Tag Archives: schools

Dugald Campbell –Memories of Ramsay Township and Almonte–Ministers Hunters and Schools

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Dugald Campbell –Memories of Ramsay Township and Almonte–Ministers Hunters and Schools

When Dugald Campbell was born on May 9, 1886, in Lanark, Ontario, his father, Donald, was 48 and his mother, Christinia, was 41 he lived in Almonte in 1901. He married Sarah Garret Johnston on September 10, 1913, in Vancouver, British Columbia. They had four children during their marriage. He died on August 17, 1973, in Vancouver, British Columbia, at the age of 87, and was buried there.

Dec. 12th, 1956. Editor of Gazette: ( this was written in the early 1900s)

The Sunday School affairs.

There were good ministers and priests as well—Rev. A. E. Mitchell, Rev. O rr Bennett, Rev. Chas. Daly, Rev. Dr. Chown, Canon Low, and the1 venerable old saint of St. Mary’s church, the late Father Foley. We had lots of other interesting characters in and around Almonte. Too many churches now have no evening service. There are scarcely any tea meetings or church socials such as we knew them

There were great hunters such as John Dulmage, Mack Fraser and others. There were some good baseball players—Chippy McGrath, Davy Hart, Hughie Clarke, Alex McGregor, the Grey boys, the Dixon boys, the Nagle boys and so on.

The school teachers—P. C. McGregor, W. C. Black, John McCarter, R. L. McDonald, all the McGregor girls, four of them, J. A. McPhail, J. W. Donnelly, R. E. Tasker and the inimitable Miss Armour, the teacher of French, and the classical headliner of the high school, Miss Margeret Thompson. No wonder the marks of the fellows and girls of those days were good, they had good and splendid teachers. I remember one remarkable character—Johnny Duncan. He was the ice man for years at the open air rink. He also built a boat for the Mississippi. It was quite a wonderful boat, but there certainly was no money in the venture, and its usefulness did not continue.

W. W. Pittard owned and printed the Almonte Times, always a hand set paper. Pitt was really something when the spirit moved, and that was often enough. The Gazette, under McLeod & McEwen, later James McLeod, and from then on to now, always had a good paper. It was always progressive, always Liberal and always considered sound.

The town band also was something unusual. Tom Brown wag leader, and he had a few of the following — Sid McLean, Bob Dodds, Andy Hill, Walter Scrimegeour and his son, Charlie, Josh McCallum, Alf Proctor and Ernie Proctor, and some of us kids were allowed to hold the music when the band played on the town square.

Recently the editor of the Carleton Place Canadian sent me a photo of the Perth Crescent lacrosse team of 1903. The Crescents were champions, and some one had routed out the picture and it was printed in the Perth Courier. In 1905, and it was really a great year under old Jimm y Porritt and Mike Gleason.

The C.P.R. were running wooden cars from Montreal to Vancouver what a difference from the modem ‘Canadian’ which crosses the continent now. Six days from Montreal to Vancouver, now three and a half days by rail; by air from Vancouver to Toronto now 11hours. Modern life has speeded u p greatly, but we ought never to forget that the days of the 1900 era were also good. The horse and buggy days were good days.

If you could just see some of the farm lands of western Canada, with their tractors and gas propelled machinery, scarcely a horse on the vast prairie country now at all. Times have changed and the wheat farm ers are taking off — wheat crops of 500 and 600 million. Down in the fruit valleys of British Columbia they take off several million boxes of apples per year, nearly everyone has their own home and their own car.

There are too many centralized TV picture shows in every home, most of them and no wonder there is world trouble. We are getting plenty of Hungarian refugees coming in air lifts over the Arctic to Voncouver these days, starving people, without any of the North American comforts, who are coming to us from hunted Europe.

Let us give thanks in Canada at this Christmas time for all the blessings which we enjoy. Let us be very sure that we deserve them because war clouds are gathering which are anything but good.

The Thing about Schools in Carleton Place

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The Thing about Schools in Carleton Place

Among public school inspectors in Lanark County a record of long service was made by F. S. Michell who continued in that capacity from 1880 to 1921.  Near the beginning of his forty years of duty he reported his views and findings on teachers’ prevailing salaries:

“The headmasters of the Public Schools in Carleton Place and Pakenham received the highest salaries paid teachers in this County – $550.  Male teachers salaries of 1884 ranged from $300 to $550, averaging $337.50.  Female teachers received from $150 to $350, the average for 1884 being $193.  Even the princely sum of $550 is but poor inducement for a man to undertake the ordeal of preparation in High, Model and Normal Schools and the harass and responsibility of a large graded school.  While the false economy of cheap teachers is the rule, the work must remain largely in the hands of students and school girls who intend to teach until something better presents itself.”

Twenty-five years later Carleton Place appointed a new public school principal to teach the senior class and supervise the operation of two schools and the work of thirteen other teachers.  The opening salary was $800.  Teachers were: Misses McCallum, Shaw, Burke, Anderson, O’Donnell, Caswell, Sturgeon, Sinclair, McLaren, Fife, Flegg, Morris, Cornell, and Mr. R. J. Robertson, principal.

Public school teachers of 1917 as listed by R. J. Robertson, principal, were Misses V. Leach, H. Cram, Laura Anderson, A. L. Anderson, I. H. Caswell, M. E. Sturgeon, Lizzie McLaren, Kate McNab, S. P. May, M. I. Mullett, C. Mallinson, M. M. McCallum and Mary Cornell. 

An item of juvenile training of this period was the Carleton Place curfew bylaw passed to protect youth or public order from the post-war perils of 1919.  It provided for ringing of a curfew bell at 9 p.m. standard time.  After this hour children under 16 years unless accompanied by a parent or guardian were required by law to remain indoors.

An earlier list of Carleton Place public school teachers available is that of 1890 :  Misses Munro, Nellie Garland, Shaw, Cram, Flegg, Garland, Smitherman, Lowe, Suter, Ferguson, McCallum, Mr. Neil McDonald (who transferred to the high school in 1890), and T. B. Caswell, principal.  Public school principal preceding Mr. Caswell was John A. Goth.  The local school board in 1890 comprised of Robert Bell, chairman; board members, McDonald, Struthers, Taylor, Donald, Begley, Kelly, Wylie, Breckenridge and, until his death in 1890, David Findlay, Sr.  In the same period J. R. Johnston, M.A. (Queens) was high school principal, with D. E. Sheppard, barrister, as assistant.

This is the last grade 13 graduation from the old  Carleton Placer High School 1918
Photo Thelma Dowdall

The story of high schools in Carleton Place is a lengthy one with many interesting sidelights.

The corner stone of the present High School (Prince of Wales High School) was laid in 1923 and under it was placed a scroll containing the following information:

The High School has made many moves since it was started about 75 years ago (about 1848) as a Grammar School. . Mr. Nelson, a highly educated gentleman, was the first teacher.  The first building used was a frame one on the Central School grounds.

The Most Photographed Home in Carleton Place Hurd’s Hall

From there it was moved to Hurd’s Hall on Bell Street, being the upper flat of the building for many years known as McKay’s Bakery.  After that the present Holiness Church on the corner of Bridge and Herriott Streets, was used for a short time.  Then the north-east room in the present Central School was used.

Newman’s Hall Bridge Street

From here it was moved to Newman’s Hall, in the rooms now occupied as temporary quarters for a High and a Public School class.  This school went back again to the Central School building for a short time, until the present used building on High Street was ready for occupation in 1882.

Note: Newman’s Hall is the building now occupied by the Brewers’ Retail Store and the school on High Street is the present Prince of Wales School.

For nearly 30 years the people of Carleton Place were considering the question of better school accommodation, but owing to the exigencies of the times, such as loss of population, removal of industries and expenditures on other public undertakings, small progress was made.

However, with the rapid growth of the rising generation during the past few years, we have become convinced that more school accommodation should be provided.

Early in 1922 it was decided to build a High School.  Messrs. Richards & Abra of Ottawa were selected as architects, a plan was adopted, the estimated cost being placed at $100,000.  A building committee was appointed composed of J. M. Brown, chairman, A. E. Cram, Alfred McNeely and W. J. Muirhead.

On the 12th of June, 1922, the Council submitted the question to the electorate who pronounced in favor of granting the aforesaid sum by a vote of 412 for to 79 against.

The scroll concluded with a list of the contractors.

On January 3, 1924, the present High School was opened at an impressive ceremony.

The history files recount some of the turbulence that accompanied building of schools, including a riot which once decided the place for the town hall.  read-The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place and Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory of the Coming of the Prince of Wales School

Howard M. Brown, who has written countless articles on the early history of the town, records that in the 1870’s came municipal incorporation, the building of a town hall on Edmund Street (now Victoria School) and finally the provision of a High School on High Street. read-Back to School at the Victoria School in Carleton Place 1919

The school was built in 1877 by the Board of Education.  The succeeding administration, supporting objections to its location refused to accept the school and in 1879 began converting the town hall into classrooms.  After public and private litigation and a long and bitter municipal feud the High School was occupied as such.

The town hall settled into service as a combination Public School and village lock-up.

Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory of the Coming of the Prince of Wales School

The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place

The Donneybrooks of Carleton Place-Number 3

Comments About a Picture–Prince of Wales School

And the Walls Came Tumbling Down-Prince of Wales School High Street

Just Beat It! Carnival Riot in Carleton Place at Riverside Park

And the Walls Came Tumbling Down-Prince of Wales School High Street

Before and After in Carleton Place — Be True to your School

What Will 50 Cents Get You at the Prince of Wales School?

A Rare Photo of S. S. #5 Dalhousie 1890s — Thanks to Donna Mcfarlane

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A Rare Photo of S. S. #5 Dalhousie 1890s — Thanks to Donna Mcfarlane

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Linda
Aunt Margaret had this in a frame   but she had the names in behind
it..that she knew- Donna Mcfarlane
Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

S.S. #5 White School White Community Hall

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S.S. #5 White School White Community Hall

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  1. where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.
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Montague Central School 1989

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Montague Central School 1989

I had to document this as I was worried the newspaper clipping might go missing.

The Record News Smiths Falls 1989 September 27, 1989– Thanks to Joyce Tennant

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte
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Did the Germans Start the Fire at the Portland School in 1915?

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Did the Germans Start the Fire at the Portland School in 1915?

When the white wooden schoolhouse in Newboyne and the Harlem schoolhouse were both burned to the ground in 1915, it was rumoured the Germans were behind the arson. The brick schoolhouse was erected on County Road 5 in 1918. It closed in 1936 due to a lack of students, and the few who remained went to S.S. No. 1 Newboyne. In 1956, S.S. No. 1 closed and the students were transported to S.S. No. 2 Newboyne, which finally closed its doors in 1966 when Rideau Centennial School opened. Shortly afterwards, the old schoolhouse was sold to the Anglican Church Women (ACW) for $1 and became St. Peter’s Anglican Church Hall.

The Germans burned down the school? 1915 was a busy year for things being done the Germans in our area it seems.  In February 1915 it was said that some of the folks in Brockville and the surrounding area were returning from church and spotted something lit in the sky on February 15, 1915.  When the mayor of Brockville and three constables also witnessed this alledged incident word quickly spread up and down the valley that the Germans were invading Canada.  Read more here: Was it the Germans Or UFO’s that Invaded the Ottawa Valley in 1915?

There were many phantom German air raids and war hysteria in Quebec and Ontario during the First World War. During the Great War vivid imaginations and wild rumours were the order of the day, and local politicians did little to ease fears. Nobody knows what started the fire at the Portland schools which totally destroyed tho building, doing damage to the extent of about $1500. No coal was put in the furnace after noon on the day before– so was it the Germans, or just schools needing much needed improvements finally succumbing to fire?\

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Black and white photograph of school group in front of Portland School in 1895. The school was built in 1888. Photo Our Ontario

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Black and white photograph of Portland School group in 1897. Teachers identified as Hattie Donovan and Rebecca Edwards with 47 pupils. Photo Our Ontario

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Black and white photograph of Portland School group in 1902. Identified as Miss Cawley, Mina Bell, and 37 pupils. Photo Our Ontario

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Photograph of the Portland Public School in 1936. Left to right (front row): Donald Hull, Wilbert Dowsett, Edwin Baxter, Janet Biggs, Betty Seward, Cyril Hull, Howard Atwood, Gerald Hull, ? Broadbent, Alvin Seward,
Second row: Ms. Lovina Cameron (teacher), Bertha Simpson, Gwenyth McKenney, Mary Simpson, Joyce Gilmour, June Biggs, Mary Polk, Sylvia Stevens, Mr. Thrasher (music teacher)
Back row: Arnold Rogers, Donald Byington, Everett Hanna, Gerald Hanna, Tom Strickland, Orville Seward.-Photo Our Ontario

historicalnotes

 - I ; I Portland' School Dispute Flarers Into...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 16 Aug 1960, Tue,
  3. Page 4

Portland is one of the early settlements along the Rideau. Although land was granted in the area of Portland in 1801, it was not until the early 1820s that a community started to grow in the location of the present day town. An 1818 map shows a trail leading to the location which is named “Old Landing.” An 1828 map also shows it as “Old Landing” with more of a substantial road leading to it (a road built in 1816). Local history credits the first settler on the village site as being Ami Chipman (b.1807, son of Heman Chipman). An 1830 map shows a “small settlement” in this location. The name of the small community was changed to Portland in 1833, in honour of William Henry Cavendish Bentinck, the 3rd Duke of Portland. The name Portland comes from the Isle of Portland, which lies off shore from Weymouth in Dorset, England.

Portland remained a centre of commerce through the 1800s, serving the commercial boat traffic that plied the Rideau. The business directory for 1866-67 listed coopers, hotel keepers, store keepers, blacksmiths, wagon makers, mitten makers, a watch maker, a miller, and a dentist. When commercial activity along the Rideau slowed down in the early 1900s, the main activity in Portland became a service centre for local residents, including the many people starting to cottage on Big Rideau Lake. This remains Portland’s raison d’être to this day.

There are several interesting buildings to see in Portland. These include the Emmanuel Anglican Church located on the height of land at the south end of town which was built in 1862. It was expanded in 1885 and in 1897 a tower with bell was added.  Rideau Canal Info

The Smith’s Falls News in 1837 reported a case of smallpox at *Oliver’s Ferry in 1837.  In that year an Irish woman with two daughters aged 12 and 13 were put off at the ferry from a steam boat.   Many settlers came as far as Brockvile, then walked north about twelve miles and then west to Portland where they were transported on the Rideau to Oliver’s Ferry, coming thence to Pert
#006032-86 (Lanark Co): David WILSON, 23, blacksmith, Almonte, same, s/o Hugh & Mary, married Lizzie CHURCHILL, 23, Portland – Leeds Co., Perth, d/o William & Melissa, witness was Albert LANG of Almonte, Nov. 2, 1886 at Perth.

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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Was it the Germans Or UFO’s that Invaded the Ottawa Valley in 1915?

Tales from Oliver’s Ferry

Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

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Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill

 

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October 8, 1937. S.S.#6 Middleville School

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October 8, 1937. S.S.#6 Middleville School. Back row 3rd one from left is Roy Yuill — with Roy Yuill.

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Middleville Public School in 1908– Photo by Laurie Yuill

 

Middleville 1885

Middleville school still stands today. Photo Middleville & District Museum

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family

Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

The Home Permit– School Records

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The Home Permit– School Records

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Years ago some children had to work on the farm or look after family and could not attend school so they needed a Home Permit.. Wanda Lee Morrison gave me this Carleton Place Home Permit and it is cherished.

Ellen Glinka

In time gone by children sometimes left home as early as 7-years-old to pursue another field of education or apprenticeship ( instances of cheap child labour in factories and shops) They were exempted only by attaining home permits that indicated their guardian needed them to be either home for sickness or farm work or apprenticeship.

Ray Paquette– That picture of the permit above and the reason for it’s issue brought some less than pleasant memories back to me. The McNeely family, and in particular Grant and Robert were childhood friends and I remember the night when Mrs. McNeely succumbed to her illness. I was attending an evening movie at the old Roxy of the Disney production of “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” when the film was interrupted by a typewritten note asking Grant to come to the box office. When I returned home, following the movie, Grant was there to spend the night as neighbours stepped in to relieve Mr. McNeely of the responsibilities for the younger children. Joan and Glen were old enough to understand what was going on but I’m sure Grant, Bobbie and Wanda were having trouble taking this in the loss of their mother, who I still remember.

Thank you Ray for your comment.

 

 

historicalnotes

 

Ellen Glinka asked

Is there any site where one could look at the records? What years were involved? Would love to learn more about them.

Unfortunately there is not a set place you can find them– and this is a start. But I do believe it is because it is a privacy issue.. CLICK here.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Apr 1942, Tue,  Page 4

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

Suspended Teacher —Appleton School 1931 — Miss Annie Neilson

Ladies & Gentlemen- Your School Teachers of Lanark County 1898

School Salaries of 1918

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

 

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street in Carleton Place (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour walk with stories of murder mayhem and BOO!.. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!!

So Which One Room School House Became a Pig Barn?

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So Which One Room School House Became a Pig Barn?

 

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The flags no longer proudly fly above the former one room school house nor does the teacher ring the bell for recess. The teachers from the old, one-room schoolhouses deserve a lot of credit for the wonderful work they did under difficult working conditions in the days of yesteryears.

The teacher would try to have a lot of work on the blackboards for the various grades before the day began. As soon as the children were settled, they began with the recitation of The Lord’s Prayer as good Christian morals were very important to the folk in the community.

The older pupils would have their work laid out for them so they could work alone from blackboard materials while the teacher concentrated on the younger children who were more dependant on direction and explanation. The week’s monitors would have brought in a pail of fresh drinking water from the rusty old pump at the school well. The dipper would be in the pail and everyone drank from it, sharing whatever germs were active in the little community. Some older boy would put an extra stick of wood in the stove to warm the room up.

What happened to some of those one room school houses that once scattered Lanark County? By the 1950s, the days of the one room school house were numbered. The introduction of rural school busing resulted in school closures as sites were amalgamated for efficiency and cost effectiveness.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal20 Jul 1979, Fri[First] RevisionPage 3

In April of 1965 trouble was brewing and the pot was over flowing. Mrs. Nino Manzon of Carleton Place had been carrying on a paper war since January against the townships eight schools.  In 1965 Margaret Manzon’s children were attending Tennyson School in Beckwith Township. Declaring the rural one room school “antiquated”, she began a campaign to bring modern educational facilities to the area.

Most of them were sold at tender except the sole survivor of a one-room public school that once formed the backbone of childhood life in Appleton. The little brick schoolhouse in Appleton was leased by the North Lanark Historical Society for $1 a year. Tragically that beloved schoolhouse burned down in 1973– but was rebuilt and stands today as the North Lanark Regional Museum.

Most of the schools became private homes except for one located near Casselman. (Prescott Russell school board) That school which became a pig barn, and two in Leeds and Grenville were used as storage sheds. Most were snapped up for about $500 each depending on the location, age and condition. One sold for as much as $13,000,  yet one located on Dalhousie Lake waterfront property went for a mere $250. *That particular school house had sat vacant for 20 years. ( Please see Alice Gilchrist’s comment below)

historicalnotes

 

*Dalhousie Lake School-

“yet one located on Dalhousie Lake waterfront property went for a mere $250. That particular school house had sat vacant for 20 years” can you identify this schoolhouse please. Not aware of any schoolhouse on Dalhousie Lake waterfront ….. closest I can think of is former S.S.#4 and it is a mile away from lake”. Alice Gilchrist
Author’s Note- I try to do a lot of research in my writings but nothing beats personal recollections. So I believe Alice..:)

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal20 Jul 1979, Fri[First] RevisionPage 3

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal09 Jul 1980, WedValley EditionPage 3

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

 

Outhouses Need to Be Cleaned– Conditions of Our Rural School– 1897

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Screenshot from the Report of the Minister of Education 1889–F. L. M i c h e l l , P. S. Inspector

May 28, 1897 Almonte Gazette

 

S.S. No. 12, Lanark (James).—A good building on an excellent site. The room needs cleaning and the outhouses, especially the woodshed, need repairing. School work greatly improved, but still inferior in some subjects. Order and discipline good.

S.S. No. 3, Ramsay (Union Hall).— One of the neatest and prettiest school properties in the county. The trustees and teacher seem determined to keep the school in a front rank. The school Walls have been neatly papered (the only school in the district thus finished). This together with a full supply of good pictures presented by the parents gives the room a comfortable home-like appearance. Contact with neatness and beauty must exercise a beneficial influence on the formation of character. Thanks to trustees and teacher for their pioneer effort towards a more cheerful state of things in the school room. The teacher is energetic and enthusiastic, and his school ranks among the best in the inspectorate.

S.S No. 1, Pakenham (Cedar Hill).— An excellent building on an ample site. School dirty and yard overgrown in places with weeds. Outhouses need repairs and cleaning. Some of the desks are broken. This state of things is not usual in this section. The teacher, though without previous experience, is doing very fair work and will doubtless have better results at next visit.

 

S.S No. 2, Pakenham (Sadler’s).— Accommodation excellent except floor. The blackboards need renewing. Excellent yard, but outbuilding dirty. The school is in charge of a teacher of wide and successful experience, and the standing is good in all classes. A first-class school.

S.S No. 3, Pakenham (Ellis)—Excellent school house and site. The floor is worn out and the fence very unsubstantial. Outhouses must be cleaned. Here also, an experienced and energetic teacher is in charge, and though the full programme is taught, the work is well done. The grading excellent in standing, order and discipline.

S.S. No. 5, Pakenham (Scott’s)—A commodious building, but dirty and out of repair. Blackboards bad and new window blinds needed. The fences are in a disgraceful condition ; no pump and general neglect apparent. As this is one of the wealthiest sections in the county, such a condition of things is inexcusable. No grant can be paid unless the necessary improvements are attended to. The school work is exceedingly well done and the standing very satisfactory. Though the attendance is large the order is excellent.

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Screenshot from the Report of the Minister of Education 1889–F. L. M i c h e l l , P. S. Inspector

 

S.S No. 6, Pakenham (Doyle’s).— An excellent new school on a well chosen site. Out-house needs repairing and cleaning. School work, except in grammar, is good, The attendance in some cases has been irregular.

S. S. No. 7, Pakenham (Bellamy’s Road).—Building greatly improved, but it needs sheeting within. The yard is not fenced as the law requires. The school work is below the average and the classification is very unsatisfactory. A regular certificated teacher must be engaged in future. The increase in attendance is phenomenal.

S. S. No. 8, Pakenham (Lowe’s). A good building, but in need of cleaning and painting. The yard should be levelled and large stones removed. The standing is fair—writing, arithmetic metic and literature below the average, owing in many cases to irregularity.

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Screenshot from the Report of the Minister of Education 1889–F. L. M i c h e l l , P. S. Inspector

S. S. No. 11, Ramsay (Appleton) An excellent brick schoolhouse of two divisions, but getting out of repair through continued neglect. Floor will soon need renewing. Desks cumbersome and uncomfortable. School should be reseated with modern desks. Outhouses need cleaning. The attendance is increasing and the school work well done in the senior division and fairly done in the junior. The order is generally satisfactory. Good work should be done here this year.

S. S. No. 12, Ramsay (Simpsons). A very comfortable brick school on a good site. The walls must be repaired and interior repaired and cleaned. Floor, bad in places. Gates, need attention and outhouses must be cleaned. The school attendance increasing and the work exceptionally well done. The teacher is earnest and competent. Trustees act wisely in securing tried, successful teachers, since loss of time and opportunity must often result when the opposite course is pursued.

F. L. M i c h e l l , P. S. Inspector

 

 

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S.S. No. 1 Pakenham-The One Room Schoolhouse

Rural Schools: Ramsay Township etc, Pages of the Past, County of Lanark, Ontario Canada”.  To purchase this book and others, go to www.archiveslanark.ca .

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun