Tag Archives: shoes

The Mysterious Shoe Trees

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The Mysterious Shoe Trees

In the 1950s we had a shoe tree which according to the late great Blaine Cornell was located on upper High Street, which I keep asking if folks remember. When I moved here there was also a super great shoe tree just as you turned into the town of Almonte on the right hand side at the edge of the forest. Then many years later it was removed.

Carleton Place once again had the beginnings of one on McArthur Island which used to be called Gillies Grove. I managed to take a photo before some of the trees disappeared years ago LOL.

So what happened to the shoe trees? Dies anyone know? I also found these notes in the old Ottawa Citizen.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Jan 1985, Thu  •  Page 21

Also read____

Lost Lanark Legacy Fruit Trees– Need Help!

Whatever Happened to the Lanark County Greening Apple?

When Were Some of the Trees Planted in Riverside Park?

also read from the millstone

Tree of many tongues

April 15, 2013 – 7:00 am

by Neil Carleton — CLICK

The Lynchs of Almonte — Genealogy

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The Lynchs of Almonte — Genealogy
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Apr 1916, Wed  •  Page 11

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Aug 1911, Mon  •  Page 1
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Fri, Nov 03, 1899 · Page 6
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Sep 1893, Sat  •  Page 5

D. P. Lynch

In those days, even as at present, Almonte had three doctors, a medical triumvirate whose names were household words in the community and the district. Alphabetically, they were Dunn, Kelly and Metcalfe. The first was my father.

He came to Almonte in the later months of 1911, and the circumstances were both fortuitous and amusing. In early August of that year the town lost Dr. D. P. Lynch through death. Shortly after, Father J. F. McNally, newly appointed parish priest in Almonte (a Prince Edward Islander by birth, and subsequently Archbishop of Halifax) wrote to my father at Elgin in Leeds County, pointing out the death of Dr. Lynch.

Source: “Tales from the Doctors House” by John Dunn.
Built in 1868, John Dunn fondly remembers his time in the stone Doctor’s House in Almonte. As a child, it made him feel special. After all, all the important buildings in Almonte were made of stone: the railway station, the high school, the post office, and the churches. His father, Dr. John Dunn had inherited the house in 1910 from the previous doctor, Dennis Lynch, who had inherited it from the first doctor in Almonte, William Mostyn. The second owner, DrLynch, added an open verandah

A. Lynch

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Nov 1899, Fri  •  Page 6 (first wife emily)

They lived on Bridge Street in Almonte

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Sep 1921, Mon  •  Page 6
From Sandra Houston’s Rosamond Cookbook 1911
NAME:Albert Enoch Lynch
BIRTH DATE:12 Sep 1865
BIRTH PLACE:Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
DEATH DATE:2 Feb 1925
DEATH PLACE:Almonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
CEMETERY:Saint Pauls Anglican Church Cemetery
BURIAL OR CREMATION PLACE:Almonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
HAS BIO?:N
FATHER:Daniel Lynch
MOTHER:Jane Lynch
SPOUSE:Emily Lynch (first wife)

3 Albert E. LYNCH b: 12 September 1865 in Ramsay Twp, Ont. d: 02 February 1925 in St. Paul’s Cemetery – Almonte, Ont.
+Sarah Ellen BOOTHROYD b: 06 August 1874 m: 07 October 1902 in St Andrew’s, Almonte
*2nd Wife of Albert E. Lynch:

(Sarah Ellens sister)

When Mary Boothroyd was born on 31 August 1878, in Almonte, Mississippi Mills, Lanark, Ontario, Canada, her father, Joseph Boothroyd, was 38 and her mother, Easter Stead, was 39. She married Henry August Wagner on 10 November 1919, in Almonte, Mississippi Mills, Lanark, Ontario, Canada. She lived in Ontario, Canada in 1878 and Lanark, Ontario, Canada for about 10 years. She died on 5 December 1944, in Almonte, Mississippi Mills, Lanark, Ontario, Canada, at the age of 66, and was buried in Almonte, Mississippi Mills, Lanark, Ontario, Canada.

