Tag Archives: Schwerdtfeger

The Mayhew Sisters Business Women of Carleton Place — Schwerdtfeger Genealogy

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The Mayhew Sisters Business Women of Carleton Place — Schwerdtfeger Genealogy

Miss Bertha Mayhew ran her own millinery shop on the main street of Carleton Place in the late 1800’s. She had learned the trade from her older sisters who ran “The Misses Mayhew” hat and dress shop in Pakenham.

After falling in love with and marrying the shopkeeper next door, barber and tobacconist Henry Schwerdtfeger, she closed her shop and Henry took over the entire main floor for his businesses. The couple continued to live upstairs with their daughters Gladys and Hazel before buying a large red brick home on Lake Avenue West. 

Bertha continued to work out of her home, and years later, when daughter Hazel died in 1988, executors discovered boxes and boxes of hats and millinery supplies in the attic. Many taxidermy birds, lace, netting, beadwork, chenille flowers and buttons are still in their original packaging. With great foresight, this collection was donated to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum by the Hazel Schwerdtfeger Estate. Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum 2014

Miss M. A. Mayhew, who has been in poor health for several months, passed away somewhat unexpectedly Monday afternoon. Her trouble was a heart failure. Miss Mayhew was a daughter of the late Ephriam Mayhew of Athens, Ont., and was 65 years of age. She came to Carleton Place with her sister Sophia in 1879, the two embarking in business here as milliners and dressmakers. Sophia died in 1887, and Adeline continued the business until three years ago, when she retired. They were successful, and built the block known by their name on Bridge street. May 8th 1903 Almonte Gazette

As Good as New and Good Food Company now on Bridge Street-

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Bertha Mayhew was 20 years younger than her sister Mary Adeline and 23 years younger than her sister Sophia. In 1879 the sisters moved to Carleton Place from Pakenham and set up shop on Bridge Street, as noted in the Carleton Place Directory listing: “Mayhew, Miss Adeline (S. & A. Mayhew)”. ((Sophia and Mary Adeline)

In the late 1800’s Bertha ( Bertie) Opa Mayhew of Carleton Place,Ontario was running her sister’s milliner on Bridge Street right next to dashing Henry Schwerdtfeger who ran the local tobacco store. The two sisters had been listed as Milliners & Dressmakers in Pakenham, Ontario, but it looks like the oldest Mary Adeline came to Carleton Place and set up the business first.

Sophia was listed as living in Pakenham and spending most of her time in Carleton Place. read-Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

Name
Bertha O Mayhew
Birth
10 August 1865
Death
5 November 1939-

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Name:
Bertha Mayhew
Marriage Date:
29 Jan 1890
Marriage Place:
Canada, Carleton Place, Ontario–

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Bertha looks like she was a late child of the Mayhew family and was sent to live with her sister in Carleton Place and learn the business. Mary Adeline owned the building with Sophia and as the sisters died off it was gradually passed down to Bertha upon the death of Mary in 1903. Henry Schwerdtfeger ran the local tobacco store where the Good Food Co was and after he married her, she closed down the business and expanded his tobacco business in there and likely took care of her affairs which included being the proprietor of the building. The Schwerdtfeger ‘s had two daughters: Hazel and Gladys.

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In the 1891 census the newlyweds are living with Mary and I imagine they were still all living together until Mary died.

Mary A Mayhew52Head
Henry A Schmondfeger27Lodger
Bertha Schmondfeger27Lodger

After their parents Henry and Bertha died, sisters Hazel and Gladysl, (who never married) lived together in the old family home on Lake Ave West. Hazel became a registered nurse and the sisters lovingly kept all their mother’s millinery sundries and later donated the collection to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. A large portion of Hazel’s estate was willed to the Victorian Order of Nurses in Carleton Place, and as a tribute, the former V.O.N. building on Campbell Street was named Hazel House with a portrait  of her and her sister hung in the foyer

Patti LennoxThe VON building was built because of a generous bequest from the Schwerdtfeger sisters. Until the building sold last year, their pictures (along with a plaque commemorating the building opening) hung in our reception area.

Henry Schwerdtfeger had left his daughters a monthly stipend, but as the cost of living got higher it just was not enough to live on. Once in awhile when money ran low they used to go buy furniture at Home Hardware on their late fathers account and then return the merchandise for cash the next day. No one ever said anything about their habits as they were extremely loyal customers.

According to the late resident Carmen Lalonde who worked for EADES Home Hardware on Bridge Street; he remembered the two sisters very well. Some considered the two quite odd, with one sister always leading the way at a quick gait, and the other one huffing and puffing behind her.

One summer day a man attempted to enter the Schwerdtfeger sisters home through a basement window and alarmed the sisters. Soon the locking of doors and windows became routine, and when repairmen entered they found themselves locked inside the house with the sisters until the job was done. The daughters of milliner Bertha Mayhew Schwerdtfeger will always be fondly known by their pillbox hats–one wore red, and the other one blue.

Gladys and Hazel Schwerdtfeger at St. John’s Lutheran Church, Riverside Heights (1972)







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Henry Norman Schwerdtfeger 
Bertha Mayhew 
Gladys Adeline Schwerdtfeger 
Hazel Mae Schwerdtfeger 

United (Pine Grove, Maple Wood, St. Fillan’s), Lanark, Ontario



Name:Bertha Schwerdtfeger
Birth Date:10 Aug 1865
Death Date:5 Nov 1939
Cemetery:United Cemeteries
Burial or Cremation Place:Beckwith, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:N
Spouse:Henry Norman Schwerdtfeger
Children:Infant Son SchwerdtfegerGladys Adeline SchwerdtfegerHazel Mae Schwerdtfeger
Name:Bertha Mayhew
Gender:Female
Origin:Scottish (Scotish)
Age:7
Birth Date:1864
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Place:Pakenham, Lanark North, Ontario
District Number:80
Subdistrict:c
Division:02
Religion:Methodist
Occupation:Clerk
Neighbours:View others on page
Household MembersAgeSophia Mayhew30Adeline Mayhew27Walter Mayhew17Bertha Mayhew7

1871 Census

1911 Census

Name:Bertha Schwerdfeger[Bertha Schwerdtfeger]
Gender:Female
Racial or Tribal Origin:Canadian
Nationality:Canada
Marital Status:Married
Age:56
Birth Year:abt 1865
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1 Jun 1921
House Number:90
Residence Street or Township:Lake Ave
Residence City, Town or Village:Town of Carleton Place
Residence District:Lanark
Residence Province or Territory:OntarioOntario
Residence Country:Canada
Relation to Head of House:Wife
Spouse’s Name:Henry Schwerdfeger
Father Birth Place:Ontario
Mother Birth Place:Ontario
Can Speak English?:Yes
Can Speak French?:No
Religion:Methodist
Can Read?:Yes
Can Write?:Yes
Municipality:Carleton Place
Enumeration District:97
Sub-District:Carleton Place (Town)
Sub-District Number:51
Enumerator:Norman Williamson
District Description:Polling Division No. 6 – Comprising that part of the town south of the 12th concession line and west of Rochester street and Franktown Road
Neighbours:View others on page
Line Number:10
Family Number:92
Household MembersAgeRelationshipHenry Schwerdfeger56HeadBertha Schwerdfeger56WifeGladys Schwerdfeger19DaughterHazel Schwerdfeger17Daughter

Mayhew family

Inscription

Inscription: [Edit]
In Memory Of
Ephraim Mayhew
Who Died
Nov. 19, 1884
at 77 Years

In Memory Of
Polly Middleton
Wife Of
Ephraim Mayhew
Who Died
Feb. 12, 1869
at 59 Years.

In Memory Of
Mary Adeline Mayhew
Who Died
May 4, 1903
At 55 Years.

In Memory Of
Sophia Mayhew
Who Died
June 13, 1887
At 54 Years,
5 Mon. & 9 Da.

Gravesite Details This Stone is in it’s own fenced in Plot on the Eastern side of the Lyndhurst (Abandoned) Cemetery.

Lyndhurst CemeteryLyndhurst, Leeds and Grenville United Counties, Ontario, Canada

Name:Mary A Mahen[Mary A Mayhew]
Gender:Female
Marital Status:Single
Age:52
Birth Year:abt 1839
Birth Place:United States
Residence Date:1891
Residence Place:Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Relation to Head:Head
Religion:Methodist
Occupation:Milliner
Number of Employees:7
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
French Canadian:No
Father’s Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Birth Place:Ontario
Neighbours:View others on page
Household MembersAgeRelationshipMary A Mahen52HeadHenry A Schmondfeger27LodgerBertha Schmondfeger27Lodger

1891 Census

Film No 186296 Vol 18 – 21Ephraim Mayhew 64 Edwardsburg Lewis / Sarah Anne Livingstone 62 Edwardsburg Henry Gale / Polly June 19, 1872 Yonge 348

Related reading

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

The Unusual Schwerdtfegers — Genealogy

Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

A Letter from a Local Student Nurse 1930s

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

The Unusual Schwerdtfegers — Genealogy

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The Unusual Schwerdtfegers — Genealogy

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Aug 1936, Sat  •  Page 19

The Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, CanadaMon, Oct 03, 1904 · Page 10

This is “Tranquila Lodge”,One of two cottages built by Henry Schwerdtfeger at Lake Park. The Schwerdtfegers spent the summers next door in their octagonal cottage, and this building was rented out. It still stands today, painted a bright blue colour!–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Aug 1935, Fri  •  Page 11

Bertha Schwerdtfeger — Mother of the Carleton Place Schwerdtfeger Sisters

The King Cafe Fire 1924

Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

A Letter from a Local Student Nurse 1930s

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

Bertha Schwerdtfeger — Mother of the Carleton Place Schwerdtfeger Sisters

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

More Stories of the Schwerdtfeger Sisters

The King Cafe Fire 1924

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The King Cafe Fire 1924

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jan 1924, Mon  •  Page 7

 

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This building was once a hardware store, then it was the tailoring business belonging to Mr. Shaw. After that it was a Chinese restaurant for a short period of time. Mel Newman also operated a grocery store at 31 Bridge Street.  Mel’s friend, Sam Ventura,  was the projectionist from the Star Theatre and lived upstairs and later married Ruby Ashfield. Then there was the disastrous fire of 1924.

Linda,

I had noticed some evidence of fire damage in the attic space of my apartment and wondered if that is why a couple of rooms had lowered ceilings – to cover something up! It’s cool that there was originally a restaurant/confectionery in here, too. I had heard rumours that it was a rooming house. In the plans of the street from the turn of the century, it shows a carriage house at the back of the property, and you can see some of the old foundation from that in our parking area.

By the way, the As Good As New building was obviously built some time after this one – there are window wells in my side of the basement that are now blocked by that building.

My storefront was empty for about a year before I moved in. Before that, it was a lovely, lovely gift shop called ‘Country Lanes’. I can’t remember the owner’s name, but she had dried flowers, baskets, vintage-style cards, and she was one of the first people I knew to sell vintage-style Christmas ornaments before they became all the rage again. It was a beautiful and memorable store in Carleton Place for the 1990’s.

There was a tea room in here before that. When I moved in, I discovered a rudimentary kitchen with two double sinks behind the pharmacy shelving and the men’s and women’s bathrooms were already here – a bonus for me! There was blue-flowered wallpaper behind the shelving and pale blue rolled linoleum in the bathrooms and kitchen.

Petra Graber The Good Food Co.

 

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Before

If you look at the picture of this building,  Miss Mayhew’s and  Schwerdtfeger ‘s stores became ‘As Good As New’.  The man that looks like he is holding on to the hitching post is standing in front of what is now The Good Food Co.

 

Know your King’s Cafe– There was a King Cafe, chinese food restaurant where The Good Food Co. is now and The King’s Cafe which was part of the Queen’s Hotel.

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In front of the Queen’s Hotel with the King’s Cafe- Photo- Tom Edwards July 12 1920– King’s Cafe was at the Queen’s Hotel

 

 

relatedreading

 

Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

A Letter from a Local Student Nurse 1930s

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

Bertha Schwerdtfeger — Mother of the Carleton Place Schwerdtfeger Sisters

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Related reading:

Margaret Love -From Sweet to Sour

Before and After in Carleton Place — Mac Williams and The Good Food Co

A Burrito for All Seasons– Good Food Company

More Stories of the Schwerdtfeger Sisters

You Can Leave Your Hat On

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You Can Leave Your Hat On

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Handmade Schwerdtfeger hats Wanita got at their auction and gave to me

 

When I was a child I would accompany my Mother once a week to the hat store that sat for years on the Main Street of Cowansville, Quebec. It was a place of serenity for me as I sat quietly while my Mother “window shopped” inside. I can still remember the bright yellow walls and a lot of flowery hats perched upon the hat racks. The clerks were petite, well dressed, and all I ever seemed to hear them say was “Yes Madam”. In those days you agreed with the customer as the customer was always right.

My love of hats stemmed from that very shop in Cowansville that I used to visit once a week. Years later I have a room full of hats, mostly made by myself, but some are vintage. The vintage ones were given to me by friends as they knew I would make a home for them as I have done. Each hat has a story, and that bedroom is now almost a hat museum. My latest acquisitions were given to me this week by my friend Wanita Bates, and these vintage hats are all about local history. They once belonged to the iconic Schwerdtfeger sisters of Carleton Place, Ontario who will be remembered for life by most citizens of the town.

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Schwerdtfeger sisters

After their parents death, sisters Hazel and Gladys Schwerdtfeger, (who never married) lived together in the old family home in my rural town in Ontario.  Hazel became a registered nurse, and the sisters lovingly kept all their mother’s millinery sundries. After the last sister’s death most of it was auctioned off, and some of the collection went to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

But these were not ordinary sisters–most people feared them when they walked down the street as they were so unusual. They were real mad hatters. One sister always lead the way with her quick gait, and the other one  would huff and puff behind her trying to keep up to her sister’s pace. The daughters of former milliner Bertha Mayhew Schwerdtfeger were also known by their dainty hats they sported at every outing. One wore red, and the other blue.

 

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Linda and Wanita in Linda’s hat room

 

So today when I went to vote at the advance provincial election poll I wore one of my hats. I am sure I too was thought of in the same manner as the Schwerdtfeger sisters, but I didn’t really care. Hats are far more nostalgic than practical in my life, but it all stems back to the hat store back in Cowansville for me. I’m not trying to be edgy and vintage, but my Grandmother always reminded me that ladies never went out without a hat.  

Hats are about emotion, and how it makes you feel. Really, it’s about what went in the inside, not what’s on the outside. I can still remember every one of Mother’s and Grandmother’s hats as expressions of a identity, pride, dignity and strength. When I wear a hat it reminds me that like them, I have now become the keeper of past memories. Style endures, and so do the memories.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

A Letter from a Local Student Nurse 1930s

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

Bertha Schwerdtfeger — Mother of the Carleton Place Schwerdtfeger Sisters

Another Episode in Spinsterdom–The Armour Sisters of Perth

Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

Family Photos– Mississippi Lake– Darlene Page

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Family Photos– Mississippi Lake– Darlene Page

26755194_2083015741921890_107095725_n.jpgDriving on the ice on Mississippi Lake at Pretty Island-

These photos are from Darlene Page. When her aunt, Deloris Agnel, maiden name Julian, passed away she gave Darlene a photo album. Thank you for sharing Darlene.

 

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Winter on Mississippi Lake at Brighton Dale Cottage-Schwerdtfeger cottage . The cottage was demolished in 2005

 

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Summer View at the Schwerdtfeger cottage at Lake Park 1905- Henry and Bertha on the top verandah. Children Hazel and Gladys on the grass– from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

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This is the first Carleton Place Canoe Club’s all woman’s war canoe crew. Darlene Page’s grandfather was the coach–Her aunt’s also in the photo too (lady girl on the right) Her grandfather, Clarence Waugh, was in the middle standing. Darlene’s Aunt’s name was Deloris Agnel, maiden name Julian. The year would be 1940s.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

The Cottages of Mississippi Lake — Carleton Place Ontario

My Neighbours –Photos of the Cliff- McCann House and Springside Hall

Edwards Genealogy– Family Photo Album

Photos of Austin Bain Gillies— Gillies Family Genealogy

Barnes Buchanans and McCarten Family Photos–Doug B. McCarten

Family Photos of Arthur Williard Toop & James Henry Martin

Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

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Reverend Schwerdtfeger Buried in the St. Lawrence Seaway

Unveiling service of historical plaque at St. John's Church, Riverside Heights

Black and white photograph of the unveiling service of an historical plaque at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Riverside Heights, Ontario. The plaque commemorates Reverend Samuel Schwerdtfeger, the first Lutheran pastor in Upper Canada.

 

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The Last Years of the Reverend J. Samuel Schwerdtfeger Book given to me by Krista Lee
Most books on the German element and on the Lutheran Church in Maryland mention the name of the Rev. J. Samuel Schwerdtfeger. A native of Burgbernheim, Bavaria, Schwerdtfeger had a difficult childhood.
After six years in the Neustadt orphanage, he entered Erlangen University where he attended some lectures on theology and law but soon began to drift aimlessly. He fell victim to immigrant runners who took him to Holland where he bound himself for passage to America. In the spring of the year 1753 he arrived in Baltimore where the ship captain offered him for sale as a studious theoligist for the amount of his passage. The Lutheran congregation of York, Pennsylvania, being at that time at loggerheads within their old pastor, heard of the bargain and bought Schwerdtfeger as their preacher.

 

 

 

scan0001.jpgHazel and Gladys Schwerdtfeger of Carleton Place with the plaque that was made for their direct ancestor.

 

After five years of service in York, he transferred to New Holland, Pennsylvania. Schwerdtfeger’s temperament was not conducive to a long ministry at one place. In 1763 he assumed the pastorate of the Lutheran Church in Frederick, Maryland. His five years of service there proved beneficial for the organization of that group of Lutherans which
had been without resident pastors for many years.

However, Schwerdtfeger felt the urge to move on. After a trip to Europe, he made again brief appearances in Maryland and Pennsylvania before settling in New York State where he distinguished himself through his pastoral work in Albany and Feilstown. He became one of the founders of the New York Ministerium. American Lutheran sources have claimed that Samuel Schwerdtfeger died at Feilstown, New York in 1788.

 

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Photo Philip Allan- Gladys Schwerdfeger in Carleton Place

Recent Canadian research, however, has proved that Schwerdtfeger’s controversial, yet often distinguished career did not end in New York. During the Revolutionary War, the pastor had remained a staunch loyalist. His name appears on a petition sent to the Crown Lands in Quebec in 1780, with those of 150 other citizens, asking that they be allowed to become citizens of Canada. His son, Frederick, who was born in Frederick, Maryland,in 1765, was then already living in Canada.

The elder Schwerdtfeger made several preaching tours among the Palatine United Empire Loyalists. Finally in 1790, the Evangelical Lutheran congregation in Williamsburg
township, Dundas county, Ontario, extended a call to Pastor Schwerdtfeger who accepted without hesitation. For more than a decade he labored among the German settlers along the Canadian side of the Saint Lawrence river. He died in Williamsburg, Ontario, in 1803. The Lutherans of Ontario consider J. Samuel Schwerdtfeger the patriarch of their denomination.

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Some time before the St. Lawrence Seaway was completed, the ladies of the Lutheran Church discovered that their founding pastor Johann Schwerdfeger was buried in an Anglican churchyard and this did not sit well with them. The women sponsored a drive to have his remains relocated to the Lutheran churchyard. Later when the St. Lawrence Seaway was being flooded, the original church was covered with water! Memorial stones were removed to a new churchyard on higher grounds. In some cases, the remains were also moved, but it is not known if Schwerdfeger’s remains were moved for the second time. It has long been speculated that the body was lost or destroyed Specifically? The Body is under the St. Lawrence Seaway.

 

historicalnotes

 

This is “Tranquila Lodge”,One of two cottages built by Henry Schwerdtfeger at Lake Park. The Schwerdtfegers spent the summers next door in their octagonal cottage, and this building was rented out. It still stands today, painted a bright blue colour!

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Jun 1945, Mon,  Page 19

 

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Lake Avenue West walking tour was treated to black licorice cigars in honour of Henry Schwerdtfeger, Bridge Street tobacconist. We learned about Henry and other business tycoons as we wandered Lake Avenue on this final summer tour.

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This is “Juanita Lodge”,One of two cottages built by Henry Schwerdtfeger at Lake Park. The Schwerdtfegers spent the summers next door in their octagonal cottage, and this building was rented out.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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 One of three in our collection belonging to Hazel Schwerdtfeger.

Hazel was a Carleton Place native who received her nurse’s registration in June of 1935. She eventually became a public nurse in Almonte. Just one of the many young Carleton Place women who went in to the nursing profession.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Bertha’s daughters Gladys and Hazel Schwerdtfeger’s childhood photos and clothingCarleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

A Letter from a Local Student Nurse 1930s

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

Bertha Schwerdtfeger — Mother of the Carleton Place Schwerdtfeger Sisters

Another Episode in Spinsterdom–The Armour Sisters of Perth

 

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A Letter from a Local Student Nurse 1930s

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One of three in our collection belonging to Hazel Mae Schwerdtfeger -Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Hazel Mae Schwerdtfeger was a Carleton Place native who received her nurse’s registration in June of 1935. She eventually became a public nurse in Almonte. After their parents death, sisters Bertha and Hazel, (who never married) lived together in the old family home on Lake Ave West.

Hazel became a registered nurse and the sisters lovingly kept all their mother’s millinery sundries and later donated the collection to the Beckwith and Carleton Place Heritage Museum. A large portion of Hazel’s estate was willed to the Victorian Order of Nurses in Carleton Place, and as a tribute, the former V.O.N. building was named Hazel House with a portrait  of her and her sister hung in the foyer.

Here is a letter she wrote to her father. There is no date on it, but I am assuming it is the 30s as she graduated in 1935. Letter courtesy Wanda Lee Morrison and the Joan Kehoe Collection.

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Sister Bertha and Hazel-Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Dear Daddy,

If Dr. McEwen come to Toronto and wishes to put in a good word for me have him see Miss Austin the superintendent as she is fair-minded. Her assistant Miss Collins sometimes takes her place and she is a devil and no one can talk to her. Whatever he said to her would be to no avail as she hates everybody in creation.

He could see Mr. Bower also as well as Miss Austin. That’s if he wishes to put in a good word for me. Either Mr. Bower or Miss Auston would do. I suppose Miss Austin is best as she is the head of nurses.

 

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Schwerdtfeger, Hazel Mae: Memoirs of Reverend J. Samuel Schwerdtfeger : “the Saint of St. Lawrence Seaway,” first pastor of Upper Canada’s first Protestant church, U. E. Loyalist and Lutheran patriarch of America / Hazel Mae Schwerdtfeger. (New York : Carlton Press, 1961)

 

Before the Schwerdtfeger Sisters – There was Aunt Sophia

So was there Money Hidden in the Schwerdtfeger House?

The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

Bertha Schwerdtfeger — Mother of the Carleton Place Schwerdtfeger Sisters

Another Episode in Spinsterdom–The Armour Sisters of Perth

The Nurses of Carleton Place

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News