, Canada

Formally Recognized: 1978/04/17

The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.
​Erected in 1872, our beautiful stone building served the community of Carleton Place as the Town Hall and lock up until 1879, and then as Victoria School for 90 years until 1969.

The museum is run by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Historical Society with assistance from the Town of Carleton Place and the Township of Beckwith.Opening as the Victoria School Museum in 1985, the name was changed in 2011 to reflect the scope of our collection and our communities.


Carleton Place Town Hall Sued For Cupolas!

Why is the Town Hall Stage Slanted? Is it Collapsing?

Shenanigans of the Monday Night Town Hall Opening

What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall 1897