Tag Archives: springside hall

The Hidden Things We Find from the Past

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The Hidden Things We Find from the Past

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Once upon a time it was a magnificent home. The shrubs where the horse tack was was on the right.

 

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My grandfather Crittenden sold it in the late 50s and it slowly fell into diisrepair.

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It became Enterprise C.B.G. and then was torn down after years of neglect. Photo from Agnes Rychard who used to live on the second floor.

 

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This is what’s left now. Photo 2016

 

Years ago when I lived in Cowansville, Quebec there was something I found one day and it interested me for as long as I lived in town. Hidden in the side shrubs of my Grandfather Crittenden’s home there was a cement pillar with a ring. I knew it was once used to tie horses, but it still fascinated me. For years I used to used to imagine what kinds of horses they used to keep and how grand it must have been to see the former occupants use fancy carriages.

 

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Stone Pond 1981 — now it is buried.

 

I have a small stone pond down at the bottom of my back yard built when the house was built in 1867, but it is now buried with sand.  My late husband covered it so the kids wouldn’t get hurt. One day I will get someone to dig it out, or maybe some day someone else will find it. There was also a remainder of some small stone pillar on the Argyle Street side near the fence and I immediately thought it might have been for a horse, or maybe it was a monument for a deceased pet.

 

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To my surprise it was none of the above, and thanks to the gift of photos from Jennifer Fenwick Irwin from the collections of the Carleton Place Beckwith and Heritage Museum I found out what it was. It was some sort of garden flower pedestal. There is only part of it left (seen in the hostas) so I figure the rest of it is underground like the pond.

 

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Here is it what it looked like around 1910-1920 Cram family home Springside Hall in Carleton Place-Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Never forget that your home and your ancestors hold keys to some family mysteries. What have you found?

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

The Mystery of the Masonic Rock – Pakenham

The Mystery of the Almonte Post Office Clock –Five Minutes Fast and other Things….

Marvin Arnold Walker — Another Ron Bos Genealogy Mystery

The Mystery of the Alfred McNeely’s — Were there Two?

Another Lanark County “Murdoch Mystery” –Elfreda Drummond of Ashton

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

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They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret  — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

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September 28, 1936

The entire block headed by Lake Ave East and sidelined by Campbell Street, Argyle and Lisgar Street in Carleton Place was once owned by the Morphy and Cram family. The family stone home was built by the Morphys, and additions were made by the Crams and Seccaspinas. Behind the house, facing Lisgar Street, held hundreds of raspberry bushes and a small stone pond which is now buried over with sand at the bottom of my property.

The Cram family ran the local tannery where the Senior’s Citizen building on Sussex Street is now located. Their family consisted of  a son Arthur (Art) who was killed in a motorcycle accident on High Street in July of 1929. His friend, Don Moffatt, was badly injured. They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram.

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The patriarch, Albert Cram, born in 1867, died in 1929, at the age of 62,  almost one month later after his son died. He was the mayor of Carleton Place for two terms–1909 & 1910.

 

 - A. E. Cram Dies At Carleton Place Former Mayor...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Aug 1929, Tue,  Page 20

 

The Cram’s two daughters were: Constance and Angeline (Angelene), who was also called “Babe”. After their parent’s died the two girls sold the Lake Ave East home and moved to McArthur Ave. into the home formerly owned by Franklin Abbott.

 

 - In- STONE RESIDENCE, large grounds, attractive...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  13 Feb 1939, Mon,  Page 20

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 - Lawson Cram - CARLETON PLACE, Sept 27.-...

September 28, 1936

Margaret Constance Cram

Donald Lawson was born on 13 Apr 1903 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York. He died on 11th Feb 1979 in Charlotte County, Florida.

Donald married Margaret Constance Cram, daughter of the late Albert Edward Cram and Edna Ella Constance Grant, on 26 Sep 1936 in the Lake Ave East home called Springside Hall in Carleton Place, Ontario, Canada. Margaret was born in 1907 in Carleton Place, Ontario, and was a graduate of Branksome Hall which was an independent girls’ school for day and boarding students from Junior Kindergarten to Grade 12 in Toronto that was founded in 1903. She also attended McGill University in Montreal, however there is no record of her graduating. The marriage ended in divorce. Margaret died on 27 Dec, 1975 in Carleton Place, Ontario, Canada at the Cram girl’s residence on McArthur Ave.

 

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 - Miss Margaret C. Cram and Donald Lawson to Wed...