These Shoes Weren’t Made for Walking

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These Shoes Weren’t Made for Walking

Thirty five years ago I delivered a ten pound male child. There isn’t a month that doesn’t go by that I don’t remind him, like Beverley Goldberg, that I was in labour for 28 and one half hours. What did I get from that day in August of 1985 besides a beautiful healthy baby boy? Well, the next day the top of my left foot became very puffy and has remained that way for 35 years. The nurse said not to worry at the time because it was only postpartum fluid swelling– and it would go away. Well that fluid, brought its home furnishings and plants and has squatted on top of my foot since that day in 1985.

Anytime I buy shoes the right foot takes a size 9, and the other foot needs the shoebox the pair came in. I wore trendy heels every day of my life until that day, and now when I find shoes that fit I buy what they have in my size. Don’t even talk to me about boots.

Last year I walked into Walmart on a quest for comfy shoes. Instead, I purchased two pairs of high heel shoes that cost only $5.00 each. I was thrilled when I tried them on and vowed to wear them everyday for one hour until I got used to them.The next day I donned the leopard 4 inch heels trimmed in red and walked from the car to the row of grocery carts. By aisle two I was hanging over the cart to support myself and my feet were now in excruciating pain.

A farmer in overalls was also checking out my shoes and followed me to aisle four pretending to buy peaches. He returned a few times still eyeing the shoes, and I don’t think I ever realized the power of heels in a rural area. I paid for the groceries and literally crawled back to the car in pain. As soon as I sat in the car I ripped them off, and the feeling of relief was much like being constipated and then having it all disappear.

I gave away my last pair of leopard stilettos to a friend of mine after keeping them in my closet for five years. They had thin gold heels, and the suede was soft as silk, and they had only been worn once for about 8 minutes. Placing them on my feet as I sat on the couch at a monthly church lady meeting; I gingerly walked over for tea with a performance worthy of an Academy Award. The ladies marveled at how I had walked in them all day and I never acknowledged anything different. What a shoe Oscar moment that was, and really it wasn’t the place to fib at a church meeting.

Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz proved shoes on a gal’s feet can change your life, and Cinderella made a point that just one shoe can procure you a Prince Charming. So, now I have come up with some excuses when my shoes really don’t match my eccentric clothes. 

I tell folks I am afraid of heights so I wear lower heels. Well, let’s just say I am just one step closer to Velcro shoes. Cowboys die with their boots on and I am just going to die comfortably with my flats. Life is always full of interruptions and complications isn’t it?:)

Saddle Shoes –Did You Walk a Mile in Those Shoes?

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Saddle Shoes –Did You Walk a Mile in Those Shoes?

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I was a child who missed the saddle shoes of the 40s and the 50s by a few years, but my older Albert Street friend and neighbour Verna May Wilson made up for me. There were those of of my friends who thought the return of saddle shoes in 1972 was the best thing since Lucky Charms and Lava Lamps. Then there were two or three and myself who said they hated the entire situation with I believe we said, “You’ve got to be kidding me!”. And, as would be expected, there were a few old timers that had to throw in their two cents and tell “us kids” about the “olden days”. One of my friends launched the conversation, and her first words were, “Hey, saddle shoes are coming back, and my Mother thinks that is great!” For her Mother it was like smelling wine and roses— no, more like winning a sweepstakes contest.

Some of you some will remember the old days of saddle shoes when you bought them sparkling white and clean, and then you tried your very hardest to get them dirty before the kids at school got the chance to do the job for you. Seems nice white saddle shoes just wasn’t the thing in those days, and it was very painful to have your friends trying to take every inch of bark off the uppers of your saddle shoes.

 

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I really don’t wander around beginning conversations about saddle shoes these days, but when the subject has come up  I once again have always always expressed my displeasure with them. 

I do remember hearing Verna telling me her Mother became hysterical at the sight of the new saddle shoes when she returned home after her first day at school. They were scuffed and gave the appearance of having gone through a small war, but that was the “in” way to wear saddle shoes.

Day after day a bit more wear and tear became noticeable, and just about the time you really got the uppers of your saddle shoes to the point where they were socially acceptable with the “In” crowd things started happening to the rest of the shoes, and it was time to get a new pair.

 

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There were all sorts of things Verna Wilson did with saddle shoes. She would change her laces to match an outfit and I swear some peaked out of their Albert Street Venetian blinds on a daily basis to see what she had done. But, this was a girl that came home at lunchtime to change into another fresh white blouse that she wore with her navy blue school tunic, and she was perfect in my eyes.

She mentioned there was a professional scuffer at Cowansville High School that would scuff your saddle shoes for a nominal price. I heard that his scuffing business was so popular that you had to wait as long as three or four days to get his attention.

My style once older never followed Verna, but it involved my Grandmother’s borrowed pearls, penny loafers, with a scent of Evening in Paris. I was also so mesmerized with tap dancing that sometimes I taped nickles on the bottom of my shoes. The coin sometimes came in handy for a call on an emergency payphone. Can you even imagine– a penny! But after months of wearing them my father began calling them “clodhoppers” as that’s what they used to call big shoes that just didn’t fit well anymore.

 

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Shoes have always been part of everyone’s lives and they can either afford you the adoration of your peers, or jeers from the cool kids table in the lunch room. Should we get into the Hush Puppies era, or can we just stop now at Saddle Shoes and Loafers and suppress those memories?

Did you know that all these shoes we wore actually changed the shape of our feet over the course of our lives? As Leonardo DaVinci once said, “The human foot is a masterpiece of engineering and a work of art.”  Maybe so, but after a lifetime of fashionable shoes, my feet are no masterpieces– they in fact looked like very scuffed Saddle shoes that no one would want– and that my friends are going easy on them.

 

historicalnotes

 

I was Linda Knight, Junior bridesmaid at this wedding.:)

 - J. Dunn, Hadlock -Wilson -Wilson Wedding Held...

Clipped from

  1. The Gazette,
  2. 08 Sep 1959, Tue,
  3. Page 26

lindaaa.jpg - Youngsters Bid Saddle Shoes 1 . I I i I l 1 L I...

Clipped from

  1. Asheville Citizen-Times,
  2. 16 May 1943, Sun,
  3. Page 20
  1. Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

Needham’s Shoe Store in Almonte- Memories

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Needham’s Shoe Store in Almonte- Memories

 

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 Scott Newton  Photo

On the other corner of Mill and Brae was the Bank of Montreal, and George Eades Boot and Shoe Store. Needham and Son, bought out Geo. Eades later on and became a fixture in the community. Here are some comments of the folks that remember Needham’s Shoe store in Almonte.

Jayne Munro-Ouimet Linda, if I recall correctly it was located where Cortelli’s Pizza is  🙂Jayne

D Christopher Vaughan I can’t remember the exact location, but it was on the main street near Dougie James’ store I think. I remember getting our new shoes for school there. We were seven kids, and Mr. Needham would run an account so we could wear our new shoes – would stop by on our way home from school to make payments against our account. Small towns.

Susan Elliott Topping Us too and we were marched in again in the Fall for boots!

D Christopher Vaughan— Seems everyone had an account there – see following posts from Joe Ryan and Cathy Paterson. We got those big rubber Gollashes with the buckles that pulled right over your shoes in the winter. Does anyone remember picking up their repaired shoes or sharpened skates? They would be on the floor with all the other repairs, and Mr. Needham would tell you to “go in the back and find your shoes” (skates)

Author’s note-

Galoshes, also known as dickersonsgumshoesrubbers, or overshoes, are a type of rubber boot that is slipped over shoes to keep them from getting muddy or wet.a rubberized boot. In the United Kingdom, however, a galosh is an overshoe made of a weatherproof material to protect a more vulnerable shoe underneath and keep the foot warm and dry.

Linda Nilson-Rogers Yes and Phil Needham did repairs in harness for me too! The shop was a marvel, original wood floors and shoe boxes from counter top to ceiling!

Kim Davis We had 2 full shoe stores-one was on the corner opposite the BMO–The name escapes me…2 shoe stores, 2 hardware stores, women’s clothing, men’s clothing, Stedmans drug store and grocery store …all downtown. Throw in a couple of variety stores too! Mortons and Dougie James. Happening spot!

Joanna Meehan-Harrington the other one was Procter’s.

Dawn Jones Did Dinty Scott not have a shoe store in town?

Cathy Paterson We bought all our families footwear from Mr Needham ! We ran an account their too!

Joe Ryan Aww yes Philip Needham’s ..i remember we had an account there too and once in a while my mom would give me a dollar or two to put down on the account. Philip had a very rudimentary set of books …mostly just scribbled notes. Never could figure out how he kept track of it all!!!! Quality footwear back then!!!

Sandy France Harold Procter shoes was opposite the BMO

Ronald Ford Phil all so sharpened skates and did them right.5 cents for skate sharpening

Peggy Byrne I can still picture him in his apron coming out from his workshop back of the cash

Sandy France Phil liked to pretend he was a curmudgeon…or maybe he wasn’t pretending 🙂

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

Did The Bootleggers in Lanark County Wear Cow Shoes?

James Watson– Bigamy and Shoes

Candy Stores Shoes and Plungers– Ray Paquette

Bristol Stomp Shoes by Charles Jay

“Manolo-in” and “Jimmy Choo-in” about Uncomfortable Shoes

G. H. Ansley Perth Shoe Company Obituary

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G. H. Ansley Perth Shoe Company Obituary

 

 

 

Perth Remembered

The Factory began its life as a shoe manufacturing plant, thereby continuing a long tradition of shoemaking excellence in the town of Perth. Constructed for the Brown Shoe Company (Canada) it was considered the most modern facility of it’s kind when it opened it’s doors in November 1960.

For over forty years the Factory provided employment to hundreds of local people who produced countless numbers of shoes (most notably well known Buster Brown children’s shoes) which were sold at home and abroad.

 

EmployeesPerthShoeCo

1918- Perth Remembered

During this time the Brown Shoe Company developed strong ties to the community through its commitment to corporate and social responsibility. So it was with great sadness that The Factory closed its doors in 2003 and while efforts were made to revive shoe manufacturing at this location, it was not to be. The Factory

 

1960- In the Perth plant, 19,200 shoes were in process each day of the week. In the U.S. at the time there were fifty planes, including tanneries and other factories manufacturing the various component parts. Perth Remembered

 

A Timeline of Brown Shoes Click here..

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Perth Remembered

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 13 Jul 1935, Sat,
  3. Page 2

 

From the Buchanan Scrapbook–

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Jul 1955, Tue  •  Page 11

What’s in Your Walls? A Concealed Shoe?

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What’s in Your Walls? A Concealed Shoe?

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On Friday Shane Wm. Edwards sent me a link about something from the Northhampton Museum– it all about something called concealed shoes.

I was hooked lock stock and barrel right way. Have you ever found old shoes hidden in odd locations in your house? If so, your discovery may be evidence of a mysterious worldwide superstitious practice.  Shoes were favoured because they retain their human shape after being taken off. Not only have they have been found in cottages and farms, but also noted historical homes and churches indicating that superstitious beliefs weren’t limited to any particular demographic.  So they used folk magic to comfort themselves. Ritual concealment of these objects gave emigrants and exiles a sense of control at a time when their grip on the world seemed fragile.

During the restoration of our devastating fire in 1995 the  house had to be gutted and when our fireplace was removed we found 8 individual shoes inside a large void behind the chimney mass.  Since we had already deemed the former owners as “thrifty” because nothing was found in the walls– this was a shocker. We threw the mangled blackened shoes out thinking they were used for insulation, but now that I know what they are, I wish we had kept them.

Image result for concealed shoe

Virtual Museum of Canada–Concealed shoe–The Bata Shoe Museum–XIXth Century

 

Evidence shows that shoes have been concealed in homes dating from the Middle Ages, and theories are warding off evil to bestowing overall good luck. Some even consider the possibility of the hidden shoes as a fertility charm.  But, most found shoes are mostly focused on superstitions to repel evil spirits. Shoes are most often found near areas leading into the house; most often chimneys, but also doors and windows. The shoes are well worn, being the only garment to take the shape or “essence” of the wearer, giving evidence to the idea that perhaps the practice was meant to trick evil spirits entering the house to notice the shoes and not the inhabitants of the house.

As for fertility–modern day practices included attaching shoes to wedding cars, throwing a shoe after a bride, and an odd practice called “smickling”.  Smickling was the practice of childless women trying on the shoes of a woman who had just given birth in order to enhance their own fertility. Another curious association between shoes and fertility is ascribed to the nursery rhyme: “There was an old woman who lived in a shoe…”

I guess the whole “step into my shoes” is an understatement, and these shoes seem to be  ‘the last great secret of our old houses’.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Clippings of the Saunders Brothers Shoe Scandal in Smiths Falls–Local Politician Runs Amuck!

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Clippings of the Saunders Brothers Shoe Scandal in Smiths Falls–Local Politician Runs Amuck!

 

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Shenanigans ran amuck in small towns, even in those days, and this was quite the story between a Smiths Falls shoe store and a member of council. It went back and forth for a long time, and the whole issue smelled badly from the beginning. on october 11, 1897, four of the most important witnesses failed to show up? Things do not seem to change do they? You only need to look at the news clipping in historical facts to understand there was history to one W.E. Brown alderman from Smiths Falls and when witnesses do not show up–well, it’s hard to make a case.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  25 Jun 1897, Fri,  Page 6

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  28 Jun 1897, Mon,  Page 1

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 Jun 1897, Tue,  Page 7

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  06 Jul 1897, Tue,  Page 7

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 Jul 1897, Wed,  Page 6

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Jul 1897, Fri,  Page 8

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  14 Jul 1897, Wed,  Page 7

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Jul 1897, Thu,  Page 3

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Oct 1897, Sat,  Page 6

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 Nov 1897, Thu,  Page 1

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  26 Jul 1898, Tue,  Page 8

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Oct 1898, Sat,  Page 3

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 Jan 1898, Tue,  Page 7

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  26 Jul 1898, Tue,  Page 8

 

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  16 Jun 1898, Thu,  Page 7

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Judge Senkler and the Almonte Fire Bug

The Very Sad Tale of Hessie Churchill

The trial of W. H. S. Simpson the Railway Mail Clerk

The Buck Lake Murderer

Have you Ever Heard about Doran? Here Come da’ Judge!

Slander You Say in Hopetown? Divorce in Rosetta?

 

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Remembering a Shoemaker in Lanark Village–Thomas Wilson

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Remembering a Shoemaker in Lanark Village–Thomas Wilson

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Throughout the county increased reliance on the market to provide goods and services encouraged growth in rural craft and retail activities. Essential to the rural economy, both retailers and craftsmen were widespread within and central to life in rural communities.

As many as forty or fifty per cent of households were supported by craft or trading activities and craftsmen such as carpenters, shoemakers and tailors comprised a significant proportion of village populations. Shops formed an important link to the world of goods, supplying a range of non-local wares to an ever more sophisticated set of consumers.

In memory of shoemaker Thomas Wilson from Lanark Village

 

February 28 1908– Almonte Gazette

Many Almonte friends heard with surprise arid sorrow of the tragically sudden death of Mr. Thomas Wilson, shoemaker, of Lanark Village, last Friday evening. Mr. Wilson, who was about 55 years of age, had been in his usual good health, had done a good day’s work, and was reading in his home in the evening. His daughter went to the kitchen a few minutes after seeing him reading, and stumbled over the prostrate body of her father, who had practically dropped dead while on his way to the kitchen for a drink.

The deep and general regret of the community was shown at the’ funeral on Tuesday,
the cortege being a long one. The A.O.U.W. and I.O .F . attended in a body, Mr. Wilson having been an enthusiastic member of both orders.He was genial, warm-hearted citizen, and his death creates quite a blank in the community in which he spent all his life. The widow and family have the general sympathy in their sudden bereavement 

 

historicalnotes

 

5832-82 (Lanark Co): Thomas WILSON, 29, shoe maker, Lanark, same, s/o Thomas & Agnes, married Mary Ann O’MARA, 30, Cumberland – Russell Co., Lanark, d/o John & Julia, witn: Duncan McLAREN of Lanark, 14 April 1882 at Lanark

Wilson Cemetery, by Jean Steel (doesn’t seem to be related to Thomas)

Situated on the East and West halves of lots 13 & 14 in the 12th concession of Lanark Township, there once stood the Wilson family burying site.  For many years, it deteriorated through neglect into a state of disrepair, and many of the fine old stones became flaked and broken.  In September 1972, the remaining nine stones were removed, restored and placed in the Robertson family cemetery, concession 1, lot 15, Ramsay Township, as many of the pioneers buried there were interrelated.

The earliest burial in the Wilson Cemetery seems to have been in 1869.  According to an obituary from the Almonte Gazette, Eliza Wilson, relative of the late John Kellough of Ramsay, who died in November, 1901, may have been the last body interred in that spot.

By the removal of the stones from Wilson’s to Robertson’s cemetery we see a fine example of family and interested friends co-operating in an effect to preserve a substantial portion of the history of the area.   Let us hope many more are motivated to follow their example.

Wilson Burial Site

Lot 13 & 14, Con 12, Lanark Township.

Burials – 1869 to 1889 CLICK HERE

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

Famous Local Shoemakers

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–Patrick Tucker, seated, with Mr. William.
Some twenty-five veterans of the Raids who had served with the Carleton Place company and still were residents of the town included Maurice Burke, John Burke, William Beck, John Cavers, William Glover, David Moffatt, James Munro, David McPherson, Patrick Tucker, William Pattie and William Patterson.After imprisonment, Tucker returned to Carleton Place and resumed his trade repairing and making shoes at his shop at the corner of Bridge and Franklin Streets.
He died June 12, 1905.

No. 5 Company (Carleton Place) 41st Brockville Battalion of Rifles:  From left to right: James Storey, William Dack, Donald Stewart, William Duff, Patrick Tucker.

No. 5 Company (Carleton Place) 41st Brockville Battalion of Rifles:
From left to right: James Storey, William Dack, Donald Stewart, William Duff, Patrick Tucker.


“The volunteers then marched up to the Victoria Square, where the Brigade was drawn up in square of close column and the proceedings and sentence of a Court Martial on Corporal Patrick Tucker of the Carleton Place (C.W.) Rifles were read by Assistant Adjutant General George Smith.  The offence proved in this case was gross insubordination. These Photos are courtesy of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Thanks Jennifer!

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

 

What Does Regal Spell Backwards? Allan’s Shoe Store

Did The Bootleggers in Lanark County Wear Cow Shoes?

James Watson– Bigamy and Shoes

Lanark County Shoe Socials? A Past Fetish or Party Game?

Bristol Stomp Shoes by Charles Jay

These Boots Were Made for Walkin’ 1905

 

Manolo-in” and “Jimmy Choo-in” about Uncomfortable Shoes

Candy Stores Shoes and Plungers– Ray Paquette

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Candy Stores Shoes and Plungers– Ray Paquette

 

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Photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Comments about the story: Eades Hardware of Carleton Place-Allen Wrenches Toilet Seats and Electric Heaters


Remember when Bridge Street had parking on both sides of the street and driving down the street was a challenge? I am particularly pleased to see the mention of *Gerald Haskins with respect to Eades’: he was the “go to” guy for many years for those of us who were trying to replace an item that we didn’t know the name of but could describe it’s appearance and function. Many a “DIY” project was salvaged with the help of Mr. Haskins!–Ray Paquette

 

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Photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum 



Comments about the story:–
Bristol Stomp Shoes by Charles Jay


Dale Costello mentioned the Mulvey’s, a small candy store beside Central School where Ike Smith’s Barbershop is currently. What I remember is the patience of Job shown by Mrs. Mulvey as we pondered what to buy with the nickel we had, not a small sum in my youth. Everything seemed to be “2 for a penny”, or “three for a penny” so the decisions made at Mulvey’s was often our first lesson in personal financial management. The right decision could fill the little paper bag that our purchases were stowed in!–Ray Paquette

 

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston– Linda, I remember a candy store right next to Central school – got lots of good stuff there (where Ike Smith has his barber shop) – the lady that ran it was May Malve at least that’s what my memory is telling me! I thought it was just a candy store – anyone else remember this or something else?  Phew – thank heaven – didn’t want to think I had been dreaming this for so many year not to mention the candy I ate. The store was red tarpaper brick back then with the big Central School fence separating the properties.

 

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rayp

historicalnotes

Gerald A. HASKINS–One of Eades Hardware Longest Employees in Carleton Place.

HASKINS, Gerald A. Employee of Eades Home Hardware for over 50 years. Peacefully at Stoneridge Manor in his 89th year. Beloved husband of the late Ruth (Giles). Loving father of Diane (Bill Rutan), and the late Judy (John Warren). Dear Grandpa of Kim (Perry Hutt), Kevin (Doreen) Warren, Todd (Tracie) Rutan, and Ian. Great-grandpa to Jenni-Lynn and Mckenzie. Dear brother of Gladys Watt, and a special friend of Phyllis. Friends may call at the Carleton Place Chapel of Tubman Funeral Homes, 61 Lake Ave. West, Carleton Place on Friday December 19th from 12 noon until time of service in the Chapel at 2 p.m. Interment to follow at Prestonvale Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations to Stoneridge Manor Auxiliary, 256 High Street, Carleton Place K7C 1X1.

 

 

 

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Other Carleton Place Candy Stores

Carleton Place Cleaners -From Sweet to Sour

 

Olympic Candy Store

 

Picture

Featured Artifact – January 2015-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Matchbook Cover
(2015.1.1)

This matchbook was a give away from the Olympia Restaurant in Carleton Place. Located at 101 Bridge Street, the restaurant, with its booths, curved counter and red leather stools, was a local institution. First opened by Louis and James Laskaris as the Olympic Candy Store in 1920, it was later sold to Jim Antonakos in 1958.
A fire destroyed the building in 1960, but it was rebuilt and opened again in 1961.  I

n 1960, the New York Cafe was destroyed in a fire as was the Olympia Restaurant, in the next building, where in the 1920’s Louis Laskaris had the Olympia Candy Store. In 1958, James Laskaris sold the family business to Jim Antonakos. Howard Little’s Barbershop located in the building was also destroyed in the fire
The Olympia closed it’s doors for good in 2000 and is still greatly missed. Heritage Carleton Place

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Related reading:

 

Eades Hardware of Carleton Place-Allen Wrenches Toilet Seats and Electric Heaters

Bristol Stomp Shoes by Charles Jay

The Candy Man — George Dummert