Tag Archives: SS#17

What You Didn’t know About the Innisville School SS #17

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What You Didn’t know About the Innisville School SS #17

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The School House Innisville, Ontario–The Municipal Review of Canada in October of 1928. Linda Secccaspina —The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

1. In June 30th of 1967  held an official closing party to celebrate 104 years of operation

2.Some 225 persons attended this event including former teachers, pupils and guests at the oldest school in the Drummond School area.

3. There were no records of the building of the first school in Innisville, only that it was a log building and was back up on the hill from where the existing one was. Some even think it could have beena  house that was converted into a classroom in 1830.

4. Records in the Registry office show that on April 24, 1848 a school site was secured for S.S. 17 Drummond. In 1863 the school was built making it 104 in 1967. In 1880 another additional half acre was added to the school grounds.

5. Some 80 years later on Arbour Lay 4 maple trees were planted in the schoolyard by 4 pupils: W. J. Hughes, Ernie Ruttle,William Crmapton abd Edward Martin.

6. In 104 years there were over 809 pupils, 43 different teachers, and 7 secretary treasurers. The first woman trustee was: Mrs. S. Charles Crampton, elected in December of 1920.

7. The first Provincial Library Grant was received in 1916 and a large bookcase was donated by the basketball team in the 1920s

8. Playground equipment was donated by Mr. T. A. Code in 1928- Read-The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

9. Indoor toilets were not installed until 1929 and it was also one of the first rural schools to have electricity in January 1940.

10. An organ was donated to the school in 1940 by the Misses Margaret, Katie, Hazel and Iva Cooke.

11. Innisville School won the silver cup in 1916, 1917, 1918, and the shield in 1919, 1920, and 1921 as part of the Township School Fairs.

12. The school suffered two fires- in 1923 when it was slightly damaged and again in 1965 when the woodshed was destroyed.

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

Bill Armstrong and The Innisville Museum

 

S.S. 18 Knowles School — Nearby to McIllquham’s Bridge

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

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The School House Innisville, Ontario–The Municipal Review of Canada in October of 1928.

The School House is Section 17 in the Village of Innisville (also read Bill Armstrong and The Innisville Museum) at the head of the Mississippi Lake, about midway between Perth and Carleton Place in the county of Lanark. That is how the location was described in the issue of The Municipal Review of Canada in October of 1928.

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Actual Invitation to the event at the Innisville School August 17th, 1928 in the journal

 

On the 17th instant, the people of this section gathered at the school grounds to mark the Centennial year, and to receive a suitable donation from an old scholar of 65 years ago. Mr. T. A. Code of the Town of Perth presented a playground equipment, viz,  a swing, teter, and a soft ball outfit. He outlined changes that he thought would contribute much to the community life of the district, viz, to secure ample grounds in addition to the school for soft ball, croquet, etc. and to be used during the vacation for general meetings. He also suggested that each head of family plant a shade tree along the outline and supply a rustic seat, each done without proper upkeep, you will fail in your objective.

 

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Richard Ruttle, George Crampton. J. A. Code (centre) William Armstrong, James Churchill, Miss Darcy (teacher) , Master James Crampton-The Municipal Review of Canada in October of 1928.

R. Richard Ruttle has this development in his charge and will answer any questions as to his progress on request. All this may be a suggestion to some old boy to like wise, as many, no doubt, would like to mark the place of their early training and boyhood days.

Editor-The Municipal Review of Canada in October of 1928.

 

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Thank you Letter to T.A. Code from Master James Crampton

Innisville, Ontario

August 21, 1928.

Dear Mr. Code:-

I received your present yesterday and was surprised and pleased to get it. I wish to thank you very much for the gift and now I will be able to spend many pleasant hours playing softball with my chums.

Yours sincerely,

James Crampton

 

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Master James Crampton who write the above letter

 

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August 17th thank you note to Thomas Alfred Code

                                                              T.A. Code Esq.

August 17, 1928

On behalf of the rate payers of S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville, we the undersigned wish to extend to you our most sincere gratitude and thanks for the playground equipment which you have kindly donated for the benefit of our pupils.

We now accept them in trust for the use of all students who may attend this school. We know that the pleasant thoughts of your old home school will be greatly increased by the knowledge that the children are now enjoying healthy recreation.

Again we thank you,

signed

James Churchill

George Crampton

William J. Armstrong

Dated this 17 day of August, 1928.

 

Next- Letters from Mother

 

historicalnotes*Golf Club Photo–Shanty lunch given by Mr. T. A. Code at the Links O’Tay Golf Club, October 3rd, 1908. —Perth Remembered--Some of the people in the photo included; Robert Burris, James “Gummy” Allan, F.L. Mitchell, Capt. Matheson, James Craig, W.P. McEwen, J.M. Walker (owner of Perth Courier), Eardley Wilmot (played the first game the Ottawa Rough Riders played), Boyd Caldwell (lumbering), T.A. Code (owned Codes’s Mills) R.S. Drummond, Frank Hicks,, C.F. Stone (Perth Expositor), W.B. Hart (Hart’s Bookstore), Nat McLenaghan, J.A. Ferguson. Photo: Perth Courier 1948.

*Lamb’s quarters, fat hen, or goosefoot,  was an introduced weed which is one of the plants my Grandfather Crittenden talked about eating when he was a kid, though oddly, no one in the family ever fed it to me.  My Grandmother would point it out when it was growing in her flowerbeds, and pull it out. Grampy Critt claimed not to know that much about edible wilds, but get him talking and quite a bit came out.  Some folks used to call it “Poverty Food”.

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

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In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

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How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

Bill Armstrong and The Innisville Museum

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Bill Armstrong and The Innisville Museum

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In 1967 SS#17 Drummond –the Innisville School– closed its doors along with the rest of the Lanark County schools and a local man had a dream that this once busy building be turned into a museum. Bill Drummond who lived across the street once went to school in that building in the 1900s and already had a growing collection of Pioneer artifacts sitting on his front verandah– not to mention the ongoing  community donations once folks heard there might be a museum in Innisville.

It made sense to him that this former thriving community should have permanent memories from the once sizable population. Most of Innisville had been destroyed in a  fire in the late 19th century and a lot of the town had moved away for a better future.

Sadly the Innisville & District Museum in Drummond Township closed in 2007, and the Lanark & District Museum agreed to take on the Innisville Museum Collection in order to preserve that district’s heritage. That meant the dairy corner with the separator and the wood butter prints would be moving along with the lovely spool bed, clocks and hanging lamps. Innisville history along with the Teachers desk that had sat there through the years along with the writing slates and quill pens would still be shared with the Lanark County folks.

Thank you Bill Armstrong for caring so much about our local history to have given your free time to anyone who was interested in finding out about the past.

“History is not just something that happened long ago and far away. History happens to all of us all the time. Local history brings history home, it touches your life, the life of your family, your neighbourhood, your community.”

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Nancy Hudson–
Bill was a quiet modest man with a quick wit and sense of humour. My best memory of Bill was as Santa Claus at our Christmas concerts in the old Orange Hall, he was a very ‘slim’ Santa! If Elsie Kilfoyle was the “Ma” of Innisville, Bill Armstrong was definitely the “Pa”

 

December 20, 1977        William John Armstrong

Mr. William John Armstrong of Innisville died December 20, 1977 at the home of his grandson, Robert Armstrong, Ottawa. He was in his 80th year, and had been in failing health for some time. He was born September 10, 1898, at Gilbert Plains, Dauphin, Manitoba, the son of an Innisville couple, John W. Armstrong and his wife, Annie Hudson. He was educated at Scotch Corners and Innisville. He resided in this district for 73 years, and prior to his retirement he was a farmer, and also worked as a truck driver for the Department of Highways, Steel’s Cartage, Carleton Place and Reynolds’ Cartage, Carleton Place.

Mr. Armstrong was active in the community. He was curator of the museum at Innisville from the time of its inauguration until his death. He was Past Master of LOL No. 92, Innisville, a member of RBP, Carleton Place; Past Master of St John’s Lodge No. 63  AF and AM Carleton Place; a former member of the 100F, Carleton Place, and secretary of St John’s Cemetery Committee. Predeceased by his wife, the former Annie Gardiner. They were married at Trinity Church, Ottawa, July 18, 1923. Survivors include a son, Stanley W Armstrong, Ottawa; grandsons, Robert John Armstrong and William Edwin Armstrong, both of Ottawa; and sisters, Bella (Mrs. Ernie Miller) Pakenham; Maggie (Mrs Ernie Rathwell) Smiths Falls; Carrie (Mrs. William McCall) Carleton Place; Alma (Mrs. William Voege) New Jersey, USA; Essie , Mrs Clyde Emerson) Carleton Place and Annie ( Mrs. Carl Morris) Peterborough. Ont. He was predeceased by a sister, Ethel (Mrs. James Johnston) and two brothers, Thomas and Herb Armstrong. The funeral service took place Dec. 22, 1977 at St John’s Anglican Church, Innisville, with the Rector, Rev. Roger Young, officiating. Interment will be in St John’s Cemetery. Pallbearers were two grandsons, Robert and William Armstrong, and four nephews, John Armstrong, Gordon Miller, Robert Brydges and George Gardiner.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Related Reading

The Name of the Man that Moved the Kennedy House

The House that Skated to Carleton Place — Kennedy House

Memories of the Pickerel Run Innisville

More Pictures of the Innisville Pickerel Run

The Angling Adventures of John and Leonard McNeely

Tales of the Innisville Hotel

Back Where I came From — Innisville