Tag Archives: st james

The History of St. James Woods

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The History of St. James Woods

Photo- Mark Smith

This is from 2013 St. James Woodlot Trail dedication (Mark) Recommend that Council name the 20 Acres of Natural Environment North of the North Industrial Park as “St James Woods”, and dedicate the trails to Mr. John Hardisty Sellers, a Town Urban Forest Committee Member who also looked after these woods for the Anglican Church. This would officially confirm the current status of this area that was done by the Anglican Church as per the sign at the trails entrance by the cemetery. Location: Ramsay Con 7 PT Lot 2 RP 27R9978 Parts 2 and 3 (from Mr. Phil Hogan) : Common locale- West of the Anglican Cemetery on Ramsay 8, North of Bates Drive in the North Industrial Park.– Mark Smith

St. James Woods Trail

The early history up to 2005 was from John Sellers who was very big in managing the Woodlot. I was asked by the wardens if I could help out after his passing and I did but not to the extent that John did.
I have put in the map where all the trails are. You will note on the map there is a blank space. This is Sonnenburg Woods and the trails go across this piece of Town property.

Jim McCready

Thanks to Jim McCready for getting this from St. James Anglican Church for us to document

St. James Cemetery

Searchable Database of Parish Records

The church cemetery is situated adjacent to the 8th Line of Ramsay Township, immediately north of the Town of Carleton Place, about a kilometre north of the church.St. James Cemetery was founded on what is known as “Clergy Lands.” This land was granted to Protestant Churches under the 1791 Constitution. Over the years, the granting of these lands became a political issue and eventually the lands reverted to the Crown.

In 1856 the parish of St. James purchased the land for the sum of 100 pounds. For many years, the land supplied the wood for heating the Church and Rectory.St. James Cemetery dates back to circa 1834, the date of the founding of the Parish. Sometime between 1871 and 1890, George Dummert, who had emigrated from England in 1871, was asked to draw up a plan of plots for the cemetery. Prior to then there wasn’t an official plan.In 1903, a vault was constructed and for many years it was used by all denominations in Carleton Place. (In Canada the earth often freezes six feet deep and a temporary interment space is needed until the spring). Many of the pioneers of the Town of Carleton Place and many of St. James’ faithful parishioners rest in our cemetery. Decoration Sunday is held on the middle Sunday of August.The Right Reverend Robert Jefferson, Bishop of Ottawa from 1939-54, in his book Faith of our Fathers refers to St. James Cemetery as “now regarded as one of the finest private cemeteries in Canada.” The Parish of St. James is proud of that accolade.

In, memory of, Jacob Bond, who died, May 9, 1878, aged 37 Y’rs – also his, infant child, Joseph Francis, who died July 24, 1874 AE 1 Y’r & 11 mos.
Once repaired and now discarded.

For all you city folk as they say that read my pages– Carleton Place has a lot of amazing trails.. I already posted St. James Woods– today another surprise with Robert McClellan and Jill Heinerth– Yesterday I learned about crevices etc etc. on the St. James Walk– what will I learn today on the Mississippi Riverwalk trail.

Photos by Mark Smith of St. James Woods

Photos by Mark Smith of St. James Woods

Jim McCready
11:41 AM (2 hours ago)



to me, Joanne







A bit of history which is not documented but told to me by Old Butcher Bill Bennett.
The cement structure you see in one of Mark’s photo was a watering hole for his cattle. Bill would graze his cattle in the open fields by Ramsay 7th line. He would then heard his cattle up the main trail to the watering structure. That is why you can see remains of fencing on both sides of the trail to keep the cattle out of the Woodlot.
This structure is now on Sonnenburg Woods .


Take Care
Jim

Photos by Mark Smith of St. James Woods

Thanks to everyone who put this together!!

Clarence Herbert Goth – Goth’s Life During 1928-1933

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Clarence Herbert Goth – Goth’s Life During 1928-1933
 -
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Aug 1928, Mon  •  Page 18

In 1928 Clarence Herbert Goth. (1874-1933) was Sent to Canada’s Shutter Island for the Death of Sarah McArton

I have written about Sarah McArton’s death but never seen any media about Clarence Herbert Goth until today– so I have documented it.

Name:Clarence Herbert Goth
Age:23
Birth Year:abt 1875
Birth Place:Beckwith
Marriage Date:8 Feb 1898
Marriage Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:William Goth
Mother:Margaret McDewer
Spouse:Sophia Brice
Name:Sophia Brice
Age:18
Birth Year:abt 1880
Birth Place:Beckwith
Marriage Date:8 Feb 1898
Marriage Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:Thomas Brice Brice
Mother:Margaret Brice
Spouse:Clarence Herbert Goth

 Sophia Brice and Clarence Herbert GothMarried on Tuesday, February 8, 1898 in Lanark, Ontario.

In the newspapers it was said Sarah McArton of Ramsay Township was hit and killed by a drunk driver in Carleton Place in  August 1928. The jury in Carleton Place blamed the McArton buggy for being on the wrong side of the road.  Sarah’s brother John had placed the family buggy facing west on Edmond Street so that the east bound traffic passed against them. Mr. Goth on passing east hit the buggy with both McArton siblings in it they were getting in after church. (St. James)

W. W. Anderson and his son W. J. Anderson said that Goth was travelling way too fast at 15 to 20 miles an hour and they had to pull over at the intersection to allow him to pass. Other witnesses were: John White Sr., Harry Bennett, William Logan, Everard White, and Arthur Gerrard. The accused in a Carleton Place court on a charge of manslaughter and allowed out on bail of $5000.

He spent only six months in the Burwash Prison Farm or now known as Canada’s Shutter Island. Sent to Canada’s Shutter Island for the Death of Sarah McArton and died in

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Aug 1928, Tue  •  Page 13

The McArton’s of Ramsay

Sent to Canada’s Shutter Island for the Death of Sarah McArton

? In the Belfry of St. James

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? In the Belfry of St. James

 

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Boys will be boys as they say. Back in 1872 there were a few local lads who played a Halloween trick on the sexton of the Carleton Place Anglican church. On the day pf Halloween the church had some repairs done and was occupied, but ladders that were somehow forgotten still were against the roof and ran up to the belfry.

Halloween that year either fell on a Friday or a Saturday, so obviously the workmen were thinking more of the weekend than their ladders. Anyways the time was close enough to Sunday to give a suggestion to the local boys who were ready to celebrate Halloween. Those were the days when boys thought nothing of dragging a buggy on top of a shed on Halloween, so why tie something to a beam in the belfry. Two boys ascended by the ladders next to the church, cut the bell rope, then tied it to a beam in the belfry.

On the Sunday morning following Halloween a large crowd of boys assembled outside the church before the morning service, while a couple crept into the church to see what would happen when the sexton tried to ring the bell. These boys saw the sexton tug and tug at the rope. The rope did not move. The sexton looked surprised. After a time it dawned on him that something was wrong.

He ascended the bell-tower and there he found out what was happening.. But before the cut rope had been re-tied the congregation had begun to arrive, all asking each other why the bell had not been rung as usual. Some suggested that the Sexton had taken sick. But in due time the facts leaked out. On the next Halloween the sexton stayed in the church. The boys however, did not attempt to repeat their exploit.

 

St James Timeline

  • 1834-Founding of the Parish & first Church built
  • 1881-Decision was made to replace the original Church (cost of $3,999)
  • 1882-First service conducted in present Church
  • 1892-93-Rectory built at the corner of Edmund & William Streets
  • 1903-Present bell in the tower was installed to replace and earlier one
  • 1903-Casavant pipe organ installed
  • 1903-Oak altar (presently in the chapel) given in memory of Canon Burke
  • 1903-Vault was constructed in southeast portion of clergy reserve
  • 1913-Electricity arrives at St James
  • 1924-Elliott Memorial Hall built
  • 1966-Church wing with offices, washrooms & choir room added to church building
  • 1973-Church organ rebuilt
  • 1975-First major renovation since its erection in 1882
    • New freestanding altar & surrounding altar rail
    • Choir stalls moved from chancel to the transept
    • More participatory liturgy introduced
  • 1977-Old rectory sold & new one built next to clergy reserve
  • 2007-“New” rectory sold & property severed from the clergy reserve
  • 2013-Old church wing removed from church building
  • 2013-New Parish Hall with offices, accessible washrooms, choir room, classrooms created to replace old structure. Joined to church with glass link.
  • 2017-Elliott Memorial Hall sold

Names Names Names of St. James Carleton Place Genealogy

 

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 Friday night October 5- FREE! Donations to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum would be appreciated–

AND it’s on!!! Explore the amusing and ghastly tales of old Carleton Place. Escape into the past as your offbeat guide Linda Seccaspina provides you with an eerie, educational, yet fun-filled adventure. Learn about many of Carleton Place’s historic figures and just like you they walk the dark streets of Carleton Place in search of nightly entertainment, yet, they don’t know that they themselves are the entertainment. Walkabout begins Friday night October 5 at 7 pm in front of Scott Reid’s Office–224 Bridge Street– the former Leland Hotel –and ends at the Grand Hotel. About one hour.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

  1. relatedreading

    The Ghost Lights in St. James Cemetery

  2. The Shadow People of Lake Ave East

    When the Psychics Came to Town– Madame Monsuer

    Ed Fleming — The First Funeral Parlour in Carleton Place

    Howls in the Night in Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

    The Devil You Say in Carleton Place? Our Haunted Heritage

    Outside Looking in at The Eccentric Family of Henry Stafford — Our Haunted Heritage

    The Funeral Train That Went Through Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

    Stairway to Heaven in a Cemetery? Our Haunted Heritage

    Old Wives Tales of Death — Our Haunted Heritage

    Funerals With Dignity in Carleton Place – Just a Surrey with a Fringe on Top —- Our Haunted Heritage

    Death by Corset? Bring Out Your Dead and Other Notions! Our Haunted Heritage

    Things You Just Don’t say at a Funeral— Even if you Are a Professional Mourner

    The Non Kosher Grave — Our Haunted Heritage

    Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

     Could the Giant Pike of Carleton Place Have Turned Into the Lake Memphremagog Monster?

    Carleton Place Was Once Featured in Ripley’s Believe it or Not! Our Haunted Heritage

    Young Hearts Run Free — Warning– Story Could be Upsetting to Some

    Twitching or Grave Dousing– Our Haunted Heritage

    Walking With Ghosts — Morals, Meningitis, and The Manse

What is Heritage by Cheryl Thomas 11 Years Old Franktown

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What is Heritage by Cheryl Thomas 11 Years Old Franktown

 

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From the collection of teacher Doris Blackburn/ Karen Blackburn Chenier

Thanks

 

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Hello Linda
 
I have been busy scanning a few of my grandparents photo “Snapshot” album. I came across these of St. Johns Church.
So, I googled it and discovered an article you had written. The writing on the photos is that of my grandmother.
There is no other info on the photo, but most of the album is of the kids. Dad appears to be around 6 or 7, so I would have
to guess this was taken in 1928-1930. Interesting to find these. Our family has been in Oshawa since 1900, and
I have no idea what would have taken them towards Ottawa.
Hope you like them. You may use them as you wish. Credit to Mabel Rundle (my grandmother)
 
Ted Rundle

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

A Monument Back in Time –Time Travelling in Lanark County —Part 1

Like a Prayer I left My Mark in Franktown — Part 2

How Franktown Got Its Name

How They Stopped Body Snatching in Lanark County

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How They Stopped Body Snatching in Lanark County

 - Several cases of body snatching are reported...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 07 Mar 1896, Sat,
  3. Page 5

 

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Body snatching was once notorious and had many particularly atrocious offences. Especially at St. James Cemetery in Carleton Place where a woman’s body was once desecrated from the coffin and later found dumped into the cellar of the Kingston Medical college and re-embalmed. But, years later the burying ground custodians could scarcely recall an instance of the kind within their experience. At its peak grave robbing was a profitable vocation to keep a number of  people employed.

Aside from other considerations, it  later would be next to impossible to get a body out of St.James cemetery without being detected in the act. In the late 1880s the grounds were  patrolled through the night, and precaution was taken to prevent depredations of any kind.

A cemetery superintendent said: “The body snatching business ceased to be profitable when we used a pine box to enclose the casket”. Before the introduction to this outer box it was comparatively easy for the grave robber to narrow excavation at the head of grave, lift the wooden lid over the through which the face of the is seen, smash the glass, insert a hook under the chin and jerk the body out of the grave. But after the improvements the grave had to be excavated and the pine box unscrewed before the coffin was accessible. This takes some time, and so increased the chances discovery that few cared to engage in the business.


Unlike years before, the only bodies for which a high price was asked were those of persons dying in some mysterious way or some rare disease for which physicians or others interested were often willing to pay to induce the body snatcher to long chances.

Of course the body of a person of great wealth was always more or less in danger, but their ire usually made practically impenetrable. While there was little body snatching after the late 1800s work done by the body snatchers of a past generation often comes to light when, through the wishes of relatives or otherwise, it becomes necessary to transfer a corpse to another spot.

Many an empty was found from years past, and the cemetery men had to conceal from the relatives the absence of the remains their resting place. The custodian would seek to convince the friends of the long departed one that it was better that they should not look at the corpse, that it was decayed recognition, and that the sight of would be unpleasant to them. If he succeeded, as he usually persuading them to forego the of another last look, he manages enough sand and earth into the coffin to give it the proper weight and eludes suspicion.

In other cases the head of the coffin is found to have smashed in and there are marks of ghastly body hook under the chin,  the remains are intact, showing the robbers were interrupted at their work or found that they had the wrong corpse.

But, the value of a corpse depreciated as the years went by. The physicians and schools got all the bodies they wanted at the hospitals.

 

 - Smiths Falls News SMITHS FALLS, Nor. ; I. f...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 03 Nov 1922, Fri,
  3. Page 23
Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

The Invasion of the Body Snatchers of Lanark County

Macabre Jobs of the Past–Resurrectionists

Stairway to Heaven in a Cemetery? Our Haunted Heritage

How Sweet is the Highway to Hell?

Did Samuel Pittard of Ashton Murder His Wife?

I Bet You Didn’t Know this About St. James in Carleton Place

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I Bet You Didn’t Know this About St. James in Carleton Place

 

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Photo Linda Seccaspina

The first church built in 1834 was a frame building, built in the Georgian style and was a 64 feet long and 32 wide and had a gallery.

The tower of the church which was 44 feet high was maintained over a porch that was the width of the buildings that had 4 columns supporting its roof.

In August of 1834 Bishop Charles James Stewart of Quebec came and confirmed 97 of their parishioners. The congregation of St. James was 300, of which most were farming families.

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They began to build the present stone building in 1881 and it officially opened on Wednesday, January 11, 1882.

The church bell dates back to 1896, and at one time it rang with help of a rope outside and a ‘special rhythm’ by the bell ringer. It was also used as a local fire alarm which used to call the local volunteers. It weighs 3/4 of a ton.

The church bell used to count hours replacing the now silent Post Office clock.

In 1974 lightening struck the bell that was now electronically controlled. Beginning at 8 am the hour was tolled until 7 pm. At noon, 6 and 7 pm carillon hymns once played.

Canon Jarvis 1884-90 designed the oak furnishings of the chancel. In 1830 the kneeler and the communion rail needlepoint was done by the rector’s wife Mrs. E. Boswell.

Other current needlepoint cushions and kneelers were handmade and donated by long time organist Ralph Langtry.

In 1903 a Cassavant Pipe Organ was installed and it was an air hand pumped which was electrified in 1955, and rebuilt in 1974 with a new console and was dedicated that year.

If you sit in the second section, first pew on the right hand side you will see some signatures carved in the upper pew. About 90 years ago Miss E.Virtue and her accomplice Master C. Mull did it–Read–If You Squint Really Hard Can you see a Yeti?

Muriel Simpson who lived on Campbell Street was a faithful parishioner of St. James Anglican Church. If you look at the big cross that hangs in the church, she and her husband Eric donated it. I know because she told me a couple of hundred times.

Muriel made an impact on me, and there is never ever a day that I will not forget her. You see, she made me promise that I would sit in her spot in a certain church pew after she died.  If you were sitting in it when she was alive she made you move. She told me that bad things would happen to me if I didn’t sit on her spot upon her demise. Read more here..The “Margaret Thatcher” of Campbell Street

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Jan 1939, Fri,  Page 23

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

St. James…..

Imagine if All the People…. Photos of Father David Andrew’s Retirement Party

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

Father David Andrew – Just Call Me Father D!

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

St James and St Mary’s Christmas Bazaar 1998 -Who Do You Know?

Memories of The Old Church Halls

 

Local Churches…

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

The Church that Died

Old Churches of Lanark County

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

 

 

 

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

 

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Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–
Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

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Early Newspapers- Accident of John Devlin

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Early Newspapers- Accident of John Devlin

 

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Newspaperman 1860

 

WARNING GRAPHIC!

September 2 1898-Almonte Gazette

 

Terrible Accident Occurred on the C.P.R. track here last Saturday night (August 28). John Devlin, the seventeen-year-old son of Mr. James Devlin, Carleton Place, in company with a couple of younger boys, was stealing a ride from the junction town to Almonte on what is known as the *“blind baggage” of the Winnipeg express, and while the train was speeding along opposite the Church street crossing, about two hundred yards from the station, young Devlin jumped off between the tracks and, according to some boys who were eyewitnesses, he bounded back with his head across the track.

A wheel passing over his head, smashing the skull and crushing the lower part of his face into a pulp. Death must have been instantaneous. The probability is that deceased never knew what happened him. A couple of his toes were also cut off. The face presented a horrible sight, and was totally unrecognizable. Some young men identified the unfortunate young man by his clothing. Coroner Burns was soon on the scene, and communicated with the relatives and the railway authorities with as little delay as possible, but the ‘body remained on the ground for some time before authority was given for its -removal, the decision in the interval being that no inquest was necessary.

Undertaker Donaldson then took the body to his “ morgue,” where it was dressed and coffined, after which, at the request of two brothers of deceased, he drove it to the home at Carleton Place, whence the funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon, to St. James’ church and cemetery, and was very largely attended.

The Herald says: “ Deceased was an employee in the Hawthorne woolen mill, a weaver, and was a steady and industrious young man. The parents and brothers and sisters have the sympathy of the whole town in their sudden and heavy bereavement. He was 17 year old.

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From 

St. James Anglican Cemetery – Block A-to-J,
230 – 8th Concession of Ramsay Twp, Carleton Place
Lanark County

 

Why would anyone publish anything this graphic?

Once upon a time, newspapers were a primary source of information. In the early 1800s, newspaper publishing bore little resemblance to the business it is today. Most newspapers had a small circulation, and were staffed by a very small number of workers. Division of labor in the newspaper publishing process – news gathering and reporting, editing, and printing–was uncommon, though it became more so as the period progressed. Even in the larger, urban newspapers, the owner of the paper would usually serve as the reporter and editor. Apprentices often assisted with printing and delivery.

Their principal function was not necessarily to inform, but to make money for the publisher, which they did by selling copies of the paper to readers and selling advertisements to businesses. Nineteenth century newspapers, unlike urban papers in our own multimedia universe, often carried very detailed coverage of a much broader range of activities – lengthy transcriptions of evidence given in court, for example, or the minute by minute happenings of a municipal council meeting, or an accident similar to the above newspaper article. The hunger for news and the lack of well-researched stories often meant that rumour and hearsay were published as fact. Then, as now, sensational stories helped sell newspapers, and checking the facts did not always take priority. So don’t believe everything you read in the newspapers:)

 

 

*blind baggage
:  a railway baggage, express, or postal car that has no door or opening at one end

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal11 Oct 1929, FriPage 22

 

relatedreading

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Local Newspapers–Yellow Journalism

What Happens When Newspapers Finally Die and the Internet Reaches Capacity?

Dr.Preston Was in the House — The Case of the Severed Foot

Sent to Canada’s Shutter Island for the Death of Sarah McArton

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Sent to Canada’s Shutter Island for the Death of Sarah McArton

 

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September 6 1928

Herbert Goth, charged with manslaughter in connection with the death of 84 year-old Miss Sarah McArton, appeared on Tuesday before Magistrate R.A. Patchell at Carleton Place for preliminary hearing, and was remanded for one week

 

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Sarah McArton of Ramsay Township was hit and killed by a drunk driver in Carleton Place in  August 1928. The jury in Carleton Place blamed the McArton buggy for being on the wrong side of the road.  Sarah’s brother John had placed the family buggy facing west on Edmond Street so that the east bound traffic passed against them. Mr. Goth on passing east hit the buggy with both McArton siblings in it they were getting in after church. (St. James)

 

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Dr. Johnson said that Miss McArton’s death was due to shock, not the bruises cuts and broken legs she acquired from the accident. Chief of police Irvine told Dr. Metcalfe he did not object to the way the buggy was parked and did notice the intoxicants on Herbert Goth.

W. W. Anderson and his son W. J. Anderson said that Goth was travelling way too fast at 15 to 20 miles an hour and they had to pull over at the intersection to allow him to pass. Other witnesses were: John White Sr., Harry Bennett, William Logan, Everard White, and Arthur Gerrard. The accused in a Carleton Place court on a charge of manslaughter and allowed out on bail of $5000.

He spent only six months in the Burwash Prison Farm or now known as Canada’s Shutter Island.

 

 

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The prison was located near Sudbury and was called The Burwash Correctional Centre from 1972 to 1974. They left the main building (hospital) but gutted them (including the wiring & plumbing). All one storey buildings were bulldozed including barns, sheds, garages. The farm was a minimum – medium security facility that housed mainly non-violent offenders. It was a full fledged farm and the prisoners grew their own food.

The original name was Farmlands. The prison was renamed the Burwash Industrial Farm in 1927, and in 1972 the name was changed to Burwash Correctional Centre. In the beginning of the farm the guards may have lived there though. When they shut it down they made sure that no successive government could ever reopen it without incurring a major expense.They bulldozed, crushed, and buried everything.

 

 

historicalnotes

 - Woman Is Killed Entering Buggy as She Leaves...

 

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 27 Aug 1928, Mon,
  3. Page 4

 - Mainy Pay Tribute To Mishap Victim One Of...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 29 Aug 1928, Wed,
  3. Page 13

Burwash prison– CLICK here

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal16 Nov 1928, FriPage 3

 

 

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Photo by contributor Kal Biro – Posted September, 2006

 

 

They Still Call Her Mrs. Blackburn!

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One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, and with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. Doris Blackburn turned 80 on July 23, and at 80, you know everything, but nobody asks you.

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Some teachers just have a knack for literature– but at eighty-you still read the print edition of the newspaper, and what you like best is “Forty Years Ago Today

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The best teachers teach from the heart-not from the book. At eighty-you tell your great grandkids that when you were their age, going to the movies cost less than a pack of gum today.

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At eighty however-you no longer chew gum because of what it does to your dentures.

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Teachers want their students to feel impassioned and empowered, and at eighty, you’re not elderly, you’re “chronologically gifted.”

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At eighty, people shouldn’t eat health food, they need all the preservatives they can get.

 

 

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What perks do I now get at 80? ( I’m still waiting for mine at 65 Doris-please let me know)

Just a note– everything you see in the photo is edible– the teapot, teacup and saucer,cake, place mat– all edible.

Cake by Twisted Sugar Cakery–Kelly Lloyd

 

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To teach is to touch lives and thanks to Facebook, Doris will never forget the birthdays of people she doesn’t really know–even at 80!

 

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A good teacher is like a candle, it consumes itself to light the way for others. However,maybe Doris don’t necessarily agree with everything they say, and certainly not what is going on behind her right now.

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Good teachers know how to bring out the best in students. But, those numbers still aren’t right- what the heck are they doing back there? Contemplating a group hug?

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Balloons only have one life-but education is the key to success in life, and teachers make a lasting impact in the lives of their students- and as seen today at St.James Hall- as we celebrated the 80th birthday of this wonderful lady of Carleton Place. She will be forever known to most as— Mrs. Blackburn.

Happy 80th Birthday Doris! You’re just starting over!

 

Great picture of Mrs. Blackburn. It’s hard to break old school habits–I still call her Mrs. Blackburn-Sandra Hurdis Finigan

 

Imagine if All the People…. Photos of Father David Andrew’s Retirement Party

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Please Play While Viewing– with quotes from the song Imagine and Let There Be Peace on Earth

 

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Imagine all the people
Living for today…

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Imagine there’s no countries
It isn’t hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for

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Imagine all the people
Living life in peace..

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Imagine no possessions
I wonder if you can

 

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No need for greed or hunger
A brotherhood of man

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Imagine all the people
Sharing all the world…

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Let there be peace on earth
And let it begin with me.
Let there be peace on earth
The peace that was meant to be.

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When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace– Jimi Hendrix

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Peace cannot be kept by force; it can only be achieved by understanding. Albert Einstein

 

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AND Let’s have a better picture of Ronnete:)

Let peace begin with me
Let this be the moment now.
With every step I take
Let this be my solemn vow

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Let there be peace on earth
And let it begin with me.
Let there be peace on earth
The peace that was meant to be.

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With God as our father
Brothers all are we

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Family is not an important thing. It’s everything.

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Let me walk with my brother
In perfect harmony.

 

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If a country is to be corruption free and become a nation of beautiful minds, I strongly feel there are three key societal members who can make a difference. They are the father, the mother and the teacher. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam

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You may say I’m a dreamer
But I’m not the only one

 

 

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I hope someday you’ll join us
And the world will be as one

 

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Let there be peace on earth
And let it begin with me.

Peace Be With You Father David- we will miss you

”I’m not afraid
To take a stand
Everybody
Come take my hand
We’ll walk this road together, through the storm
Whatever weather, cold or warm
Just letting you know that you’re not alone
Holler if you feel like you’ve been down the same road”– Eminem

 

READ MORE ABOUT FATHER D HERE

Father David Andrew – Just Call Me Father D!