Tag Archives: temperance

Getting Rid of the Demon Rum- “Flies Flew Drunkenly Away”

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Getting Rid of the Demon Rum- “Flies Flew Drunkenly Away”

1939

I haven’t touched a drop of liquor in 48 years, and I’m not going to start now,” he said. But at one time, he admitted, he drank so much whisky he perspired grain alcohol. “When I was a young man out west. I used to be the first person in the bars in the morning and the last on to leave at night.” It got so bad that flies, landing briefly on his person, flew drunkenly away’ after the contact.

His companions were even afraid to light matches near him. “I came to Lanark about 49 years ago with so much alcohol in my system I never thought I’d get it out. But I took the cure from Dr. Frank A. Munroe, and within five weeks I couldn’t even take a shot of scotch, drowned in water. Financed by his mother, he bought the recipe for the cure from Dr. Munroe and started up in business here. Since then, thousands of people have paraded their delirium treatments through his front parlour.

Patients have floated in on an alcoholic cloud, and walked out with their feet treading the narrow path of sobriety. “In 95 per cent, of the cases. I’ve made complete cures,” he said. “A few of the men have slipped, but not many.” Some of his patients vibrated like tuning forks when they started to take the cure. They shook so much. Mr. McKay had to back them up against a wall and tie them with towels to give them a drink. It was hard work, because most of them were trying to lick an army of pink demons and purple dinosaurs at the same time.

“I’ve seen some bad cases.” he admitted, “but the women were the worst. They were terrible.” He shook his head sadly, but didn’t elaborate. While he said drinking is on the increase, his business has fallen off terrifically. Instead of financing a cure, people are spending their money on drink. Twenty years ago he had as many as five or six new patients a day. but now all the drunks do is weave past his door.

In 48 years residence Mr. McKay has found time to do more than just fight Demon Rum. He is also busy in the community. You can’t advertise your own business too much, in the opinion of Mr. McKay. He has personally presented his “Drunkenness Is a Curable Disease” cards to many local town councils of which he said had no interest at all in a cure.

Also read

Drunk and Disorderly in Lanark County

Her Father Was a Local Drunkard

They Tried to Make Me go to Rehab

Did you Know that Temperance Drinks Are all the Rage Now?

Middleville 1938 and Things

Any Photos of Jane Dick Bowes?

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Any Photos of Jane Dick Bowes?

Could you ask if anyone has a photo of Jane Dick (1806-1886) who married John Bowes. In 1852 they left Clayton and went to Lambton County. She came from the family with 11 children who lost both their mother and father before they reached Lanark County and the older children raised the younger ones. She was one of the founders of the Temperance Movement in Lanark County. —Rose Mary Sarsfield

Jane Bowes (Dick)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bathgate, West Lothian, Scotland, United Kingdom
Death:
Immediate Family: Daughter of James Dick and Jane Dick
Wife of John Bowes
Sister of Janet Bowes

 

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Taverns on Main Street, Lanark Village, Ontario, Canada, during the temperance movement.

Source: Lanark Legacy, by Howard Morton Brown, ISBN 0-9690289-2-X, page 207.

As the temperance movement grew in popularity, it became more difficult to buy alcoholic beverages 

in the rural areas and privately owned whisky stills became more popular – for example the one at Manotick Station.

(“The Pokey Moonshine Settlement”).

 

 

The nature of the traditional rural amusements was slowly but profoundly altered by the temperance movement. The first temperance society in the Canadas was formed at Montreal in 1828. Within four years about one hundred Societies had been organized in Upper Canada . John Gemmill in Lanark Township wrote in 1832:

We have also a Temperence Society which was formed about twelve months ago which is doing a great dale of good. There is above four hundred members although it has met with a grate dale of opposition yet it is increasing and many that was seen in a fit of intoxication are now become steady members of society. We all form a part of it. I should like that you would inform us how they are getting on in Scotland

Temperance Movement

 

Effects of excessive consumption of alcohol became a nineteenth century social problem.  Commonly caused or aggravated by other social conditions, it appears to have been a conspicuous contributor to crime and to other broader social losses.  Local temperance societies were formed as early as about 125 years ago to combat its evils.  At the outset of settlement at Carleton Place the Ballygiblin Riots of 1824 – joined in the name of law and order by participants of the areas from Perth to Almonte, with gunfire casualties including loss of a life – had been sparked by a drunken military Donnybrook on Mill Street in Morphy’s Falls.

A period of restriction of sale of alcoholic beverages, imposed in Lanark County in the 1870’s under the Dunkin Temperance Act, was ended for this county in 1879.  Its suspension was reported by editor James C. Poole (Herald, June 18, 1879):

“Hotels – The hotels throughout the county are again in full swing, though to be candid they “swung” just as freely while the Dunkin Act was in force.  Our genial landlords can now remove the syrup labels off their brandy bottles.”

Lanark and Renfrew hotel keepers two years later were found getting together to raise the prices of meals and liquor.  As reported in Carleton Place, “The hotel keepers of this section held a largely attended meeting at Arnprior, and unanimously agreed on raising the price of liquor to ten cents a glass, and meals to thirty-five cents.”  Similar liquor prices seem to have prevailed for many years, as suggested by a 1905 report from Brockville, relating that “Brockville hotel men have combined to raise the price of liquor dispensed over the bar.  Five cent drinks will hereafter be ten cents.”

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading (1).jpg

Did you Know that Temperance Drinks Are all the Rage Now?

Taverns the Press and the other End of the Valley

There is a Golden Rule of Selling Alcohol in Carleton Place?

No Drinking in Delta! Did You Know this About Delta?

Nothing But the Cooler Left in Carleton Place

82 Bottles of Booze on the Wall – 82 Bottles of Booze

The Big Beer Store Heist in Carleton Place

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to the Masonic Lodge Building

Was the McNeely Bridge Funded on “Drinkin’ Fines”?

Glory Days of Carleton Place-Jan McCarten Sansom– The Story of Petey Joe Kirkham

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Glory Days of Carleton Place-Jan McCarten Sansom– The Story of Petey Joe Kirkham

 

Jan McCarten Sansom's Profile Photo, Image may contain: 1 person, smiling

Thanks goes to Jan McCarten Sansom for this story.. Please send your photos and stories in.

Petey Joe–True or myth I’m not sure but I always heard this story said Jan. Doug McCarten said-the story may or may not be true, but Petey Joe and his brother Strawfed were actual people and their last name was Kirkham.


Petey Joe used to go to Perth (Jan says Carleton Place- Doug says Perth) to frequent the local hotel and bar. He always rode in by horse and buggy. On this particular evening he had quite a bit to drink, so he lay down in the buggy for the ride home as his horse knew the way home without a driver.

At the crossroads, the buggy was met by a couple of ladies from the Temperance Society. The ladies were disgusted and said,

“Petey Joe, you are going straight to Hell” with this he sat up in the buggy and said “Oh I thought this was the road to Fagan’s Lake”

 

 

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Lake Details: Fagan Lake is connected to Bennett Lake by means of the Fall River.

 

 

 

historicalnotes

Temperance Movement

 

Effects of excessive consumption of alcohol became a nineteenth century social problem.  Commonly caused or aggravated by other social conditions, it appears to have been a conspicuous contributor to crime and to other broader social losses.  Local temperance societies were formed as early as about 125 years ago to combat its evils.  At the outset of settlement at Carleton Place the Ballygiblin Riots of 1824 – joined in the name of law and order by participants of the areas from Perth to Almonte, with gunfire casualties including loss of a life – had been sparked by a drunken military Donnybrook on Mill Street in Morphy’s Falls.

A period of restriction of sale of alcoholic beverages, imposed in Lanark County in the 1870’s under the Dunkin Temperance Act, was ended for this county in 1879.  Its suspension was reported by editor James C. Poole (Herald, June 18, 1879):

“Hotels – The hotels throughout the county are again in full swing, though to be candid they “swung” just as freely while the Dunkin Act was in force.  Our genial landlords can now remove the syrup labels off their brandy bottles.”

Lanark and Renfrew hotel keepers two years later were found getting together to raise the prices of meals and liquor.  As reported in Carleton Place, “The hotel keepers of this section held a largely attended meeting at Arnprior, and unanimously agreed on raising the price of liquor to ten cents a glass, and meals to thirty-five cents.”  Similar liquor prices seem to have prevailed for many years, as suggested by a 1905 report from Brockville, relating that “Brockville hotel men have combined to raise the price of liquor dispensed over the bar.  Five cent drinks will hereafter be ten cents.”

1865 – A temperance society known as Temple No. 122 of the Independent Order of Good Templars, was formed at Carleton Place to oppose the sale of alcoholic beverages.  A proposal to apply a local option Temperance Act to Beckwith township including Carleton Place was rejected by a majority of thirty votes

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

Glory Days in Carleton Place— Jan McCarten Sansom

Did you Know that Temperance Drinks Are all the Rage Now?

Image result for carleton place seccaspina

Glory Days in Carleton Place- Tom Edwards– Horrick’s and Air Raid Sirens

Glory Days in Carleton Place— Jan McCarten Sansom

Glory Days in Carleton Place- Ray Paquette

Glory Days of Carleton Place–This and That–Ray Paquette

Glory Days in Carleton Place— Jan McCarten Sansom

 

Glory Days of Carleton Place-The Olde Barracks– Sharon Holtz– Part 2 

 

 

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