Tag Archives: stanzel

Documenting Stanzel History- Downtown– Photos

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Documenting Stanzel History- Downtown– Photos

The storm I mentioned didn’t take it down on 1923 I will have to check on that date. The man in the picture is my great grandfather Stephen Stanzel.

Photos Allan Stanzel-Memories of the Ideal Candy Shop Stanzel’s TAXI next door
In 1950 Mr. Dowdall purchased the brick building at Bridge and Emily and moved his business. Walter Stanzel later lived here and operated his taxi business.

Joann VoyceI remember one of the Stanzel boys (Donnie) walking their raccoon on a leash and harness on Bridge Street

Stanzel’s shoe store-Memories of Stanzel shoe store.. Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage MuseumDo you know what this store turned into? Check the photo on the right. and OPEN today… Perfect day to get some new boots!!! Stephen William Stanzel began the business in 1888; it was later run by his sons Errol, Ross and Walter. Jim Graham purchased the business in 1958

Alos read-How Miss Miller the Milliner on Bridge Street Turned into a Stanzel Story

Remembering Errol Stanzel January 1962
Fred and Libby Stanzel White Duck Inn Genealogy
How Miss Miller the Milliner on Bridge Street Turned into a Stanzel Story
RUMOURS -Raccoon or Skunk?? Fact or Fiction- Stanzel History
The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place
The Fred Astaire of Carleton Place — John Stanzel
Carleton Place Blind Woman Saved Four Seniors

RUMOURS -Raccoon or Skunk?? Fact or Fiction- Stanzel History

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RUMOURS -Raccoon or Skunk??  Fact or Fiction- Stanzel History

For years local history documenter Marg Whyte said the following:

Mr. Dowdall purchased the brick building at Bridge and Emily and moved his business. Walter Stanzel later lived here and operated his taxi business. It was well known all around town that Mr. Stanzel had a pet skunk and and a pet raccoon as well. No word if they came for rides in his taxi!

True or False?

Allan StanzelI—— I know for a FACT he never had a pet skunk they did however have two pet raccoons one was very tame and the other not so.

1957 – The Raccoon of Bridge Street- Photo- Allan Stanzel

FACT___llan Stanzel
January 28, 2018  · 


Here’s a picture of my great grandfather Stephen from 1907. They had won the riflemans cup.

Among these defenders were more than fifty men of the Carleton Place Rifle Company.  The Carleton Place Rifle Company was formed at the start of the first expansion of a trained and permanent volunteer militia of the old Province of Canada, made to meet the risk of possible war between the United States and Great Britain at the outset of the American Civil War.  Like those of neighbouring localities and others throughout the province, it replaced a venerable succession of local but normally untrained and unarmed companies of the original sedentary militia.  A view of the participation of this community, then an unincorporated village, in Canada’s first major development of its own military forces is given in the pages of the locally published weekly newspapers of that day.

When war threats and consequent militia expansion came in 1862, local demand led to the formation of the first trained and equipped militia company to be based at Carleton Place.  In January of that year, in the words of the local Herald editor:

“At a meeting of some of the inhabitants of Carleton Place and vicinity, held at Lavallee’s Hotel on Saturday evening last, it was unanimously resolved that: – ‘In view of the unsettled state of affairs between the British and American governments and the possibility of war, it is expedient that a rifle company should be formed in this village and neighbourhood, to aid in the defence of their country.’

A muster roll was then opened and signed by those present at the meeting.  Several others have since added their names, making in all upwards of sixty.”

This number, including some young men of nearby farms, appears to equal nearly half of the total number of men of ages 18 to 40 living then in Carleton Place.

The gazetting of the Carleton Place Volunteer Militia Rifle Company came in December, 1862, with James Poole as captain and John Brown as lieutenant.  Within a month it was equipped and undertaking military training.  The Perth Courier in December stated:

“Volunteer Rifle Companies are organizing in all parts of the country.  In Carleton Place a Company has been Gazetted under Capt. Poole.  The volunteer movement if properly encouraged will soon result in twenty or thirty thousand well disciplined men.  Let it be made imperative on every Militia officer to be well drilled, and Canada would soon have her militia on a footing that would be ready for all emergencies.  At present the supply of Drill Instructors is sadly inadequate.”

The newly authorized company was first paraded in greatcoat uniforms on New Year’s Day, when its captain, news editor James Poole, wrote:

“According to notice given, the members of this company assembled in front of the ‘Herald’ office on the morning of New Year’s Day.  After being dressed in the coats and accoutrements forwarded by the Government from Quebec, they were drilled by Robert Bell, Jr., nephew of Robert Bell, Esq., M.P.P. for the North Riding.  They paraded the streets several times, and from the manner of performing the drill, dictated by their youthful teacher for the time, have given great promise of future utility, should any unfortunate occasion arise.”

By mid-July it was announced:

“In a few days the new clothing will be ready for distribution, and Carleton Place will be able to turn out one of the best looking Rifle Companies in Canada.  The Company will continue to drill as usual every Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening.”

Another summer notice stressed the need for target practice, as judged by the captain of the Carleton Place Company, who published the names and scores of marksmanship of each of some sixty militiamen:

“A rifle shooting match was held near this village on Saturday last, the 15th instant, between the Carleton Place Rifle Company and the Infantry Company from Almonte.  The Riflemen were requested to be in uniform at the armoury at six o’clock in readiness to march to the station to meet the Almonters. 

The Riflemen were uniformed in the regular Rifle dress – dark green tunics and grey pants, with red facings, dark belts and shakos to match.  The Infantry wore the scarlet tunics, gray pants, white belts and shakos trimmed to suit.  The shooting was conducted under the able management of Sergt. Cantlin.  The shooting on both sides was bad, and much below the average, there being but a few men in either company sufficiently practiced with the rifle.  The following is the score of points…”

(Totalling Almonte 107, Carleton Place 106).

A mid-winter inspection of these two companies in February, 1864, as reported by Captain Poole, showed the required drilling which lay ahead:

“The Almonte Infantry and Carleton Place Rifle Companies were inspected on Saturday last by Lt. Col. Earle of the Grenadier Guards, accompanied by Brigade Major Montgomery.  The attendance of both companies was much below what it should have been – The Almonte Company mustering only 27 including officers, and the Carleton Place Company 43.  The Colonel was well pleased with the condition of the arms and accoutrements of the men; but did not compliment them very highly on their proficiency in drill, which was owing to their very irregular attendance during the fall and winter.”

The American Civil War ended in the spring of the following year.  Within six months the Fenian Brotherhood in the United States was building its resources for its expected conquest of Canada, and in November, Canadian troops were posted for several months duty at border points from Prescott to Sarnia.

In Lanark County, contracts for erecting drill halls were let early in 1866 at Carleton Place and Almonte.  Construction of the Carleton Place armoury was aided by the promise of a £50 grant by the municipality.  It was built by William Pattie on the Beckwith Street site of the recently demolished skating rink bordering the park which then was the village market square.  Supported by its hand hewn beams, it remained a useful memorial of the perils of the 1860’s until destroyed in the town’s great fire of 1910.  Its use was granted at times for other community purposes ranging from the Beckwith Agricultural Society’s exhibitions of the 1860’s and the ambitious annual choral and musical festivals of the 1880’s to a series of Bishop R. C. Horner’s Hornerite revival meetings.  Almonte’s armoury was built for the combined purposes of the militia and the exhibitions of the North Lanark Agricultural Society.

When Fenian preparations in March had indicated they then might be about to attack, and ten thousand Canadian volunteers had been called for duty, no invasion occurred, although two minor ones were attempted.  Captain Poole’s Carleton Place newspaper reports of this time said:

“The rumors of a Fenian invasion have created a great stir through the country.  The volunteers are called for service and have responded nobly.  In our own village the company is filled up and is drilling three times a day.  The men are billeted on the inhabitants and have orders to be ready at a moments notice.”

Postponement came in two weeks, when it was reported (March 28) that:

“The prospect of a Fenian invasion of Canada is so far distant that the government feels justified in disbanding a portion of the volunteer force.  An order for the disbanding of the Carleton Place Rifle Company was received on Monday evening.  The bugle was sounded, and in a few minutes the whole company were at their posts.  They naturally thought that marching orders had been received, and were rather disappointed.

The new drill shed is to be completed by the first of September.  We would again express our gratification at the manner in which the company have conducted themselves while under arms.”

Forces on each side of the international boundary continued to prepare for a coming encounter.  Other views of the Canadian preparations will follow in the next section of this story of the times of Confederation. — Howard Morton Brown

Photo of Allan Stanzel with one of the largest beets in Carleton Place 1976
CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
15 Jun 1925, Mon  •  Page 3

Remembering Errol Stanzel January 1962

Fred and Libby Stanzel White Duck Inn Genealogy

How Miss Miller the Milliner on Bridge Street Turned into a Stanzel Story

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Fred Astaire of Carleton Place — John Stanzel

Carleton Place Blind Woman Saved Four Seniors

Taxi Rides –Beer Rides 1930’s and Local Taxi Driver “Kid (Norman) Bryce”

Documenting Stanzel History — Community Comments — Stanzell’s TAXI and the IDEAL Candy Shop

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Documenting Stanzel History — Community Comments — Stanzell’s TAXI and the IDEAL Candy Shop
Stanzel House on Bridge Street–all photos from Allan Stanzel

Thank you to Allan Stanzel for all these photos and the community for your memories. Documented forever now.

John EdwardsThe house was notable as a pre-Confederation house, probably the 1840’s or the 1850’s. It had fine classical proportions and showed no structural problems.The Town had it destroyed for a parking lot as part of a hope to improve the plight of the Main Street. There was zero impact…

Donna McfarlaneRita and mose Okilman lived in the small side also… Garnet and Wilma lived there when first married also.. and i think a family Jenkins also

Allan StanzelDonna Mcfarlane remember Mose and Rita well Mose would take us kids to the dairy on Allan street and get us ice cream and it was always just before dinner Gram would tell him not to Donna you knew Gram it would always be a feast especially if your mom Martha was visiting. Miss those days good memories.

Donna McfarlaneAllan Stanzel Yes lots of memories Allan.. called your GRanma aunt Etheleen… as did my kids.. She and mom were like sisters

Allan StanzelYes and we called your Mom Aunt Martha

James McNallyWasn’t the gas station beside it

Allan StanzelGas station was next to the doucett building

Doug ThorntonLived at 92 Bridge Street, next door (where Doucette’s building is now) from 54 to 59, friends with Don Stanzel. Remember the raccoon.

Allan StanzelThat was my Grandparents home Walter and Ethelyn Stanzel they owned it before 1950 not sure the exact year but definitely during war time. It had a small building at the side that was a candy store and a large barn and garage in the back. My parents lived in one side in the late 50s until early 1960s. There was a house beside it until it was taken down and Doucett put an office building beside it in the mid 70s. My Grandfather ran his Taxi business out of there also sharpened skates in the back shed for people and the local hockey teams .They did have a pet raccoon they would walk on a leash but not a skunk that I recall I have pics of it that I will dig up and post. My grandmother sold the house in the late 70s to the town and they removed the barn and structures in the back and put in a parking lot. I grew up in that house when my parents went to work it was always fun to explore from the house with an old stone basement to the garage and the barn in the back.

Allan StanzelI see my grandmother on the left on the front step the other two ladies not so sure more than likely her sisters.

Dan WilliamsI was telling someone the other day that that Taxi sign was reachable for a jumping kid! Donnie and I went to school together amongst other things.

Chris MichiePaved paradise, put up a parking lot.

Rich Morgan

My Mother worked at The Ideal Candy and Smoke Shop in the mid 60’s! Friday evenings were the best; we picked her up after work and always were allowed a treat!


Allan Stanzel
Rich Morgan I can still remember the smell off candy and pipe tobacco when you would walk in the door.

Rich Morgan

Allan Stanzel 5 cent sponge toffee in the clear plastic wrapper! My favourite!

Allan StanzelThe building was all clapboard when my grandparents bought it he then in the 50s had it sided and bricked on the front. Information is a little off I can provide pictures of it being bricked my Mom has them if anyone is interested as well as my Grandfather walking the raccoon on Main Street.

Remembering Errol Stanzel January 1962

Fred and Libby Stanzel White Duck Inn Genealogy

How Miss Miller the Milliner on Bridge Street Turned into a Stanzel Story

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Fred Astaire of Carleton Place — John Stanzel

Carleton Place Blind Woman Saved Four Seniors

Remembering Errol Stanzel January 1962

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Remembering Errol Stanzel January 1962

On the evening of January 10 th, Errol R. Stanzel of Carleton Place met a tragic death when he was killed by the westbound C . P. R. Dayliner about 7.10 p.m . on the level crossing on the eastern side of Almonte on Andrew ‘s Bros, farm . The crew of the train said he was standing on the track in front of his stalled car and appeared to be waving. So far no one seems to know why the unfortunate man was where he was at that time. One guess is that he missed the turn at Perth Street and continued along Country Street and in some manner stalled on the track. It could easily be that he underestimated the speed of the Budd car. He was in his 70th year and retired a few years ago after conducting a successful retail shoe business in Carleton Place for many years. Dr. J. A . McEwen, County Corner was called to the scene of the accident. The funeral was held by the Fleming Bros. Funeral H om e, Carleton Place to St. James A nglican Church on S at.. Jan . 13 at 2 p.m. Interment was in St. James Cemetery.

Photo- Allan Stanzel

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Jan 1962, Thu  •  Page 46

What is sad is another Stanzel, Fred, was hit by a train-Fred and Libby Stanzel White Duck Inn Genealogy

Stephen Stanzel and his family in front of their home on 29 Queen Street circa 1906.

Left to right-Ross, Errol, Annie, Dorothy on her mum’s lap. Wattie is on the boardwalk, Minerva and Lola. —Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Fred and Libby Stanzel White Duck Inn Genealogy

How Miss Miller the Milliner on Bridge Street Turned into a Stanzel Story

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Fred Astaire of Carleton Place — John Stanzel

Fred and Libby Stanzel White Duck Inn Genealogy

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Fred and Libby Stanzel White Duck Inn Genealogy

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Jun 1941, Sat  •  Page 2

For a number of years before it became Wave’s on Franktown Road the business was run by Libby and Fred Stanzel as The White Duck Inn. If you have any information please email me.

345 Franktown Road- Wave’s Inn– photo Lorie Paul
Hi Linda. My name is Lorie Paul. I moved to Carleton Place last October, but have had a family cottage on the lake for over 60 years. My Dad (Kenneth Paul) grew up on Napoleon St. I have this picture of my Dad working at what was a lunch counter at 345 Franktown Road (Wave’s Inn). He would have been around 14 or 15 at the time, so early to mid 1930s.
I have always wondered who the other gentleman in the picture was. Wondering if I should post the picture to see if anyone knows who it is, and perhaps a family member would like to see it as well. I’m not sure if I’m allowed to post in any of the Carleton Place FB pages. My dad is standing on the left in the picture. Thanks so much, and have a great day.
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Oct 1937, Fri  •  Page 1
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Oct 1937, Mon  •  Page 6
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Apr 1934, Tue  •  Page 19
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Jan 1937, Tue  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Oct 1948, Tue  •  Page 5

John Stanzel said:

He said he was introduced to dancing at an early age because his father, the late Fred Stanzel, “liked to jig” and would act as caller for square dancing at functions such as the firemen’s ball in Carleton Place. When he was about seven John began tap dance lessons with the late Eileen Snowden.

John Stanzel said he was introduced to dancing at an early age because his father, the late Fred Stanzel, “liked to jig” and would act as caller for square dancing at functions such as the firemen’s ball in Carleton Place. When he was about seven John began tap dance lessons with the late Eileen Snowden. 1979

Related reading:

More Memories of Wave’s Inn- Julie Sadler

Down At the Twist and Shout–Wave’s Inn

Interesting Tidbits — Frances Moore

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School — Wava McDaniel Baker

Documenting Franktown Road Before it Changes

Do You Know This Man? Wave’s Inn –Lorie Paul

How Miss Miller the Milliner on Bridge Street Turned into a Stanzel Story

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How Miss Miller the Milliner on Bridge Street Turned into a Stanzel Story
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Feb 1900, Thu  •  Page 4

Max Movshovitz’s dry goods store was located in what was known as the
Sumner Building. Morbic Sumner operated a dry goods store also. The Sumner Building at 154-160 Bridge Street is on Lot 25, which is one of the larger lots on Bridge Street. In the 1960’s a large fire occurred and a parking lot took over where some of the businesses had been. So it is unclear based on land deeds if some of the businesses were located in the Sumner Building or at what is now the parking lot.

Dr. Winters was a dentist and his practice was taken over by Dr. Smith an MD. Two Stanzel sisters operated a millinery store where Miss Miller had a stand. William Stanzel, originally of France, settled in Goulbourn and in 1874, William moved his shoe shop from Goulbourn to Carleton Place. William’s son Stephen learned the trade and Ross and Earl later owned Stanzel’s shoes. These two Stanzel gals were William’s daughters .

So after that I began to research trying to find the Stanzel girls I found this terrible accident that fatally wounded Richard Stanzel. He had three sons, but one of his children, Viola P. died at 6 months old. After Richard accidentally passed in 1934 at the age of 61, his wife Elizabeth Ida died 6 years later in 1940 at the age of 64.

Stanzel Genealogy.

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Richard Milton Stanzel
1873 – 1934

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Apr 1934, Thu  •  Page 3

Spouse:Elizabeth Ida Saunders
Father:William Stanzel
Mother:Catherine Wright
Children:Viola P.
Birth:05/02/1873 Stittsville Ottawa Ontario Canada
Death:11/04/1934 Ottawa Ottawa Ontario Canada
Residence:1 Jun 1921 Carleton Place Lanark Ontario Canada
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Oct 1940, Tue  •  Page 16

The Stanzel Shoe Store

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Fred Astaire of Carleton Place — John Stanzel

Irish Sweepstakes 1948 Two Men Stood to Win 100,000!!

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Irish Sweepstakes 1948 Two Men Stood to Win 100,000!!

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Mar 1948, Fri,  Page 1

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  13 Mar 1948, Sat,  Page 1

So did they win? I couldn’t find anymore information so I guess they both split 50 bucks..

Andrew Balz on Twitter said: Their horse finished 12th, so no big payout..I also seem to recall the prize was £100,000 ($240,000?)..this when $2500 was a good salary

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historicalnotes

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 Mar 1936, Sat,  Page 29

 

relatedreading

Who Won the Baby Contest in 1889?

Sixteen Tons–Carleton Place Man Wins Big!

The Publicity Club Coupon Contest of Smiths Falls 1931

Carleton Place 1940’s —- The Popularity Contest

Win a House in Carleton Place!

Dueling Shoes and Fiddles and Step Dancing Contest July 15 1974

The Stanzel Shoe Store

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Fred Astaire of Carleton Place — John Stanzel

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

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CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Mar 1948, Fri  •  Page 1

The Stanzel Shoe Store

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The Stanzel Shoe Store

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Any memories on this store?

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Photo- Allan Stanzel

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Photo- Allan Stanzel

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Here’s another Linda my great grandfather in 1907 taken from the 1968 newspaper. Photo from Allan Stanzel

 

related reading

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Fred Astaire of Carleton Place — John Stanzel

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The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

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The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum has many great pictures and you should visit their Facebook page. Here are some amazing pictures of the Stanzel family homes.

 

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This is 20 Caldwell Street in 1933. That’s Shirley Stanzel sitting out front with her doll. Photo from–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Carleton Place Herald- Photo from–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Photo- Google Images

 

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Stephen Stanzel and his family in front of their home on 29 Queen Street circa 1906.

Left to right-Ross, Errol, Annie, Dorothy on her mum’s lap. Wattie is on the boardwalk, Minerva and Lola. —Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Photo- Google Images-29 Queen Street

 

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Photo- Google Images- He later moved to 204 Lake Avenue where he had the same home built. Both houses still exist. Right across from the High School.

 

historicalnotes

Joan Lepage—And there at 204 Lake Ave. Ethleen Stanzel who is now 100 years old still resides; wife of the late Walter(Wattie) Stanzel who’s parents built and owned these historical homes.

 

RELATED READING:

The Fred Astaire of Carleton Place — John Stanzel