Tag Archives: thomas easby

Memories of When the Devil Visited Drummond Township

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Memories of When the Devil Visited Drummond Township

 

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Hi Linda,

This occurred very near my family farm. My great grandfather Daniel Malloch walked from the farm in Drummond Center carrying a bag of grain to attend the hanging. He had the grain ground into flour and walked home with the bag of flour afterwards. He would not have wanted to waste a trip to Perth.:) It was a horrifying story told by my grandmother and she backed it up with a unique macabre visual aid. A small change purse made from the murderers skin.We still have the object and although I would hesitate to ever label it a cherished family treasure it is without a doubt a piece of history.  Glenda Mahoney (The Mahoney Legacy Ends–Masonry Runs in the Blood)

 

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The Thomas Easby Murders in 1829 — Foulest Ever in Lanark County

 

In Perth, 1829 has a heinous ring to its history for it was the year that one of the county’s foulest murders was committed.  The late W.B. Hart of Perth is responsible for the tale of Thomas Easby being told. Mr. Hart in (date illegible) gave the Perth Municipal Museum a copy of the Bathurst Independent Examiner—Perth’s pioneer paper.  Between the pages of the 1829 Examiner the story of the murders unfolds.

Thomas Easby was a pioneer who, with his wife and five children, lived in a log cabin on the 9th Concession of Drummond—on the main highway between Perth and Lanark Village.  There, on an early December night in 1829 the tale begins.

What exactly transpired within the walls of that house on that night is not known.  But it was discovered the next day that Easby’s wife and four children were dead and the log cabin was burned to the ground. Linda Seccaspina- Read More here–The Thomas Easby Murders in 1829 — Foulest Ever in Lanark County

 

 

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THE DEVIL VISITS DRUMMOND TOWNSHIP
Canada’s First Mass Murder–Ron Shaw
At about 3:00 a.m. on the cold morning of Wednesday, December 10, 1828, John Tullis
(1777-1832), who lived with his wife Margaret Jamieson (1777-1851) and their eight children on a farm at Drummond C-9/L-3(E)1, about a mile north of the village of Balderson’s Corners, was awakened by distant shouts. His wife then saw an orange glow emanating from the shanty of their neighbor Thomas Easby on Drummond C-9/L-3(W).

The Easby cabin was on fire and the Tullis’ teenage sons John Jr. (1809-1885) and Sinclair (1811-1893) immediately ran across theintervening clearing to lend whatever assistance they could. John Tullis Jr. later2 recounted that as he approached the door of the cabin Easby called out “Who comes there”. The Tullis boys identified themselves, saying they had come to help, but Easby told them he had “mastered the fire himself”.  Ron Shaw– Read the rest here–CLICK HERE

 

 

10 May 1901
Over 70 years ago a man named Easby who settled on Hunter farm beyond Balderson, murdered wife and 4 or 5 children and then burned down house…executed in Perth in 1829. On 7th inst Joseph Parton living near Hurdville, Parry Sound Dist arrested, suspected of same crime…5 children died April 30…7-18 years old

26 Nov 1909
Duncan McLaren, old resident Balderson, died at his residence Saturday last. Was born on homestead farm (Bathurst side of concession line) in 1828, son of Archibald McLaren, Highland Scotchman and pioneer settler. Just 6 weeks younger than aged townsman Robert Balderson, who was born on farm just across road on Drummond side. Same year of 1828 terrible Easby murders took place a few farms farther north. Married Miss Sarah McMillan, 1st line Drummond who survives. Mrs Francis Davies, Perth, is a sister. Leaves 2 sons, Archibald & James, Man; Peter, 6th Bathurst; Alexander, old family farm. Mrs Arthur Caldwell, Bruce Co; Mrs John Hughes, Chesley, Ont. 2 nephews in hotelbusiness in Winnipeg (Empire Hotel)… Presb…to Campbell Cemetery

 

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From Rampage: Canadian Mass Murder and Spree Killing
By Lee Mellor

MS 658 Reel 112 Document 944- 947 (handwritten) Drummond Township

Toronto – January 27th 1857

My Dear Sir,

In reply to your inquiry as to Joseph Easby I have only to state that while attending the Session of Parliament here in 1829 or 1830 I have a recollection of Mr. Wm. Morris speaking to me about him and his making an arrangement with John Hay in whose house he lodged, to receive him and to bring him up. Wm. Easby the father of the boy had murdered all the other members of his family & then set fire to the log house in which they lived — The fire did not however consume the remains and he so managed as to have them interred without any suspicion resting upon him of having murdered them. The youngest and only child spared, Joseph, was received at the time by a neighbour and it was in consequence of something said in the course of play with other children that a suspicion of foul play was excited and the bodies were disinterred. The sad truth was then ascertained that all had been barbarously murdered and Easby who was just about to leave the place was arrested. He was convicted and executed for the crime leaving the child he had spared, the instrument under providence of his detection without friends or relatives in the country. Hay having no family of his own willingly received the boy and for several years after I saw him in the house while lodging there during the Sessions of Parliament. I know that Hay and his wife were extremely kind to the boy and that they did not expect or receive any compensation for their care of him.

I have every reason to believe that their care and kindness were extended to him as long as he chose to remain with them and till he was old enough to earn something for himself.

I cannot say at what time he left them or whether he did not usually make his home with them till the death of Mrs. Hay. I have understood that he was drowned from a small schooner in which he was sailing, in the harbour of Toronto.

Tho’ I believe Hay was influenced by a feeling of kinship & humanity in taking the boy under his care, yet I think in his present position if there are means of his estate that he has decidedly the best claim upon them– at least I am not aware that any one has a more legitimate claim.

Yours very truly

A. Mc Lean

E.C. Jones Esq.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

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Was it Murder?

Murder or Accident — Bates & Innes Flume

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Not Guilty in the Murder of His Grandmother –George Watt Jr.

Fame and Murder Came to Balderson in 1828

The Thomas Easby Murders in 1829 — Foulest Ever in Lanark County

Murder in Carleton Place –Peter Cairns

The Buck Lake Murderer

The Media Then and Now–Johnny Gillies Had a Gun

Shocking Murder in Almonte–Michigan Charlie

Murder on Maple Island

Bitten by the Kissing Bug — A Shocking Conclusion to the Life of Carleton Place’s Daniel E. Sheppard

The Tale of a Pirate named Bill Johnston with Pirate Dog Supermodels

Assassinated Gossip about Lincoln, Payne and the Thousand Islands

The Man Who Would Be The Revenant

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Did Samuel Pittard of Ashton Murder His Wife?

 

 

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Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

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Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

 

October 28th The Occomores Valley Grante and Tile Event–730pm-1am Carleton Place arena-Stop by and pick up your tickets for our fundraiser dance for LAWS. They also have tickets for Hometown Hearts event at the Grand Hotel fundraiser

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Fame and Murder Came to Balderson in 1828

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Perth Courier, September 20, 1962

Balderson Was Once Known As Clarksville

Fame came to Balderson in 1828 when a *grisly murder focused national attention on the then growing village.  The details were on everyone’s lips.  The event caused Balderson author *R.L. Richardson to write “Colin of the 9th Concession” which was given widespread publicity in the pages of the Courier.

Few people know the father of Arthur Meighen taught school in the village.  Meighen was a former Canadian Prime Minister.  But of all the aspects of Balderson life cheese is the most interesting.  The first factory was built in 1881 on land purchased from Nathaniel Balderson, which burned in 1929 and was rebuilt in 1930.  The man behind the helm today is Omer Matte who succeeds an impressive line of cheese makers.  Many are still living There are Chris J. Bell of Perth, James Somerville of Boyd’s, Walter Partridge of the Scotch Line, Charles Gallery of Perth, Robert Lucas of Jasper and Percy George of Christie’s Lake.

The Balderson factory was a feeder station helping to make the giant cheese of 1893 for the World’s Fair in Chicago.  Six feet high and 28 feet in girth the 22,000 pound cheese used up 207,200 pounds of milk before completion.  It was a united effort at helping put Lanark County on the map.

Balderson was incorporated as a village in 1864 although part was then registered as Clarksville, states Mrs. John McGregor, who keeps a village history.  The great bulk of the settlers hailed from the Scotch Highlands chiefly Perthshire.  For a while it was one of Perth’s most important suburbs being settled originally from the Perth military colony.

It was founded by a Sergeant Balderson, who was born in Lincoln, England, in 1783 and died at Balderson in 1851.  Six feet tall, erect and dignified, he served eleven years in the 76th Regiment of Foot under Wellington.  He saw action against the French in Spain at Vittoria, Nive and Nivelle.  He married Annie Hewitt, daughter of Sir Robert Hewitt and homesteaded on Lot 1, Concession 8, Drummond.  Mrs. Balderson and a Mrs(?) Josias Richie were the first white women to sleep in a Perth house.

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Balderson-Perth Remembered

Balderson was followed by Ensign Gould on Lot 7, Henry McDonald on Lot 12—all on Concession 8; John G. Malloch on Lot 14, James McGarry on Lot 10, Donald Campbell on Lot 3, Peter McLaren on Lot 8—all on the 7th Concession; James McNiece and T. Bright on Lot 10, Concession 9.  The last “original” settler died in 1895.

*In 1829 Thomas Easby was hanged by the neck for the brutal murder of his wife and four children the year before.  “Colin”, his young son, testified against his father and sent him to the gallows.  Reaction of the Easby neighbors was shocking, however.  They took his body (Dr. James Wilson led the pack), skinned it, tanned the hide and exhibited the produce at the Perth Fair several years later.  The murderer’s skeleton went west with a Perth boy, old chronicles say.  The young child was sent away to live elsewhere.

Balderson United and St. John’s Anglican are the only churches in the village.  The oldest Presbyterian Church was built in 1839 and is now a machine shed on the James McGregor farm.  The village two room school was purchased by the Loyal Orange Lodge in 1865.

The oldest property deeded is the old Somerville lot, granted by the Crown to Sgt. Balderson in 1815 and now owned by Elmer Ashby, a cattle drover.  Such names as Devlin, Davidson, McGregor, McTavish, Newman, Haley, Kennedy, King, Myers, Jones, McLaren, Closs, Noonan and McIntyre still give a Gaelic tone to the village.

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This is a school class picture at the Balderson School – June, 1936.  Inez May Flintoft is in the back row on the left with a white sailor top or dress.  This is the submitters mother.  She taught school in Tatlock and other schools.  The students and teachers are as follows, as indicated by Don McGregor:

Front row, left to right; Billie McCurdy, Billie Cameron, Kenny Campbell, Margaret Allan, Helen Watt, Edith King, Rena Watt, Helen Murphy, Raeburn Duncan, Walter Allan & Clifford Allan.

2nd row, left to right; Ernest Allan, George McCurdy, Marshall Allan, Marjorie Duncan, Muriel McNaughton, Margaret Doyle, Arnold Mather, Arnold McDougall, Billie Thomas & Billie Richardson.

3rd row, left to right; Howard McGregor, Glenn Kenyon, Enid Allan, Dorothy Allan, Rita Murphy, Eileen Watt, Keith McLaren, Frank Brady & Harold Allan.

4th row, left to right; Russell McNaughton, Inez Flintoft, (teacher), Welly Duncan, (Teacher), Stewart Allan, Irene Murphy, Helen Kenyon & Albert Kenyon.

 Submitted by: Ivy Mohrhardt – Posted 28 May, 2002 

historicalnotes

*Easby Murder--At about 3:00 a.m. on the cold morning of Wednesday, December 10, 1828, John Tullis (1777-1832), who lived with his wife Margaret Jamieson (1777-1851) and their eight children on a farm at Drummond C-9/L-3(E)1 , about a mile north of the village of Balderson’s Corners, was awakened by distant shouts. His wife then saw an orange glow emanating from the shanty of their neighbor Thomas Easby on Drummond C-9/L-3(W). The Easby cabin was on fire and the Tullis’ teenage sons John Jr. (1809-1885) and Sinclair (1811-1893) immediately ran across the intervening clearing to lend whatever assistance they could. —The Thomas Easby Murders in 1829 — Foulest Ever in Lanark County

Colin of the Ninth Concession; a tale of Scottish pioneer life in Eastern Ontario–by Richardson, Robert Lorne, 1860-1921

RICHARDSON, ROBERT LORNE–Biographyjournalist, newspaper owner and editor, politician, and author; b. 28 June 1860 near Balderson, Upper Canada, son of Joseph Richardson and Harriet Thompson; m. 11 March 1885, in Brockville, Ont., Clara Jane Mallory of Mallorytown, Ont., and they had five daughters, one of whom predeceased him; d. 6 Nov. 1921 in Winnipeg.

The Thomas Easby Murders in 1829 — Foulest Ever in Lanark County

Before and After in Balderson

Oh Woe is Emily J Publow of Balderson

Being A Charles Dobbie Groupie — Balderson Before Selfies

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

The Thomas Easby Murders in 1829 — Foulest Ever in Lanark County

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The Thomas Easby Murders in 1829 Foulest Ever in Lanark County- Perth Courier

In Perth, 1829 has a heinous ring to its history for it was the year that one of the county’s foulest murders was committed.  The late W.B. Hart of Perth is responsible for the tale of Thomas Easby being told. Mr. Hart in (date illegible) gave the Perth Municipal Museum a copy of the Bathurst Independent Examiner—Perth’s pioneer paper.  Between the pages of the 1829 Examiner the story of the murders unfolds.

