Tag Archives: time capsule

The Beer Bottle Time Capsule on Emily Street?

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The Beer Bottle Time Capsule on Emily Street?
Photo Adin Wesley Daigle

Hey Linda, hope all is well we found this beer bottle in the wall upstairs while renovations commence here at the Daigle house. I thought maybe someone would recognize the names on it .

It says “Crammy” “Snidley” and “Emmat”

Anyone know???

Date of the bottle?

This is a longneck bottle so after 1983….

When Canadian breweries made the switch from stubby to longneck in 1983, each company had its own distinctive bottle. The decision to switch was made for marketing reasons. Sales were flat, and the major brewers thought a new bottle shape could give sales the boost they needed.

Molson shelled out a whopping $18 million to convert its bottling machines.

Reaction to the longneck was mixed. Some beer drinkers liked the new bottle for its style and feel. Others, however, resisted the Americanization of the beer bottle and lamented the loss of the little stubby.

In a Food in Canada article titled “Bring back the stubby!” writer David Menzies reveals that the stubby was almost resurrected in 1992 when Canadian brewing companies met to re-set the standard dimensions of the longneck. The stubby was passed over, however, when focus groups showed that women preferred the longneck to the stubby.

this logo dates back to at least as early as 1861. Molson had several brands that used this crown & anchor device before 1900. And a crown & anchor design that is pretty much the same still appears on our Stock Ale brand today. Which doesn’t really answer the question about the bottle opener, since this design has been around for quite a long time

Mrs. James Lawrie and Her Ginger Beer

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

The Big Beer Store Heist in Carleton Place

Who Stole The Beer Sign in Almonte?

What was Written on the Note in the Bottle?

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What was Written on the Note in the Bottle?

Hi Linda
   When they got the time capsule from the CP high school there was a bottle in it with a paper inside, what was written on the paper?
Thanks
Jim Houston

Does anyone know?

Peter Bradley— Photo–CPHS taken from the top of the water tower when the “new” addition was being built in the early sixties

Everyone thought Bruce Wilson had gone a bit crazy when he demanded the cornerstone of his high school be removed because he was convinced a time capsule was behind it. In November of 1998 they changed their minds. Two stonemasons clambered up scaffolding at the edge of Carleton Place High School and chipped out the stone inscribed with the date the school was built and the name of the chairman of the board on opening day 75 years ago.Nestled behind it was a cement-covered dry gin bottle, uncorked and empty with the exception of a tightly rolled, lined sheet of paper. The note, the newspapers and another note, which was tucked into a gin bottle – accompanying the capsule, were all so dry and tightly folded that they could not be fully read. And tucked behind it sat a sealed copper box, envelope-sized in length. “I was pretty happy to see they had found them,” said Mr. Wilson, a Grade 12 student. “Everyone had thought I was kind of crazy.” November 1998-The Time Capsule of CPHS

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Dec 1998, Tue  •  Page 37

The Time Capsule of CPHS

  1. A Time Capsule on the Malloch Farm
  2. Should we Really Keep Time in a Bottle or a Box? 
  3. Unwrapping 164 Bridge Street in Carleton Place
  4. Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?
  5. Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

About the photo above

Donna Mcfarlane 1961 graduation ceremony was delayed until march 16 1962 until the addition was completed

Peter Bradley 1960, The last time I climbed up the tower before moving to England. The teachers were Miss Mullett, Miss Powell, Mr Lawn, Mr Thompson, Mr Lighthart, Mr Ross and Mr Palmateer. and I missed Miss Sinclair. (Go to the bottom of the class)

Gail Grabe Peter Bradley Don’t forget Miss Sinclair!

Peter Bradley Gail Grabe Oh how could I Scuddy Sinclair and Latin and Ancient History. I still have the text books! Amo amas amat, Do, dara, ditty, datum!

Gail Grabe As I recall, history class was a guess as to which paragraph you would have to memorize in order to stand and recite verbatim as she went down each row. Occasionally she started with a different row…yikes!

Sandra Mailey Grade 13 departmental exams in June 1961, were written in Memorial Church Hall to spare us the distraction of the construction noise.

Sandra Mailey Our class graduation was the first to take place in the new auditorium …October 1961.

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston 1960 – first year of high school and the addition was going in. The biggest thing I remember is that stairs were still on the front of the school – that’s where we stood to get sorted out into grades!

David Flint the ‘vinyl village’ was just a field back then ….awesome pic

The Time Capsule of CPHS

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The Time Capsule of CPHS
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Everyone thought Bruce Wilson had gone a bit crazy when he demanded the cornerstone of his high school be removed because he was convinced a time capsule was behind it. In November of 1998 they changed their minds. Two stonemasons clambered up scaffolding at the edge of Carleton Place High School and chipped out the stone inscribed with the date the school was built and the name of the chairman of the board on opening day 75 years ago.
Nestled behind it was a cement-covered dry gin bottle, uncorked and empty with the exception of a tightly rolled, lined sheet of paper. And tucked behind it sat a sealed copper box, envelope-sized in length. “I was pretty happy to see they had found them,” said Mr. Wilson, a Grade 12 student. “Everyone had thought I was kind of crazy.”
It was not as if Mr. Wilson had set out to find a capsule. It came about by accident while he was looking for material to put on the school Web site that he operates. As he was searching any archives he could find for a short history of Carleton Place High, he noticed suggestions that there was a time capsule embedded in the building when it was constructed, most probably behind the inscribed corner stone.
“The reports said there was an opening ceremony and they kept mentioning there was something behind the stone.” That was all Mr. Wilson needed and, since there were masons working at the school, he was able to persuade them to remove the inscription stone. At the very least, it would satisfy his curiosity. “We have no idea what’s inside them yet,” Mr. Wilson says, who hasn’t tried to find any students of the day because he believes they would be at least 88 years old by now.

That’s where Tim and Rosemary Campbell come in. They were contacted because they have some expertise in this area as well as great interest in anything historical About 15 years ago, they helped uncover the contents of a capsule at Carleton Place Zion Church. That treasure unveiled papers, coins and newspaper articles. “We have a background in knowing how to deal with things like this,” says Mr. Campbell who takes care of works of art at the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography in Ottawa. “What we don’t know is what, exactly, is inside and that’s a bit tricky. If you don’t know what’s there you might damage something without meaning to.” That’s why they are waiting for an expert conservator. “This is unearthing something that hasn’t seen the light of day for a long time,” says Mr. Campbell. “We want to be sure we do it right.” It’s hoped the opening will be happen before Christmas.
So what did they find?
 With a small tool, conservator Bob Barclay carefully loosened the seal of a 75-year-old time capsule found last month in the bricks and mortar behind the school’s cornerstone. The only sounds in the second-floor lab came from the clicking cameras of students documenting the scene. Mr. Barclay donned rubber gloves to protect the precious time-capsule booty and pulled out the following tokens from an earlier era: copies of two newspapers, dated from May 1923; a mysterious note nibbled upon by insects; and several coins of the day.

The note, the newspapers and another note, which was tucked into a gin bottle accompanying the capsule, were all so dry and tightly folded that they could not be fully read. The documents will have to be humidified and softened before people can read them, said Mr. Barclay, who specializes in conservation of musical instruments in his work with the Canadian Conservation Society. Bruce Wilson, the Grade 12 student who discovered the capsule’s existence during a research project, said the documents will be an exciting glimpse into the social climate of the day. Students will be able to learn about the sense of community that existed 75 years ago not only at the school, but around the world. “I thought it might just be historical information about the school,” Mr. Wilson said. “We found a lot more than I thought we would.” Between handshakes and broad smiles all around the room, teachers and students said they were hoping the bug-eaten note would help them understand why, and by whom, the time capsule was put together.
The first item Mr. Barclay pulled out was a copy of the Ottawa Citizen, dated May 9,1923. “Banking system does not cater to the masses,” read one of the headlines on the three-cent newspaper. It was a headline that could have been written yesterday, exclaimed one of the teachers, referring to the antipathy surrounding current proposed bank mergers. The next item was a May 3, 1923 copy of the Central Canadian newspaper, which advertised yearly subscriptions for two dollars.
The note came out next, and Carleton Place conservator Rosemary Campbell said she suspected it was a message from the people who put the time capsule together 75 years ago. Aside from some visible typewriter ink, the note was not yet legible. Six coins were hidden amongst the capsule’s papers. There were two pennies, one from 1876 and the other from 1920, a dime from 1917, a 50 cent piece from 1909, a quarter from 1902 and a nickel from 1911. The tarnished coins had Queen Victoria’s head on one side and the year and value stamped on the other. “They’re probably not worth very much because of the condition they’re in,” said Ms. Campbell. “But the coins are rich with historic value.” Mr. Barclay said it’s rare that time capsules are as easy to open as this one and that the contents are so well-preserved. “They’re lucky it didn’t leak because it wasn’t sealed very tightly,” he said. “It survived 75 winters in a place where it should have been affected by the weather.”
Principal Don Sykes says the school will store the items in an acid-free box underneath a protective canopy over the Christmas holiday. An attempt will be made in the new year to ready the documents. Mr. Sykes says the school plans to carry on the tradition and put together a time capsule of its own, which will be hidden in the wall of the soon-to-be renovated main lobby.
historicalnotes
The story of high schools in Carleton Place is a lengthy one with many interesting sidelights. The corner stone of the present High School (Prince of Wales High School) was laid in 1923 and under it was placed a scroll containing the following information: The High School has made many moves since it was started, about 1848, as a Grammar School. The first building used was a frame one on the Central School grounds.

 - Students and teachers at Carleton Place High... - contained newspapers, coins and a school...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 31 Dec 1999, Fri,
  3. Page 22
  1.  - SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AT CARLETON PLACE Board of...

    Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Citizen,
    2. 11 Dec 1922, Mon,
    3. Page 14
    4.  - OTTAWA FIRMS GET S On Construction of the New ;...

      Clipped from

      1. The Ottawa Citizen,
      2. 09 Sep 1922, Sat,
      3. Page 4
  2. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Nowrelatedreading

    A Time Capsule on the Malloch Farm

  3. Should we Really Keep Time in a Bottle or a Box?

    Unwrapping 164 Bridge Street in Carleton Place

    Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

    Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

A Time Capsule on the Malloch Farm

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A Time Capsule on the Malloch Farm

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Hi Linda. This is the barn at our Malloch family farm…The barn was built by Dan Malloch my great grandfather in 1909. This is the first major repair ever done on the barn since my great grandfather had the barn built. Check out the thick stone walls. Blake is repairing the corner of the barn his great great grandfather had built. I love history. –Glenda Mahoney

 

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Sunday- July 8, 2018-We are heading to the farm today to place a time capsule in the barn foundation. I wonder if it will be found in another 109 years. Glenda Mahoney

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We each wrote a letter. Money. Crystals. Pictures. A newspaper. We are hoping it will be future Mallochs who open it. My sister Barb said whoever opens it will look at the pictures and say,  “Omg look at their hair look at their clothes!”

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

The Malloch Barn and Other Things

Should we Really Keep Time in a Bottle or a Box?

 

Unwrapping 164 Bridge Street in Carleton Place

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall