Tag Archives: school

First Woman School Trustee — Mrs. W . A. Gilmour — Hazelwood School

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First Woman School Trustee — Mrs. W . A. Gilmour — Hazelwood School

from the Almonte Gazette…Ramsay # 5 1959-1960 school year

January 1920

The township of Ramsay’s first lady school trustee is Mrs. W . A. Gilmour. At the annual meeting of School Section No. 5, Ramsay, held on Wednesday, Mrs. Gilmour was elected to fill the position for the next three years.

Mrs. Gilmour has a high reputation as an educationist, and there is much satisfaction that she should be tendered this appointment and that she should accept it. She is a daughter of the late Robert Yuill at Ramsay, and was married to Mr. William A. Gilmour, one of the most prominent agriculturists in Ramsay. Both Yuills and Giimours were amongst the first settlers from Scotland in this part of the area.

S.S. No. 5 Ramsay – Galbraith School

Daniel Galbraith purchased land on the West half of Lot 11, Concession 5 in Ramsay township in 1855. He sold half an acre to the trustees in 1870 for $1.00. The first teacher was Nell Forest. Ratepayers became enraged when the Ramsay Township School Boarded voted to close the school, so in 1958, S.S. No. 5 became a separate school section. Ratepayers donated two cords of wood per family. A new piano was purchased and a music teacher was hired. In 1969, the rural pupils were bussed to Almonte or Carleton Place. .

Photo- Jennifer E Ferris-The Forgotten Galbraith School House

S.S. No. 5 Ramsay – Galbraith School—Daniel Galbraith purchased land on the West half of Lot 11, Concession 5 in Ramsay township in 1855. He sold half an acre to the trustees in 1870 for $1.00. The first teacher was Nell Forest. Ratepayers became enraged when the Ramsay Township School Boarded voted to close the school, so in 1958, S.S. No. 5 became a separate school section. Ratepayers donated two cords of wood per family. A new piano was purchased and a music teacher was hired. In 1969, the rural pupils were bussed to Almonte or Carleton Place. The school was moved across the road to become Bert Hazelwood’s cabin in his bush. Read-Recollections of Bert Hazelwood 1973

North Lanark Regional Museum

August 21, 2021  · It’s almost back-to-school and we’re going through our school books collection! This copy of ‘Vitalized English’ was used in the S.S. No. 5 Ramsay school – called the Galbraith School. The land (Lot 11, Concession 5 in Ramsay Township) was purchased in 1855 by Daniel Galbraith, who sold half an acre of that land to school trustees in 1870 for $1.

The school operated until 1969 when the Government of Ontario mandated the consolidation of county school boards, and students were bussed to either Almonte or Carleton Place for their education.

For the Love of Money-Gillies Gilmours and the McLarens

2702 Words of History About Grieg’s School Ramsay–Miss Ruby Wilson

Norman Paul Talks About the Little Red School House- The Buchanan Scrapbook

Recollections of Bert Hazelwood 1973

January 1920– Church Street School in the Winter — PLUS PHOTOS

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January 1920–  Church Street School in the Winter — PLUS PHOTOS
Karen Hirst
June 12, 2018  · 
Church Street Public School, Almonte…memories were made within these classroom walls….if only they could talk what would they recall?
With a new school build, Church Street Apartments now occupies the site.

1866- The Church Street Schoolbuilt at a cost of $3,175—contract price.Almonte Church Street Public School, 1950/51 -MARG DRENNAN-

January 1920

Schools reopened on Monday after the Christmias holidays, with good attendance. Unfortunately the Church Street school was so cold that the children had to go home again. This has occurred several times this winter, and the explanation given is that the furnace is too small. There is a new teacher engaged in the person of Miss Eileen Staley, of Wolfe Island. She succeeds MissKate MacDonald, who resigned before Christmas. Miss Robeson, who also resigned before Christmas, is doing duty until a successor has been appointed. January 1920

Buddyzee FisherI lived in that building for a few years. Great place with huge high ceiling and similar heating bills. Lol.

In the 1890s P.C. Dowdall’s Drug Store was on Bridge St. in Almonte near the railway. In the entrance, the weather forecasts were posted up daily, providing a point of interest each day for the children walking to and from the Church Street school.

PUPILS WERE READY TO TESTIFY AGAINST PRINCIPAL OF SCHOOL (By Dugald Campbell) It has been a long time now since this little item happened. But it was back in Almonte around the latter 1800s likely. The old town had two’ famous school principals. One of course, was the redoubtable P. C. McGregor, patron saint of Queen’s University at Kingston, and for many years principal of Almonte High School. P. C. was really something. My story, however, concerns another principal, the late John McCarter. He was an old dour, stubborn Scot with a single mindedness and a stern approach to life. He held forth in the Church Street School, and he trudged, summer and winter, across the Bay Hill and up Mill Street. John McCarter was a stem disciplinarian aland he did not hesitate to lay on the birch rod at times. His arder in this direction brought him into trouble.The old man licked a lad named Jack Carney rather heavily, and there was such a rumpus kicked up that the case was sent up to the higher court in Perth. The late E. W. Smith (Almonte magistrate) did not wish to get into trouble with the two principals in the affair, so he wisely sent the case up to the county court. Mr. A. M. Greig represented School Teacher McCarter, and W. H. Stafford represented Jack Carney. The presiding judge was Judge Senkler at Perth. Carney’s lawyer took a cart load of school youths to witness that Carney took a shellacking. I was not one of the kids, but it was a great day when the prosecuting lawyer took the kids over to Perth. The late Sandy Robinson took his famous side-seater to Perth with his team of steppers.Twenty two miles was a long trip in those days, and there was a lot of heat generated around town because of the interest in the case. John McCarter had many friends and it would have been suicidal had he lost the case, but because of the youth of the lads, who were keyed up to take their oath re the licking of the Carney lad, the wise old judge dismissed the case. No evidence was taken because of the youth of the witnesses for Carney. Jack Carney’s health was not abated one whit, and maybe it was a good thing for the discipline of the town, but it was hot stuff when it lasted.

Also read—

Miss Christena Dunlop –Teacher Church Street School

Almonte Church Street Public School, 1950/51 -MARG DRENNAN

Thank you to Fran Cooper
Good morning, Linda,
Church Street Public School, Almonte that was taken on the lawn near the school for 1950-51.
I want to try to get everyone’s name and then I am going to donate the photo to the North Lanark Museum at Appleton so many people can enjoy it.
Fran Cooper.
Almonte Public School 1950-51 Photo
Back Row: Left to Right: Mrs. Howard Giles, Miss Edna Ross, Miss Agnes Gillies (later Mrs. Stuart King), Miss Marion McGill (Mrs. Murray Cavanagh), Miss Margaret Rodgers, Diane Larocque, _____________, Donna Honeyborne, Ruth Craig?,
Next Row: (short row)
Mr. Hal Farnham, Principal, John Sutherland, Miss Elizabeth Schoular
Next Row: _________, Raymond Morton, Jackie Philips, Garnet Rodger, __________,
Bob McClymont, Bob Andrews, _________________, ______________,
Second Row: Earl Needham, Hugh McMullan, Bert McIntosh, Donnie Andrews,
___________, Arthur (Artie) Wilson, Gordon Paterson, ______________,
_____________, ____________,
First Row: Elgin Miller?, ____________, ____________, ____________,
Deannie Lotan, Earl More, Billy McClymont,

Brent Eades
October 6, 2020  · 
School in Almonte 100 years ago, give or take. This is Church Street School in the early 20th century, exact date unknown. It’s now an apartment building.

From Frank will Fix it..
Linda, here’s a picture you might find interesting. Church Street School, Grade 1 class picture 1959-1960. I’m in the 2nd row, 3rd from the right. Frank Blakeley

Bob Smithson grandpa and Cameron smithson middle row

Alice CharleboisJohn Dalgity , your Uncle Jack is in first row 5 from left, Gordie Lotan 3 over from him. Your dad Garry second row, 7th from left. I have that picture with the names.
Karen Hirst
September 4, 2019  · 
Church Street Public School

Gwen OneillI loved that school playing ball at recess was my favourite time there. Haha
Sheila Mueck and I were there at same time.

church street school -CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jul 1971, Wed • Page 2

Catherine LehewShe was known TINA DUNLOP..she taught GL Comba (my mothers father) in grade school.
She was tall woman always worn dress very Victorian.. my mom had Ms Ross Gr 1..Tina Dunlop had grade 2 1934. Very stern..walk around with a pointer line us up along the wall to learn your authentic very stern.
She possibly my mother’s grandmothers cousin
My grandmother was Jenny Dunlop married Charles Comba originally from Pakenham.
My us Emily Comba

Judy Reid Hamre
July 8, 2021  · 
I went to Church Street School until grade 5. This was grade 3 not sure why it says G.L. Comba because everybody in the pic can confirm it wasn’t Comba!

Comments-

Church Street School-Hello Linda,My mom was born & raised in Almonte along with her 8 siblings. My Uncle worked the print shop for the Almonte Gazette, Uncle Fred was reeve at on time, my aunts worked in the flour mill Grandpa Clement built homes and helped build St. Mary’s church twice ! Thanks to Lin Jones

Almonte Public School 1959This school had a girls’ entrance on the East end and a separate boys’ entrance on the West end. The playground was even divided into a girls’ playground and a boys’ playground and we didn’t dare cross the line. The full basement was divided into a basement for boys and a basement for girls to use in inclement weather at recesses. Also, a girls’ cloakroom and a boys’ cloakroom on each floor and a girls’ stairs and a boys’ stairs to the second floor and to the basement.Anyone remember Church Street Public School? With Miss Ross on the piano?- Ian McDougall Tokyo Every morning the whole student body would gather in the foyer and sing, God save the Queen, Oh Canada and Don’t Fence Me In. I lived there for a short time, less than a year, but remember that I really loved the town.-Prudence Hutton Florida

More about the Church Street school-A hostel on Church Street?? Do tell…. Clipped from The Ottawa Citizen, 10 Jul 1971, Sat, Page 37 CLICK to read all..
Judy Reid Hamre I went to school @ Church St. and I remember thinking how cool it was to have a drop in centre (I was 11)
Glenn Arthur I remember that and the descrption that the teens were given by Mr Galligan. I also was a Volunteer at the Centre along with other teens in town that that all turned out to be pretty good citizens of Almonte and area
Judy Reid Hamre
January 10, 2020  · 
This is the clock that hung in my classroom. My father rescued it after the school closed

Cathy PatersonSure do grade1 to 6 awesome to sets of stairs going up two down to the cloakroom boys side and girls side lining up outside to go in ! Off to classroom then assembly then singing God Save The Queen then The flag would go up of Elmer the Saftey Elephant of no accidents! School patrols out on the corners

Marty TaylorThink I only went there 1 year? Don’t remember much except the whole class got half a day off due to the smell after I threw up on some girls back in the classroom.

Sandy FranceThe grade 8 boys were tasked with wrapping the Union Jack flag so it could be unfurled by yanking on a cord during the singing of God Save the King. One day some wag filled the flag with small pebbles. Mr. Farnham was not impressed by the ensuing clatter.

Donna TimminsI went to the high school for Gr.1 with Miss Rodger, then Church St for Grade 2, 3, 4 &5 with Miss Rodger, Miss Gillies who later married Stuart King & Mrs. Penman for Grade 5. Mr. Sutherland in Gr. 6 which at Easter we transferred to the new GLComba and then back to Church St. for Gr. 8 with Hal Farnham. Lots of fond memories.

Judy Reid Hamre
January 11, 2020  · 
I bought Miss Schoular’s Singer treadle sewing machine at a flea market in Carleton Place in the late 70’s. It had every accessory imaginable and sews beautifully

Don RaycroftGlenn Arthur A “beautiful” addition if I recall.😊I remember Ed Giffen teaching us the football basics and how to win. When he started the program I remember him saying you guys will be able to hit each other without visiting Mr. Farnham.It didn’t seem funny at the time but I have often laughed about it over the years.And I have no idea how he got in his Austin Mini. Maybe he took the front seat out??

Another House/School that Moved and Moved

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Another House/School that Moved and Moved

Photo from Whispers from the Past ( see below)

Mr. Murray Manson can boast of owning the most travelled house in this part of the country at least. Recently he purchased the house from Willard Kellough at Union Hall and Harry Metcalfe moved it with his bulldozer to its present location on the 9th line. But this is not its first trip and we are indebted to our Clayton correspondent, Mrs. Geo. Bolger, for the history of the building. 

It was originally the school house in Clayton Village built in 1866 measuring 22×32 and it stood beside the present school. It was idle for some time and finally Wm. G. Robertson bought it and in those days buildings were torn down and rebuilt. Levi Blair of Pakenham assisted by Geo. Bolgetr took the house down and the materials were drawn by horses to the 3rd line of Ramsay where it was built on a foundation made by Thomas Munro and J. R. Drynan. It made a fine residence. 

Then Mr. Robertson moved to Manitoba and the farm was sold to J. A. Erskine, then to Elvin McKay and recently to Willard Kellough. He sold it to Mr. Manson and it is to be hoped that the poor old school is allowed to rest in peace. In its day as a school, the pupils sat 10 to a bench: there were no black boards and the pupils used slates. The only men in this district who worked on the removal of the school are John R. Drynan and Geo. Bolger. 

Jan 24 1952 Almonte Gazette

Rose Mary Sarsfield

Rose Mary Sarsfield
 There are still a few copies of my book available for those who haven’t gotten a copy yet, or as a Christmas gift to someone with ties to Clayton. They are available at the Clayton Store, the Mill Street Books or from me. rose@sarsfield.ca

The Name of the Man that Moved the Kennedy House

The House that Skated to Carleton Place — Kennedy House

An Update to the Kennedy House — Harold “Ozzie” McNeely

The House on the Cliff and the Old Bridge

Documenting The Brooke Valley Hippies – 1981

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Documenting The Brooke Valley Hippies – 1981

1981

The locals call it Hippie Valley. But on the map it’s known as Brooke Valley, a sprawling spread west of Perth that looks more like the Ponderosa than a hippie haven. It’s a place where the folk are so self-sufficient, some have decided to take the education of their children into their own hands. Jim and Ruth Dcacovc, both former public school teachers, did it for 12 years. Recess for the Deacove girls used to be a game of basketball or a cross-country ski in the back field with Dad. Science class was helping out in the garden. “We’re self-admitted renegades,” says Jim, who with his wife Ruth now make cooperative games. “We did our 12-year duty and fulfilled our social work contract with society.”

This year Tanya, 13, and Christa, 12, went back to the public school in preparation for high school. The girls are products of young professional parents who have joined a number of Canadians who believe public schooling is not all it’s chalked up to be. The Canadian Alliance of HomeschoolerS now numbers about 300 families across Canada. It was founded two-and-a-half years ago as a support system for parents who wished to take their children out of public school, by Wendy and Rolf Priesnitz who live in a rural area near Hamilton. “There are a lot of people very unhappy with the school system,” said Priesnitz.

