Tag Archives: skating

The Old Arena — Community Memories

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The Old Arena — Community Memories

Jan 1971–

The old Almonte arena in the photo above stood where the new one now stands. Linda Nilson- Rogers believes the old roof caved in so they built a new one. She said that the best thing was Fred Larose running the Canteen! He was a nice man and he would let the kids take extra creamers for your hot chocolate.

They also had these long heaters by the stands that roasted you in front while your butt froze!

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1970, Sat  •  Page 11

Thanks to the Almonte Fire Department and several other public spirited individuals, Almonte youngsters will soon have a rink to skate on.  The firemenhave been busy Hooding a large section of. the parking area at the end of /the N.L.A.S. ‘grounds and hope to have fairly decent ice-to skate on by this weekend. 

‘The fate of the Almonte Community Centre is still in doubt, pending the arrival of an engineer’s report being prepared by J. L. Richards and Associates, consulting engineers, of Ottawa. In any case, it looks doubtful that the building will be available until February and the outdoor rink at the N Ii.A .S. grounds can fill a big void until that time.

Although the fare m en’s rink will not be surrounded b y boards, making i t unsuitable for hockey, it will be equipped with enough lighting to perm it night skating. ‘ Water for flooding is being pumped from the river with a portable pump and the firemen have been flooding every night working in teams of two. They couldn’t have asked for better weather for making ice, during these last few days. – Everyone will be free to use the rink but skates will have to be changed the old-fashioned way — sitting on a snowbank. Work was started on the project last Saturday and the firemen are grateful to several people who helped make it possible, including the N.L.A.S., Mayor Chas. ‘Baker; Lindsay Farm Equipment, Dave Drummond, H Harry’s Motor Sales, Jerry O’Connell, Francis Naismith and Don Lowry.

Dave Rooney

I was only in there once before they tore it down. I played 2-3 years of hockey outdoors before the new arena building was constructed.

Geordie McConnell

I would LOVE to see an old photo of the outdoor rink! That said, I still see it in my head when my feet get really cold (PTSD?).

John Dalgity

Early Saturday morning practices, freezing cold & wait for the sunrise!

Dave Rooney layers of long johns under their equipment we know they did not sweat skating. I remember cleaning the ice with shovels before the tractor came out to water.

Sandra Thompson

I enjoyed many skate days on the ice in this building. I remember reporting to the person looking after the ice at the time that there were pieces of wood on the ice from the rafters. I remember not being on the ice long after because we were all asked to leave. Shortly there after the rink was closed for inspection & renovations. Little did we know it would be torn down and replaced with a new building. The town council, I believed voted on installing an out door rink for use. I could be remembering incorrectly but I also believe Susan Elliott was with me at the time, do you remember this Sue?

Sandra Thompson

Susan Elliott Topping, I believe Peter L is correct because I remember Freddie & Norma Larose being there a lot but there may have been someone else there that night the wood chunks were coming down. Perhaps Freddie & Norma along with Chuck and Sis had plans. I remember them always being together. Good times & memories.

Cathy Paterson

Remember going there for school carnival and racing in our skates to a chocolate bar at the other end ! Everyone got one

Susan Elliott Topping

Had lots of family work there. I did too-ticket window in 1970.

Nancy Durant Hall

I played hockey, and love skating at the rink when I was not on the river

Marty Taylor

Likewise. Played hockey for several years. Many of the surrounding towns we went to play at, only had outdoor rinks, so I considered myself lucky to have an indoor rink. Also, behind the arena, was tobogganing every winter.

Ted Hurdis

Played hockey there many times. The coldest rink around , no question !!

Peggy Byrne

I remember racing to get the shovels so you could scrap the ice before Freddie Larose would flood the ice – no Zambonis back then.

A group of skaters on the Indian river. A hockey game is on in the background.
1900
Almonte
Skating has always been a popular pastime for Almontonians. Skating was referenced in poetry and around the town accounts in the town’s first newspaper the Express in 1861, 1862. Whether it was on the frozen Mississippi or Indian Rivers or the numerous small ponds that dotted the rural landscape skating was the thing to do on cold winter nights. Skating parties and carnivals were very popular social events. Skating was something men and ladies could enjoy together. When the first indoor arena on the Island was built it saw an endless stream of patrons both young and old.

Ray Madden

Played hockey there many years for Corkery Fearnots ,Junior Raiders & Stan’s Packers in 1960s & 70S. Great memories. Yes I did play with Cheeser. Great guy. I also remember your dad as rink manager giving some of us players a buck for each goal we scored in a juvenile tournament in the early 60s. I hope we didn’t take all of your allowance.lol. That may have been before your time.

Joe Ryan

Having lived very close to the arena for all my younger life , i was a “rink rat” who spent much of the winter months hanging around the old barn. Fred Larose used to pay us “two bits”….25c to clean up the stands and dressing room after the games , which on many nights were packed to the rafters. We would also climb the scoreboard and change the score when someone scored. Lots of ice scraping and hauling the 5 gallon drum full of hot water around to flood the ice. It was COLD but had a great atmosphere for the games , with people cheering and banging on the tin sides. When there was nothing going on we had a way to crawl under the arena and get onto the ice to play some shinny and do lots of skating. Fred and Norma also had us work the canteen once in a while and paid us off in candy and the odd hot dog. I believe , if i’m not mistaken , the old building was torn down , but the boards remained and thats what we used for the outdoor rink. At that time we used to play shinny under the front bridge…a few places on the island ..Willard’s and lots on the rink behind St Mary’s school. HATED when the weather got warm and we weren’t able to play our great sport!!!!!

Judy Morton

Many memories – skating carnival! I won a prize for my costume and Louis Peterson handed them out! I have the photo somewhere.

Mary Anne Harrison

They held a walk a thon to raise funds for the new rink. I think it was 22 miles. We walked out to Clayton on the old road (by the Naismith House) and back in to Almonte on the new one (by the Civitan Hall). The new road was still under construction at the time. Anyone else remember doing that.

Judy Ann

Got hit at the side of my right eye with a puck when I was 13. 8 stitches by Dr King & lucky it didn’t hit further, either way … could have been right on my eye or my temple. I think that’s the first time I realized my Angels were watching over me

Karen Hirst

Another dating site with Ken–opportunity to hold hands, skate to the music, round and round we’d go, learning to do the curves smoothly, attempting to skate backwards as well and stay off our bottoms !!! Fun entertainment, some hot chocolate to warm us up from the canteen.

Thanks to Arlene once again.. ADHS celebration at Almonte Arena. ( not sure for what or the year)





The Almonte Arena where it stands today, near Gemmill Park, was opened in 1950. A newspaper clipping posted in the comments below confirms this information – thank you friends! Winnifred Knight Dunlop Gemmill bequeathed the land to Almonte in ’43 after her death.

The first image below is of the “newly constructed skating rink”. It was used from 1950 to 1973. The earliest plaque on view at the current Almonte and District Community Centre (ACC) & Arena highlights the 1973 erection of the Arena. (Also on plaques at the arena: The Community Centre erected in 1975, reno’ed in 1995 & again most recently in 2010)

Almonte Gazette, Oct 1949

Brian Mckenzie-Thompson
October 19, 2020  · 


Well folks, it’s the end of an era! The “mayor” of Almonte (Bram Karp) has officially retired from the Almonte arena! 10 years of hard work from this hard working individual. Always quick to greet people as they walked through the door and welcomed them back as they left! Congratulations
Brammer! — with Bram Karp.

A group of lads pose with their sticks before strapping on the blades for a game of shinny.
1920
Almonte–The Almonte Arena where it stands today, near Gemmil Park, was opened in 1950. Through the years it has seen its share of activity. Hockey players, Broomball players, Figure Skaters, Ringette Players, call this there second home in winter months. Roller hockey and ball hockey enthusiasts use the surface in the summer months.
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Mar 1971, Wed  •  Page 5
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Feb 1973, Wed  •  Page 67

Gemmill Park Skating Rink May Be Illegal–1947

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Gemmill Park Skating Rink May Be Illegal–1947
The original site of the Almonte Community Centre
1899
Almonte-Photos from Mill of Kintail Conservation Area
Lanark, Ontario

December 1947 Almonte Gazette

The open air rink to be built in Gemmill Park has cost the taxpayers of Almonte $908.00 up to the present -time and will cost considerably more before it finished was the unwelcome news unfolded before the Council at its meeting on Tuesday night. This large sum of money is made up of two items—$563 for work done by Harry Metcalfe’s bulldozer in levelling the site chosen by the Committee and $345 for lumber and other material.

The rink has been an unfortunate project from the start so far as the Council is concerned. There was considerable criticism over the site selected. Unofficial and some semi-official critics who have viewed the large area composing Gemmill Park (98 acres) express astonishment that the Council Rink Committee and the Parks Commission should pick on a spot which would require the expenditure of $563 to make it level. In doing this those responsible not only ran into difficulties in preparing the terrain for flooding but raised the animosity of the Roman Catholic community by locating the rink so close, to the convent that it may be a nuisance to the sisters of St. Joseph.

It is said by those opposed to the site chosen that the rink could have been put out in the middle of a field which was already level or so nearly level that it would cost little to make it satisfactory for flooding. Others feel that as it is to be a temporary expendient —so it is hoped—the rink might have been put on the town hall lawn a second time. Argument against this latter alternative is that the ice sheet there would not be large enough for hockey. Maybe Illegal.

There are citizens of the town with considerable municipal experience who feel that the building of a rink is ultra vires so far as a municipal council’s authority goes. They say a town council has no right to engage in private enterprises such as building rinks any more than it would have to build a large dance hall or bowling alley. If this contention is correct then the money spent on the open air rink has been expended illegally.

Gemmil Park, a true testament to the devotion to physical activity in the town. At any time, in any season you will find someone in the Park. Tennis courts, track, soccer fields, football field, play structure, baseball diamond, horshoe pits, basketball courts and the recently added skateboard ramp. The hills beyond the tennis court are the site of winter fun; sledding here is the ultimate.

John Gemmil, prominent town citizen, once owned a stately home and farm where the park is today. After his death, the property passed to his daughter Winifred Gemmil. Upon her death in 1943 the farm or Homestead was bequeathed to the town of Almonte that they might “construct, establish and maintain a Public Park or Recreation Ground.”

Prior to this park being established numerous other sites through out the town had been used as playgrounds. The most used field in town was the N.L.A.S (North Lanark Agricultural Society ) grounds on Water Street in Almonte. The field was large and the grandstands provided good seats for spectators. In the 1920’s and 1930’s sporting events were typically played on McCallum’s Sports Field.

The Almonte Arena where it stands today, near Gemmil Park, was opened in 1950. Through the years it has seen its share of activity. Hockey players, Broomball players, Figure Skaters, Ringette Players, call this there second home in winter months. Roller hockey and ball hockey enthusiasts use the surface in the summer months

Almonte-Photos from Mill of Kintail Conservation Area
Lanark, Ontario

Amanda Pulker-Mok
July 1, 2018  · Almonte  · 


Last stop of the day, the main stage at Gemmill Park and fireworks! Thank you to everyone who organized events this weekend. You all did such a fabulous job! Happy Canada Day!!
— at Gemmill Park Almonte.

Clippings of the Almonte Bombers

So What Happened to Miss Winnifred Knight Dunlop Gemmill’s Taxidermy Heads?

The Homestead – a John Dunn story

Jessie Leach Gemmill -The “Claire Fraser” of Lanark

History of McLaren’s Depot — by Evelyn Gemmill and Elaine DeLisle

Next Time You Drive Down Highway 15–Gemmils

From Gemmil’s Creek to the Riel Rebellion

Orchids in Gemmils Swamp June 1901

Skating on Fraser’s Pond and Hobo Haven — Larry Clark

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Skating on Fraser’s Pond and Hobo Haven — Larry Clark
Photo Mike Jeays– the reason i picked this photo is because Ted Hurdis told me it reminded him of playing in that area as a child.

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Fraser’s Pond by Larry Clark

Hearing of “Stompin Tom” and his affection for Skinners Pond reminded me that I was especially enamoured with such a swampy location in our neighbourhood; known to us (or named by us) as Fraser’s Pond. It could easily have been properly called Buffam’s or Bamford’s as we had no knowledge as to whom owned the land. We never really cared who owned a particular property as we would “possess” it for our adventures until such time as we were chased away (but that’s another story). 

Mother was not particularly in favour of our pastimes and would remonstrate us with the words as we left, “stay away from the pond!”. Those words would ring in our ears as we set out (previously with no idea of what we would do that day) for the swamp. Mother would be distracted by the activities of my four younger (boisterous) sisters who vied with each other in determining whose turn it was to do the dishes. (This was an activity beneath me and seldom was I called upon, since on one occasion that I was forced to perform this despicable chore, my performance was so sub par that I was never asked again (seems that monitoring my activities for more than 3 hours was too much to ask for my mother’s patience).

Buffam’s Farm on Napoleon Street- December 2020-A Meteorite or a Fuse Box? A Carleton Place Legend Part 2

After donning our thick wool socks, rubber boots, hammers and nails (the raft/s always required some repair) we left for Frasers’, a distance of approx. 1/2 mile.It was located between the tracks and Napoleon St. at the base of a small hill which was covered with cedar bush, aka Hobo Haven. This was always a Springtime activity because the pond did not always have sufficient depth of water during summer months (Dibblee’s not far away). The pond was laced with cedars and small bushes (can’t remember the type) which created a series of channels and backwaters that were ripe for exploration and if we had 2 or more serviceable rafts were great for “hide and seek” (and/or ramming). The rafts were generally just a combination of two old water soaked logs with a myriad of short, equally wet planking connecting them. Just a minor shifting of weight could cause the water level to rise sufficiently  to start coming into your boots. Of course that could be a bit of a challenge to see how high you could get the water to go without it breaching the top of your boot-particularly if you were two on a raft, each trying soak the other.

The strategy may have been to see how wet we could get before the soaking became intolerable and we had to retreat to our homes where, invariably we be praised (ha) for, after having found ourselves surrounded by swamp, we had managed to extricate ourselves, ourselves.

Tired of the chase, we would take to the cedars; climb to the tops; start to swing back and forth until we judged that the distance between trees was such that we could jump/leap to the next (a la Tarzan), voicing Tarzan -like whooping as we flew! Needless to say these stunts did not always go smoothly, as follows: a. couldn’t swing close enough to the next tree: b. loss of grip and falling to the base of the tree: or worst of all, the top breaking off and me, tumbling to the pond below. Our parents could put up with the soaking of our clothing but the ripping and tearing of our clothing was a bit problematic.

For more of a problem, fast forward 4 or 5 years-the location a large barn on the 8th line (near Ashton) which contained a meagre amount of straw left over from the over-wintering of a pair of horses (Pat and Dolly). For some reason, there was a couple of ropes (one would be for the hay rake)  hanging from the loft of this cavernous area and on sighting them, almost simultaneously we said,  “Tarzan!” In order to make this coming scene more authentic we divested of our clothes, climbed and swung about, living our dreams of the forests of Africa. With a yell, becoming a bit of a scream as I lost my grip and slipped down the rope (problematically), as the rope was between my legs. It was a moment I am not likely to forget. Seeking sustenance (pity) from the farmer (there was some swelling, pain, heat, etc). Upon further examination, we didn’t think it worthy of medical involvement but being cautious of such an injury, we decided to consult with a neighbour and son.  A man of few words, upon examining the affliction, he looked rather grave and said one word; “SILVERBALLS”.

Larry Clark

The editor will leave the word Silverballs with you to use your imagination. Linda

Photo- Mike Jeays

Remembering Evelyn Clark — Larry Clark

Larry Clark Memories : Billings Bridge, Willow Trees and the Orange Lodge

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Larry Clark

Larry Clark — Your Veribest Agent

A Personal Story — Caught in the Ice– Rocky Point- Larry Clark

So I was talking about the location of some of these places with Ted Hurdis and this is what he said.

Where was Fraser’s pond??

Ted- Unless they mean the quarry out past where John Francis Fraser lived. I didn’t trust the ice at the quarry-it was pretty deep and unpredictable. It was supposed to be spring fed so you never new how the ice was. The water in the summer was ice cold. We had a pond right across the road where Stuart Neilson kept his horse.

Where was Hobo’s Haven?

Ted-Hobo Haven would have been the cattle loading yard right behind us at the tracks. They could get under where it was secluded and dry . That structure was built to load cows right on to the train. Many a hobo would be at our back door for water and sandwiches. They were never turned away.

Minto Skating Club Comes to Carleton Place — 1947

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Minto Skating Club Comes to Carleton Place — 1947
Sports | City of Ottawa

silver ‘sequins, going through a smart number.

Skate Guard: Guy In The Sky: The Story Of Maribel Vinson Owen's Leading Man

Easy to look at, In the same part of the bill were Margot Mereweather and Nancy Minnes. Almost a tradition in Minto Club shows Is the act put on every year by the Lopdell ladies. This year Eva and Kay -Lopdell added another appealing act to their repretoire, and were warmly encored by an enthusiastic crowd.

The crowd had already learned that Cynthia Kirby was reputed one of the best skaters of her age in eastern Canada, and so it was no surprise to many when she flashed out in her red costume, and started to do her split-second Jumps, her exciting twirls, her effortless and intricate routines. A tall girl, she has a personality all her own, and is a real crowd pleaser. Although her solo lasted the usual time, it seemed all over in a second, and when she came in, she had to be sent out again to do an encore.

It was noted that the Minto girls themselves were enthusiastic about her routine, and were among those applauding the loudest. Undoubtedly the Minto maids saved the best till the last, with their Irish Court. Here the girls actually danced jigs on skates, and danced well too. The writer happened to single out Patricia Kennedy, and the way she was doing her Irish washerwoman dance was worthy of being reproduced in the movies. Other girls, not less good, held their arms akimbo. traditional style, and reeled and danced and kicked and whirled in a most agreeable way.

Then there were interesting routines. The girls spread out in a pattern, came together again, did a drill, then once more were bunched together. The act ended with an elaborate bow, skates turned in, combining appeal and comedy in agreeable proportions. It was obvious that the Carleton Place people liked their first taste of fancy skating.

The Minto Club really gave a great show, and the town applauded vigorously. Notable was the large percentage of young people and the con trast between the high percentage of grownups attending such a show in Ottawa and the high percentage of youth attending such a show in Carleton Place was most obvious. The young Carleton Place boys whistled in their best fourteen year old wolf-call style, at the gorgeously dressed girls, while the teenagers thrilled also at the fancy costumes, and wished that they could take up figure skating?.

No question about it, the Minto Club made a hit. As to the young men of the caste, they skated extremely well, and probably would be even more effective if they would take the time to work out more all-male routines, either for comedy purposes or along straight lines. The Minto entourage travelled by bus in both directions, and were in charge of Charles H. Cumming. Looking after the program and doubling as pianist was Mrs. D. Roy Kennedy, Mrs. Donat Paquin, assisted by Mrs. Gayle Catherwood. arranged the costumes, and the director was Irwin M. Morgan.

Skate Guard: Donald B. Cruikshank, Man Of Many Hats

1947 – 1948 – Barbara Ann Scott, Minto member, became Olympic, World, North American, and Canadian Champion.

1904 – Founded by Their Excellencies, the Earl and Countess of Minto. Lord Minto was then the Governor – General of Canada and gave permission for the Earl’s coronet to be part of the Club crest.

Membership was composed of 15 gentlemen and a few lady associates, most being members of the Rideau Skating Club, organized about 1885. Ladies were subsequently admitted to full membership.

Skating sessions were held once or twice a week on the outdoor rink at Government House. Members were required to pass a skating test. Skating facilities were obtained at the Rideau Rink on Laurier Avenue, and later at Dey’s Arena also on Laurier Avenue.

 -
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CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada03 Feb 1947, Mon  •  Page 13

Carleton Place Figure Skating Club

My Barbra Ann Scott Doll –Noreen Tyers

Moonlight Skating to Greensleeves–Comments Comments Comments

The Almonte Skating Rink on “The Island”

So Where Was the Ice Palace?

The Old Carleton Place Arena

So What Did You Wear Ice Skating?

The Figure Skaters of Carleton Place

Skaters Under Ice? Ring That Bell!

Falling Through the Ice- One Reason Indoor Rinks Were Created

  1. relatedreading

The Old Carleton Place Arena

Do you Know What This Hockey Sweater Was?

That Good Ole Hockey Game in Carleton Place

Roy Brown Hockey Photo

Doug Gibson–Founder of Junior Hockey in Carleton Place

He Shoots He Scores — Carleton Place Hockey

The Roar of the Referees and the Smell of the Hockey Bag in Carleton Place

O Brothers Kane in Carleton Place- Where Art Thou?

Where Was One of the Open Air Rinks in Carleton Place?

Fire Destroys Smiths Falls Skating Arena

Carleton Place Figure Skating Club

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Carleton Place Figure Skating Club

 

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Third Annual Bonnechere Skate January 17 What year? Carleton Place Skating Club

Back- Sidney Fisher, Kaylin McNeely, Coach Dee, Sierra Rivington and Laura Brisson. Front row is Leia Dozzi

Photos from the Carleton Place Canadian from the files of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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skayinLisa Mulvihill and Kerri Mulvihill at the end

 

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Photos from the Carleton Place Canadian from the files of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Hannah White- Carleton Place Precision Skaters

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Moonlight Skating to Greensleeves–Comments Comments Comments

The Almonte Skating Rink on “The Island”

So Where Was the Ice Palace?

The Old Carleton Place Arena

So What Did You Wear Ice Skating?

 

The Figure Skaters of Carleton Place

Skaters Under Ice? Ring That Bell!

Falling Through the Ice- One Reason Indoor Rinks Were Created

Doug Gibson–Founder of Junior Hockey in Carleton Place

 

The Winter of 1916

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The Winter of 1916

 

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Jennifer Fenwick Irwin– Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. This was December of 1916, and the only time I’ve heard of that the ice here was thick enough for skating. This photo of Horace Brown was taken the same day. He was A. Roy Brown’s younger brother and home on leave.

So not thinking with a full deck I assumed that there must have been a heck of a cold snap in the area. As I searched through the archives I found out that the west was hit hard with cold and snow.

Victoria’s Snowstorms of the Century – February 2, 1916 and December 28-29, 1996. Huge snowstorms, 80 years apart, clobbered Canada’s “snow-free” city with more than 55 cm of snow. The December storm dropped 80 cm of snow in 24 hours, 125 cm in five days with cleanup costs exceeding $200 million (including a record insurance payout for BC of $80 million).

But for the east it was just another winter with the usual comings and goings….

 

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Feb 11th 1916 Almonte Gazette

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Feb 11th 1916 Almonte Gazette

Then Darla Fisher Giles solved the mystery. A sweet woman named Mrs. Smith who lived on William St was employed as Mrs Johnston’s companion and told us kids of a time that you could skate on the river outside Dr. Johnston’s house. She claimed it was before the dam was reconfigured and the river froze solid in that area.

 

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Skating at the Central Bridge besides Patterson Funeral Home at Carleton Place 1916.– Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

“My Father finally sent me to skate on the river. I had skates, but he wouldn’t ever let me skate on the river before. There were large kids skating right next to the Central Bridge. That was before the dam was changed.”

 

 - THE OTTAWA EVENING JOURNAL, TyESDAY, OCTOBER 1...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  31 Oct 1916, Tue,  Page 5

 

historicalnotes

Image result for winter 1916 canada

 

“The coldest winter was 1916-17. The winter was so cold that I felt like crying… I can remember we weren’t allowed to have a brazier because it weren’t far away from the enemy and therefore we couldn’t brew up tea. But we used to have tea sent up to us, up the communication trench. Well a communication trench can be as much as three quarters of a mile long. It used to start off in a huge dixie, two men would carry it with like a stretcher. It would start off boiling hot; by the time it got to us in the front line, there was ice on the top it was so cold.”

The winter of 1916-17 also caused a famine in Germany and is often known as the ‘Turnip Winter’. After an extremely wet autumn had ruined the potato crops and cereal production, the German population was forced to subsist on turnips in order to survive.

Killer Lightning – July 29, 1916. Lightning ignited a forest fire which burned down the towns of Cochrane and Matheson, Ontario, killing 233 people.

 

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As the need for soldiers overseas led to a shortage of workers in Canada, many of these “Austrian” internees were released on parole to work for private companies.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Moonlight Skating to Greensleeves–Comments Comments Comments

The Almonte Skating Rink on “The Island”

So Where Was the Ice Palace?

The Old Carleton Place Arena

So What Did You Wear Ice Skating?

 

The Figure Skaters of Carleton Place

Skaters Under Ice? Ring That Bell!

Falling Through the Ice- One Reason Indoor Rinks Were Created

Doug Gibson–Founder of Junior Hockey in Carleton Place

 

O Brothers Kane in Carleton Place- Where Art Thou?

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O Brothers Kane in Carleton Place-  Where Art Thou?
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Photo- Linda Seccaspina 1982
Hi Linda

It would also be pretty neat if you have any pics or info on the rink we all played on years ago. They were the Brothers Kane, and a lot of us played minor hockey on the outdoor rink up there on High Street.

 

old findaly

 

It would have been in behind Stonebridge Manor to the right. That’s likely 45-50 years ago, before we all walked to raise money for the arena that we have now. I have an old newspaper clipping that says I played for Armours, and I think Parkman and Taylor was another sponsor.

Tom Edwards

So what say you? Please leave comments so we can document this.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 relatedreading.jpg

 

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

Where Was One of the Open Air Rinks in Carleton Place?

 

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The Almonte Skating Rink on “The Island”

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Photo from the Almonte Gazette

 

ALMONTE’s Skating and Curling Club January 1903- Almonte Gazette-1903-01-02-08

When Almonte undertakes to do a thing she usually does it well, and when Contractor Donaldson undertakes to do a thing he does it both quickly and well. For the past two or three years the erection of a large rink has been discussed spasmodically, and some preliminary steps towards the accomplishment of that end were undertaken, one of which was the formation of the Almonte Rink Co., but not until this year did things assume practical shape.

Now, however, Almonte is the possessor of what has been pronounced by competent judges to be the best skating and ending rink in the Ottawa Valley. The building, a cut of which is given above, is situated along the bank of the Mississippi river, on the island, between the bridge and the falls above the Rosamond Woolen Co’s, mill, on a site for which- the Rink Co. are largely indebted to Mr. B. Rosamond. It is a very convenient location, easily reached from, any part of the town. The skating rink is 80 x 18 feet, the roof being sustained by seventeen- wooden  arches forty-five feet high, both ends being anchored to the concrete piers upon which they are set, and every pier less than two feet high is anchored to the rock below with 2 inch iron and 1 inch bolts, so that there is no danger to the structure ever moving.

Along each side of the building outside the arches is a lean-to about nine feet wide, which with the platform at each end will give accommodation to nearly 1,500 spectators. Along the sides the platform is in three steps, each one being a foot higher than the one in front of it. This will enable everybody to see what is going on upon the ice.

Between the skating and curling rinks are two waiting rooms, fitted with lockers, etc., for the skaters, a refreshment room and the waiting room for the curlers. Upstairs are dressing rooms for the hockey players with lockers in each, a band stand, and two club rooms. These are reached by a stair from the vestibule of the rink, in which is the ticket office. Even the minutest description of the rink would fail to convey a correct idea of the immense size of the building.

In each of the arches there is nearly one thousand feet of lumber; 165,000 feet of lumber and 210,000 shingles were used in the construction of the rinks, and three tons of nails, including half-a-ton of shingle nails were required in the work. One-and-a-half tons of iron rods and bolts are used to stay the arches and otherwise strengthen the building, and through 1,500 panes of glass the light of the sun enters in. The curling rink, at the south end of the skating rink, is 43 x 143 feet, with a five-foot platform up the centre. This building, too, is set upon concrete piers, as are also the poses in the centre which support the roof.

The rink is well lighted, and ventilated, and is a bright and comfortable building; The curling rink and the waiting rooms are lighted with incandescent lights and the skating link with arc lamps. The contract was given to Mr. J. Donaldson for $4,870 on the 14th of October, ground was broken on the following day, and on the 21th of December the contract was taken off his hands completed. They deserve great credit for the manner in which he rushed the work through, for the quality of material used, and for the  neatness and excellence of the work done. Mr. Win. Hart was overseer of the work and Mr. Geo. Garvrn had charge of the machine work, and upon both of these gentlemen the architect bestowed the warmest praise. Mr. J. P. McLaren, of Ottawa, was the architect.

Peggy Byrne added–“Murray Guthrie skated in this building and they had moccasin dances after – he could tell you a few stories about this relic’.

 

So Where Was the Ice Palace?

The Old Carleton Place Arena

So What Did You Wear Ice Skating?

Your Carleton Place Trading Card–Meet Number 7 — Brian Trimble

The Figure Skaters of Carleton Place

Skaters Under Ice? Ring That Bell!

Falling Through the Ice- One Reason Indoor Rinks Were Created

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

Falling Through the Ice- One Reason Indoor Rinks Were Created

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Anne of Green Gables- YTV- Google Image

On Saturday night as I was watching Anne of Green Gables I realized ‘falling through the ice” was a daily common occurrence in days gone by. According to various history sites did you know that it was the fear of falling through the ice that prompted the creation of indoor rinks? Every single day I come across tragic notices of animals and people falling through the ice. Maybe that’s why I don’t like my son ice fishing.:(

January 9–1891- Almonte Gazette

The Perth Courier of last week gives an account of a horse that was missing on
Monday and on Tuesday was found in *Grant’s Creek. He had broken through
the ice and nothing but his head was to be seen, everything being frozen like a
collar around him. A team was procured and the poor animal pulled out by
means of a rope. The poor brute was then taken to town, put in a warm
stable, was rubbed down, and soon was all right.

Perth Courier, December 25, 1868

Mr. Fourdinier of Sand Point deeply lamented by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance, died suddenly on Saturday last from an attack of rheumatic fever superinduced by having been immersed in the water, his horses having broken through the ice last week while taking a pleasure drive.

Perth Courier–March, 1840

March, 1840 – On Monday last a fine little girl about 5 years old, daughter of Mr. Michael Tovey of Bathurst in company with another girl a few years older, while on their way to the house of Josias Richie, crossing the River Tay, the elder girl broke through the ice, her helpless companion approaching to near the fatal spot and when probably lending her feeble help was herself drawn into the watery grave. Their cries were heard by Mr. Richey in time to extricate the eldest who in her struggles probably kept the other down under the water until the current carried her underneath the ice and we learn there is very little probability of her body being found at present by her afflicted parents.

 

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Haggart’s Mills–Photo from David Taylor

 

Perth Courier–December 28, 1855

Thomas Radenhurst, third son of the late T.M. Radenhurst, Esq., was skating on the river above *Haggart’s Mills when crossing some ice not sufficiently frozen to support him, he broke through the ice and being carried under it by the current, was drowned. Four hours elapsed before the body was recovered. The deceased was about 12 years of age.

Perth Courier, March 4, 1943

Squadron Leader Kenneth C. Wilson Rescued After Five Days on an Ice Flow

Squadron Leader Kenneth C. Wilson, younger son of Lt. Col and Mrs. E. H. Wilson of Perth, was rescued from an ice flow on Northumberland Strait on Monday afternoon after a harrowing five days on the floe after parachuting from a plane which he was forced to desert and the news of his safety, wired to Perth immediately, ended a period of suspense endured by his parents and hundreds of friends here since word reached Perth last Wednesday that he was missing after bailing out of his plane.  A Canadian press dispatch on Monday told of the rescue and the hardships endured by Squadron Leader Wilson and three other members of his crew:  “After drifting five days on an ice flow in the wintry waters of Northumberland Strait, four members of a crashed RCAF bomber were rescued Monday afternoon three miles off the New Brunswick coast and brought ashore at Cape Tormantine, N.B.

They were picked up by the ice-breaking car ferry Prince Edward Island after a searching air force plane sighted them and guided the ferry to their aid. The four men parachuted into the strait last Wednesday night after their twin engine bomber from the Dartmouth, N.B.air base ran into difficulties and had to be abandoned in mid air.   They were Squadron Leader Kenneth C. Wilson of Perth, Ont.; F.O. A.J. Barrette of Ottawa; P.O. William Augustus Richardson of the United States; and Warrant Officer Second Class Joseph Albert Dobson of Bathurst, N.B.

 

The aircraft was the one which unloaded its cargo of depth charges about a mile outside Charlottetown Wednesday night after it and three other planes in the squadron lost their way in the fog.  Two of the aircraft managed to land on Charlottetown airport and the third crashed about six miles from the home base at Dartmouth, killing the four crew members.  Despite their freezing ordeal on the surface of the ice cake, the four men were in remarkably good condition although suffering from exposure and frost bite.  Only one had to be carried aboard in a stretcher while the others were able to clamber on the rescue craft without assistance.

They were taken aboard about 3:00 Monday afternoon and brought ashore at Cape Tormantine. They were later rushed to the RCAF hospital at Moncton, N.B.  From information obtained from those aboard the ferry, it is believed the four flyers crawled on the ice after parachuting down and then made their way together.  It was some time Thursday before they were able to reach one another and make plans for their united actions, according to those reports.

The ice floe from which they were taken was only thirty yards square although substantial and thick enough to weather a light storm.  During most of the time they were afloat the weather was severe, with near zero temperatures and scudding snow squalls to make them more uncomfortable.  They had only one fire during the time they drifted up and down the strait with the winds and the tides, almost within sight of the shore.  It is believed they used their parachutes to kindle that one small blaze that kept them warm for a few minutes before the cold set in again.

All they had to eat were a few chocolate bars they had with them as they left the plane.  They rationed themselves strictly and lived on one quarter of a bar a day until they were sighted.  Then provisions were dropped to them from a hovering search plane and a few hours later the car ferry came crunching through the ice cakes to rescue them. What they used for water during their imprisonment on the ice is not known but presumably they were able to melt ice.  An attempt was made first to send a flying boat to their aid but this had to be abandoned because of the treacherous ice flow.  Then the ferry was signaled and called off course to rescue them.  Another C.P. dispatch on the same day stated that F.V.Barrette and P.O. Richardson were the two suffering from frost bite and that Squadron Leader Wilson and Warrant Officer Dobson were in nearly perfect physical condition despite the hardships of five days on the ice flow.”

 

historicalnotes

*Grants Creek is a stream in Ontario and is nearby to Perth, Caroline Village and Fairholme Park.

 

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Haggart’s Mills– Photo from the -Perth Historical Society

*The Haggart Mills, on Perth’s Mill Street, amongst the town’s most important industrial complexes in its day, operated between 1817 and 1964, when it burned. At its peak, it included a flour mill, sawmill and carding mill. Its most famous owner, John Haggart, MP and Cabinet Minister, was instrumental in the resurrection of the Tay Canal, which ended at his flour mill. His beautiful home still stands beside the mill site. –-Perth Historical Society

Read about HAGGART, JOHN GRAHAM– click here

Haggart House- Perth, Ontario– click here

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Nov 1898, Sat,  Page 9

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

Skaters Under Ice? Ring That Bell!

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Photo- Mississippi Valley Textile Museum-Anglican Church when there used to be a cemetery there. Before the rectory was built. Also shown-Grieg’s and Illingsworth’s House.  1870-1871

Dec 4 1891-  Read the Almonte Gazette here

A big scare was created in town last Tuesday night, shortly after midnight, by the vigorous ringing of the fire alarm bell. A few dozen citizens dressed hurriedly and rushed for the fire station. On asking where the fire was they were told that there was no fire—that a couple of skaters were supposed to be drowned up the river, and some young men rang the alarm in older to rouse a crowd and arrange to search for’ the bodies!

The action of those who rang the alarm were condemned on all sides as an unwarranted proceeding under the circumstances. Had Mr. Tosh, the caretaker, not been ill in bed he would not have allowed it. The facts are that a couple of the young folks were skating on the river, and, the afternoon being fine and the ice good, they glided along till Appleton was reached ; then went to Carleton Place and, being too late for the evening train, came home on the Winnipeg express.

 

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Almonte 1879-Public Archives

Meantime their relatives got very anxious, felt sure an accident had befallen the absent ones, and began to talk of arranging a search party when the thoughtless bell-ringers got in their work. When the train arrived a little later with the missing couple aboard, the agony of suspense was relieved, and all repaired homeward, consoling themselves with the thought that “ all’s well that ends well.”

But the proceedings are not likely to be repeated.

 

Related Reading

So Where Was the Ice Palace?

The Old Carleton Place Arena

So What Did You Wear Ice Skating?

Your Carleton Place Trading Card–Meet Number 7 — Brian Trimble

The Figure Skaters of Carleton Place

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun