Tag Archives: Thomas Alfred Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 27- John Code and John Ennis

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 27- John Code and John Ennis

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Innisville Mills in background ( old bridge)

In 1876 John Code had been out West for a while ( since 1872) and he decided to come back to Innisville for a visit. John Ennis was running the flour and saw mills at that time and decided he didn’t want all the hard work at that time and was trying to interest someone into renting the mills.

Ennis had an employee at that time called Sam Spender and asked John Code if he would consider renting the property with him. Both Spender and Code went into business with each other and rented the Innisville mills for $850 a year for five years. They told Spender they would try it out and would give it up at the end of the year if they did not do well. Even though they did not do too badly John Code got gold fever once again and left to try out the west once again and the partnership ended.

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John Code –ancestry.ca

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

John Code of Perth and Wild Bill Hickock

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 26- Mary Rathwell and Eleanor Ennis

John Code of Perth and Wild Bill Hickock

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

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I had previously printed two other letters from his Mother, but I found this one tucked away in the journal- Original posting–The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

Innisville, November 11th  (no year)

(No idea who Jessie is)

My Dear Son,

As I am sitting here all alone tonight I thought I would drop you a line. I was glad to hear to hear you went up to see the last of Jessie once again. My poor dear child I am very sorry she was taken from us so soon. My dear, if you had only known her, she was the soul of kindness, you would have only known her to appreciate her. I have lost a good child as she was always that to me.

I know it is very foolish for me to grieve so much for her, for at the best my time will not  be very long, but she showed me every respect when I was there last winter. They are the kindest people I have ever known. I hope that poor Jim will get on staying with them for awhile anyhow, poor fellow. He is well respected there and keeps good company, and I believe poor Jessie did not forget him at the last.

One thing we cannot say that he was a slighted husband for whatever he said was alright with her and what she said was the same with him. I often thought you might have driven out with Jennie ( Leslie maiden name T. A. Code’s wife) and the baby ( Dorothy Leslie Code later Mrs. T. R. Caldwell, Oshawa) while Jessie was well. It would have shown her a little respect if nothing else. Tell Dorothy she has a grandma in the country who thinks as much of her if not more than any grandchild she has, but I don’t see much of her. Remember me in the finest manner to Jennie, and if she had known Jessie better she would be sorry for her too.

From your Affectionate Mother.

 

authorsnote)

After I read this, I knew that it does not matter what era or year it is, Mother’s think the same. Elizabeth Hicks Code, Thomas Alfred’s mother, was not happy the way the death of this dear girl she loved was handled by her family. Sentences like: “if she had known Jessie better she would be sorry for her too” proved to me that Elizabeth was unhappy the way her son had handled Jessie’s death, and these gentle words she wrote was how she felt. These days, maybe more emphatic words would have been used, but that was the sign of the times.

genea

Dorothy Code- Thomas Alfred Code’s daughter, he also had a son Allan.
Canada Census, 1911
Name Dorothy Code
Event Type Census
Event Date 1911
Event Place Lanark South Sub-Districts 1-37, Ontario, Canada
Gender Female
Age (Estimated) 19
Marital Status Single
Religion Presbyterian
Relationship to Head of Household Daughter
Birth Date Jun 1892
Birthplace Ontario
Household
Role
Sex
Age
Birthplace
Thomas Code Head M 57 Ontario
Dorothy Code Daughter F 19 Ontario
Allan Code Son M 15 Ontario
Barbara Hutchinson Housekeeper F 42 Ontario
Maggie Gamble Domestic F 22 Ontario
Mary Stewart Domestic F 44 Ontario

Dorothy married T. R. Code in England and lived in Oshawa.

historicalnotes

  1. Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpgIn the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembereds-l1600.jpg

    How did I get this?

    I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

    How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

    Allan Leslie Code

    1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

    Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

1856journal-wool-manufacturing_1_70c4804ce147025919e12f28eedefdd4 (1)

Hand written insert or advertisement for an ad to be placed in a newspaper owned by James C. Poole. Paper my have been Lanark Herald or the Carleton Place Herald, Lanark County, Ottawa, Canada. A & G Code were clothing manufacturers in Innisville, later in Perth

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

 

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As I have previously written, after the death of my father William Code in 1868 my brother John Code took charge until 1872. In that year he left for the West and Mother retired in the red brick house near the river on the south-east side of Innisville. From then until 1876 I was in charge with the exception of a few months during the winter of 1874.

I admired how John left after writing to Billy Quinn, who had also departed from Lanark a few years previous to join those seeking their fortune in gold. Billy had mentioned that gold had been found near the town of Helena, Montana by four gold miners who had struck it rich at the appropriately named “Last Chance Gulch.” John had decided that I was old enough to take over, and he at the age of 22 left the train station at Perth with his good friend Bill Ennis. The trip from Perth to Brockville was $1.50 at that time, and the whole trip cost him about $150.00 to Montana.

He didn’t write a lot, and Mother worried, and I guess I did too.  Last Chance Gulch would prove to be the second biggest placer gold deposit in Montana, producing some $19 million worth of gold in just four years. Overnight, thousands of miners began to flood into the region, and the four original discoverers added to their fortunes by establishing the town of Helena to provide them with food, lodging, and supplies. But unlike many of the early Montana mining towns, Helena did not disappear once the gold gave out, which it inevitably did.

John reached Helena in 1872 working odd jobs along the way and Mother finally heard from him in July  in a letter that was written and posted in May. Mother asked me to mail him a copy of the Perth Courier so he could keep up on the comings and goings of the area. Bill Ennis eventually left the area in October of 1874 to seek another adventure  in the state of Washington leaving my brother in Montana.  An interesting fact is that in 1888 Helena, Montana had more millionaires per capita than any other city in the world and sad to say that my brother John Code never became one of them.

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Mary Maria Butler (1st wife) Family were merchants from Harper and Perth and John Code- ancestry.ca

John did return to Innisville in 1877 and married Mary Butler and had 4 children, but sadly Mary died in 1892 at their home in Perth. Five years later he took another wife by the name of Isabel McKinley from Scotch Line who blessed him with another 4 children. My brother joined me in co- founding the Golf Club in Perth and dabbled in the insurance business as well as being the Treasurer of the County of Lanark for many years.

Author’s Note- John Code died at the age of 82 in 1932

 

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John Code –ancestry.ca

 

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John Code and Mary Marie Butler and Isabella Mary McKinley

Perth, Drummond Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada–ancestry.ca

 

 - ! Treajnrer 38 Yean j i mr 1.'- 1.'- JOHK OODR....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 18 Dec 1928, Tue,
  3. Page 2

 

 - Lanark Treasurer ; Resigns His Post John Code....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 20 Nov 1928, Tue,
  3. Page 3

Son Howard Code

 - Harold M. Code Ottawa Lawyer Dies at Perth...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 14 May 1941, Wed,
  3. Page 2

 

 

historicalnotes

 

  1. Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpgIn the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembereds-l1600.jpg

    How did I get this?

    I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

    How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

    Allan Leslie Code

    1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

     

    Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

  2. Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

    relatedreading.jpg

 

 

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

 

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Before and after.. thanks Jennifer E. Ferris for sending the new photo

 

 

 

No date, I assume it is in the same period of the other clippings and notes mid 1920s.

 

Smartly dressed up for the occasion McDonald’s Corners, alias the Ninth Line, alias “The Hill,” looked its best on Friday last when the local Women’s Institute sponsored a “Field Day”. This event attracted a large number of spectators from all parts of the countryside and the towns and the villages round about. Notably among the visitors was a group from Perth under the leadership of Mr. T. A. Code a gentleman who has evinced keen interest in the Institute and its activities.

Mr. Code is a friend of ‘The Hill”. Not only is he a donor to the prize list, but he organized a party of two motor carloads who were present with heart and soul who entered into and very acceptably assisted the presentation of the various items on the program. Many regrets were heard that McDonald’s Corners had defaulted on their usual fair. This year no fair was held as it had been feared that the times were out of joint for the holding of a successful agriculture show. There may or may not have been sufficient reason for this feeling of termerity, but at all the events the time was seized upon by the Women’s Institute who sprang into a breach and used the date for a Field’s Sports Day

Temporarily the race track was converted into a campus upon which all the events were brought into competition. Encircling crowds of men and women, boys and girls, watched with thrilling feelings: the ball games, the strenuous runners on the track and the numerous novel competitions that gripped the contestants in their keen endeavours to being victory to their banners.

Ideal weather prevailed throughout which not only added enjoyment to the watching of the athletic trials of skill and speed at the ringside, but gave congenial openings for friendly greeting and meeting which is so prominent at this time. Mr. Thomas Alfred Code is the originator of slow motion softball. No player must exceed a walk, either in the field or on the bases. The inclination to accelerate one’s speed is difficult to restrain. If the ball is shot in from the outfield hit and comes dangerously near catching the runner out of it is provokingly hard to keep from a few quickened paces that will attach the runner to the much desired base. But such a  proceeding is absolutely against the rules and many a brilliant batter has fallen from the hectic heights of a long level lob that sent the ball careening out through space to the dismal depths of despair when the umpires would call him out simply because he tried to save himself by taking a few speedy steps in order to reach base.

McDonald’s Corners vs North Sherbrooke were pitted against each other in the great game. McDonald’s Corners won with a score of 8 to 1. Parrot McCoy of the Rochester Athletic Club was much in evidence. His coaching was superb and Mr. Stanley J. Kirkland of Perth was an umpire of impeachable integrity.

Then there was the the hard ball game between McDonald’s Corners and Poland with McDonald’s Corners winning by a narrow margin of one run with the score being 11 to 10. Some of the out of the ordinary games were: the rolling pin and the ladies slipper contests. Married ladies cast a rolling pin, the one achieving the longest distance being declared the winner. The rolling pin used in the event was over 50 years-old and was made by Reverend Hugh Ferguson’s son, now head of the Children’s Shelter, and Juvenile Court Judge in Stratford, Ontario. During the contest a number of meek married men were observed stroking their ‘frosty pows’ as their Amazonian spouses deftly handled this all too convenient weapon.

The law of inertia was in evidence as the ladies gracefully relieved themselves of their right slipper. It was a reminder of Charlie Stewart’s remark at a political meeting when the speaker did not seem to have much room for his frenzied criticism.

“There’s naethin wrenches a body sae bad as to kick at naethin”

The ladies kicked at nothing except thin air, but my how the slippers did fly. And so in this manner the glorious afternoon wore on– fun, laughter, jollity, a real entertainment of friendly rivalry conducted in the most friendly fashion, and making everyone feel extremely happy.

In the evening there was a dance in the *Women’s Institute Hall and a capacity crowd. At eight o’clock it opened with a grand march and circle with “The Hill” Orchestra leading in the trembling rhythm.

Supper was served at midnight and the continuation of the dance went on until ‘wee sma hours’.

 

 

historicalnotes

  • The store was later closed and the building sold in 1866, subsequently becoming an agricultural hall. Agricultural fairs were held in this building, once producing a show of potatoes that was said to exceed that of any other local fair and to rival even the provincial exhibition. The building was later home to a dance hall (known as Polly Hall after its owner Polly McCullough) where frequent dances were held, attended by settlers from miles around. The dancing continued alongside plays and other musical events when the building housed the McDonald’s Corners Women’s Institute, seeing many more lively nights before it was eventually sold, standing to this day as a private home.Read An Email from Alberta about McDonalds Corners

 - There's a chance to grow at McDonald's Corners...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 25 Sep 1978, Mon,
  3. [first edition revised],
  4. Page 3 - Stanley J. Kirkland, Prominent Resident Of...

    Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Journal,
    2. 12 Mar 1949, Sat,
    3. Page 15

    History

    The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

     

    51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

    Code Felt Co today– Click here..

     

    Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

    In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

    s-l1600.jpg

    How did I get this?

    I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

    How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

    Allan Leslie Code

    1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

     

    Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

  5. Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

    relatedreading.jpg

 

 

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

30706936_10155711740086886_7475694585063145472_n.jpg

This poem about Franktown was glued into the journal of Thomas Alfred Code (1920s)

Franktown Past and Present

A Poetic Panorama Of Rich and Exuberant Fancy by Rev. John May, M.A. (1834-1913), 

 

Near Franktown I first saw the light,

And Franktown still is my delight,

Yes,though its sliding down the hill,

The dear place, I still love it still,

Unrivalled spot to muse and think,

And make demands on printer’s ink,

Concocting simple easy rhymes,

Descriptive of the olden times.

This village saw a lively rush,

When Ottawa was still a bush,

Two highways intersected here:

Stage coaches crossed from far and near,

Discharging passengers and freight,

Flourishing stores kept open late,

Two fine hotels aglow with light,

Were vocal far into the night.

With song and glee and rustic dance,

Toned with ‘scrap” or two perchance,

A jolly frolic place as yet,

For then the village still was wet.

Two or three lively business men

Made tidy little fortunes then.

Labourers had enough to do:

Good wages for their labour too.

Mechanics, artisans and such

Hard work enough if not too much.

The tailor stitched with all his might;

The cooper thumped his barrel tight:

The brisk shoemaker pegged away,

More than a dozen hours of the day.

All were busy then as bees,

Until the railway banished these.

The engine crushed the Village legs,

Much as the housewife mashes eggs,

And left it moaning night to death,

With feeble pulse and gasping breath.

O for the golden days of yore!

The Church was crowded to the door,

Two doctors fired their dead shot pills,

Full 50 miles, at mortal ills,

The great Van Ambergh brought his show,

To Franktown. sixty years ago.

The Ring–Behold it as you pass,

Sodded, and coated o’er with grass!

He halted at no other town:

All mustered here to see the clown,

The lion. elephant, chimpanzee,

And lots of other things that tickle fancy,

As for fairs on village green,

This match could nowhere else be seen,

One deafening din of bullock roar,

Buyers and sellers by the score,

Fat rolls of money right and left,

None stolen– rare indeed was the sight,

Here a wild fellow travelling “tight”

And yelling “Howld Me” or I’ll fight!

Another striding to and fro,

With chip on shoulder–don’t you know!

Yonder a maniac raves and rants,

With nothing on him save his pants!

Elsewhere uplifted fists abound,

A wild mob seething round and round,

Meanwhile away from row and noise,

Apples are sold to girls and boys,

One big one for a penny or two,

If rather small for one to do.

The buyer settles and departs:

Settlers go home with joyous hearts,

And swollen pockets. Night settles in.

And ends the fair, the fight, the din.

Those days are gone.

Those days are fled,

Poor dear old Franktown hangs her head.

Not hers the fault, her sons are grand,

Her daughters best in all the land!

Yet she droops and fades away,

Sad contrast to her early day.

No Amburgh now unfolds his tent,

No tavern rings with merriment.

No stage coach blows its rousing horn:

The fair of all its splendours shorn,

The tailor, cooper, cobbler gone.

Two doctors? No! Not even one,

In the still necessary store,

One customer for ten of yore,

The streets are silent as the grave:

The whole place darksome as a cave.

The houses stand; but on the street,

You’re startled if a face you meet!

The Agent now avoids the place:

Seldom a stranger shows his face:

The traveller likes it not a bit–

No place to eat, or sleep, or sit!

No provender for man or beast.

Where once* was spread a ducal feast!

Wayfarers give it the ‘go-by”,

For Franktown, once so wet is now dry.

A place of placid sweet repose,

What a retreat ‘twoud be for those’

Unnerved by hustling city din,

On wrecked on bestial seas of sin!

The monk bevowed to silence keep,

The sluggard, wed to sloth and sleep,

The hustler in his mad pursuit

Or gain, or other Dead Sea fruit,

The worried, fretted, restless man,

Dwindling existence to a span:

All, whirling furious and fast

Like leaves in a November blast:-

Come, one and all, and sit with me,

Beneath this spreading basswood tree;

And rest, and sleep, and happy be!

For, be it clearly understood

This wild oat place, at last, is good.

historicalnotes

 

*The Duke of Richmond slept a night and had his meal at the old Burrows hotel on his way from Perth to Richmond. Read The Haunted Canoe from the Jock River and The Franktown Inn

Franktown was nailed to the glade, and though it never reached the glory painted by the noble imperialists. It has never forgotten that Van Amberg’s Circus bivouacked there one day because both Perth and Carleton Place were too small affairs to entertain so massive an establishment.  It was probably also on the same trek when the Duke of Richmond was bitten by his pet fox and rabies developed and he slipped away and was drowned in the river as he sought to quench is burning thirst. Well that’s what the fox said.  Read –How Franktown Got Its Name and  Meanwhile Back in Lanark Village

 

Franktown Historical Fact

1886

Indians who had camped for the winter at Franktown, selling baskets through the district, struck their tents and returned to the St. Regis Reserve

 

Carleton Place Herald, Feb. 10, 1903–Presbyterian Church of Franktown

Mrs. Jas. L. McArthur presented a Bible and Mrs. Allan Cameron three plush chairs for the pulpit platform.  The speakers of the evening were Rev. Dr. Crombie and Rev. Mr. Cooke of Smith’s Falls, Rev. John May of Franktown, Rev. Paul Pergau of Franktown and Revs. Woodside and Scott of Carleton Place

Sunday, September 23, 2012″…And Franktown Still is My Delight” – A Sermon for the 190th Anniversary Celebration of St. James’ Anglican Church, Franktown, ON

 -

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 27 Dec 1930, Sat,
  3. Page 2

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

16142723_1051594584940647_8581465931721026240_n.jpg

“In May 31, 1851, a meeting of the trustees of the County Grammar School and those of the Town of Perth was held at which it was decided that a new school should be build and named “The Perth Public School” Before and After Photo Perth Remembered

This letter was written by Thomas Alfred Code  November 19th, 1929. 

Does this town require a new Public School building? Judging by an editorial which appeared in a local paper a few weeks ago, it seems as if it did– at least from the writer’s point of view.

Before going into this expenditure, which in all probability would be in the neighbourhood of $100,000, would it not be well for those who be responsible for the debt to look into the matter and see what could be done with the present one– allowing that alterations are necessary.

The present building appears to be in good condition. If remodelling inside is necessary, it could be done at a small percentage of the cost of the new building, and answer the purpose just as well.

We have been borrowing and spending freely the past few years and until we are relieved of some of our present debenture debt, would it not be wise to defer the matter of a new Public School for the present?

This town is dependent on agriculture and the manufacturing industry. Further expenditure is a serious matter to those who are anchored here, but not to those who can dispose of their holdings and leave town in a fortnight, without loss. I do not think we are putting out better men and women than we did fifty years ago, under old conditions when people are practical and possessed under old conditions when people were practical and possessed of strong individuality. Today, the latter is obtained in the picture show and self-help and self-endeavour are lost sight of.

The Captains of Industry in our town had only a practical common school education. For fifty years and over, I fail to see where education has added to the material uplift of Perth. What we want is increased industry and more employment. I find that an outsider can come into this town and sell a doubtful stock, but if any reputable citizen were to go out and solicit stock to start an industry, he would fail. As to education– I am not– referring here to those going in for professions, scientific research, etc.– but rather to the high average that have education forced upon them, and when done are looking for a position–not a job–where work is involved. Those who succeed have natural characteristics, ambition, aggressiveness and all around generalship. Education facilities are alright and under conditions I support it, but our town may be made an expensive place to live in with high taxes and expensive Hydro Power cost. It would be well for those who have to bear the burden to weight this school question. It is the general opinion that if there is no increase in industry, a small annex would suffice for the present.

Should our assessment values drop, the liability remains, and the rate would increase. Likewise, in the County the liability is being increased yearly, and the end is not yet. A 5% tax on assessed property is something to ponder over.

Is it not time to wake up? Whither are we drifting?

30652887_10155701015306886_8802234718067097600_n.jpg

T. A. Code

 

historicalnotes

 

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

 

30594437_10155698816201886_2242085628453847040_n.jpg

 

Author’s Note—Since *Nathaniel McLenaghan was a customs collector in Perth beginning in 1897 and Edward the 7th was on the throne from 1901-1910 so this letter was written in the 1897-1910 time frame.

Apology

Nathaniel McLenaghan, Esquire. Collector of Customs and of Inland Revenue for His Majesty, Edward the 7th, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of the British Dominion beyond the Seas, Kings and Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India, and to all these presents may come, we sent greeting.

Dear Mr. McLenaghan,

We, the undersigned, who live, move and have our being (doing as little real work as possible) in and around the County Buildings in the Town of Perth feel that we have done you a grave injustice by circulating foul slanders calculated to injure you, not only in your official capacity, but also your private associations, if such were possible.

We doubly regret our actions as well know your reputation in the community will not stand much trifling with and we hasten to make redress. We plead in mitigation of our offence the fact that we have become so accustomed to stating what is not the fact, that it is most difficult for us to tell the truth excepting when a lie will not suit  our purpose, and we trust that this apology will, with the hereinafter mentioned compensation, be accepted by you as a full and ample settlement of the whole matter and a peace offering from us.

We may say that as far as our information goes, you did not steal any wood from the Inspector of Public Schools, Francis L. Mitchell, to wit, and we base this conclusion on two grounds, either of which we deem good and sufficient.

Firstly: Mr. Mitchell had no wood to steal, that is, we believe all the wood he has been known to have since he moved to the Rideau, has been gathered by him at night from the premises adjacent to his cottage and we understand that at such times you were in company with, and like him, make your own provision for the next day. As a consequence, in our opinion, you would not be at all likely to take such a long chance on being caught, as would necessarily result from an attempt to take any of Michell’s plunder.

Secondly: We think you would be much more likely to steal the money from Michell and buy the wood. As against this last conclusion however, is the fact that Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales. For these several reasons, we are able to completely exonerate you from having either directly, or indirectly, unless perchance you may have done so in your sleep, ever harboured a single thought which would tend to deprive your friend and neighbour of a single chip of his wood pile.

In order to fully recompense you for the injury done to your reputation and to show how fully we desire to save you from financial loss by reason of our wrong-doing, we will pay you the sum of One Cent in equal quarterly instalments of One Farthing.

Believe us,

Your most humble and obedient servants,

Wm. P. McEwen

John Code

W.H. Grant

John Lee

 

 

historicalnotes

*Nathaniel McLenaghan (November 11, 1841 – September 26, 1912) was an Ontario merchant and political figure. He represented Lanark South in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1890 to 1893 as a Conservative member.

He was born in Drummond Township, Canada West in 1841, the son of Irish immigrants, and educated in Perth. He taught school for several years before becoming involved in exporting cattle. McLenaghan served on the town council for Perth. He was named deputy customs collector at Perth in 1893 and customs collector in 1897.

He died at Perth in 1912

 

img.jpeg

Clipped from

  1. The Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times,
  2. 27 Nov 1928, Tue,
  3. Page 4

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

30516161_10155696638156886_7073750392789532672_n.jpg

Family Record as taken from Family Bible and amended by W.A. Code, October 1927

William Code and Elizabeth Hicks married the 27th of February 1849 by Reverend Mr. Harris at Perth, Ontario

Mother, Elizabeth Hicks dies at Innisville on October 23, 1895 at the age of 72, and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery at Perth.

Father, William Code, dies at Innisville on November 21, 1868 at the age of 49 and was buried in St. John’s Church burying ground Innisville. Mother wished to be buried in the cemetery at Perth where her brothers were buried, whom she loved dearly. There was a strong bond of affection between Mother and her brothers, and particularly between her brother William and herself.

Births

John Code born January 22 1850

Margaret Code born February 1 1852- died 11th March 1929

Thomas Alfred Code born June 9th 1854

Mary Elizabeth Code born July 26 1856

Robert George Code born October 20 1858

William Abraham Code born February 27th 1861

James Richard Code born January 27th, 1864

 

Marriages

John Code and Mary M. Butler married October 22, 1884 by Reverend R. L. Stevenson at St. James Church, Perth, Ontario

John Code and Margaret Code married December 2, 1885 at Trinity Church, Innisville by Reverend F. H. Farrar

T.A. Code and Jennie Leslie married November 12, 1890 at the Leslie home on Theodore St. Ottawa

James R. Code and Jennie Elizabeth McGregor married October 18th 1893 in St. Margaret’s Church, Toronto, by Reverend Moore

W.A. Code and Pearl C. Harris married Febriary 22, 1899 in St. Margaret’s Church, Toronto by Reverend Moore

 

Deaths

William Code died at Innisville on the 21st November, 1868

Elizabeth Hicks died at Innisville on October 23, 1895

Jessie Elizabeth McGregor, wife of James R. Code died at Toronto (no date)

Jennie Leslie, wife of T.A. Code died at Perth

Bessie Mary Code, daughter of George and Margaret Code died at Innisville August 5th, 1887

Robert George Code died at Ottawa on April 12th 1921

Mary Elizabeth Code dies at Toronto on November 18, 1922

 

Births of Children of Others

Bessie Mary Code born August 31,1886– daughter of George and Margaret Code

Margaret Carol Jones granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Code born December 20, 1924 at Charlottetown, P.E.I.

Arthur William Jones, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Code, born on July 16, 1926 at Ottawa, Ontario.

Arthur Reginald Jones and Muriel Pretoria Code, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Code married on September 26, 1923 by the Reverend Channell G. Hepburn at All Saints Church, Ottawa, Ontario.

The foregoing is a somewhat disconnected account of some family history which the writer has stored in his mind if it serves any useful purpose or interests any member of the family he will be well repaid for the time given to it.

Sincerely yours,

W.A. Code

37 Second Avenue, Ottawa

October 20th, 1927.

 

historicalnotes

 

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

 

30443462_10155694217961886_2422463530352508928_n.jpg

Aunt Ann, before passing on was a slim, slender girl in her teens, and it was not until the later years of her life that she became stout. It may be interesting to some to be informed that Aunt Ann was considered one of the best dancers amongst the girls of her day. To work all day in the house, or in the fields, and dance all night was a common occurrence on the part of the girls of Aunt Ann’s time. Would or could the girls of today do it?

These were the days when the sickle was the sole means of cutting the grain, and Aunt Ann declared she had many a time bound grain into sheaves all day after a reaper with the sickle and danced all night. These were the days when a jar of good whiskey was brought to the fields and placed at one end of same. It became a case of keen competition when more than one reaper was engaged to see which could reach the jar first. These were the days when whiskey was pure and unadulterated and left none of the ill effects experienced today by thirsty ones. The fact that all drank of it more or less without injury would seem to indicate that if  the brand is A1 it is quite in order to take a little for the stomach’s sake.

The writer has a large sized photograph of Grandma Codd which he prizes very much. It was passed on to me and every time I gaze upon the fine old face the words come to my mind that were commonly used to express the appreciation of his friends that “Johnnie Codd’s word is as good as his bond.” This would seem to be a very good testimony of the character of the man and one not often used in these days of stress and struggle. My fondest recollection of Grandfather or Granda, as he was always called, is of occasions when he rode we younger ones on his knee and sang to us that appealing song, the last line was:

*”Oh Jennie put the kettle on and we’ll all have tea!”

Of Grandmother Codd the writer has no information; as stated in the beginning of the family history, as she was Mary Ann Nugent, and judging from the large- sized photograph which used to hang in the old home of the family at Innisville, she must have been a kind and good woman.

My mother, Elizabeth hicks was born at Enniskillen, County of Fermanagh, Ireland and came to Canada in 1842. She lived in Perth until her marriage to William Code. my father on the 27th of February, 1849.