Clipped from The Brooklyn Daily Eagle,  07 Sep 1936, Mon,  Page 15

 

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“Springside Hall”

 - LAWSON, Margaret Constance Crum Suddenly at her...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Dec 1975, Wed,  Page 40

Miss Angelina “Babe” Cram

 - k Death Accidental Of Miss H. Smith .....

 - Brown and Vincent Clost, both of Carling...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Nov 1935, Fri,  Page 16

 - Lindsay Girl's Skull Is Fractured in Carling...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Nov 1935, Tue,  Page 1

 - y Hanna Curran Ferns and early Summer flowers...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  05 Jul 1943, Mon,  Page 8

 

 - short- Pem- Issue Badminton Draw At Carleton...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Jan 1935, Tue,  Page 15

 

I could not find much else on  Angeline “Babe” Cram, but it seems she remained a spinster. Her sister Margaret never remarried, and she died in their home on McArthur Ave. “Babe” Cram however might have remained a spinster, but she was quite the badminton player in Carleton Place where I found several notations about her. No matter how hard I tried nothing was mentioned about Angeline was mentioned after 1942. She was still alive in 1975 so come Spring I will go check the United Cemetery.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

What’s Changed in Your Home in 40 Years?

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

 

CRAMS

More “Clippings” on the Local Crams

The Rosamond Christmas Party 1863-or- When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Door

After I Read an Obit About Mrs. William Cram I also Found Out

Donald Cram — Nobel Prize for Chemistry

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Searching for Joey Cram of Carleton Place

I Now have Part of Joey Cram

 

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Yesterday at 1:27 PM  · Almonte  · 

It’s Photo Friday. The Mississippi Golf Club was established in 1915 on the former Patterson Farm in Appleton. In 1934, Angeline Cram and friend were photographed practising their swing in front of the old stone clubhouse. It burned to the ground in 1997.
— at Mississippi Golf Club.

My Neighbours –Photos of the Cliff- McCann House and Springside Hall

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My Neighbours –Photos of the Cliff- McCann House and Springside Hall

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Summer 2017- The Sweeney family lives here now and the Nephin’s bought it from Laurel McCann.

Mr. W. Cliff and his wife Susannah (Sussie) Cliff once owned this home on the corner of Lake Ave East and Campbell Street.  Mr. Cliff had once been the editor of the local Carleton Place newspaper. The Central Canadian and was said to be a very fluent and flowery writer. The local newspaper was founded in January 1876, under the sponsorship of William Bredin of Carleton Place, with William W. Cliff of Napanee as editor and publisher.  There were 1,800 persons living in Carleton Place at the time. The Man Who Received the Carleton Place Newspaper for Life

The next residents were the Cecil T. McCann family. He was the proprietor of the local downtown pool room and had once been a resident of Westport. He and his wife Laurel (Costello) had a family consisting of: Marilyn, Karen and Thomas. Laurel McCann was my friend, and if you think I am outspoken you never met Laurel. She was one of a kind, and I will forever miss her.

 

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Photo-Susan McCann

The original fireplace in the McCann home. Kate Sweeney says it no longer exists as it was replaced with less ornate bricks and stone and converted to gas. But, the amazing original French doors are still there- Kate says they are really unusual as they’re set at 90 degrees to each other. Structurally, they’re pretty unique from what she has seen.

She also added when the new extension was added the original external windows were kept, so they can see both from the kitchen and sitting room into the sun room.

 

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Cecil on the Campbell Side of the house. My house in the background.–Photo-Susan McCann

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Susan McCann’s Father burning leaves. Remember those days? You can see Springside Hall with the original fence. When we bought it- it had a white picket fence. Originally, there was concrete pillars with pipes as a fence. The carriage house is in the back and we tore it down in 1988 as it was falling down. You can see the white summer  kitchen on the back of the house. That was not there in 1981 when we bought the home. There was just a hole in the ground where it had been, and we built the stone addition and garage where it was. Photo-Susan McCann

 

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Susan McCann’s Aunt Marilyn on the front porch of the McCann home. That veranda was taken down and stored in the garage. I bought it at Laurel McCann’s auction sale when she moved. It is now my side veranda on Campbell Street.

 

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Laurel McCann’s front veranda is now my side vernada on Campbell Street.

 

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This photo was on the McCann pool room wall–Susan McCann sent this to me last night along with some photos of my home.. This is a blast from the past in Carleton Place. This would be the iconic Cecil McCann and the other old lads in the restaurant. The sign says Dorothy’s Tea Room which became The Eating Place. Photo-Susan McCann

 

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Tom Edwards Lori Rothwell. Bought lots of Howick jeans there from her and Mrs McCann at the Korner Kupboard. (She had great taste)–Elenor Rothwell is in the edge of the pic as well. Photo-Susan McCann

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Photo thanks to Wendy Healey 1973-1974

historicalnotes

 

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Springside Hall was once an entire block belonging to the Morphys and the Crams. The home was built in three cycles. The Morphys  in 1867. The Crams added an addition in 1910 and my family in 1988 and 1995. The Cram family ran the local tannery on the site of the present senior building on Sussex Street. Their family consisted of a son Arthur,  who passed away in a motorcycle accident on High Street in the 1920s and two daughters.

After the Cram parents died the girls moved to McArthur Avenue into a home formerly owned by Franklin Abbot. Mr. George Raeburn a CPR station agent and his wife Mae Finlayson bought the property and later had it surveyed and sold the back portion to J. Arthur Hobbs and his wife Kaye McLeod who built a house on it. After the Raeburns, it fell into another family’s hands for a year until the bank took it over.

We bought it in 1981 and the first person I met was Muriel Simpson who just walked up to the back of a tall ladder Ange was standing on. Laurel came out of her house with her constant cigarette in hand telling Muriel to go back in the house and give us a breather LOL. Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

Reusing the Past of Carleton Place — The Morphy’s and the McCann’s

In Memory of Tom McCann

Memories of the Bracewells of Carleton Place

The “Margaret Thatcher” of Campbell Street

Reusing the Past of Carleton Place — The Morphy’s and the McCann’s

In Memory of Stuart White of Carleton Place

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

1979thanks to Joann Voyce

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

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They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

 

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22 year-old Arthur (Art) Cram died in a motorcycle accident on High Street in Carleton Place in July 29, 1929. Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  15 Jul 1929, Mon,  Page 7

 

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The service took place in the house, so I assume it was done in the foyer here. The mile long cortege began at my home on Lake Ave East down Moore Street and Franktown Road until the cemetery.

Image may contain: tree, house, plant and outdoorSpringside HallVintage Carleton Place & Beckwith

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

CRAMS

More “Clippings” on the Local Crams

The Rosamond Christmas Party 1863-or- When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Door

After I Read an Obit About Mrs. William Cram I also Found Out

Donald Cram — Nobel Prize for Chemistry

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Searching for Joey Cram of Carleton Place

I Now have Part of Joey Cram

 

Springside Hall

 

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

What’s Changed in Your Home in 40 Years?

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

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Now You see it, Now You Don’t: The Disappearing and Reappearing of the Tim Horton’s Subterranean

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Now You see it, Now You Don’t: The Disappearing and Reappearing of the Tim Horton’s Subterranean

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Photos by Bill and Carole Flint= The Sky Pilots

A disappearing stream or subterranean (under Tim Horton’s Franktown Road) is the term used to describe a stream or a river, which flows into a sinkhole or a crack. There is a geological reason for this vanishing act: the bedrock under Tim Horton’s on Franktown Road is made of early Carboniferous (around 325-360 million years old) limestone. Limestone is prone to dissolving when it comes into contact with slightly acidic rain water, creating of fissures, sinkholes, and underground channels and caves (Pike Hole) that surface water can escape into.

In the past the stream flowed down Rochester Street where memories of opening up basement windows to let the flood streams go through are still talked about. Then it flows under my house (Springside Hall on Lake Ave E.) where in the Spring before we bought it and installed sump pumps after the first Spring the basement waters would be about 4-5 feet deep.

From there it flows into the old stream at the bottom of Lisgar Street where that stream was once a lot bigger. Big enough to warrant a small bridge on Lake Ave East where there was a small bridge near Beckwith Street. The staff at Nichols/Waugh used to clean their work tools in the stream on a daily basis on the corner of Lake Ave East.

But, where does it come back to the surface again? It is commonly stated that it reappears a few miles downstream and flows out at the arena. I asked our popular photographer John Rayner to shoot some photos, if he was near the arena, so we can see where it finally flows out into the Mississippi River.

So thanks to John here it is.

All Photos courtesy of John Rayner ac-pic-sm

These are just some of his fabulous photos–see the rest his Lanark Couty photos here on his blog The AC is Always On..

                      Go to about where there is a path between the ball fields.
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That scene above was to my back as I looked at the drain pipe.pipe (metal) below.
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There is another drain pipe (plastic) to the left as you look toward the river from the path, but it didn’t look as though it had discharged anything for awhile.
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I was able to go down the embankment to look back at the drain pipe (the metal one).
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A young nimble-footed person might have been able to get to where your stream enters the Mississippi, but I am neither young nor nimble, so I took a few photos back up on the trail, all to the right (toward the arena) of the drain pipe above. You can see where they meet up below, with your stream being on the foreground.
​All Photos courtesy of John Rayner
So that’s all I’ve got for you. You might see better later in the fall when all of the leaves have fallen.
I didn’t know about this, so it was fun to explore and find it.
Thanks John!!
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 I grew up on Lake Ave. E. in the last war time house. We played in treasure valley a lot. Spring time we would build a raft in the pond in the valley and skate on it in the winter. Summers we played house at the ledges of rock going into the valley. One time some boys had bows and arrows. The end of the arrow had a nail on it. As we were running home guess who got an arrow in her little behind. That’s right me!
historicalnotes
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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum-This map dates to 1868 with updates in red done in 1873. Rochester Street didn’t exist in 1868 “This has become the division line by length of occupation”. The name Rochester is penciled in red in the 1873 update along with “this part of Street laid out by third parties”.

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum The stream crossing under 12 Con. (now Lake Avenue East) had A BRIDGE! (at the corner of Beckwith Street). This stream still runs, mostly underground, but is visible in backyards along Argyle Street, and then again along Sussex Avenue.

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Is that part of Tannery Creek? This is the barn where Canadian Tire was..

Peter Iveson- There was Tannery Creek– it emerged on the east side of Beckwith Street and ran between the MacDougal House and where Canadian Tire was, then run under the CPR tracks and eventually went through the old dump and into The Mississippi River.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

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Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–
Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

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What’s Changed in Your Home in 40 Years?

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A few months ago Jennifer Fenwick Irwin gave me a copy of an old real estate listing for my home from 1977. After a beloved owner of my home, Mr. Reaburn died, their son Bert put the house up for sale and his wife May lived at Fairmont Nursing Home in Almonte. They did sell the house, but the new owner only managed to hold on to it for a year, and then it fell into the hands of the bank. We bought it in 1981 and I am still here.

The ad said it was a two storey home built for the Morphy’s when the area was known as Morphy’s Falls. They advertised it as a 4 bedroom home with hot water and oil fired heat. They also said there was a fireplace and a music room with quarter cut oak floors. The wide staircase was made from Cypress wood (looks like oak but better they said) and a three -car garage with a stone post in the centre that could be used as a sundial. Taxes were  $1,153.82 and stone walls were supposedly 2 feet thick.

 

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So what is different now?

I had been told it was William Morphy, son of the founder of Morphy’s Falls (Carleton Place) in 1860 who built the house, while this article says another son, Edmond Morphy built it. The only other records I had is that it was bought in 1905 by former Carleton Place mayor Albert E. Cram and then occupied by the Raeburns.  But, now I know the house also was once a residence to the Johnson and Merrick families. I still have not found any records pertaining to those two latter names.

During the fire of 1995 we changed the position of the dining room doorway and the back staircase, but imagine my surprise to find out that somewhere through the years the interior had also been changed and additions built by the Crams. The three car garage advertised was actually an old carriage house and it was torn down in 1985, as it would have fallen down sooner than later.

 

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Most of the main floor woodwork, which I fought to be restored after the fire, is quarter-cut oak, which indicates a turn of the century change from the simple upstairs woodwork. . The Raeburn’s recalled that the front staircase had been changed early on. The elaborate gilted curtain rod that once hung in the dining room from Mrs. Raeburn’s family home, the Finlayson House in Clayton, is no longer there, but there still remains one plain but original rod over the french doors that open to the study.

Two feet thick walls? No, they are actually 3 foot walls as we found out during the fire of 1995. If this house had not been built of stone it would have been razed to the ground after the fire. I don’t know where the music room was- but, I assume it is now what we call the study. As for the fireplaces, there used to be two, but one got converted into gas and the other one actually had a blocked flue when we bought it and we found out the hard way when we tried to light a fire. It now lies dormant.

 

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The four bedrooms in the listing confuses me as there are 3 bedrooms in the main house and there are two smaller rooms in the old ‘servants quarters’. But it was mentioned years ago there were three in the back connected to the back staircase.We know that the newel post and stair rails on the back staircase are from the 1860s, as when we changed the back staircase we reused the original wood. So there will always be a mystery of how many bedrooms were actually in this house. There are now two more bedrooms in the new section that was built in the early 90s.

The listing mentions many built-ins with leaded windows. I can only count three. The built in dining room cupboard which has been moved three times in that room. The upper window insert of the dining room and the door to the now new solarium that the restoration workers put a ladder through after the fire.

They do mention the basement floor which was– simply– Carleton Place’s bedrock in its raw form and–they forget to mention that 4 giant logs held up the floors of this very house. We did renovate the basement, but one of the storage rooms still is ‘founded upon a rock’ as Howard Morton Brown once wrote.

That first Spring our basement was privy to the running waters that have been flowing down from Tom Horton’s at Lambsdown on an annual cycle for hundreds of years. While repairing the basement after the fire we did find the hidden cistern room and I guess they just directed all that fresh flowing basement water running through into that room.

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Should I mention the only existing kitchen (summer kitchens were torn down) was a galley kitchen which was obviously only for the help. If you opened the oven door you had to climb across it to get to the other side and there was no room in there for a fridge so that was down in the basement. Sometimes that fridge was half way under water in the Spring. After we sat one too many times at a tiny table in the galley kitchen to eat, and watched gusts coming in from the windows blowing things around on the table, we built an addition on and a new kitchen was the main focus. No one ever tells you about the joys of an older home do they? I personally have volumes of stories.:)

As for the taxes being about $1100- well, I think we all know the answer to that– and as for the heritage maple trees- I got a work order from the town this year for many to be removed due to their age.

In reality I have yet to find the dumbwaiter, nor any fabulous finds. Some days I don’t like my house as things take turns breaking down and other days I know it is my job to protect the heritage of this home no matter how cold I get in the winters from an out dated broken-down boiler heating system.

So pardon me while I move my laptop upstairs right now as drafty gusts are picking up, but in all honesty I will have my feet firmly planed in my home until I die. After all,  I just don’t understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment.

Enchantment?

Can I get back to you about that on Friday?:)

 

 

Author’s Note– As I read the list of Pallbearers below for George’s funeral I realized I know so much more about these folks today- and for that I am grateful…

historicalnotes

 

October 13, 1977        REABURN

In hospital at Carleton Place, Ontario on Thursday, October 13, 1977, GEORGE WILLIAMSON REABURN, beloved husband of Lucinda May Finlayson, dear father of Bert, Yellowknife NWT, dear grandfather of Stephen and Sarah, in his 84th year. Rested at the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home, McArthur Avenue, Carleton Place. Service was held in the chapel on Saturday at 3 p.m. Interment Boyd’s United Cemetery.

October 13, 1977        George W. Raeburn

George Williamson Raeburn died at Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital on October 13, 1977. Mr. Reaburn was born in Dalhousie Mills, Ontario on June 26, 1893. He first worked for the Bank of Ottawa and the Bank of Commerce at Parry Sound, Ontario and later at the Canadian Pacific Railway, Chesterville and Winchester and since 1938 at Carleton Place.

In 1922 he married Lucinda May Finlayson of Almonte and they had one son Bert, presently in Yellowknife, NWT.      Mr. Reaburn was very active in the Chesterville United Church and Zion-Memorial United Church of Carleton Place and was clerk of session for many years. His other interests included the Carleton Place Scout Group Committee and he was a driver for the Cancer Society. He was a member of Chesterville Lodge No. 302 A.F. and A.M. and was Worshipful Master in 1923.

In Carleton Place he was active with St. John Lodge No. 64 and Maple Chapter No. 116 RAM. The service was held from the Barker Funeral Home, Carleton Place with interment in Boyd’s Cemetery. He is survived by his wife, May of Fairview Manor, a son Bert and daughter-in-law Marion of Yellowknife and two grandchildren Stephen and Sarah Leigh, also, of Yellowknife and by a brother-in-law, Edgar Findlayson of Carleton Place.

Pallbearers were Andrew Dickey, Wilf Hogan, H. B. Montgomery, George Nobes, Renhart Springer and Stewart White. Honorary pallbearers were Lloyd Allen, Stewart Cavers, Hub Dopson, Jim Hammond, Mac MacCauley, Frank Moon, Mervyn Morris, Cecil Ruttle, Eric Simpson, Herb Sinclair and Earl Willows.

 

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

 

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

 

 

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina 1981

1981 — Part 1

In the early 80s I had recurring dreams that I could not shake which featured red shutters and water. My late husband, Angelo, and I were looking for a house, so for weeks I drove up and down the streets of Carleton Place totally missing the old Morphy Cram House on Lake Ave East.

The dreams got worse and they also ended with me fighting for my life immersed in flowing water. Angelo thought I was nuts- but off to the Carleton Place Library I went. There I sat one day in February in 1981 researching homes in Carleton Place. I began to talk to an elderly gentleman next to me and asked him if he knew any houses that had red shutters. He told me the only one he knew was the old  Hi-Diddle-Day House on Lake Avenue East. Because the house is set back so far away from the road it took a couple of “ups and downs” to find it. But once I found it- it was the very same house I had been seeing in my dreams, and it was for sale.

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina 1981

Ange called up the real estate office and they told him to forget even placing an offer as there were currently 5 offers on the house. For the next three consecutive nights I tossed and turned with the same dream. On the 4th day the real estate office called and said all the offers had fallen through and to come and look at the house.

I will remember that day for the rest of my life- there were countless weather warnings and people were advised not to travel on the icy roads. Ange was fearless and we drove those 35 km on slick black ice in a 1976 Corvette. Yes, my friends, brains were lacking that day.

When we walked into the house the poor house had been stripped down by the former owner who had bought it from the Raeburn’s and lost it to the bank just two years later. I am not going to mention his name, but gossip still goes up and down the street that he was the one that allegedly got someone’s Mother (who runs the country) pregnant.

We walked into the silent house and all that was left in the was one lone hanging lightbulb in the front receiving area. Everything that was not nailed down had been taken and some of it sold (by the former owner), right down to the brass push button light plates. There we stood and looked up to the top floor ceiling. There in a ceiling hole was a glimmer of the outdoors and fresh air was definitely coming in.

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina 1981

 

I knew immediately this was my forever home, and in those days as a budding amateur psychic I put my hands on the oak fireplace in the study and tried to contact any spirits that might be afoot. I will repeat what I said above: “yes, my friends, brains were lacking that day”.

Even with all the work that would be ahead of us we knew we wanted this house- so onward and forward we drove back to the real estate office on St. Laurent Blvd. in Ottawa to put in our offer. By that time the roads were worse than the initial trip out to Carleton Place and driving a summer car was treacherous and in our case could have been deadly.

Right in front of the Ottawa Citizen building on the Queensway the car got caught in accumulating ice and did three 360 turns in the middle of the road. In the final spin our car missed the metal hydro pole on the side of the road by three inches. As we sat in the ditch, unhurt, but the front of the car looking like a can opener had opened it Ange turned to me and asked a question. Was it “Are you okay”? No, he looked at me and asked,

“Do you still want the house?”

Without hesitating I said,”Definitely!”

A week later the house was ours.

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina 2016

Immediately the dreams stopped and later I found out that one of the former owner’s 6 year-old daughter had drowned in the creek below the house which now partially sits on Lisgar Street. As for the former owner, he continued to haunt us, offering us pieces of the house he had taken like a use car salesman and had stored in a local warehouse. In my mind he never really did own this special house–after all, old houses never really belong to people ever, people belong to them. In 1981 we became part of the history of the Morphy Cram house known as Springside Hall.

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If you look at the table in the last picture you will notice a picture of the Dunlop House in Carleton Place and one of the Dunlop ancestors on the table in my study.The Dunlop House is also part of my life now. People that owned these homes are part of all our history and should be respected- of course, maybe we can leave the guy that stripped my home out of it.:)

 

RELATED READING

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

Sometimes When You Least Expect it– The Dunlop Issue

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

Related reading:

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Glory Days in Carleton Place– Norma Ford

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Lynne Johnson

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

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Ottawa Journal 1971–Photo from the Wanda Morrison- Joan Kehoe Collection

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I have written many stories about my home the Morphy Cram house, called Springside Hall in Carleton Place on several occasions. Jennifer, from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum, has often wondered why there is very little information or photos of the house throughout the years. Imagine my surprise when yesterday going through a scrapbook lent to me by Wanda Morrison that there was an article about Springside Hall in 1971.

To some of you that don’t know, the facade of my home was once the opening background picture to famed puppeteer’s Noreen Young’s  CBC children’s television program called ‘Hi Diddle Day. When we bought the home in 1981 the interior of the house had been stripped right down to the brass push button light switches, but the outside still had the red roof shingles and window shutters which we later changed.

I had been told it was William Morphy, son of the founder of Morphy’s Falls (Carleton Place) in 1860 who built the house, while this article says another son, Edmond Morphy built it. The only other records I had is that it was bought in 1905 by former Carleton Place mayor Albert E. Cram and then occupied by the Raeburns.  But now I know the house also was once a residence to the Johnson and Merrick families.

During the fire of 1995 we changed the position of the dining room doorway and the back staircase, but imagine my surprise to find out that somewhere through the years the interior had also been changed.

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Front Staircase- photo by Linda Seccaspina

Most of the main floor woodwork, which I fought to be restored after the fire, is quarter-cut oak, which indicates a turn of the century change from the simple upstairs woodwork. When interviewed, Mr. and Mrs. Raeburn had lived in the house for 32 out of the total 40 years they lived in my home. They recalled that the front staircase had been changed early on. The elaborate gilted curtain rod that once hung in the dining room from Mrs. Raeburn’s family home, the Finlayson House in Clayton, is no longer there, but there still remains one plain but original rod over the french doors that open to the study.

It mentions the ell (0ver the kitchen wing)  having three bedrooms which were part of the servants quarters, as it connected to the back staircase. But in reality when we moved there there were only two, so where was the third bedroom?  We know that the newel post and stair rails on the back staircase are from the 1860s, as when we changed the back staircase we reused the original wood.

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Photo by Linda Seccaspina-Last year Blair White gave me a folk art oil painting that George Raeburn did of his home The Morphy Cram House/ Hi Diddle Day home. He had given it to Blair a good many years ago. When I die I want it to go back to the White family and have Blair’s son Ben look after it until he can pass it on. I met May Raeburn once and also met her son Burt when she passed on.

 

The property that was once a whole city block is now an acre in total, and the raspberry bushes that grew wild all over at the back of the house made way to a residence in the 60s when the Raeburn’s sold part of their property. The old carriage house mentioned in the article is now gone as it was in very bad shape when we bought it.

I was sad nothing was mentioned of the dumb waiter that is blocked in a wall in the previous galley kitchen that went up the old servants quarters. I really wanted to know more about it, but what I learned next was even better. What was shocking is that Mrs. Raeburn told the newspaper that one of the cornerstones of the house contains artifacts the Morphy’s put there, but no records exist of the original contents. She said she wasn’t inquisitive enough to investigate. I most certainly am.

 

Related reading:

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Houseful of Whimsy 1982 Ottawa Journal

 

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

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Two days ago I posted the story about the hidden room in my basement. Local resident Nancy Green posted on Facebook she had the same thing and had poked a flashlight to see if she could find anything odd. Well now, It makes total sense what it is. It is located directly under the front verandah, and very common in older homes. It definitely used to be a cistern.

Cisterns were used for the collection of rain water, and were quite common at homes throughout the 19th century.  They can also be found at a few 18th century homes and some were built as late as the early 1940s.  Using the roof as a rain collection surface, gutters and downspouts delivered water to the cistern.

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Most of them were a  large rectangular box located under a porch, with the porch floor being the cover.  Before the floor of the porch was replaced we used to have th remains of what was once a trap door. There were many folklore “rules” governing when and how water was to be collected if you wanted it to stay “sweet”. Built to catch rainwater, which was then used for domestic chores. Of course it became doomed by indoor plumbing.
The success of indoor plumbing initiated the demise of cisterns, which became white elephants with the abundant flow of water from kitchen and bathroom faucets. Cisterns were eventually filled with unwanted items, buried and forgotten and walled over like ours. The fact that cisterns have remained virtually undisturbed, in some instances for hundreds of years,  can we consider them archaeological finds?

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Apparently some of them (not ours) are steeped in treasures, such as ceramics, coins, tintype photographs and food particles, that can tell archaeologists about what people of the time liked to buy and eat. You have to remember when my home was built in 1867 the local water probably smelled bad and people got sick. The early settlers associated rainwater with freshness and thought cisterns might be the long-term answer. So should we really consider these rooms archaeological finds? That’s hard to answer as I am sure in a few hundred years people will dig up tanning beds and think we used to fry people for punishment.

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place