Tag Archives: teachers

Clippings of Miss Schoular

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Clippings of Miss Schoular

Born in Tatlock, Darling Twp., Lanark, Ontario, Canada on 2 Dec 1895 to James Scoular “Schoular” and Margaret McKay. Elizabeth Ann Schoular passed away on 22 Jan 1985 in Almonte, Lanark, Ontario, Canada.

When Elizabeth Ann Schoular was born on December 2, 1895, in Lanark, Ontario, her father, James, was 32, and her mother, Margaret, was 33. She had three brothers and three sisters. She died on January 22, 1985, in Almonte, Ontario, at the age of 89, and was buried in her hometown.

Heather MoatYou brought back memories of Miss Scholar’s class yes not enough books so we shared.That was a long time ago,you have a great memory.Cheers

from Don Andrews… “hello almontemay years ago when i was in grade one, mrs scholars class, i wonder how many people remember her.there was always a shortage of books and we had to double up.i was always paired up with elizabeth warner, me being from the country and being very shy, i think i was doing a lot of blushing.she moved away and i have thought of her many times over the years”,-Don Andrews

Norma QuinnMiss Scholar was my grade one teacher and also taught my dad

Janet I. ScottMiss Scholar taught my brother David Ritchie too.

Sandy FranceMiss Schoular taught my father in 1918 and me in 1946.

Susan Elliott ToppingDuncan J. Schoular’s daughter Elizabeth, is also a retired teacher.

Dave RooneyI delivered the Ottawa Journal to her in the 70s until the Journal shut down. Very nice woman.

Margaret Jones DrennanMiss Schoular taught me in 1950. I remember that I loved her class. Every Hallowe’en I remember her well because she showed us how to draw and colour pumpkins.

Margaret McNeelyIf u check out the pic of my 1943 school class Miss Schoular is in the background.

1943 school class

Janet I. ScottShe taught my brother in Grade 1. Probably 1954 at Church St. Public School.

Judy MortonLoved Miss Schouler, my first grade teacher. I was only five years old in Grade 1. I went over to the school with a friend when his Mom was registering him for Grade 1 and since there was an xtra desk, Miss Schoular said I could stay, so that’s how I started school at age 1!

Peppy MockoI remember her as a real nice lady & a character

Sheila BelrangoIt was ‘Miss’ Schouler and she taught Grade one in the ChurchStreet Public School. She taught both my Mother and myself. There are a very few teachers today as dedicated as she was.

ill a discussion—- Marte Sheldrake

I remember Miss Schoular also, although she never taught me as I moved to Almonte from Windsor in 1952 when I was placed in Miss Ross’s Grade Four class with Don and his cousin, Bob Andrews. We went through the next four years in the same classes and you’re right Don–you appeared very shy, an admirable quality in hindsight!
I met Jack De Sadeleer once as his sister, Judy, was one of my best friends until she married and moved to southern Ontario.As to the photo of the grocery store (see story), I don’t believe it was ever Harry Gunn’s. In the fifties it was owned by a Mr. Pobst ( sp.? ) until he closed it . But you would buy items at the counter and he or his assistant, Harold Woermke, would climb a ladder and take the items off the shelves, wrap them in brown paper, tie them with a string and hand them to you. Kind of like a sketch from “the Two Ronnies “.He closed the store in the late fifties and it became Mappins Jewellry Store, managed by Mr. Pobst. In 1965, my father, Perce Baker, bought the building from Bob France and it became Baker’s Gifts and Flowers, as my dad had also purchased The Flower Shop on Farm Street from George Gomme.Harry’s grocery store was on Bridge Street, just behind our building. He later had a dress shop across from Peterson’s Dairy on Mill Street. Since my husband Derek died almost two years ago,I now spend my time living between Ottawa and London, England where my fiancé lives and when people there ask me where I’m from, I very proudly say ” ALMONTE ” !Marte ( Baker ) Sheldrake

Mrs Schoular backrow

Name:Elizabeth Scoular
Gender:Female
Racial or Tribal Origin:Scotch (Scotish)
Nationality:Canada
Marital Status:Single
Age:25
Birth Year:abt 1896
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1 Jun 1921
House Number:21
Residence Street or Township:Farm St
Residence City, Town or Village:Town of Almonte
Residence District:Lanark
Residence Province or Territory:Ontario
Residence Country:Canada
Relation to Head of House:Daughter
Father Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Name:Margaret Scoular
Mother Birth Place:Ontario
Can Speak English?:Yes
Can Speak French?:No
Religion:Presbyterian
Can Read?:Yes
Can Write?:Yes
Months at School:B1-24
Occupation:Teacher
Employment Type:2 Wage Earner
Nature of Work:School B
Income:875
Out of Work?:No
Duration of Unemployment:0
Duration of Unemployment (Illness):0
Municipality:Ward 3
Enumeration District:97
Sub-District:Almonte (Town)
Sub-District Number:44
Enumerator:John Lawson
District Description:Ward 3, Polling Division No. 1 – Comprising all that part of the said Third Ward north and west of a line formed by Bridge, Country and Perth streets
Neighbours:View others on page
Line Number:35
Family Number:21
Household MembersAgeRelationshipMargaret Scoular58HeadElizabeth Scoular25DaughterGella Scoular23DaughterAlexander Scoular20SonJames Scoular18Son

Related reading

Genealogy Clippings Foy Almonte

Old St. Mary’s Almonte — Clippings Photos and Memories

Teachers —- I Wish I Would Have Had Mr. Souter

Battle of the Hatpins — Women of Local History

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Battle of the Hatpins — Women of Local History

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On January 1, Alexandre Clairoux posted this photo on Abandoned Ottawa- Gatineau site of an old schoolhouse built in 1915. He mentioned it could have possibly accommodated the Franco-Ontariens population. The idea behind these schoolhouses was to reform the school system since teachers weren’t getting paid.

Okay, what’s the story here?
Apparently the story has been written many times, but I still decided to document it.

GUM-What-Happened

Regulation 17, for those who do not know, was an act of the Ontario government in 1912, whereby the French schools of the province were ordered to stop teaching in French. This rule imposed a common law on all the schools in Ontario, and bottom line was only one hour a day was allotted to teaching in French. It became strictly enforced beginning in 1915–1916, and pitted local citizens against each other. Then it got worse.

On April 29, 1914, a group of English-language Catholic school commissioners obtained an injunction against the Catholic School Commission and paralyzed all administrative efforts, which was the paying of teachers and the right to borrow. This resulted in the bilingual teachers not being paid for several months and the Guiges school on Murray Street remaining closed.

Just like today, excuses were tossed back and forth. Some said the predominant reason for this law was for the concerns over the ‘quality of education” being taught in Ontario schools. “Quality” meaning that the bulk of teachers teaching in French were actually the nuns who had been summoned directly from Quebec. They argued that the nuns had none of the teacher’s education the Ontario teachers had. In plain words:they just were not good enough.

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After years of battles on May 12, 1916 Parliament, by a vote of 107 to 60 rejected the motion moved by Mr. Ernest Lapointe and supported by Sir Wilfred Laurier, for mediation by the Dominion Parliament in the Bilingual School dispute in Ontario. 
Lapointe’s argument was not to get rid of bilingual schools. The solution was to create institutions and teacher’s colleges geared towards fulfilling the need of this bilingual school system.The Honorable ? Frank Oliver opposed the Federal House taking part in any of the provincial matter –and that was that.

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When the class year opened in the fall of 1915 at the Gigues School the parents of Lower Town tried to prevent the school board from installing teachers who had promised to “teach by the rules”. The parents wanted two young French-Canadian teachers: Diane and Beatrice Desloges to teach their children, but of course the board wanted nothing to do with them and only use their own appointees.

Well enough was enough and the two sisters, supported by the parents, defied the regulation requiring them to teach in English, moved their classes to two empty stores at the corner of Dalhousie and Guigues streets and resumed their classes without pay.

In the meantime, the teachers hired by the board sat in the now empty rooms of Guigues School. That was until early 1916, Tuesday, January 4th, 1916 to be exact. The store fronts were unsuitable for instruction in winter which prompted parents to invite the Desloges back to the school to teach in January 1916. The Lower Town parents marched on the school, forcing the government teachers out and placed guards out front.

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“Les gardiennes de l’école Guigues d’Ottawa”, 1916

Photo courtesy of the University of Ottawa, Centre for Research on French Canadian Culture (CRCCF). Diane and Béatrice Desloges are seated third and fourth in the front row. Photo courtesy of the University of Ottawa, Centre for Research on French Canadian Culture (CRCCF).

The guards were actually the 70 Francophone mothers who prevented inspectors from entering by using their long hat pins, kitchen utensils etc. as weapons. They had enough:  enough of barricades, and enough of politicians telling them how to educate their children. At nine o’clock, the students’ mothers came and ordered the children to accompany their teachers back to Guigues School where they enjoyed a triumphant re-entry.

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The mothers established themselves as permanent “Guardians” of the school and used all the tricks they could conjure to thwart their adversaries to turn away some school inspectors. Many of the women carried little “Sacred Heart” flags. These were no dainty women. Constable Young waved one of these flags, but it immediately was snatched away from him and a woman struck him with her fist.

The classrooms of the Misses Desloges were closely guarded by groups of strong women and men. The rooms were at opposite ends of the corridors on the second floor– but all the floors and stairways were choked by a surging throng of people to help. The 30 police looked on but did not attempt to put any one out.

On Friday, January 7th, there was a turn of events: inside the school, the police were waiting for the Desloges sisters and their “guardians” to try and prevent them from entering the building.  Some parents, both men and women, managed nevertheless to gain access to the school with a group of pupils. They, in turn, allow the Desloges sisters to enter the school through a side window.

Detective Oilmet and Detective Tissot had been on duty outside the building for some time. Things began to look ugly and a hurried call was sent in to the police station for more police. They arrived on a street car, about eight in number, and marched down to the accompaniment of hoots and jeers. These policemen, with Detective Thomas McLaughlin, entered the school and took up positions inside.

If the police were sent down with the intention of preventing the people from entering the school it was a useless mission because the building was now filled by hundreds of men and women, besides the classes which were going on. The Misses Desloges were placed at the head of their classes and one of them opened the classroom window facing Murray street and waved her hand to the crowd below. This was a signal for more cheering.

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School children protesting against Regulation 17 in front of Brébeuf school, Anglesea square in the Ottawa Lower Town district at the end of January or the beginning of February 1916-Click

One man named Verrot was taken into custody for being particularly demonstrative, but he was let go when he reached the police station. In the meantime Police Constable Coombs was bitten on the thumb by an infuriated woman and Commissioner Charbonneau was the centre of attraction. In the hall of the school on the top floor police began ejecting women. Immediately Mr. Charbonneau informed the crowd that he was going to tender his resignation– a wise move if I must say so. This lasted until  Feb. 3, when the school closed its doors, and the children paraded in the streets bearing signs reclaiming the use of French.

There were many legal manoeuvres, including a lawsuit aimed at jailing the elected commission’s president, who was flaunting the will of the appointed commission. The Christian Brothers appeared in court as witnesses for the elected commission. Two brothers named Francis and Theophilus, who, as school principals, risked going to jail rather than expose the elected commission’s secretary.

As a result of the Battle of the Hatpins, the government abandoned efforts to prevent French-language teaching at Guigues. Bilingual schooling in Ontario was officially reinstated in 1927. Canadian archivist Michel Prévost suggested that this protest represented “a movement dominated by women” which was rare given their marginalization at the time.

Gigues school is no longer a place for education and now houses condominiums. Every building and every person has a story and it needs to be told and remembered. On January 29, 1916, francophone mothers stood outside an Ottawa elementary school  in the dead of winter. These women prevented inspectors from entering with only hatpins and rolling pins. Each time a woman stands up for herself, without knowing it possibly, without claiming it, she stands up for all women– no matter what the issue is. (Maya Angelou)

I will raise my hatpin on January 29

NDP MPP France Gélinas introduced a private member’s bill to have every January 29 officially recognized as Battle of the Hatpins Day last year.

From Historica Canada— comes this video

historicalnotes

Patricia Foottit My mother , Marie Francoise Noel de Tilly and her twin sister, Marie Louise, were born in 1919 in Montreal. They came to Ottawa around the age of six, and attended French Catholic schools in Ottawa. My mom would tell stories about her education, and being taught in French but having to hide the French texts when the inspectors came to the school. She had a deep faith, and loved the Sisters who taught her. Even in her 90s, she could remember the names of those women. Mom and her sister went on to become teachers

Did you know?

The newspaper Le Droit, which is still published today as the province’s only francophone daily newspaper, was established by the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate in 1913 to oppose the ban

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Ottawa Journal Photo

Guigues School closed in June 1978 due to declining enrolment and increasing building maintenance costs. The end of an era is at hand at Ecole Guigues, one of Ottawa’s oldest elementary schools. Before long the three-storey structure cn Murray Street will be empty of students forever. Because of declining enrolments and the age of the building, the Ottawa Separate School Board is transferring Guigues students to nearby Routhier School on Guigues Street, which is undergoing repairs.

In its heyday, Guigues School accommodated up to 1,000 students but it wasn’t until 1970 that the school admitted girls as students. No date has been fixed for the move but school board officials say it will probably be sometime early in 1979. When the 250 students leave the classrooms of Guigues School, they will be leaving behind an illustrious and often embattled history dating to 1864.The remaining students were transferred to nearby École Routhier. The Centre de services Guigues was officially opened on May 30, 1997. That same year, the project was awarded the City of Ottawa’s Architectural Conservation Award of Excellence for Adaptive Reuse. Read all about it here–CLICK

Bill 164, Battle of the Hatpins Day Act: NDP MPP France Gélinas wants every Jan. 29 remembered as Battle of the Hatpins Day. It would commemorate an incident on Jan. 29, 1916, when Franco-Ontarian women pushed back school inspectors from entering a school and shutting it down for teaching French, which was illegal in Ontario at the time. The bill passed first reading.

Apology and resistance

A hundred years later, in making her apology for Regulation 17, Kathleen Wynne dismissed the idea of compensation or reparations: she claimed the province is already making “concrete gestures” by providing French services and schools, and argued there is even a “debate” about creating a French university in Ontario.

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When the Teacher Got into Trouble

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When the Teacher Got into Trouble

 

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I have heard some queer stories of happenings in the school-rooms of by-gone days, but this one is without precedent, as far as I know. Word was that a fiery, hot-tempered individual, whose particular method of inflicting punishment was hurling sticks at his students in a Lanark County school.

He always kept a pile of sticks on the desk beside him and the moment he discovered a pupil acting up, he would take careful aim and send one of his missiles whizzing across the room. He seldom missed his mark.

One day his accuracy got him into serious trouble. The stick he hurled on this occasion caught a husky youth square on the nose and caused the blood to flow. That was more than the students could stand. With one accord there were about twenty good-sized lads in the room who rushed to the front, climbed all over him and gave him a thrashing he wasn’t likely to forget in a hurry.

Or so they said….. 🙂

 

historicalnotes

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 28 Dec 1935, Sat,
  3. Page 2Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

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    The Blizzard of 1888– Three Heroic Teachers

  4. Lanark East Teachers’ Institute 1930 Names Names Names

  5. The Trouble With Trying to be Normal– The Ottawa Normal School

    Ladies & Gentlemen- Your School Teachers of Lanark County 1898

    “Teachester” Munro and the S.S. No. 9 Beckwith 11th Line East School

Teachers —- I Wish I Would Have Had Mr. Souter

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Teachers —- I Wish I Would Have Had Mr. Souter

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I hated geography in high school. I could never figure out what I was going to do with a subject like that, and when I read the article about Mr. Souter from Almonte and District  High School I wonder if he could have gotten the ‘rocks out of my head’.

In 1998 John Souter was retired and and read three newspapers a day because he could. Teachers never forget, and he remembered the good times, forgot the bad times, and still thought about those who made it worthwhile. In 1998 John had been teaching the Almonte students for 31 years. I don’t think the students ever forgot him either, as he apparently kept them on their toes and students fondly remembered his ‘notorious’ movies.

Mr. Souter had an appreciation of the world, and in 2001 he decided he was going to “move around a lot of rocks and dirt” along with his wife when she retired. He loved the field trips he took his students to, whether it be Tatlock or other points unknown. Fond memories of climbing a volcano in  Costa Rica or watching fire-eating Santa Clauses in a town square while it was 30 C made retiring early more difficult. But, he needed an escape route from working conditions such as oversized classrooms, and increased teaching hours which is still today underfunded and undermanned.

He made students love geography and want to becomes teachers, and maybe I would have finally understood that geography is all about the mountains and the rivers knowing secrets, and not just about maps. It is about understanding the complexity of our world and Mr. Souter was definitely a teacher of the world.

With files from Lucy Connelly Poaps.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

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Lanark East Teachers’ Institute 1930 Names Names Names

The Trouble With Trying to be Normal– The Ottawa Normal School

Ladies & Gentlemen- Your School Teachers of Lanark County 1898

“Teachester” Munro and the S.S. No. 9 Beckwith 11th Line East School

The Forgotten Clayton School House

Be True to Your School–SS #15 Drummond

Schools Out for the Summer in the County

School Salaries of 1918

Home Economic Winners Lanark County Names Names Names– Drummond Centre

Lanark County Public School Results 1916 Names Names Names

Scotch Corners Union S.S. #10 School Fire

School’s Out at S.S. No. 14 in Carleton Place

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place

 

Did You Know this About Smiths Falls? Believe it or Not!!

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Did You Know this About Smiths Falls? Believe it or Not!!

 

Miss Hosack who was a nubile school teacher in Smiths Falls in 1871 received a princely salary  of $125 per year. It was thought that her salary was so restrained because her class was so small. After all she only had 141 pupils!

 

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Then there was the time in 1887 when residents thought the advance guard of a circus had come to town. Lindsay and Gilday, the main street grocers rode a tandem bicycle down the main drag with white smocks flying. It was said they were three sheets to the wind.

 

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It must have been a very interesting sight years ago when Billie Williamson had a match factory and all the boys and girls in town made the paper boxes at so much per hundred or the boxes and slightly less for the covers.

 

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Railway Museum of Eastern Ontario

And if anyone in your family ever spoke to Police Chief John Lees affectionately known as “Moose” to his friends he might have told you about the hectic days of the Ontario Temperance – Act when arrival each night from Montreal brought in to Smiths Falls of large shipments of contraband liquor in charge of ruffians trying to bend the law. On one occasion the Chief’s haul was so large three cabs were required to draw all the assorted beverages from the railway station to the police station.

If you ever get tired of listening to the never-ending tales about Smiths Falls you might try to solve the mystery of the disappearing apostrophe in Smiths Falls. Originally the town was called Smyth’s Falls then changed to Smith’s Falls.  Funny thing about that apostrophe–nobody seems to know what happened to it. Years ago it was taken out of all Frost and Wood Company’s correspondence and then it was chipped from all the postal department plates in 1939.

Then the first woman on Smiths Falls council  and 1964 Woman of the Year named Margaret Graham mobilized the IODE behind her urging that the name be changed from highway signs.  Some said it was a great time saving measure for all typists if the apostrophe was removed. Years ago school children were reprimanded for dropping the apostrophe and now you are chastised if you put it in–trust me:)

 

 

historicalnotes

Another in Smiths Falls, built of stone, if finished would be the best school in the District. But it is in a state and a high rent is paid for a miserable building in which the school is kept. There are also a few good log school houses in some of the townships, including two in Bathurst, three or four in Beckwith, a very good one at Westmeath and another at Pembroke. Of the rest many are too small and some few are ill built and worse finished, exhibiting loose and shattered floors, broken windows, ill-constructed desks, unsafe stoves and stove pipes and unplastered walls

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

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S.S. 18 Knowles School — Nearby to McIllquham’s Bridge

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S.S. 18 Knowles School — Nearby to McIllquham’s Bridge

 

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S.S. 18 Knowles School

S.S. 18 Knowles School was located in a small clearing on the farm of a Mr. Ralston located on Lot 6  Con. 12 built in 1844 nearby to McIllquham’s Bridge. The daughter of a local farmer, Maria Dayton was the first teacher with a yearly salary of $36. Griselda Menna taught after Miss Dayton left to get married and she received every second Saturday off and two weeks holiday.  In 1855 Griselda was awarded an extra $64 a year making her salary an even $100 per annum.

In  late 1854 the school was moved to a better central location at the corner of the Perth Road and 12th Line on land donated by Abraham Jackson. It was said that the old school was dragged to its new home with new additions of new windows, floor and clapboards being placed over the original logs. Of course Miss Menna came along with the move and continued to teach school until 1865. No word if her salary had been increased, and I can not find mention of her or her family anywhere, which is odd, especially with a first name of Griselda.

By 1887 a new school was needed, and a site half a mile north and across the 12th concession was chosen to build a new frame school. The school was in use until 1968, except for the years 1945 and 1953 when the population of the school was only 4 pupils. During those specific years students attended the school in Lanark Village.

 

 

 - School Closing Social Evening LANARK (Special)...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 04 Jul 1968, Thu,
  3. Page 28

 

A motion passed in 1967-68 by the Drummond Township School Area Board, to close the small schools in the area and to build a large school which would be central for the children in the township. A ten acre field in Drummond Centre was purchased and on this property was built a school which consisted of eight classrooms, a staff room, a library, a health room, a gymnasium, a kitchen, offices and change rooms, as well as washrooms and supply rooms.

In June of 1968 the following rural schools closed their doors:

S. S. No. 3 2 nd Line S. S. No. 13 Drummond Centre

S. S. No. 8 Wayside S. S. No. 15 McIlquahm’s

S. S. No. 9 Code’s S. S. No. 16 Prestonvale

S. S. No. 11 Balderson S. S. No. 17 Innisville

S. S. No. 12 McGarry’s S. S. No. 18 Knowles

These building were later sold and turned into homes except for one, Innisville, which has been turned into a museum. In September 1968, the shiny new school was ready for students.

The first staff consisted of:

Principal: Mr. Walter Kane

Grade 1: Mrs. Carmel Fergusson Grade 5: Mrs. Bertha Livingstone

Grade 2: Mrs. Gladys Thomas Grade 6: Mrs. Verna Montgomery

Grade 3: Mrs. Dorothy Cavanagh Grade 7: Mrs. Laura Thomson

Grade 4: Mrs. Lila McFarlane Grade 8: Mrs. Edythe Moulton/Mr. Kane

Music: Mr. Robert Adamson Art: Mrs. Renals

Secretary: Mrs. Connie Ebbs Custodians: Alan and Marion Wedenmaier

January 17, 1969 marked the official opening of the school with a large crowd with many dignitaries attending, including trustees, John C. Ebbs – Chairman, William J. L. Playfair, J. Barrie Frizell, Thomas J. James, Gordon D. McIntosh, W. Keith McLaren and Lloyd M. Knowles, Secretary-Treasurer and George M. Nobes, Area Superintendent.

The first year saw the building of the garage, donation of plaques and trophies to honor outstanding achievement in various areas, and the graduation of eighteen grade eight students.

 

genea

Local Knowles Family

 - : . Edith Rae Knowles Dies in Toronto LANARK...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 13 Sep 1949, Tue,
  3. Page 16
  4.  - I ' ' ' Malcolm M. Knowles Lanark Cheeseman...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 23 Oct 1952, Thu,
  3. Page 36

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Lanark East Teachers’ Institute 1930 Names Names Names

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Lanark East Teachers’ Institute 1930 Names Names Names

 

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Lanark Village Grade 1 students, 1946.

 

 - last Institute Opens In Carleton Place i...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Oct 1930, Thu,  Page 2

 

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from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Marion McVeigh- who taught in Lanark for many years and was also the principal

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

The Trouble With Trying to be Normal– The Ottawa Normal School

Ladies & Gentlemen- Your School Teachers of Lanark County 1898

“Teachester” Munro and the S.S. No. 9 Beckwith 11th Line East School

The Forgotten Clayton School House

Be True to Your School–SS #15 Drummond

Schools Out for the Summer in the County

School Salaries of 1918

Home Economic Winners Lanark County Names Names Names– Drummond Centre

Lanark County Public School Results 1916 Names Names Names

Scotch Corners Union S.S. #10 School Fire

School’s Out at S.S. No. 14 in Carleton Place

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place

 

Beckwith One Room Schools– Leona Kidd

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Beckwith One Room Schools– Leona Kidd

 

 

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From:School Article from the Heritage Committee

 

The state of schools and school teaching in Ontario’s early days has long been a favourite topic in oldtimers’ tales of life in the past century. Before the Canadian union of 1841 and for sometime after, ability to read and write and to do more than elementary calculation by numbers was beyond the reach of many citizens, both natives and immigrants, unless obtained by home training.

A grammar school or high school education was for the few, mainly a rare few with the opportunity and wish to prepare for a life in one of the learned professions. The widespread existence of tax-supported public schools in the province has a record extending back little more than a hundred years. Among the reforms of the 1840’s and 1850’s was a slowly growing common school system, fathered mainly by the native-born Rev. Dr. Egerton Ryerson, Methodist minister, first head of Victoria College, Cobourg, and from 1844 to 1876 Superintendent of Education for Ontario. Admission to a large share of the province’s public schools remained subject to payment of school rates or fees which not all parents were prepared to pay.

For the so-called Free Schools the part of operating costs not met from county and provincial taxes were raised by ordinary local property taxes instead of by rate-bill admission fees. Free schools increased in number only after overcoming strong opposition in many districts. Compulsory school attendance remained a remote idea.

 

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#3 Beckwith – Cuckoo’s Nest School

Men with ideas ahead of their time, as James Poole showed in his Carleton Place newspaper of the early 1850’s could be friends of education and enemies of the free schools. Teachers Salaries Under $200 In Lanark County tax-supported schools had increased in number to 91 by 1850, and teachers to 102, thirteen of which were women teachers. Only five of the county’s schools were free schools. Teachers average yearly salaries including board were about $40 for men and $30 for women, and about $10 less excluding board.

Fourteen of the county’s schools were good or first class schools, as graded in inspections of 1850. The rest were equally divided between second class and inferior or third class schools. The schools of Lanark and Renfrew counties of this time are pictured by the Rev. James Padfield, rector of the Church of England at Franktown, in an 1848 report to the Bathurst District Council in his capacity of superintendent of common schools of the united counties. He found 120 schools in operation under the Common School Act in the two counties, all but a few of which had been inspected by him in the preceding fall and winter.

Teachers of schools selected by Mr. Padfield for commendation where Mr. Warren, then of McNab township, Mr. Hammond of Lanark township, Mr. McDougall of North Sherbrooke, Mr. Morrison of Perth, Mr. Heely of Carleton Place, James Poole and Mr. York of Ramsay, Mr. McDougall and Mr. Lindsay of Beckwith, and Thomas Poole of Pakenham. Log Schools Mr. Padfield provides an eye witness summary of the nature of this district’s pioneer schools: “The Schools in general are better attended from the middle of November to the end of April.

Among the pupils may often be found many young persons, both male and female, from 15 to 20 years of age and upwards. During the other six and a half months the older pupils are kept at home to assist their parents in agricultural employments. The Schools then are practically deserted, having frequently and in almost every township not more than ten or twelve scholars in regular attendance in a school, often fewer. This interferes in a most disastrous way with the education of the young.

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The first schoolhouse was built in the 1820s at Gillies’ Corners on Lot 3 Con. 2 Beckwith. The union school, U.S.S. No. 4 Drummond & No.

“The School Houses throughout the District are for the most part built of logs, not more than twenty feet square and seldom eight feet high. Many are much smaller and less height. In each of these are crowded together during the winter months from twenty-five to forty children. The interior arrangements are often very defective. Many are quite unfit for schools. “Among the few good and tolerably commodious school houses in the District may be mentioned one on the south side of Perth and another under construction in Perth, both frame buildings. Another in Smiths Falls, built of stone, if finished would be the best in the District. But it is in a state and a high rent is paid for a miserable building in which the school is kept. There are also a few good log school houses in some of the townships, including two in Bathurst, three or four in Beckwith, a very good one at Westmeath and another at Pembroke. Of the rest many are too small an some few are ill built and worse finished, exhibiting loose and shattered floors, broken windows, ill-constructed desks, unsafe stoves and stove pipes and unplastered walls.

“A greater uniformity in textbooks is beginning to prevail. I recollect visiting one School last winter at which fifteen children were present, no two of whom had books of the same kind. The quarterly examinations have been almost a dead letter. In many instances not a single person has been present to show the least interest in the advancement made by the scholars, except perhaps a solitary Trustee.

 

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S . S . 2 , FRANKTOWN , LOT 11 , CONC . 3

On the whole in spite of these various hinderences our Common Schools are undoubtedly improving (signed) J. Padfield, S.C.S. Bathurst District, 2 October, 1848.” Of ten new school houses completed in the district in the following six months, as noted in Mr. Padfield’s next inspection report, one in Perth was ‘a commodious frame building divided into two apartments, one for boys and the other for girls,” three were log schools in Montague, one a 22 foot square log school in No. 18 Drummond, and one in Beckwith at Franktown, described as a substantial stone building. It appears the latter building is still standing at Franktown, though not in school use.

At Franktown and No. 14 Montague the previous schools had been destroyed by fire. Teachers Convention, 1842 School teachers meeting at Perth and Carleton Place in 1842 were the first general conventions of this District held following enactment of the Canadian school statute.

At Perth the superintendent of Education for Canada West, Mr. Murray, had recommended to an August gathering of teachers of the two counties that they select a committee to suggest improvements to the new Common School Bill. The committee, consisting of one teacher, from each of the townships of Bathurst, Beckwith, Burgess, Drummond, Horton, McNab, Pakenham and Ramsay, met at John McEwen’s inn at Carleton Place a month later. Its recommendations, compiled by a subcommittee of three teachers (Thomas Ferguson of the Derry School, Beckwith, J. Fowler of Bathurst and Mr. Kerr of Ramsay), favoured “a union of Townships for the proper forming of School Districts, and that the Commissioner in whose Township the school is located manage the same.” Other recommendations were that no teachers lacking specified qualifications be employed, and that teachers salaries be not less than $50 per year, payable half yearly.

 

 

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Beckwith One Room Schools List:

School Section #1 Lot 3 Concession 2 Gillie’s Corners

S.S. #2 Lot 11 Concession 3 Franktown

S.S. #3 Lot 15 Concession 3 Cuckoo’s Nest

S.S. #4 Lot 24 Concession 4 Prospect

S.S. #5 Lot 9 Concession 7 7th Line Beckwith East

Union School S.S. #5 Beckwith Township Lot 1 Concession 7 Tennyson

Union School S.S. #10 Drummond Township Lot 1 Concession 7 Tennyson

S.S. #6 Lot 22 Concession 6 Derry

S.S. #7 Lot 11 Concession 9 9th Line Beckwith West

S.S. #8 Lot 19 Concession 8 9th Line Beckwith East

S.S. #9 Lot 22 Concession 10 11th Line Beckwith East

Union School S.S.#10 Beckwith Township Lot 2 Concession 10 Scotch Corners

Union School S.S. #14 Drummond Township Lot 2 Concession 10 Scotch Corners

Union School S.S. #12 Beckwith Township School located in Ashton

Union School S.S. #11 Goulbourn Township School located in Carleton Cty

Union School S.S. #13 Beckwith Township Lot 1 Concession 10 Montague Twp

Union School S.S. #10 Montague Township Lot 1 Concession 10 Montague Twp

Union School S.S. #15 Marlborough Lot 1 Concession 10 Montague Twp

S.S. #14 Lot 14 Concession 11

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Outhouses Need to Be Cleaned– Conditions of Our Rural School– 1897

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

Ladies & Gentlemen- Your School Teachers of Lanark County 1898

“Teachester” Munro and the S.S. No. 9 Beckwith 11th Line East School

The Forgotten Clayton School House

Be True to Your School–SS #15 Drummond

Scotch Corners Union S.S. #10 School Fire

School’s Out at S.S. No. 14 in Carleton Place

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place

Remembering Leckie’s Corners 1887

Schools Out for the Summer in the County

Fracus in Smith’s Falls– Need Fresh Staff

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Perth Courier, Sept. 16, 1887

Quite a sensation was created in Smith’s Falls last week by the case of a row between two of the teachers in the high school resulting from previous bad feeling between the two men.  The reports of trouble which have reached here are to the effect that one of the assistants, Mr. Mitchell, went into the room of the principal, Mr. Ned Robertson, and was ordered out.

Claiming a right of admission there, Mitchell refused to go when after some angry words Robertson knocked or shoved the other man and knocked his head two or three times against the floor.  Mitchell is an elderly man and got pretty well damaged in the encounter his opponent never receiving a scratch.  We understand Mr. Robertson claims the provocation he received from Mr. Mitchell was unendurable and that he allowed his feelings to get the better of his discretion.

The Independent refers to it as a “disgraceful affair”.  In the Mayor’s court the day after Mr. Robertson was fined $10 and costs for the assault and at a special meeting of the Board of Education both teachers were requested to resign their positions.  We believe Mr. Mitchell has done so and Mr. Robertson did not where after the Board ordered the high school to be closed and the doors locked.

We believe Mr. Robertson does not look kindly on his “judgement” but appears regularly every day at the door and tries to enter thereby throwing the onus of the lockout onto the Board of Education.  Notwithstanding, the Board has advertised for a fresh staff to fill the vacancies and seems determined to hold the ground they have taken.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

6 Seconds of Cowansville High School – Our Miss Phelps

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In memory- Feb. 9, 1908 — Jan. 22, 2013

 

Sitting in a grade 9 art class I wondered how I could do a book cover art project and relate it to the latest “infatuation” in my life. I cannot remember how the word eagle came in to play right now and wonder if it might have been his nickname. But there I was showing art teacher Miss Marion Phelps my idea of doing a cover for a book called The Eagle Has Landed. She lowered her glasses a tad and gave me a small pat on the back. Quite perplexed; she asked me why on earth I was going to do something like that when others in the class were doing book covers of popular subjects. Of course she was completely right and had she known the real reason she would have politely suggested that I choose another subject.

I was never an artist as I am the Queen of stick-figures but Miss Phelps always tried to bring out the best in me and everyone else. That year in grade 9 I won an award for art and still to this day have no idea why.


Almost fifty years later everyone remembers Miss Phelps and to some like former CHS student Jim Manson, she became his mentor. In the Stanstead Journal in 2001 Manson gave an interview how she helped him with research when he was getting his PHD at Concordia. He became engrossed in Samuel Willard who had spent many years petitioning the Quebec government for land owed to him in 1792. For two years Manson haunted the archives with Miss Phelps being the head historian cheerleader. Manson published a booklet and became part of the Brome County Historical Society and it was all thanks to our Miss Phelps. Jimmy Manson was not the only one that had fond memories of her and here are some comments from former students of Cowansville High School.

Claudia Forster Allen- Not only did I like Miss Phelps as a teacher for all obvious reasons as we’ve said before . . her passion for history (local) and getting us to know our own history but she babysat me as a little girl when I was still crawling.  It was in the apartment over the Dairy .. lol my parents lived there when they were first married. I would go in and immediatly go for the cupboards and throw around and bang her pots and pans. She told me the story years later. I would also stand in the window and watch the cars go by. . . and pee my pants. . lol  I think she lived with her mother and they would just laugh.
Audrey Bromby- I had her in 6th grade, and she was very quiet, soft spoken and very kind. She was in the Fordyce Women’s Institute and used to come to our house when my mother had the meetings at our house. I remember one time when she came, there was a painting on the wall done by my brother, Bob. She stood looking at it and said that she should have given him a better mark.
Bob Bromby- I recall that”piece of art”, a still life bowl of fruit. I believe she gave me a 61% on it, which was close to the 59% FAIL and the worst mark in the class. Truth is that Miss Phelps drew most of it as she would frequently lean over my masterpiece and erase portions of my pitiful attempt to produce a classic and redraw it. She did this so many times that there was little of my ‘blooming talent’ left to see. The following year I went back to taking ‘Gym’ where I could at least clear the boxhorse. To this day I can draw a mean stick man. I only took the class at the urging of Stan Aiken (who did have talent) because he didn’t want to be the only guy in the class. I wonder if that ‘painting’ is still around…
Wayne King- Loved her.

 

 

 
Barbara Goettel Lacroix– I had Miss Phelps in Grade 6. When she was writing on the blackboard, we used to copy each others work!! I believe she was a bit hard of hearing also. She was a great art teacher – only year that I ever drew anything.
Margaret Clay Jacob– I also had Miss Phelps in Grade 6. I really don’t remember that much about her actual teaching other than, as Audrey mentionned, she was soft spoken and kind. I loved her art classes and took them in Grade 9 & 10.

Linda Knight Seccaspina– She was one of the few teachers that believed in me.
Beverley Hastings Howman- I remember her art classes – my best subject. And the day Keith Bell posed for a full length pencil sketch (clothed of course). Good memories!
Claudia Forster Allen– it was, she was a lovely lady . . . inside and out . . . 🙂
Pennie Redmile- Not only was Miss Phelps a good teacher- but her love for local history caused her to “take on” the Quebec Gov’t (about 20 years ago- – in her 80s) The Gov’t wanted to straighten the hwy between Sweetsburg & West Shefford (Bromont) — Near W Shefford, they were going to build their road over one of the earliest cemeteries. Miss Phelps was not about to allow that– & she made her voice heard. Amazingly, the Gov’t heard her outrage– & though they had no intention of changing their road’s new location, they offered to put up a monument in the Methodist cemetery in W Shefford, with all the names & dates of the deceased from that old pioneer cemetery! Thanks to Miss Phelps intervention – that monument exists as a lasting memorial to some of the very early Shefford settlers!!
Pennie Redmile– With so many of her former students not living in the area, you may not know that every year there is a “Marion L Phelps Award” given to a person who has contributed a great deal to the preservation or promotion of local history in an area of Quebec. The first one went to Miss Phelps some years ago. I wasn’t there to see her accept- but I was at the same conference & she was just “beaming”. & I’m not certain of the precise wording of the award– but if no one else knows – I can find out.
There is a series of books available on the Canada Archives & Library website called “Dictionary of Canadian Biography” & Miss Phelps contributed some of the articles about earlier “folks” from out home.

Adelaide Lanktree– Miss Phelps is living at Manoir Lac Brome in Knowlton. I’m sure that she would love to hear how much she was appreciated. She is 103 years old.

Miss Phelps was actually born on a farm in South Stukely, Quebec, and graduated from Macdonald College with an intermediate teacher’s diploma. Phelps has been given numerous awards throughout the years for her dedication to the history of the Eastern Townships but really it is the award of the heart that she deserves to get as she touched all of ours and will never be forgotten. Miss Phelps, there will never be a day where I or others forget what you brought to our lives and we thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

 

From the Book by Linda Seccaspina and her fellow Students at Cowansville High School–Cowansville High School Misremembered– available at Wisteria in Carleton Place and all on Amazon sites.

Feb. 9, 1908 — Jan. 22, 2013: Remembering Marion Phelps


Brome Lake loses one of its most esteemed residents Marion Louise Phelps, distinguished Townships teacher, archivist and historian and widely acknowledged as “the” authority on Brome County history, died last week in Knowlton. “It is with sadness that we inform you of the death of Marion Phelps, former archivist and longtime volunteer of the BCHS,” said Arlene Royea, managing director of the Brome County Historical Society (BCHS). “Miss Phelps passed away on January 22 at the age of 104, just a few days short of her 105th birthday.”Royea, who knew Phelps since 1977, called her “remarkable.” Royea also visited Phelps on a daily basis at Manoir Lac Brome, a retirement residence in Knowlton.Phelps was the daughter of William W. and Maude (McDougall) Phelps of South Stukely. She attended the Blake School, the Stukely Village School and Waterloo High School before graduating from the School for Teachers at Macdonald College. She went on to teach at Ste. Agathe and Waterloo High School before going on to Heroes’ Memorial High School in Cowansville. An outstanding teacher, she was awarded the Order of Scholastic Merit by the Department of Education in 1960.Always interested in history, Phelps was a leader in organizing and giving classes in local history and genealogy for the Missisquoi Community School during the 1950s. From those classes a renewed interest in the Missisquoi County Historical Society was kindled. Although still teaching, she spent many hours organizing the books and documents that helped to get Missisquoi Historical Society back on its feet. In 1959, Phelps was appointed curator of the Brome County Historical Society.

The Bio of Miss Marion Phelps