Tag Archives: stone homes

The House Across the Way- Dickson House

Standard
The House Across the Way- Dickson House

img.jpg

1970s

 

db41ae0a43284a511c8b43f767089975.jpg

 

Each day when the sun comes up; the house that surveys the Little Falls also gazes upon the village of Pakenham. The third and last home of town of founder Andrew Dickson, built in 1850, is a typical Victorian Gothic home made out of local limestone. His second stone home, (100 yards away) that sits at the end of the 5 arch bridge was once described by a traveller in 1841 as “a large and splendid stone dwelling”.

 

 

Andrew Dickson, who was also the Sheriff, was well known as a geologist and as Pakenham is known for fine stone and fossils he chose all the stone for his homes himself. There were no fine fireplaces in this home as he  and his family relied on the fashionable parlour and hallways stoves of the time. The house consisted of small rooms, and there were two rear rooms accessed only by a small passageway which were thought to be lived in by the hired help. This house was an important home in the village, as matters of importance in the development of the area were conducted here.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Apr 1894, Mon,  Page 3

 

Four of his daughters married important men of the era:

Dr. John Sweetland who later became the Sherrif of Carleton County

Robert Lees who became a prominent Ottawa Valley lawyer and assistant crown attorney in the Patrick Whelan trial. Whelan was accused of the murder of Hon. Darcy McGee. Lees even made his home on Lees Ave in Ottawa a replica of the Dickson home in Pakenham.

Robert Brown established a General Store in Pakenham, and Daniel Hilliard the 4th, was a merchant, and lumberman joining his father-in-law in his ventures. Hilliard also built the stone home facing Highway 29 just before the entrance to Pakenham.

45579933_10156107589736886_2930599882781622272_n.jpg

Photo- Marilyn Snedden

Did you know his first bank was a whole in the trunk of a tree?

 

The Lees Family of Ottawa East–Click here
By Sue Hill
 

Robert Lees was the patriarch of the Lees family who lived in a house called Wildwood. It stood, at the end of a long lane, on Main Street, where the Queensway is now.

Born in Scotland in 1814, he came to Canada as a babe in arms. His father Andrew Lees pioneered in Pakenham, Ontario. Robert Lees became first a schoolteacher, then a lawyer and Queen’s Counsel.

He courted and married Jessie Dickson of Pakenham, and during their courtship their exchange of letters included both historic and personal events. There is a description of the riots on “Stony Monday” in 1849 on Rideau Street at Sapper’s Bridge. He wrote: “Bytown is a fearful place to live in just now… The idea of making you take up your abode in such a place is horrible.” He made a reputation in defending some of the radicals against what he saw as persecution by the authorities.

One of the letters refers to a family disgrace involving Jessie’s sister, which drove her to ask Robert if he wished to be released from the obligation of his engagement to marry. The letter detailing the disgrace is unfortunately missing. Some of the letters they wrote are difficult to read because they are written in two directions on the same page – paper was dear.

In fact, Lees did stay in downtown Ottawa after his marriage to Jessie in 1852, and they lived at first in the Matthews Hotel (later became the Rideau Convent). With their growing family they lived in a building on George Street also housing the law firm of Lees and Gemmell. Four of their children were born in Ottawa: Ella in 1853, Victoria in 1856, Elizabeth in 1857, and William in 1859. Victoria was a sickly infant and not expected to live, so they did not name her but called her “Sister” for several years. She chose her own name – Victoria, after the Queen.

The crowded town, epidemics of disease and bad drains in the summer led them to move in 1853 to the country, to the suburb of Ottawa East, Nepean Township, just south of the Rideau Canal. When a friend asked why he wanted to live “in the wild woods”, Lees took that as the name of his house and estate. Daughter Jessie was born at Wildwood in 1864. The estate included a tenanted farm stretching from Main Street to the Rideau River, and orchards and kitchen gardens near the house. Will sometimes worked on the farm when he was home from university and law school. The whole family worked in the gardens hoeing, weeding and all the other chores familiar to gardeners. In the fall it was harvesting, canning and taking the surplus produce to Byward Market – as reported in a diary: “We took along the girl to hold the horse”.

They seemed to do most of the housework themselves as it was difficult to keep a girl to work so far out in the country. Their problem with the yardman was that he was so often “off on the spree”. Cleaning out the garret was such a triumph that they marked the occasion with a photograph. Photography was coming into its own as a hobby for amateurs and the Lees family and their neighbours the Ballantynes were keen photo-cranks, taking photos of their homes, neighbours, relatives and the local scenery.

Robert Lees took his role as Patriarch seriously. His five children were all accomplished in music, writing, drawing and other arts. They boated on the Rideau River, played tennis, snowshoed, sometimes to downtown Ottawa to do their Christmas shopping. They formed the Wildwood Opera Society for their own amusement, and presented concerts in the parlour. Every week for years whichever family members, visitors and neighbours, especially May Ballantyne, would meet by the dining room fire for Elocution Class. Members took turns reciting selections of poetry or prose, some written by other members of the class. One member each week was delegated “Critic” and wrote up commentary on the performances for the family newsletter the “Wildwood Echo”, published fortnightly. As reported, “one of the younger members fled the room during a recitation of “The Nancy Bell”, complete with lip-smacking. (It is a humorous poem about cannibalism by W. S. Gilbert.)

The “Wildwood Echo” was a collection of contributions by many members of the Lees’ circle. They took it in turn to serve as editor to hand-write the pages and distribute them by mail around the province. It contained poems; a romance novel serialised over several months, essays, drawings, photographs and watercolours. May Ballantyne was a prize-winning painter of flowers.

Also in the “Echo was “Thistledown”, a column on the doings at Wildwood and Ottawa East. These doings included: fighting off fruit thieves at Halloween, gypsies with a dancing bear in the neighbourhood, a chimney fire in which Cousin Bob (Robert Dickson Brown of Ottawa) proved a hero by climbing the roof and extinguishing the blaze, and listing the many visitors from Perth, Pakenham, Brockville and other places. At the time of some troubles with the Fenians William formed the Wildwood Rifle Club and taught the womenfolk how to shoot, in case they need to defend themselves. Once the Fenians tried to burn down their house.

Elizabeth’s diary from 1879 recounts her time in Toronto attending the Normal School and contending with a crummy boarding house. The boarders seemed to be fed mostly gruel, but on Thanksgiving, when they hoped for something special, they were given “some bits of fried beef”. One day on arriving home from school, she found they had all been evicted.

By 1884 Ella was married to Sidney Preston and living in Toronto. Elizabeth taught school in Ottawa East from 1880 to 1884. When she married Cousin Bob they moved to the house he had built at the other end of Main Street, corner of Riverdale. It was called “The Pines” and was on a large property that included a factory that Robert Brown owned on the Canal.

The part of the farm nearest Main Street was developed for housing about the time that Robert Lees died in 1893. The planned streets were called after the Lees children.

William attained his law degree about the same time. He married Lizzie Turnbull and they built a house, named “Plain Air”, on William Street where Lees Avenue is now. They later moved to Wetaskawin, Alberta, where William became Judge Lees.

Jessie studied violin in Germany and gave music lessons at Wildwood and in Ottawa. She later moved to Erindale, Ontario.

Victoria moved in with Elizabeth and her son Robert Lawrence Brown at “The Pines” when Robert Brown died in 1895. She did not marry but built a house on Riverdale Avenue for herself in 1927. She moved to a bigger house on the same street when her sister Jessie came to live with her. Victoria, who had been a sickly child, out-lived the others and died in 1942.

Editors Note: the obituary of Robert Lees has been reproduced here from notes by the above author.

 

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

Quotes on Andrew Dickson and Local Quarries

Dickson Hall Fire Pakenham-H. H. Dickson

 

Fossils

Whale Sightings in Pakenham and Smiths Falls – Holy SeaWorld!

Whale Sightings Outside Smiths Falls– Part 2

 

unnamed (1)

The Old Stone Home on High Street–Memories

Standard
The Old Stone Home on High Street–Memories

 

 

21430547_10155215149191886_7433763365234060007_n.jpg

Joann Voyce—Corner of High St and Water St—This shows the stone house that stood on that corner opposite Findlay’s loading dock 1950s

 

Keith Giffin –Our family lived in that stone house, for a number years in the late 40,s. The float that you see was from the optimist club of Carleton Place ,they sponsored a boys camp on Graham Lake as well as the Smith falls and Ottawa club

 


Joann Voyce-– The building between Stalwart ( part of Vic Bennett Motors ) and the stone house on the corner was Hugh Devlins Barber Shop on the left and a family residence on the

Ray Paquette– Didn’t Bob Francis and his family live in the residence when your family was on High Street?

Joann Voyce– Not sure but Alan and Connie Bennett lived on the right side of the stone one when Mike was born

Ray Paquette –-Connie was a good friend of my mother while my son Scott was in school with Matt, Mike’s son. I remember when they lived down the hill on Allan Street. Alan was in the Air Force and so the family was somewhat nomadic…

Joann Voyce– Hugh Devlin and his wife lived over the Barber Shop and his daughter Doreen and her husband lived on the right of her parents

 

Stephen Giles— My Mother and her parents moved to Carleton Place in 1946. Their first residence was an apartment in this house

Blaine Cornell-Yes, Robert Francis and family lived in this old stone house.in the 50’s If i remember correctly his father’s name was Fred. I remember a family by the name of Monday operating the barbershop also in the mid 50’s.

 

21552134_10155217069511886_1449593034_n.jpg

 

 

48395877_10155700442277312_5150387492733583360_n.jpg

Joann Voyce
12 hrs
Yes Deborah Devlin-Adams I pushed you in Marg’s doll carriage and I have a picture of it

Linda says “look at the buildings you can see beside Findlays”

historicalnotes

On the Perth road, now High Street, a dozen of the village’s buildings of 1863 extended from Bridge Street along the north side of the road for a distance of about two blocks.  There was only one building on its south side, the large stone house torn down several years ago, at the corner of Water Street.  It was built in 1861 by John Sumner, merchant, who earlier at Ashton had been also a magistrate and Lieutenant Colonel of the 3rd Battalion.  Carleton Militia.  Beyond this short section of High Street was farm land, including the farms of John McRostie, Peter Cram, the Manny Nowlan estate and David Moffatt.  The stone farm houses of John McRostie and David Moffatt are now the J. H. Dack and Chamney Cook residences

John Toshack, who came to Ramsay with his wife, seven sons and two daughters, was a man of strong religious tendencies.  He had been a deacon in the Congregational Church under the Rev. Mr. Ewing in Glasgow, and preached in the first shanties of settlers in Ramsay before there was an ordained clergyman in the township.  His younger daughter, eleven years old at the time of the 1821 migration, became the wife of the first Peter Cram of Carleton Place.  Surviving her husband on the Cram farm homestead on High Street which later was acquired in the eighteen eighties by her nephew Peter Cram (1831-1920) of Carleton Place, she died in 1890 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. James Thom in Ramsay.

The buildings on the north side of High Street were rented houses owned by John McEwen, William Neelin, William Moore and Henry Wilson; and the homes of Mrs. John Bell, Arthur Moore and James McDiarmid; together with Joseph Pittard’s wagon shop, and two doors west of it near the future Thomas Street corner, the new foundry enterprise of David Findlay. —Howard Morton Brown

In 1914- A resident was awarded damages for injury to a horse frightened by an unattended and unlighted automobile parked on High Street.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 May 1971, Sat,  Page 36

Image result for high street carleton place

Jean Isabel Galbraith Findlay , 207 High Street, Carleton Place (Findlay home).

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

Looking for Memories of Harold Linton’s Gas Station

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

Before and After – Old High Street Barn

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

Can Nancy Drew Solve the Case of Carleton Place’s Hardy Boys on High Street?

The Hardy Boys in Carleton Place

Ken Findlay Fatally Shot on High Street

One of the 7 Wonders in Carleton Place

 

Screenshot 2017-08-15 at 18.jpg

I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

unnamed (1)

The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

Standard
The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

img.jpg

1972

This historical home is located on a charming little country road next to the Mississippi River to the southwest and connecting the Appleton Village with Highway 44. Known for many years as the Ross Craig farm — it was built in 1857 by Robert Bryson. The house appears on the Walling map of the counties of Lanark and Renfrew, and all the homes on this road once competed with each other to see who could produce the best quality home.

Some evidence points to the kitchen “ell” as being the first building, as the window trim is plain unlike the rest of the home which carries the “eyelash trim”. The floors are made from maple or pine and architectural details point out that this home was once one and a half storeys being carefully built to a two storey later on in years. The staircase is boxed in and very wide similar to the Glendinning home in Glen Isle.

The original kitchen was eventually turned into a family room and there is a minor mystery in the home. At the top of the stairs next to the master bedroom is a small room which is now a bathroom, and it was formerly either a large cupboard or a baby’s room as a peek through tiny window is on the master bedroom wall.

It is obvious that the Bryson and Craig families lived in the main house and used the smaller section for the hired help. This home is one of the rare homes in the area that has no fireplace and they probably used box stoves or ornamental Franklin stoves. William Kennedy and family bought this home from Hugh Grace who had followed the Craig tenure in 1969. It was always a farm but through the years the acreage of the property got smaller. In 1972 the Kennedy’s moved to Mattawa and any current history of the house known would be appreciated.

historicalnotes

Along the ninth line between Shipman’s Mills and Appletree Falls located the Matthew McFarlanes, Sr. and Jr., and Thomas Patterson; while across the river along the 10th line located James Leitch, Arthur Lang, Peter McGregor, John Smith, James King, James Bryson, James Orr, Richard Dulmage, William and Robert Baird. James Bryson from Paisley and James King took Lot I11 of the 10th concession. George Bryson, a son of James, was one of the first Lanark County pioneers to go into the lumbering trade in 1836 and later, with his brother Robert, engaged in lumbering at Fort Coulonge and along the Black River in the province of Quebec. George Bryson represented Pontiac County in that province and was called to the Legislative Assembly of Quebec in 1867. The village of Bryson was named after him. During the lumbering era George Bryson and Simon Dunn established shanties throughout Ramsay and built the slide at Shipman’s Mills. There was talk of running the slide in canoes to save portage but all flunked out except Robert Bryson who with Dunn ventured the risky trip in a large pine log canoe. The canoe and crew shot down the steep incline at a rapid clip and all went well until they came to a 14 foot drop at the end of the slide into the bay below. The canoe split in two and the men were thrown into the rapids below but were rescued by onlookers.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

More Memories of The Beckwith McTavish House

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

The House on a Beckwith Hill–The McTavish House and Ceiling Medallions

The House of Daughters –Stonecroft House

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

The James Black Homestead

The Mysterious Riddell— H B Montgomery House

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Rescuing the Money Pits —The Other Dunlop Home with the Coffin Door

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

The Apple Does Not Fall far from the Tree

Before and After in Carleton Place –The Doctor is in!

Heh Miss Wilsonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn! Carleton Place Heroe

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

The McCarten House of Carleton Place

Old McRostie Had a Farm in Carleton Place

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

The Louis on Sarah Street for $43,500 — Before and After– Architecture in Carleton Place

Memories of Mississippi Manor

Day in the Life of a 70’s Pattie Drive Home – The Stay at Home Mom Era

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The Brick Houses of Carleton Place

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Appleton Chinchilla House

unnamed (1)

Screenshot 2017-08-15 at 18.jpg

I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

Standard
History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

 

img.jpg

1974

 

It took seven long years for the McEwen’s to build this stone house on the 7th line, about a half mile west of Highway 29. Made of local limestone it has a centre door way with Cross and Bible panels, sidelights, and a square fanlight at the top. Directly over the door is proudly marked 1873, the day that the house was finally completed.

Set in a grove of lovely trees the house has a snake fence separating it from the roadway and at the rear there was once barns, a stable, a tack house and a drive shed. The house that remained in the family for decades was one of the finest homes in Beckwith at one point.

 

 

 

The dining room has a ‘dado’ once known as a chair rail, and all the rooms were finished as it was truly a house of distinction with a boxed staircase located in the centre hall. The kitchen has an interesting porthole window facing West and recessed windows are all panelled and have bubble glass panes. Beamed ceilings, golden ash woodwork, and pegged floors grace the  house as well as matching doors throughout with 6 panels and enamelled doorknobs.

That large staircase carried the feet of a family that led upwards to three bedrooms complete with floors made of Balsam Poplar or Balm of Gilead. It was once a popular tree as it also had medicinal properties of balsam poplar that lie in the winter buds. These are black, upright and sticky, and are strongly aromatic and if chewed taste tarry and hot.

It is not surprising that the buds also contain and are covered with waxy resins, terpenes and phenolics with disinfectant properties.  It is among the fastest growing trees in Canada, up to a foot each year, especially when young. The trees are short-lived, normally up to about 100 years, but used as flooring like this home it can give a golden glow to the atmosphere of the home.

The former ell and woodshed was converted in the 70s by Eve and Peter Levers who bought the home from Clarence McEwen. Today the house is still there with a few minor changes.

When I had to turn either red or left on Highway 29; it was a no brainer, and I immediately felt drawn to the left. It was the right move as sure enough, barely half a mile now the road, was the McEwen home. It was set back farther than what I had originally thought and thought of living there the long cold winters in this secluded area. In fact I could still see in my mind “Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead trudging down the road after another argument with her husband with her coat hem blowing in the wind.

The barns were no longer there, but the property was well maintained and looked loved. That’s all that mattered to me, the history of the McEwen house still lives on– and that’s what counts.

 

 

historicalnotes

 

19275068_10213047360649829_657707249279348686_n.jpg

Jayne Munro-Ouimet–Hi Linda, Here is another McEwen house in Beckwith.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading.jpg

The House of Daughters –Stonecroft House

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

The James Black Homestead

The Mysterious Riddell— H B Montgomery House

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Rescuing the Money Pits —The Other Dunlop Home with the Coffin Door

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

Before and After in Carleton Place –The Doctor is in!

Heh Miss Wilsonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn! Carleton Place Heroe

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

The McCarten House of Carleton Place

Old McRostie Had a Farm in Carleton Place

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

The Louis on Sarah Street for $43,500 — Before and After– Architecture in Carleton Place

Memories of Mississippi Manor

Day in the Life of a 70’s Pattie Drive Home – The Stay at Home Mom Era

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The Brick Houses of Carleton Place

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Appleton Chinchilla House

 

 

unnamed (1)

McFarlanes –Stewart’s Fire– and Other Things in Ashton

Standard
McFarlanes –Stewart’s Fire– and Other Things in Ashton

Donna McFarlane sent me this note yesterday:

“Sometime before 1874 the old log house across from the mill pub in Ashton was a hotel or stopping place operated by Donald McFarlane. I noticed that it was now restored to log.. Donald’s son William later opened a hotel at Youngs Point”.

So I am looking for information about the hotel. If anyone knows anything or has heard stories- leave comments, PM me, or send me an email sav_77@yahoo.com

 

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal15 Apr 1887, FriPage 3

 

Meanwhile I found this..

img.jpg

 

In the old days the more outside buildings you owned around your home or farm- the more prosperous you were.  Or people thought you were. The complex at the old McFarlane farm in Ashton as it came to be known consisted of many log buildings scattered around the property.

The first building was a log shanty, and they threw it together quickly because they had too. Those buildings were the one with the large spaces between the logs that blew in the cold air in the winter. However, those shantys grew too small for growing families, so they were abandoned and usually a new frame house was built until the ultimate home could be achieved. That would be a stone home–meaning: they were now at the top of the heap in prosperity and social stature.

The McFarlane’s finally added a stone home to their complex and it had everything from the newel posts at the bottom of the stairs to the square fanlight and side lights. These were all the signatures of a master builder. But, it is the outbuildings that are a fascinating part of this farms history to me. Small medium and large log buildings frame the vista of meadows, flower and vegetable gardens making it a rich overall feel of rural contentment.

The Crown deeded the property to James McFarline in 1828. Similar to a lot of misspellings in those days his last name was later changed to McFarlane. When he died in 1867 the farm was given to his children and in 1891 his eldest son, James McFarlane was listed as the owner. James Lorne McFarlane was the last of the family dynasty to own the property obtaining the title in 1949.

In 1966 the McFarlane family ceased owning the property.

 

comments

Updates from Donna McFarlane– Thanks Donna!

The comments in the article above are not all accurate as the information was given by the owner at the time of the open house.
The farm lot 24 conc 10 was settled by James Mcfarlane in August of 1820
and settlement duties completed it was deeded in 1828. After his death
his youngest son James bought out his siblings (Catherine Drummond, Grace
Mccuan, Ann,Elizabeth,Janet, Martha and William) and retained this
property. James sr also owned Lot 23 conc 9 Beckwith which oldest son
William bought his siblings out and retained.
The log home was burnt and replaced by the stone home. The small two
storey log home that was used by the Mcfarlanes for a hen house was
actually moved by Lorne from lot 25 conc 10 (property that Lorne owned)
In Feb 7 1964 the properties were deeded to John Mcfarlane with Lorne and
Gladys having a life interest however because the farm could not support
two families John went to work off farm and it was sold.
Donald of Ashton and James of Beckwith and William of Goulbourn were
three brothers from Comrie Perthshire Scotland.

 

historicalnotes

 

Joseph Arthur Mcfarlane who was dean of medicine at
U of T was born on the Gordon Bourne property that his father Joseph son
of William of Goulbourn owned. He attended the Derry School.–Donna McFarlane
unnamed (67).jpg
unnamed (68).jpg
unnamed (69).jpg
Ashton Choir no idea of year–I’d say 50s??
Photos sent to me by Donna McFarlane

img

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal19 Feb 1897, FriPage 5

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal10 Mar 1945, SatPage 18

 

img.jpg

Mary Jane was daughter of Donald of Ashton.. the other was granddaughter of James of Beckwith–Donna McFarlane

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal03 Jan 1929, ThuPage 22

 

img.jpeg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  10 Feb 1900, Sat,  Page 7

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

Related reading:

 

The Ghost of the Lanark County Old Log Cabin

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine