Tag Archives: Snow Road

Buttermilk Falls — Location Location Location

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Buttermilk Falls — Location Location Location
The Buchanan Scrapbook

This is the front piece photo of “The Canadian Mississippi River”. The book’s caption reads: ” Buttermilk Falls at Snow Road, on Antoine Creek within sight of the Mississippi River. This picture must have been taken in the early part of the 20th century because of lack of vegetation

The Canadian Mississippi River Hilda Geddes MAP
Gregory C. SprouleIt’s on Highway 509 at Snow Road Station

Frankie B Gray

Stopped by not long ago and there were lots of children playing and swimming there, looked like they were having a blast! Beautiful spot

Freda Ellenbergerreally great in the spring with just a bit of ice still

Ryan Hunter-I drive by it everyday on the way to work. It feeds into Millar’s lake near the bridge that the 509 crosses the Mississippi. Theres a small cottage right next to it so if you visit, make sure not to trespass on thier section

Gregory C. SprouleBlair Paul Morrows road off 509 was at one time Morrows cottages

The Canadian Mississippi River Hilda Geddes

June 15, 1915

Mrs. Jim Kennedy and some of her children were taking jim’s midnight lunch over to him at the mill as he was the night watchman. While crossing the birdge her wee son Bert tripped on something and rolled under the birdge railiing. He fell into the water and was drowned. The men searched all night , but there is quite a curren there and his body was not found until next morning.

1911 Census

Name:Bert Kennedy
Gender:Male
Marital status:Single
Race or Tribe:English
Age:4
Birth Date:Oct 1906
Birth Place:Ontario
Census Year:1911
Relation to Head of House:Son
Province:Ontario
District:Frontenac
District Number:69
Sub-District:32 – Palmerston, Canonto (north and south)
Sub-District Number:32
Place of Habitation:Palmerston
Family Number:59
Neighbors:View others on page
Household Members:NameAgeJames Kennedy34Mary Kennedy27Bert Kennedy4Flossie Kennedy6Ellesie Kennedy1Lottie S Kennedy2/12

 If you have not read  The Canadian Mississippi River by Hilda Geddes.. run don’t walk!

The Saylor Store on Snow Road (McLaren Depot)

History of McLaren’s Depot — by Evelyn Gemmill and Elaine DeLisle

The old Cornucopia Lodge on Snow Road

A History of Snow Road & McLaren’s Depot

Margaret Closs Lanark and Snow Road- Genealogy

Mississippi Station?

Hughes’ Rapids on Millar’s Lake.
This photo and the one above appear on page 66 of “The Canadian Mississippi River“. The book’s caption for this photo reads: ” Roll top dam at foot of Hughes’ Rapids at the head of Millar’s Lake. “

Ragged Chutes —This appears on page 60 of “The Canadian Mississippi River“. The book’s caption reads: ” Upper Dam at Ragged Chutes in river driving days. “
Ragged Chutes.
This appears on page 62 of “The Canadian Mississippi River“. The book’s caption reads: ” Ragged Chutes in river driving days. “Ragged Chutes”

Frontenac County Ontario :
Collection of Glass Negatives
from the Snow Road area, circa 1900

This collection of glass negatives was found in an antique store in Perth, Ontario. They were taken in Snow Road or in the immediate area. Twelve of the photos appear in Hilda Geddes’ book “The Canadian Mississippi River“, published 1988, reprinted 1992, by General Publishing House, Inc., Burnstown, ON. I’ve identified those photos according to the captions in Hilda’s book.

The source of these negatives is a mystery. The Perth antique dealer told me that an elderly couple walked in and offered the negatives for sale — they didn’t leave their names and no other information is available.

I’ve oriented the published photos according to how they appear in the book, but it is possible that some or all of the others need to be “flipped” horizontally.= Charles Dobie

realted reading

Hilda Geddes — The Queen of Snow Road and the Mississippi

Geddes Rapids Bridge 1903 — Dalhousie Lake

Mr. and Mrs Geddes of Snow Road

Hilda Geddes — The Queen of Snow Road and the Mississippi

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Hilda Geddes — The Queen of Snow Road and the Mississippi

Hilda Geddes spun her tales, and we learned to understand ourselves.Her book-The Canadian Mississippi River by Hilda Geddes is one of the referencebooks I use all the time. I wish I had met her.

Editor’s note: This is an edited version of a eulogy given by writer Michael Dawber at the funeral of Hilda Geddes, a historian, columnist and storyteller in Snow Road Station, Ont, who died March 13 at the age of 93. By Michael Dawber The English novelist E.M. Forster wrote that “our final experience, like our first, is conjectural. We move between two darknesses.” It is the contribution we make to our community, to society, and to one another that lights the way between those two doorways.

Hilda Geddes spent nine decades making that contribution. Her contributions were enormous and freely given. Like her father John, whose remarkable diary describes the life of Snow Road Station, a hamlet west of Perth, for more than half a century to 1966, Hilda recorded in 1988 the day-to-day existence of this community, which is my home too, for close to 30 years, almost as long as I have been alive.

Like the Yukon’s Edith Josie, Hilda was a community storyteller renowned far beyond her home. I am sure everyone who live in the area has read her words, heard her stories and, through them, experienced this remarkable place. Hilda has been a fixture of Snow Road for so long that the two are part and parcel. In her book The Canadian Mississippi River, Hilda wrote: “I have always had an affinity with the big Mississippi River and the K&P Kingston and Pembroke Railroad, having been born beside both.

While I was growing up, I always had the feeling that the K& P Railway and the Mississippi River would go on forever, my home from 1912 being beside the Snow Road station. During the 27 years I worked for the federal government in Ottawa, I never lost my roots at Snow Road. She told me her interest in storytelling began after she retired from the public service in 1967. In the mid-1970s she was asked to compile a historical sketch for the Presbyterian Church centenary, and from there began a 25-year exploration of this community and the Ottawa Valley beyond.

She told the collective story of this vast place in a way accessible to everyone, with humour and character, in six books and countless newspaper columns. Hilda could spin a long yarn from earlier days, and obviously enjoyed the spinning. I will never forget the afternoon Hilda and her brother Ralph told me the story of lightning striking five different places in the family home, the two of them each building the tale higher with burning telephone lines and smoking mail sacks. And another of her many stories was a tale about the excursion trains to the Renfrew Fair. “This train was scheduled to leave Renfrew around 9 p.m., but usually would wait if all the passengers were not on tap. On one occasion, however, it pulled out on time and some of our crowd got left behind. They had gone to a movie, thinking the train would wait.”

Instead, it pulled out on time, and when they arrived at the station, all they saw were the red rear lights going out of sight. They hired a taxi hoping to catch it at Renfrew Junction, but again it had left. They went ahead hoping to catch it at Opeongo, with the same result. They were forced to stay in Renfrew all night and come down on the morning train. They were a “sheepish looking bunch.”

She said her one regret was that she had not begun her work 50 years ago, when living memory reached back to the pioneer days. It gives you pause to realize that the Wright Brothers flew at Kitty Hawk only four years before Hilda was born. The youngest generation now could not imagine the reality of that time without the stories of our elders to remind us. Hilda wrote once, “Today, our memories of the old Snow Road as told by our parents are fading, and one wonders if the following generations will ever hear of it, or remember it if they do hear the story. This was at the root of my desire to chronicle all the data I could …” We are all fortunate that she had that desire.

More than 2,500 years ago, the Greek poet Sappho wrote, “I say that, in another time, someone will remember us.” Thanks to the commitment of Hilda Geddes, we can know we will all be remembered, and so will she.

27 Mar 2001

If you have not read  The Canadian Mississippi River by Hilda Geddes.. run don’t walk!

relatedreading

The Saylor Store on Snow Road (McLaren Depot)

History of McLaren’s Depot — by Evelyn Gemmill and Elaine DeLisle

The old Cornucopia Lodge on Snow Road

A History of Snow Road & McLaren’s Depot

Margaret Closs Lanark and Snow Road- Genealogy

Mississippi Station?

McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

For the Love of Money-Gillies Gilmours and the McLarens

Logging Down the Line From Snow Road to Lavant to Carleton Place to Appleton to Galetta

Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle — From the Pen Of Noreen Tyers

Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandma and the Cute Little Mice– From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

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Grandma and the Cute Little Mice– From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

 

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A little story I wrote-1

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USA

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

relatedreading

 

Another Broken Bed Incident — Stories from Richards Castle — Noreen Tyers

Lets Play Elevator- Charles Ogilvy Store — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Jack’s in Charge-Scary Stories — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages —- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

I am Afraid of Snakes- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Hitching a Ride Cross Town — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

My Old Orange Hat –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Out of the Old Photo Album — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

 

Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle — From the Pen Of Noreen Tyers

Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

 

 

Another Broken Bed Incident — Stories from Richards Castle — Noreen Tyers

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Another Broken Bed Incident — Stories from Richards Castle — Noreen Tyers

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Another Broken Bed incident.

This story was related to me by sister

The Old Stone House at Snow Road  on the Mississippi, had a lot of stories to be told.  When you are a child, sweet innocence is so present and in the 1940’s this was much more prevalent.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Be right back


The Stone House had no running water, electricity, the only source of light was a coil oil lamp or a flashlight.  In the forties the flashlight gave off little light. If the moon was out it was not bad as you could find your way, when it shone in the window.  If the stars and moon, were tucked behind the clouds, you could barely see your hand in front of your face, it was dark.

The children were put to bed when darkness descended, so by the time the adults came up to bed, they had been sleeping for a while.  On most evenings after the kids were out of their hair, everyone would sit and play cards or just talk and some may have beer or a drink.  It would be much later when they would venture up to bed.

The men would be up early so they usually went off to sleep quite quickly, after all it was a lot of work rowing a boat, fishing or cleaning the fish for dinner.  When they needed to bring up a block of ice from the Ice house, it would take a bit of muscle power and a walk to the barn. Oh such groans could be heard. Now if they had already made their trip to the outhouse it meant another trip, maybe even digging out a block.  One has to remember that some of the blocks were a good size, and they were on holidays. Rest was important, so they believed, after all they worked hard all year and they were on holidays. But, most important they were MEN!

On occasion one would become romantically inclined and I guess maybe  had been thinking of it during the day, so on their way to the bedroom the urge would once again rear its ugly little head.  Now my parents, aunts and uncles were young active people and a two-week period might just be a long time to wait. It never seemed to matter that there was a few people in the house.   After a week of good old country air and rest from their work a young man’s thoughts might just turn to thoughts of love.

 

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Photo Noreen Tyers

You have to remember the house would be filled with young innocent sweet things, too young to know anything about a young man’s fancy.  All of a sudden a big crash bang and who knows what the NOISE was about in the middle of the night and pitch black. It does take a few minutes for a flashlight to be found and then find out where the noise came from. As a child you can only think something wild has arrived on the scene, maybe a Big Bear or God knows what.  Imagination of a child is quite vivid, at least mine was. The flashlight on, Grandpa was first on the scene into my Aunt and Uncles Room he went. The stately old bed had broken and the mattress was laying on the floor, two red faces appeared on the bed rail just wondering what had happened. Surprise the mattress is on the floor, and thoughts of love soon Punk disappear.

“Foolish young people” that’s all Grandpa, said and the kids went back to bed non the wiser and still the sweet innocent children that had no thoughts other than the bed broke.  Grandpa will repair the bed in the morning, he always fixes things.

From the Pen
of Noreen
April 29, 2018

Note: I often wondered why my grandfather never gave his little talk to the adults?    Who me?
“You know if you want to come back next year ….”

Stories from Richards Castle.

 

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Photo Noreen Tyers

Castles in the Bush click here.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

Lets Play Elevator- Charles Ogilvy Store — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Jack’s in Charge-Scary Stories — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages —- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

I am Afraid of Snakes- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Hitching a Ride Cross Town — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

My Old Orange Hat –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Out of the Old Photo Album — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

 

Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle — From the Pen Of Noreen Tyers

Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Jack’s in Charge-Scary Stories — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

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Jack’s in Charge-Scary Stories — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers
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Dear Linda
Another story for you

Childhood , Oh so scary childhood “Mom don’t leave big brother in charge” maybe we can come with you… Please!

Jack’s in Charge-Scary Stories
I have a brother who I love dearly but as a twelve year old left in charge of his two younger sisters while Mom and Dad went down the street three doors away to visit Grandparents.  Brother dear was left in charge, OH DEAR, oh dear.

My Brother, could not do any  wrong, in my Mothers eyes.  He always obeyed my mother’s request, at least he told her he understood and he would go get our parents should there be any trouble    Sweet Boy, NOT ..  OH YEAH!  I would say to my sister oh here we go again what will he do now? He was a good brother but he sure scared us sometimes.  He did know how to creep us out!

In my childhood there was no television, you would listen to the radio, and on Sunday evening there were horror or horrible shows as I would call them.  Sound effects and voices were so scarey, creaky doors, screaming people, piercing sounds, footsteps to name a few.  I still shiver

Dear Brother would get two chairs and place them in front of the radio.  He would then say, sit  down,  First time it happened we thought we were going to play, musical chairs or something.  But OH NO., Brother dear would go and get a couple of my Dad’s ties and tie us to the chair.  He would then turn up the radio and shut off the lights.

Oh we were so frightened my younger sister would be crying, I would be screaming and no he did not stop   He would just wait for a scary part in the program and then he would crawl under the chairs and grab our legs. The programs THE SHADOW KNOWS and the GREEN HORNET.

I do not know how my sister and I survived, you know much later in Life around the age of 45, it was discovered I had been born with a hole in my heart, this problem was never medically repaired or had any family Doctor  known it was there. Over  the years this caused major heart problems , and I ended up with Open Heart Surgery.. Here was this sweet thing scaring us to death, he was supposed to protect us, so I thought.

When the shows were over he would untie us put everything away, my parents would come home shortly after.   Once again my sister and I would say that Brother was mean to us and tied us to a chair.  Mother would say, “I don’t think he would do that.”  She would ask him ‘’did you put those programs on the radio’‘and he would admit to it.  Mom would say he will not do that again and that would be the end of the conversation.

Needless to say the next trip down the street by our parents to our Grandparents we would know, Here comes the Green Hornet, and experience the same treatment.  One night shortly after, my mother, went out she did not go down the street right away, when the lights went out, she came in and caught him.  WHEW   we were safe AND THEY WERE NOT HEARD AGAIN.  So ended LISTENING TO THE GREEN HORNET AND THE SHADOW KNOWS, and I am stronger for it.  I think!

From the pen of Noreen—July 2018
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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages —- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

I am Afraid of Snakes- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Hitching a Ride Cross Town — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

My Old Orange Hat –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Out of the Old Photo Album — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

 

Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle — From the Pen Of Noreen Tyers

Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle — From the Pen Of Noreen Tyers

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Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle — From the Pen Of Noreen Tyers

 

 

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Another little story from our stay at Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle from the pen of Noreen Tyers from Perth


The Front Door Bell

   
We lived in a rather humble  abode, not much money in those times but a lot of love.  We had very close relationship with our extended family and enjoyed our time with them.

Upon arriving at the stone house on Snow Road, Grandpa felt there were a few things to put in order.  It was he who had the responsibility of renting and making sure that nothing got broken on our stay there.  It was as if he took on this chore and he made sure everyone toe the line. There was always a space in time when he and Grandma  had to prepare for the onslaught of the rest of the family and of course the young ones, and there were a few.

On the front door there was a door bell, that you would twist and it would ring.  There was no electricity at the house and the bell worked manually (turn the little knob and barrrring ).  For we children this was a new found toy and we took pleasure making it work and hearing the bell sound. After all we didn’t have one of these treasures at home, nor had I seen one before coming to the Stone House at Snow Road.  Before very long Grandpa would roar and come to the door. He soon learned that he should take out the ringer part and put it away until we were leaving, which he did!

At the time we were all disappointed that our new found toy did not work and therefore  of no interest any more. Grandpa did get some peace of mind knowing that it would not get broken, there would be no ringing and he had no trouble in reassembling before he left,

The sound of that ring of the bell and Grandpa’s  roar can still be heard in the halls of Richard’s castle.

From the Pen of Noreen

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

    Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

    Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

    Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

    My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

    Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

    My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

    The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

    Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

    The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

    The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

    The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

    Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

    Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

    My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

     

Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

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Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

 

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From the Original Photo Album of my Grandfather: John Andrew Lahey Some Catches from the good old Mississippi River at Richard’s Castle, Snow Road Vacation in the 1940’s

 

While on our Summer holidays fishing was a big part of the men’s activities.  Fish was also a source of food and we felt a real treat, many a meal was served, and everyone enjoyed it. Cleaning of the catch was so important as no one wanted a scale left on to be crunched on while eating.

I do remember worrying about my family out in the boat as Dad didn’t swim,  I never saw Grandpa swimming, now my Uncles did. These trips would take place before breakfast when other people were not yet out of bed, or sometimes after supper in the evening.  Pictures of the catch were taken with everyone beaming. Now this was when the fish were plentiful and also great for eating. No pollution in the waters then. Now writing this down I do have to admit the taste buds are waiting to be treated.

Off in the morning they would go on their merry way, getting ready was a big thing and the noise level could sometimes be high, what ever happened to respect for other people still sleeping.  It always amazed me that the fishing tackle and rods were not left in place for their morning fish. These were men on a mission, no motor for the boats you would row to your destination. On the way back, they  were rowing against the current which made it a bit more challenging . On most occasions they would fish the mighty Mississippi River for a couple of hours, and then come back to the stone house. I was never sure whether they had had enough fishing or were hungry for breakfast.  I do think the tummy had something to do with it though.

Now when Mom and Grandma knew they had caught a feed of fish, dinner menu was planned.  I can remember the flour, salt and pepper in a bowl and a mixed up egg to dip the fish in before pan frying.  I also remember the old Findlay Cast Iron Frying Pan for frying the fish, in those days one never thought about calorie count. As a child this was heavy beast to lift. Cleaning of the Fry Pan was a ritual that only a few knew how to do it properly.

Now it was hoped that there were still Lemons available to be squeezed on the fish.  I do know that Mom would buy a few at the Fruit Store and wrap them carefully for our stay at Snow Road as she knew there would be a few fish caught.  They would also make up their own recipe for what is now called Tartar Sauce. Oh it was just so good and MIND THE BONES, you don’t want to choke, was always voiced to the young ones.

On one particular day my Uncle was cleaning the catch down on the edge of water.  Grandpa always seemed to managed to be the expert on how this should be done. Uncle was well engrossed in his chore and doing a great job, when under his feet something moved.  It turned out to be a rather large snapping turtle who had been sunning himself close to shore and checking out his source of food. This was rather distressing as everyone knew that the Turtle could do some damage if he wanted to. There was lots  of advice given to him from others around, on how this situation should be rectified . After some discussion my Uncle was cautious and removed himself off the turtle’s back. I am sure he would have been safe as he was dropping the discarded parts of the fish into the water, and the turtle was having a real treat which was being prepared in bite size pieces just for him.  Come to think of it not many ever volunteered to do the cleaning of fish.

From then on when the fish were being cleaned, the shore line was checked out for  turtles, who might just be lurking around waiting for their tid bit treat.

Man those fresh Pickerels were great and they are still a treat!  Come to think of it, it has been years since I sat down of a meal of good pickerel.  Not so sure they are as plentiful today in the good old Mississippi River, in the 1940’s,  dream on Noreen.

From the pen of Noreen Tyers

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

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My Uncle Earl Lahey our Leader, his two children Earl and Linda. My older brother Jack, Sister Grace and my self the gangley one beside my brother, We are just so stylish and cute. Photo Noreen Tyers

 

Here we go another Snow Road adventure dug up from the summer holidays.   Hikes in the old Cave by Noreen Tyers

When I stop to think of the time we spent at Snow Road, I have to say that Uncle was the one who entertained the children.  We could always depend on him to do things that were adventuresome and fun.

There was an old wooden bridge that went across the Mississippi River to an island.  This bridge was in bad repair and had places where the boards had broken, so one had to watch where you placed your feet.  At the time we didn’t swim so that this was a challenge and maybe somewhat dangerous in today’s standards. Uncle Earl was always close by so he guided us along on so before long we were on the other side.

We always had to take a treat on our adventure and something to drink.  It was quite a walk from the bridge to the cave, where he was taking us.  We walked through a grass covered area the whole time I was watching for snakes.  It is so interesting how as a child the creatures always were rather big and always dangerous.

Another important item that traveled with Uncle Earl was light for inside the cave.   


We had reached the opening to the cave, it did look rather frightening and very dark.  We were not so sure that this was going to be as enjoyable as when we talked about it earlier.  Speaking for myself I could imagine other things that would be not quite so frightening. I am one that might be sticking close to the adult for protection and I am sure that there were a lot of questions, just out of sheer fright.  Inside the cave there were many things to see, bugs, spiders, bats hanging of the side of the walls. I often think of how it would have been great to be able to take photos, but in those days a camera would not have been what we needed in a rather dark, damp atmosphere.  To keep you in suspense a hat was one of the items I was told to have to ward off the bats. What I didn’t know at this early age was that bats usually sleep during the day and chances are they wouldn’t leave their spots on the wall of the cave.

At the time we did not know that Uncle Earl was afraid of spiders.  Now little ones were not too bad, he tolerated them, but if a big one happened to appear, you could watch him turn rather white in a hurry and leave the spot quickly.  When I think of it I am sure he was thinking that this was a bit of a chore and may not have been such a good idea. I do have to say that other than the pale face you never noticed any fright.

I was getting to the point where I thought it should be time to leave the cave and I just hoped that  we could find our way out. I am sure that the cave had been checked out before we ever started on our adventure but we sure didn’t know that.  I know that the trip through the cave would have been much quicker without the children. After a few minutes a bit of light appeared and we were at the entrance of the cave.

After our experience we were ready for our treat and drink and then make our way back to the house.  We did have to cross the bridge again but this time it was not quite as bad, seeing we did it already.


I am so glad that these memories have lasted and I am ready to write some of them down.  I am sure that I have not remembered everything but I can always add to it should I remember something of importance.From the Pen of
Noreen – June 2007




Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

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My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

 

 

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Noreen Tyers—Grandparents in front of Richards Castle, in Snow Road
around the 1940’s John and Charlotte (Mavis) Lahey Summer holidays at the Stone House.

My childhood Memory– by Noreen Tyers

When I was a young girl with long pig tails
I was so excited when Mom would say pack your old sand pail

It was not long after school was let out for holidays in the summer
I just knew we would go for a vacation that would be so much the funner

Preparation was started and soon Mom start gathering up
The items that were needed, but she didn’t have to bring her cup

We travelled in the back of Ogilvy’s old delivery van
On the long winding, unpaved roads, that was the plan

The children and father would all get very car sick
For Mom to stay sane and clean was always a trick

The reason this was so special and I loved it so dearly
We would be with the extended family, some years all of them nearly

It was crowded and noisy there was excitement for sure
We could go for a swim and then sit on the shore

The place that we stayed was Richard’s Castle in Snow Road
On the Mississippi River and there was usually some frogs and toads

The Old Stone house, so elegant and quaint
When I think of it, Grandpa really was a saint

Between the Dinning Room & Living Room there was pocket doors, just such a delight
We would play Elevator until an adult came along and got us in sight

Grandpa always put up with his grandchildren’s energy and pleasure
While making sure that he took care and looked after any treasures

Each year, I try to travel the roads and visit, this spot
No inside plumbing or anything like that during my stay, instead under the bed came Out that good old Chamber POT

Lines from the Pen ✒ of Noreen MAY 2016

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

 

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

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My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

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Gerry and Noreen (Regan) Tyers. April 29, 1961 At the Church we were married. Trinity Anglican , on Cameron and Bank Streets in Ottawa. Photo Noreen Tyers

 

 

                               My Wedding Tiara

 

My beautiful little tiara I wore on my wedding day

Was used by my daughter, when as a child a princess she did play.

I’d retrieved this little tiara and placed it back on the shelf

Then one day when I was cleaning, there it was again all by itself.

So once again I retrieved it and wrapped it in a cloth to be put away

Now this time, I hid it oh so carefully and there in the hat box it seemed to stay.

When my daughter decided to marry she thought again of this little tiara so fair

 

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Teri (Tyers) and Blair White Wedding Oct 9/99 Camp Merrywood on the Rideau

 

 

She felt once again like a princess and included it in her own wedding plans with care.

Apart came my little tiara with it’s shiny beads all askew

Don’t worry she said for in jig time it will appear once again just like new.

Some pearls were added to the stones of this beautiful little tiara to be worn on her Wedding day

Once again it was used by my precious loving daughter at her very own special time we pray.

How important it is to keep treasures and collect your own special thoughts

For you know my dear wonderful memories like this just never can be bought.

These tiny beads are now left over from your very own beautiful Wedding head piece.

Put them away in a safe place for some day a daughter may use them with her very own wedding fleece.

February 2001 From the Pen of Noreen

 

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Some more wedding Trivia from my collection of Wedding Trivia
Garters originated in the 17th century as silk sashes tied below the bride’s knee, which were removed by the groomsmen and worn in their hats. Other garters might be fancifully decorated with blue ribbon symbolizing constancy. They would be part of a bride’s trousseau filled with such a frothery assortment of lingerie and linen, perhaps embroidered and sewn by her own hand, to be taken to her new home.

Why does the bride carry a handkerchief? Not all brides do, but if you choose to, it will be a lucky sign. Early farmers thought a bride’s wedding-day tears were lucky and brought rain for their crops.–With Love ❦ Handcrafted by Noreen

In days gone by the Bridal Hankie was put away after the wedding day to be turned into a Christening bonnet for the first born Child

❧❦❧ A Bridal Hankie

A little hankie I edged for you In each stitch I planted a few

A wish for happiness, a wish for health

Please don’t forget to look after your wealth

This hankie may be used when sad and maybe a little blue

But most of all I want happy tears and keep the sad ones few

Carry this hankie on your wedding day

Then put it away and take it out on a joyful Christening day

With Love ❦ Handcrafted by Noreen

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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