Tag Archives: stuart mcintosh

Mackie Creek – Stuart McIntosh

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Mackie Creek – Stuart McIntosh
In the summer, visitors will sit under this dam on Mackie Creek and look through the fine curtain of water on the outside. Just east of Griffith before Mackie enters the Madawaska. It starts at the schooner lakes. Just east of Griffith before Mackie enters the Madawaska. It starts at the schooner lakes. —Stuart McIntosh






CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
30 Apr 1903, Thu  •  Page 4

Herb, Earl and Isobel Tooley at Mountain School (SS No. 14) ca 1935

Judd and his family logged, farmed and raised cattle on the mountain. Their son Herb remembered walking cattle from the farm to the Lavant train station where they were loaded and shipped to markets. 

Logging was one of the main industries in the area during those times, and employed many local families. Harvested pine from the surrounding area often was floated through Mackie Lake into the small creek at the north end of the lake. From there they were moved into Long Schooner and Round Schooner and through Mackie Creek into the Madawaska River. Rapids existed on both creeks so wooden chutes (or slides) allowed the logs to bypass the rapids. When Herb was about 15 or 16 years old, his grandfather, Luther Tooley, lost his leg in a logging accident on the trail between Proudfoot Bay on Fortune Lake and Brule Lake. He managed with a wooden leg for the rest of his life. 

The remains of several old logging roads still exist around the lake, one of which follows the creek down from Camp Lake. Another one branches off Mountain Road and leads into the marsh at the south end of the lake, where at one time marsh hay was cut.

In the 1920’s, Louise’s parents Julius and Carlena (Hartmann) opened a tourist lodge on their homestead on Sand Lake, and Luther (Judd’s father) operated a hunting & fishing camp on Brule Lake. Now known as “Pleasantview Lodge”, the large log cabin on the site was actually moved there by Judd and his brother John, from their mother Emma’s (Wood) homestead. Read more here… click

Gillies Mill Sand Point Braeside…. Fires etc.

The Gillies Fire Braeside July 4th 1949

David Armitage Gillies –Last of the Old “Camboose” Lumber Men

Who Really Wrote the Books? Mrs. Harriet Lewis — Stuart McIntosh

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Who Really Wrote the Books?  Mrs. Harriet Lewis — Stuart McIntosh

Mrs. Harriet Lewis authored “Outside Her Eden” during the nineteenth century. This advertisement was in the back of the book.

Stuart McIntosh sent this photo to me and of course there was a story..:)It seems Harriet was doing a lot of writing for her husband Leon LOLOL


CLIPPED FROM
New York Daily Herald
New York, New York
16 Jun 1869, Wed  •  Page 10

Working name of US author Julius Warren Lewis (1833-1920), who called himself “the Dumas of America”, and who recorded himself on census returns as Leon Lewis; much of his early work was done in collaboration with his wife, the romance author Harriet Lewis (1841-1878).

In 1856 Leon Lewis had married 15 year old Harriet Newell O’Brien, born at Penn Yann, N. Y. in 1841. Harriet began writing serials for the New York Weekly in 1865. Between 1868 and 1878 the two authors wrote separately and in collaboration for the New York Ledger. The couple was so popular that they were paid enormous sums by the story papers and lived in “grand style” at Penn Yann. Harriet Lewis died 20 May, 1878 at Rochester, N.Y. She was 37 years old.

Harriet’s Husband Leon Lewis

Julius Warren Lewis, better known as “Leon” Lewis, was born in Southington, Connecticut, April 8, 1833, the second son but fourth child of James Dana Lewis and his wife Patty Bishop. His brothers and sisters were James B. (1825-1869), Sarah Ann (Mrs. Charles W. Risley, 1827-1921), Mary Ann (Mrs. George Bronson, 1830-1898), and John Woodruff (“Juan,” 1835-1919).

“Leon’s” schooling was limited to a few winter months while doing chores for his board and clothes on the farm of his uncle Gideon Dunham, the husband of James Dana Lewis’ sister Mary. He was, however, of a literary turn of mind, and began writing at the age of 18. He was also romantic, for about this time he read an article in a Sabbath School Journal, written and signed by “Harriet Newell” which impressed him and led to a correspondence with the writer, Harriet Newell O’Brien (1841-1878), of Penn Yan, New York.

Afterwards they met, were married in 1856 when she was 15 and he was 23, and thereafter lived in Penn Yan.Then began a literary collaboration which lasted during Harriet’s entire life. While each wrote independent stories, many were written in collaboration, and even some of those signed with Leon’s name were written by Harriet. In a letter to Robert Bonner, she wrote: No person, man or woman, has any hand in writing Mr. Lewis’ stories save myself. And no one assists me for I love to write better than to do anything else in the world. From Leon Lewis Click

In January 1879, Leon Lewis went ‘missing,’ from his home in Penn Yann, N.Y., leaving in scandalous circumstances. He sailed off to Europe in the company of his niece, “Miss Julia Wheelock, fifteen years of age.” At Brazil, Leon stepped off the steamer and married his young ward.

Leon Lewis was divorced from his second wife in 1913 and died at Winstead, Connecticut 28 Oct 1920.

Books Which Has Been Lost—-Emma Scott Nasmith

Found in a Garage– Ron Bos — Annie Sophia Shields McLaughlin

Who Was Miss Jessie Alexander ? Poetry Slams of the 1800s

Stuart McIntosh

Maple Syrup Making Photos by Stuart McIntosh

In Praise of School Bus Drivers – Stuart McIntosh

In Memory of Silver Cross Mothers — thanks to Stuart McIntosh

Handwritten Clippings from Stuart McIntosh — When Cutting Corn was $3.00 and Tobacco was 20 Cents

Teamsters Horses and Accidents- Stuart McIntosh

Cheesemakers of Lanark County — Eastern Dairy School- Stuart McIntosh

Then and Now Bowland Road-Community Memories of the McIntosh’s–Stuart McIntosh

Community Memories of the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh

Documenting Ed Pelletier -Photos- Stuart McIntosh

What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh

Maple Syrup Making Photos by Stuart McIntosh

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Maple Syrup Making Photos by Stuart McIntosh

Maple Syrup making photos by Stuart McIntosh

Sandra Iwaniw

Those were the days you could make money on a sugar bush. Most farmers now only make enough for their own use and it is usually over an open fire. They still use wood to get the highest heat. I have some great memories of staying up all night with my dad to stoke the fire.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jun 1927, Sat  •  Page 2

Maple Pudding— One and one half cups milk, 2eggs, 1 tbsp gelatine granulated– 1/2 cup cold water, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1 cup maple syrup. 18 cup shredded almonds, canned peaches. Scald milk and pour slowly over the well beaten yolks of the eggs. Add salt and put in double boiler and cook five minutes, soften gelatine in cold water. Add to first mixture, stirring well. Remove from fire and add maple syrup. Let cool

Vancouver Daily World

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada05 Apr 1922, 

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Sep 1910, Wed  •  Page 10

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
29 Jan 1913, Wed  •  Page 4

A few Memories of Maple Syrup

So What Did you Eat with Maple Syrup? Pickles?

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

Granny’s Maple Fudge —Lanark County Recipes

Life in the Sugar Bush in the 1800s

What You Might Not Know About The Maples

That Smell Of The Lanark County SAP Being Processed — Noreen Tyers

Sticky Fingers – With Apologies to Edward Gorey –Wheeler’s Pancake House

STUART MCINTOSH

In Praise of School Bus Drivers – Stuart McIntosh

In Memory of Silver Cross Mothers — thanks to Stuart McIntosh

Handwritten Clippings from Stuart McIntosh — When Cutting Corn was $3.00 and Tobacco was 20 Cents

Teamsters Horses and Accidents- Stuart McIntosh

Cheesemakers of Lanark County — Eastern Dairy School- Stuart McIntosh

Then and Now Bowland Road-Community Memories of the McIntosh’s–Stuart McIntosh

Community Memories of the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh

Documenting Ed Pelletier -Photos- Stuart McIntosh

What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh

In Praise of School Bus Drivers – Stuart McIntosh

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In Praise of School Bus Drivers – Stuart McIntosh
Stuart McIntosh -Photo

In praise of school bus drivers: for navigating through conditions of ice, rain, snow and sleet down narrow backroads and high volume highways. For delivering precious cargo from before daylight on cold winter mornings to the beginning of those hot late June afternoons especially when heaters and air conditioners are window operated.

For driving while dealing with all the internal and external complications of a trip. For doing your safety checks, log books, minor repairs, cleaning and forever dealing with mechanical and communication issues. More importantly for being there as that reliable person during such difficult times.

Thanks Stuart

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Sep 1910, Wed  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
21 Dec 1910, Wed  •  Page 1

Related reading

Remembering Basil O’Keefe — Bus driver Extraordinaire

In Memory of Silver Cross Mothers — thanks to Stuart McIntosh

Handwritten Clippings from Stuart McIntosh — When Cutting Corn was $3.00 and Tobacco was 20 Cents

Teamsters Horses and Accidents- Stuart McIntosh

Cheesemakers of Lanark County — Eastern Dairy School- Stuart McIntosh

Then and Now Bowland Road-Community Memories of the McIntosh’s–Stuart McIntosh

Community Memories of the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh

Documenting Ed Pelletier -Photos- Stuart McIntosh

What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh

McIntosh Clan 100 Strong Holds Picnic at Family Homestead 1953

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Books Which Has Been Lost—-Emma Scott Nasmith

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Books Which Has Been Lost—-Emma Scott Nasmith
Published in 1927– photo from Stuart McIntoshCanada’s Early Women Writers

Emma Scott (1880-1940) was the daughter of Methodist minister Reverend James Scott and spent her childhood in Owen Sound, Ontario. She studied art in Toronto before moving to Colorado to teach painting, where she met William Raff. They married, and Emma gave birth to a daughter, Dorothy Raff, shortly before William’s sudden death. 

Scott returned to Toronto and continued her studies at the Conservatory of Music. From there, she took post-graduate work at the Curry School of Expression in Boston and at the Gower St. Academy in London. Eventually she returned to Toronto, where she worked at the Conservatory of Music and also at Victoria College, teaching courses in expression.

In 1901, she opened her own School of Expression at the corner of Bloor and Yonge streets in Toronto, and established herself as Principal of Elocution, Oratory, Physical Culture, and Dramatic Art. One of her first pupils was Margaret Eaton, wife of Timothy Eaton, founder of the Eaton Company. The Eaton family acted as benefactors of the school, and eventually it was renamed The Margaret Eaton School of Literature and Expression. Scott continued as principal of the school until 1925.

Her public performances of classic literature and her enthusiastic advocacy for drama and music made her a prominent figure in the cultural world of Toronto in the early 1900’s. As founder of The Margaret Eaton School, she provided a valuable education to women at a time when women’s educational options were very limited.

The last page is a small sample of the literature which has been lost — Stuart McIntosh
Folder 076 — Photographs — Margaret Eaton School Toronto 1901-1942 — Emma Scott Raff Nasmith papers

Related reading

The Eaton’s Sewing Girls

Found in a Garage– Ron Bos — Annie Sophia Shields McLaughlin

Who Was Miss Jessie Alexander ? Poetry Slams of the 1800s

Handwritten Clippings from Stuart McIntosh — When Cutting Corn was $3.00 and Tobacco was 20 Cents

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Handwritten Clippings from Stuart McIntosh — When Cutting Corn was $3.00 and Tobacco was 20 Cents
Grandma also kept an account of expenses. Note washboards were $1, bag of flour was 75 cents
Farm wives often kept a running diary of on farm events. Note that scrubbing the floor was one. Also buying the Bolger mare, unusual weather,etc.

Wages have also changed–An interesting ledger is the large one from the Clayton store now stored at the Lanark County Archives— Stuart also said his father made 25 cents a day in the logging camps.

Weekly Wages in 1888 — Nothing to Write Home About as they say…

Working in the Grist Mill

Working on the Telephone Lines — Electrocution at Carleton Place

Was Working in One of Our Local Mills Like Working in a Coal Mine?

The Early Days of Working in the Ramsay Mine — Going Down Down Down

I’ve Been Working on the Railroad

She Doesn’t Think My Tractor is Sexy–The Farmer’s Wife 1889

Butter in pails, 17 to 18c-The Almonte Farmer’s Market 1898

Lanark Farm Life is Not so Bad- 1951

Once Upon a Time on the Farm

Farming Could be a Dangerous Business in Lanark County? Who Do You Know?

Stuart McIntosh

Teamsters Horses and Accidents- Stuart McIntosh

Cheesemakers of Lanark County — Eastern Dairy School- Stuart McIntosh

Then and Now Bowland Road-Community Memories of the McIntosh’s–Stuart McIntosh

Community Memories of the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh

Documenting Ed Pelletier -Photos- Stuart McIntosh

What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh

McIntosh Clan 100 Strong Holds Picnic at Family Homestead 1953

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Teamsters Horses and Accidents- Stuart McIntosh

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Teamsters Horses and Accidents- Stuart McIntosh

Bill McIntosh and Orland Moses hooking up the team. Most teamsters will tell you: the neck yoke gets hooked first and unhooked last. How far the links are hooked from the D/ring depends on your team.

Mr. Salter owned the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place and during the decades, he and Mrs. Chatterton swapped ownership back and forth through the years. Who knew what was going on between the two of them? On the 31st of March in 1932 Mr. Salter was very lucky he did not lose his life that day when he drove Mr. Hambly of Ottawa who was a guest of the hotel to Lake Park on Mississippi Lake.

The horse was going at a great clip as he turned  in to stop at the front door. But the horse had other ideas and turned in sharp and the cutter struck a stone and the occupants were thrown out. Mr. Salter’s head struck the hard road and he was knocked out cold. There was a large gash on his head from back to front and the blood flowed from the gash.

Friends flocked around and he was carried into the Queen’s Hotel and Dr. Sinclair was summoned and Salter’s wounds were dressed and word was he suffered great pain.

These accidents from Untimely Demise by Mr. Shaw from the newspaper archives

Dec. 15, 1871 – A lad of 14 years, Charles Boyle, son of a widow residing in Almonte, came to
a violent death in the following manner. He was attending a threshing machine on Monday
when he came hastily out of the barn and put two span of horses in motion. Before the driver
could succeed in stopping them the unfortunate lad was caught in the coupling which attached
the horse power to the spindle driving the machine, and which dragged him roughly around. His
leg was badly broken also his ankle, his neck badly cut, besides other injuries. He lived only
two hours after the accident.

July 20, 1888- On Friday morning, Findlay and Thomas McIntyre were drawing in hay and the
horses became frightened and ran away across the field, jumping the fence and Thomas who
was on the wagon, was thrown to the ground and dragged for several yards and when his
brother Findlay reached the spot he found him insensible. He breathed only a few minutes and
passed away.

November, 1841 – William Burley, Constable for Division #5, Bathurst District, while on the
discharge of his duties, in returning home at a late hour on the night of Saturday, 13th, was
unfortunately killed by falling from his horse about two miles distant from Fitzroy Harbor on the
road to the village of Pakenham.

Feb., 1870 – A young man named Corkerry, 6th Line Ramsay, was driving a sleigh loaded with
wood and when descending a hill part of the load fell off the sleigh taking Corkerry along with
it. The horses took fright and started off. The young man was thrown in front of one of the
runners on the sleigh and was dragged in that position for some distance when the sleigh
passed over his body, crushing it severely. This accident was witnessed by two men in front
who stopped the horses and went to his assistance. He lingered for 24 hours when death put an
end to his sufferings.

June 27, 1873 – A fatal accident by a runaway horse occurred at Hopetown in the township of
Lanark last week. It appears that the horse, on being tied to a post, became frightened and in
some way pulled out the post and ran off. John Stewart of that place on seeing this ran around
the building for the purpose of stopping the horse but came in contact with it, receiving such a
wound on the breast that it caused his death in a few hours.

Drynan Family – Names Names Names – Genealogy
8 horse hitch– almonte fair —The Boy that Ran Away to the Circus and Other Stories

Related reading- Stuart McIntosh

Cheesemakers of Lanark County — Eastern Dairy School- Stuart McIntosh

Then and Now Bowland Road-Community Memories of the McIntosh’s–Stuart McIntosh

Community Memories of the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh

Documenting Ed Pelletier -Photos- Stuart McIntosh

What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh

Related reading

Almonte’s Outlaw Horse — A Horse of a Tale

War Horses — Between 500 and 1,000 Horses Were Shipped to Europe Everyday

The Ghost Horse of Tatlock — A Faerie Tale???

You’ve Got Trouble in Franktown-Dead Horses and Wives

A Horse is a Horse of Course– Of Course—Angus McFarlane

Buggies Horses and Accidents

Did you Know Old Burnside has a Ghostly Horse?

Let’s go Racing Boys — J. A. Brunton –Where was This Sign?

Let’s Go Racing Boys with Nellie Sharper and Alex Hunter from Carleton Place

The Boy that Ran Away to the Circus and Other Stories

Drynan Family – Names Names Names – Genealogy

Uncle Johnnie Erskine and Stewart Ferguson by Tom Edwards

More Notes about the Mysterious Arklan Farm

Ride a Horse Save a Cowboy

Cheesemakers of Lanark County — Eastern Dairy School- Stuart McIntosh

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Cheesemakers of Lanark County — Eastern Dairy School- Stuart McIntosh




Dads cheesemaker’ class of 1925 thanks to Stuart McIntosh — “D.H. McIntosh”

Following, once again, the apparent success of a western Ontario institution, the Dominion Dairy Branch opened the Eastern Dairy School the following year through the Queen’s University’s School of Mining and Agriculture at their Kingston campus.

The long courses included: practical, laboratory-based classes in testing milk, cheese and butter making, repairing boilers, and keeping factory accounts, but also required students to attend lectures in bacteriology and chemistry.

The Eastern Dairy School stressed that “In the cheese-making department students…are encouraged to discuss matters connected with their art.

Experimentation was central to these dual goals, and the calendar for the Eastern Dairy School stressed that “In the cheese-making department” students…are encouraged to discuss matters connected with their art,  and to experiment.

The Eastern Dairy School’s program calendar stated that, “students may remain at the school as long as they wish, provided they show an interest in their work and conduct themselves in an orderly manner.

Beginning in 1911, only cheese- and buttermakers with aprofessional certificate from the Eastern Dairy School or OAC would be allowed to manage a cheese factory or creamery, unless granted a “special permit from the minister of Agriculture on the grounds of experience and competency.

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
24 Feb 1925, Tue  •  Page 14
CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
14 Dec 1918, Sat  •  Page 25
CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
14 Dec 1918, Sat  •  Page 25

Balderson Cheese Factory — The Buchanan Scrapbook

Clippings and Words of Local Cheese Factories

Rosebank Cheese Factory

Questions on the McCreary Settlement and the IXL Cheese Factory

Say Cheese! It’s an IXL Story

The Old Union Hall Cheese Factory By Berenice McKay

Archie Guthrie’s Notes on Lanark Mines Hall’s Mills and Cheese 1993

The Cheese Souffle that Went from Balderson to Carleton Place– Little Known Fact

Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

Pakenham Cheese & Butter Factory– McCreary Blair Storey

Watson’s Corners And Vicinity 1891–Shetland Ponies and Cheese

When the Cheese Crashed Through the Floor

Then and Now Bowland Road-Community Memories of the McIntosh’s–Stuart McIntosh

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Then and Now Bowland Road-Community Memories of the McIntosh’s–Stuart McIntosh

Same place..different times. Approximately 1914..Lillian, Ethel,Dave,Alec and John R. McIntosh.

Photo from Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” If you want to purchase a book please email at rose@sarsfield.ca or call at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

Approximately late 1970’s…Dave and Alec. The original log house had been covered in board and batten. The wood shed was later removed and used as the sugar camp on what is now Bowland Road.

Clayton Ontario History

March 31, 2018  · Ed and Becky Rath Pelletier, Ethel, Lillian, Alex and Dave McIntosh. Thank you to Stuart McIntosh for sharing.

Clayton Ontario History
November 14, 2017  · 




Again we are looking for help with identification on this group of ladies outside Guthrie United Church in Clayton. They are Mrs. Cochrane, Mrs. Penman, Mrs. Wm. Dunlop, Mrs. John McIntosh, ?, ?, Mrs. Bob Paul, Mrs. Charlie McNeil, Mrs. Rintoul. Thanks to Allan Bellamy and Stuart McIntosh for the photo.


Clayton Ontario History

June 28, 2021  · Writings from the autograph book of Eleanor McIntosh 1934. Thanks to Stuart McIntosh for sharing. Mrs. M. S. Code was Mrs. Matthew S. Code, (Mabel Penman, later married Thos. Price). Mrs. Jimmy Shane was the first Mrs. Shane, Violet Moore. Notice how these ladies signed their names. It was common at the time to go by the husband’s name. Even when I was first married in 1971 my mother used to write to me and address the letters to Mrs. Brian Sarsfield.

Photo from Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” If you want to purchase a book please email at rose@sarsfield.ca or call at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

Community Memories of the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh

Documenting Ed Pelletier -Photos- Stuart McIntosh

What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh

McIntosh Clan 100 Strong Holds Picnic at Family Homestead 1953

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Community Memories of the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh

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Community Memories of  the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh
Charlie Lorimer’s farm, Ledore. Note the milk cans, butter churn and wooden eaves troughs Stuart McIntosh photo

Ben Willis–My Great Uncle Charlie’s homestead. This is “NOT ” The Dunlop Hunting Camp

The Lorimer homestead was east of uncle Charlies approx. 1 mile Building still standing ( Dunlops Hunt Camp) My great Grandfather Joesph lorimer and wife Annie mac Itosh raised 9 children here My mother Jean Bates Willis was born here in 1920.

Stuart McIntosh
January 20 at 2:49 PM  · 

Joe Lorimer, Bert Lorimer, Dave McIntosh, Dave Lorimer. Hunting on the Lorimer plateau 1941. At the home place.

Blair PaulGreat picture and stories! In the 40s and 50s you could see this house from the Poland church steps….before the bush grew up!

Peter EwartRhodena Bell where abouts would the feldspar mine be?

Rhodena BellPeter Ewart the entranceto the Feldspar mine was right across from the corner of ladore school it is all fallen in now My dad used to own Ladore school at one time

Ethel NagleWe used to sell the cream too, remember the truck coming to pick them up

Alice GilchristShelley McLeod Your grandpa picked up the cream at our farm

Leanne WalkerMy Grandmother lived here as a little girl after their home burnt. Hazel MacIntosh. Hazel Cameron would know more.

Peter EwartLeanne Walker the wooden eaves trough is most interesting…

Stuart McIntosh
January 19 at 5:20 PM  · 

Dad hunted with Joe, Doug and Dave Lorimer on what is called the Lorimer plateau.

Rhodena BellThis is owned by Hal Rodgers family from Hughesville PA now and Dunlop hunt camp now

Sandra DunlopJim Willis This farm has been passed down 3 generations now on both the Rogers family and the Dunlop family. At one point Morley Ashby owned it and sold it to Roger family

Kathy GrahamI believe Annie was my great (great) grandmother, I belong to the Lorimer-McIntosh clan, my grandfather Joseph married Elva Doucett, our reunions were held in Clayton, Ontario! I haven’t been to one in years tho’ ! My grandfathers father was Charles I believe! My maiden name is Hewitt my mother was a Lorimer!

Dave Craigthis is where my grandmother grew up. I have my great uncle Alecs pocket watch. Alec and Annie Lorimer never married. My middle name is Lorimer

Barry BatesKathy Graham if you read my cousin Dave’s comment below, you’ll see that Annie and Alec were never married. You must be from another branch of the Lorimer’s. You mentioned Charles. There was an Uncle Charlie and Aunt Virginia that I remember. On a Summer vacation, we visited them in Vancouver.

Kathy GrahamBarry Bates yes I think I must be from a different family! Charles and Annie I thought were married? My grandmother was also related in some way to the Paul’s in Lanark. Or Poland? (Ontario) the people who owned the store!

Cheryl Anne CooperWe used to sell cream too and fed the calves the skin milk.Oh I remember getting bunted by the calves. We shared the chores with in laws.I washed the separator parts every second day and hated it…but it had to be done!!

Photo-Rhodena BellI am trying to find pictures of the Lotimer girls I have stored

Rhodena BellBlair Paul my grandmother in middle her dad Joseph park to left and lorimer girls on either side might be uncle Jim park beside his dad

Cheryl Anne CooperWe used to sell cream too and fed the calves the skin milk.Oh I remember getting bunted by the calves. We shared the chores with in laws.I washed the separator parts every second day and hated it…but it had to be done!!

Blair PaulGreat picture and stories! In the 40s and 50s you could see this house from the Poland church steps….before the bush grew up!

Lodore Road in the winter
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Wed, Jun 08, 1904 · Page 4

Documenting Ed Pelletier -Photos- Stuart McIntosh

What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh

Mary Stuart Brien –Mary Beth Wylie

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Remembering and Documenting The Loose Hay Loader

Howard and Olive Giles– Clippings