Tag Archives: shampoo

What Did You Use MIR Dish Soap For?

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What Did You Use MIR Dish Soap For?
Dan Sparling
November 27 at 4:32 PM  · 

My toy bottle in 1965!

I hated MIR dish washing soap. It wasn’t because it was a bad soap; it probably was very good at what it was advertised for. What I could not stand was sitting at my Grandmother’s tiny kitchen table eating lunch or dinner and staring at the Yellow bottle ( it came in a few colours) while I ate as it stood as a loan sentinel on the side of the sink caked in dry soap. My Grandmother always the dishes done and the stove stoked but she never seemed to clean off that bottle– and that bottle looked like a wax candle after a week.

However I had no idea now or way back then that women used dish soap to get rid of greasy hair. Apparently, it has been going on since Little House on the Prairie.

Wild Poppy—Oh…do I remember this! And the same way my mother pronounced “mirror.”

Darlene MacDonaldThis was the best shampoo ever!

Linda Seccaspina— shampoo????? really? My grandmother used it to wash dishes.. tell me more..🙂

Darlene MacDonaldLinda Seccaspina Yes this was our everyday dish washing liquid soap. When shampoo was scarce we used this as well. 😁

Dawn JonesDarlene MacDonald yep. Made your hair clean! And no conditioner in those days!

Peggy ByrneTwo to a package – was a deal

Karen SmithDarlene MacDonald I can barely remember it, jeez so long ago.

Wild PoppyDawn Jones still remember the nice smell of Mir.

Sandra HoustonMy Nanny used this dish soap

Kathy DevlinIn a house of 4 females we often ran out of shampoo and used sunlight dish soap. No greasy hair in our house but lots of shine!

Darlene MacDonaldLila Leach-James It was dish detergent. We used it as both 😁

Bev FergussonDarlene MacDonald so did we when needed. Those were days of making do with what you had!

Brenda BridgewaterYes dish soap Lila you don’t remember guess you didn’t do dishes !!!!

Lila Leach-JamesBrenda Bridgewater oh Jesus and had to bring the water up from the pump house! Glad those days are behind me! Yes, I guess we used it for shampoo also

Donna SmithMy mom used this didnt care for the smell myself

Kayla GleesonI remember these, my mom made crafts with them

Kayla GleesonLinda Seccaspina I remember them with doll heads on them??

Russ ThompsonTasted like crap lol

D Christopher VaughanYou shouldn’t have said that word then.😉

I will Wash Your Mouth Out with Soap!

Remember Halo Shampoo?

Peter McCallum — From Brown and Wylie Mill Employee to The King of Mack’s No Rub Laundry Soap

What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

As the World Turns in Carleton Place — Soap and Ground Beef

Who was Cody the Kid in Carleton Place? — Soap Box Memories

As the Cell Phone Turns – a Soap Opera

How Many Times Should You Bathe?

When Everything Else Fails…

Remember Halo Shampoo?

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Remember Halo Shampoo?

Hair products. Halo Shampoo. 1985.0460.126, 1985.0475.187, 1984.0351.325. https://americanhistory.si.edu/

There were limited shampoo choices in the 1950’s and 1960’s; Halo, Prell, or Breck The 1970’s ushered in many many new shampoos to choose from–loaded with gimmicks, promises and lures.  It conjures up images and smells of bath time when I was small.

I wanted my Mom to buy Halo shampoo because the model was blonde, and she had a pageboy hairdo, that “swished” when she shook her head. I thought that my hair would swish if I used Halo shampoo When I entered my teens I used to buy Prell because of the pearl in the shampoo.

In 1938 the Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Company in Jersey City, N.J., introduced Halo, the zero soap shampoo. Their slogan was “Soaping dulls hair, while Halo glorifies it.” The product came with a double-your-money back guarantee. Advertisements claimed that the lack of oils and harsh chemicals made the product clean-rinsing and safe for children.Over the years the Colgate-Palmolive Company used celebrities and program sponsorships to endorse their product. In the 1940s, the product jingle, “Halo, Everybody, Halo,” was introduced on the radio and early TV. Through the following decades, many celebrities and recording artists, including Frank Sinatra, Peggy Lee, and Eddie Cantor, sang the Halo jingle. Halo was still being sold in the late 1970s.While the Halo bottle retained its distinctive shape, at the end of 1954, Colgate-Palmolive introduced this new blue, white, and gold packaging. In 1956, their ads claimed they were “America’s #1 Selling Shampoo.

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CLIPPED FROM
Chicago Tribune
Chicago, Illinois
24 Mar 1940, Sun  •  Page 89

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 May 1947, Thu  •  Page 10

read–Flour Shampoo

The Stack Perm or the Disco Wedge ? 1970s Hair Fashion

Why Were These Folks Facing Backwards?

The Best Little Chin Hair Post on the Prairie

Lois Lyman–A Hair of a Blunder!

To Die Dying Your Hair

Flour Shampoo

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Flour Shampoo

 - Montreal River Miner and Iron County Republican
Hurley, Wisconsin
18 Dec 1900, Tue  •  Page 2

Rye flour shampoo:

  • 1-2-3 tbsp fine grounded light rye flour (depending on your lengths of hair)
  • Mix with water until you have a slightly running paste (some say it works better for them if the paste is really running, I find it easier if it is not too thin)
  • Wash out thoroughly and if you like use an apple vinegar rinse too.
  • If you hair feels still dry, try and use a tiny tiny bit of coconut or argan oil to rub into your hair ends. Too much will make your hair look greasy straight away, and I can only use it the evening before I wash my hair, because else I look like I have really fatty hair. But for people with thicker hair it works great.
  • If you are in a rush and can’t wash your hair, you can mix starch with unsweetened cocoa powder plus a tiny bit of cinnamon to make your own dry shampoo.

Tip:

  • Don’t make rye flour shampoo in advance. It will become kind of a stinky sour dough something. I tried it once accidentally when I made too much and kept if a few days for the next wash, it was not really fancy 😀

 

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By the early 1900s, several hair care changes were afoot. Bathing had become an essential aspect of personal hygiene, and shampoos and cleansers for the hair became more common.

During the Victorian Era, thousands of doctors were hitting the streets, proclaiming the health-benefits of bathing to the world. The Victorians were famously fascinated with new, industrialized products and health fads. Washing hair with lye was still common, but a challenger appeared on the scene in the form of the humble egg. Now, about once a month (as was the recommended amount), women would crack eggs over their heads, work the gooey egg up into a lather in their hair, and then rinse it off.

 

The history of the famous Breck Girl shampoo ads, plus 25 iconic ...

 

Finally, in 1930, in Springfield Massachusetts, Dr. John H. Breck founded Breck Shampoo. It was because of his clever advertising campaign that commercial shampoo began to be used as the hair-washing product. Breck ran ads in Woman’s Home CompanionSeventeen, Harper’s Bazaar, Glamor, and even Vogue, under the slogan “every woman is different”, claiming to create a personalized shampoo that would result in beautiful hair, every single time. By the 1950s, his shampoo was available nearly everywhere. The campaign remained popular until the 1970s, creating a cultural expectation of frequent hair-washing.

 

 

 

The Stack Perm or the Disco Wedge ? 1970s Hair Fashion

Should Girls Speak to Strange Men in Uniform? 1917

Why Were These Folks Facing Backwards?

The Best Little Chin Hair Post on the Prairie

Lois Lyman–A Hair of a Blunder!

To Die Dying Your Hair