Thomas Easby was a pioneer who, with his wife and five children, lived in a log cabin on the 9th Concession of Drummond—on the main highway between Perth and Lanark Village.  There, on an early December night in 1829 the tale begins.

What exactly transpired within the walls of that house on that night is not known.  But it was discovered the next day that Easby’s wife and four children were dead and the log cabin was burned to the ground.

Although many neighbors suspected Easby of  murdering the five and then burning down the house, nothing could be proved.  The only surviving Easby child, however, added fuel to the already growing flames.

The survivor—a four year old boy—was adopted by a neighboring family, a Mr. and Mrs. Richardson.  On one occasion when  Mrs. Richardson was building a fire under a soap cooler (kettle), the child remarked: “That is what daddy did to mommy”.

Eventually local authorities had the bodies disinterred and Dr. James Wilson examined the remains—apparently something seemed a little fishy.  He had a warrant issued for Easby’s arrest and on Feb. 2 the soon to be convicted murderer was lodged in the Perth jail to await trial.

The trial began on August 21.  Easby, however, was only charged with one murder….that of his wife.  This deed was all the more deplorable because Ann was pregnant at the time of her death.

The chief crown witness (of the eight called) was John Tullis, a neighboring farmer.  Tullis testified that he had awakened about midnight on the night in question by a loud shriek.  His mother saw the Easby cabin on fire and another son, Sinclair, went over to investigate.  On approaching the hut, Sinclair Tullis was told by Easby that the fire was extinguished and that everything was alright.  As a result, the Tullis boy went home.

However, at day break, as the Examiner article recalled, “he (Sinclair Tullis) returned to the miserable hovel—when Easby informed him that all the family except himself and little Joseph were burned up in the cellar”.

Mrs. Richardson, Joseph’s adopted mother, also took the stand.  She testified that while “at first she did not suspect Easby, the child’s prattle worried her and she finally consulted their neighbor John Balderson regarding her fears.”

Dr. Wilson—another Crown witness, stated that he found four distinct head wounds “on the wife’s head—one or two of which could have caused immediate death.”  Then the nail was really driven into the coffin.  John Balderson swore that the suspect had admitted while in jail to the murder.  The jailer, James Young, also testified “that Easby had frequently confessed to him and stated that he was about to murder the remaining child also and had taken him in his arms for that purpose but the youngster smiled and laughter in his face and that he had not the heart to execute him”.

With such a preponderance of evidence the jury had little difficulty in reaching a verdict.  They returned from the jury room in a matter of minutes and the foreman intoned the guilty verdict on Easby. Easby was sent to death and hanged less than one week later.

But the post script to the case is worth noting.  As revealed in the Examiner “the body of this felon had been buried in the English Church Cemetery but owing to the excitement and strong feeling evinced by the crowd which witnessed the execution and the fear of reprisals the remains were exhumed that night and handed over to Dr. Wilson and two medical students for dissection”.

The gruesome account continues:  “they first skinned the body and the hide was tanned in a local tannery and cut up into small squares which were sold to the public bringing as much as $2. Talk about your early murder memorabilia! The skeleton remained in the possession of Dr. Wilson till after his death and sold to a local Perth lad who took it west with him.

That was the end of Thomas Easby—one of Canada’s first convicted multiple murderers.

Also read-Fame and Murder Came to Balderson in 1828

historicalnotes

First Execution for Murder – Thomas Easby, of Drummond township, 1829; found to have killed his wife and four children, publicly hanged at Perth after rejection of defence of insanity.

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 “Tell me dad how did you meet mom ? Was it a church social, a wedding, were you school sweethearts ? No son, I met your dear mother at a public hanging ” – Maybe true romance is dead after all ?
Source: Mrs Clayton Hilker – The Bancroft Times
Date: unknown. Photo from Dan Kehoe-Bancroft and Area History

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Death by Corset? Bring Out Your Dead and Other Notions! Our Haunted Heritage

Things You Just Don’t say at a Funeral— Even if you Are a Professional Mourner

The Non Kosher Grave — Our Haunted Heritage

Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

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Donna Farrell-Hyde

30m  · Met in Ontario I believe when new settlements came in to Wilberforce

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