The widowed mother of Elizabeth Hicks came to this country with her two daughters (Elizabeth and Mary), the latter becoming James Kerr. The foregoing will explain the connection between the Kerr and Code families and show how an intimacy and friendship of a lifetime came about.

Mother (Elizabeth Hicks) had three brothers, namely, James, Robert, and William, and all lived in Perth at the time of their death. For many years Robert at Ferguson Falls held the position of Postmaster and conducted a small store. Some years before his death he removed to Perth.

Mother died at Innisville on the 23rd October, 1895, at the age of 72 and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery, Perth.

Father died at Innisville on the 21st of Novemeber 1868, at the age of 49 and was buried in St. John’s Church burying ground near Innisville. Mother expressed a wish to be buried in the cemetery at Perth. There was a strong bond of affection between Mother and her brothers, and particularly between her brother William and herself.

Much more might be added to what has been written, but it is hoped enough has been related to form the basis of a more detailed story which one of the present generation may some day write.

Tomorrow: Family Record as taken from Family Bible and amended by W.A. Code

 

historicalnotes

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

s-l16001.jpg

Of the four brothers who came to this country it is only necessary in conclusion to allude to John, he being the grandfather of the generation in which the writer is included. When the brothers reached Canada Grandfather Codd secured work at his trade in Montreal, and continued to work there until after John and William were born. He then with his family left Montreal and sojourned in Kitley for a time, where George was born. About this time Grandfather Codd and three or four others formed a party and determined to seek land for themselves. At that early day in the history of this Canada of ours, this was not an easy matter.

Very fair progress was made until Perth was reached, only a few unpretentious houses representing the County Town of today. Three miles north of Perth, about where the John Doyle home is situated, all further progress by oxen and wagon had to be abandoned. This was the first wagon that had been brought through the country and it was naturally quite the curiosity.

The land first taken by Grandfather Codd did not prove satisfactory, it have been drawn in the district now called Scotch Corners. The next lot drawn was the farm owned by the Willows family, and here the rest of the family was born. (The writer is not altogether sure of the foregoing paragraph as he was told that the farm taken by grandfather was known as the Thomas Jackson lot which he had given up.)

The farm afterwards settled upon by Grandfather Codd at Innisville was purchased from a retired British soldier who obtained it from his government in recognition of services rendered late in the war.

It was told to the writer that when Grandfather Codd with his family reached the banks of the Mississippi after their laborious journey from Perth they were confronted with the problem of just how to ford the river. The woods on both sides were dense and trees grew close to the water’s edge. They appear to have made the crossing where the old woollen mill stood, for there was a small island in the centre of the river just below where the slide used  to be. (at the dam) This island was swept away by the rush of water at this point some years ago, which accounts for the hole or basin that be found there today. Black Bass and other small fish used to be caught in this hole in the good old days, and may possibly still be caught there.

Uncle George told the writer that as they forded the stream, the water being somewhat swift and reaching a little over their knees, they found it most difficult to make headway owing to the fish that filled the river from bank to bank. The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall. With Aunt Ann, who was a little girl, on his shoulders, Uncle George had a most anxious time getting across the Mississippi River, and when they reached the Island he was greatly relieved. After a brief rest they reached the other shore in safety.

There were three daughters and six sons in Grandfather’s family: the daughters being Ellen, Ann, and Bessie. The sons were: John, Richard, George, Abram Thomas and William. Abram and Bessie were twins. The writer may not have the names just given in the order of their birth, but that will not matter of the purpose of this short family history.

Tomorrow: Aunt Ann

 

historicalnotes

 

It went as far as incorporation by the Legislature of the Mississippi Navigation Company in 1809, with the authorized capital of $100,000, to build locks at Innisville and Ferguson’s Falls and carry on a shipping business. The chief freight was expected to be sawn lumber and iron ore, which was to be towed by barge to Carleton Place, and to go from here by rail to American markets. The steamer, the Enterprise, was built for this purpose, and then the lock-building scheme was abandoned.

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?