In the Perth area there are just two children now in home instruction and just a handful of “homeschooled” children in urban areas. Right now, there are none in Ottawa-Carleton. The concept of home instruction seems to attract the young professionals who have moved to rural areas to seek a different lifestyle. The Kerrs, who live abcut 80 kilometres east of Ottawa, just outside the little village of Dalkeith, Ont., still practise “homes-chooling.” The Kerr kids learn about fractions by baking whole-wheat bread or bran muffins. “I guess we were considered mavericks at first.” says Pat Kerr. The Deacoves and the Kerrs say they enjoyed their years in the school system. All four are university graduates, but they, began to realize with their own children that public schooling was not the answer. As well, the two couples wanted to be closer to their children, watch them grow up and have more of a hand their development than is possible in most families. While home instruction is not encouraged by boards of education, parents do have the legal right to educate their children.

“I wouldn’t contemplate it (home instruction) knowing the benefits of the school system to children,” says Bob Cressman, director of education for the Lanark County Board, whose board takes in the Brooke Valley area. Parents are not required to have a teaching certificate in order to teach their children at home. As long as the program and studies set out by the parents is satisfactory to education officials, parents are allowed to excuse their children from school for one year.The inspection process is usually repeated on an annual basis. Cressman considers the idea a “fad” that started in the early 1970s with the increase of communal living.

“I’m not even sure from my point of view if it’s a good idea having everything come from the wife and husband … I don’t see it as a broad enough education. “Home instruction depends a lot on parents,” he says. “If they are former teachers, the instruction given them could be excellent, but how they would develop on a social and emotional level in a restricted environment is perhaps questionable.” Ken Johnson, provincial school attendance counsellor, is in charge of investigating all complaints by school boards if children are not attending school. He and his staff are asked to investigate about two cases of home instruction every year.

“A child is excused from attending school if he or she is receiving a satisfactory education at home or elsewhere.” Parents who teach their children at home can be charged by their boards of education if the program is not found suitable by board officials with neglecting a child’s education and if found guilty, can be fined a maximum $100. Few charges in year Johnson figures there are about two or three cases a year in the six Ontario educational regions. “We have to protect the child’s right to education,” said Johnson. “Most parents 99.9 per cent of them are well-meaning, but some are over-indulgent or over-protective of their child. “Of course it causes concern with boards because of declining enrolment, but there is no panic,” said Johnson. “It’s not popular.” Parents who teach their children at home agree it’s not for everyone. The Deacoves say parents must be dedicated and be willing to devote a lot of time to their children. Their days must be structured and disciplined, but the benefits to learning at home are immense a one-to-one teacher-student relationship and incorporating education into everyday tasks.

The family began their routine at 9 a.m. and finished at 3:30 p.m. The day consisted of reading, writing and math. Subjects such as home economics were picked up by the girls when they mended clothes, science class became working in the garden and learning about crop rotations and pollination of flowers. “After teaching in public school systems we experienced a lot of discontent about the role we had to play,” said Jim. “An immense amount of time is spent on things other than learning and developing as a person.” They wanted an alternative for their children a system in which the kids wouldn’t be under constant competitive pressure. “There are an awful lot of tests and exams going on perpetually … in our view they tend to shift the emphasis on learning to extraneous factors such as rewards, status and privileges,” said Jim. “But with our homeschooling approach they took our progress checks and if they didn’t understand a concept we tried a different perspective. “Academically I don’t think they suffered,” said Ruth, who did question the lack of social contact the girls might have missed. But they always had friends and at one time were part of a small school started in the valley by her parents.

Time to join others last September, the Deacoves felt it was time for their girls to go to regular school. Tanya would soon be entering high school and taking subjects the Deacoves felt they couldn’t handle. “She (Tanya) needed a thorough year of immunization before the big pressure situation.” They say they’re enjoying it and finding it easy. “Teachers don’t expect very much,” said 12-year-old Christa. “They ask you to do an assignment and expect it in two weeks . . I figured we had to hand it in the next day.” Both girls said they had trouble adapting to some things. Tanya is worried about exams and Christa said grammar was foreign to her when she first started back at school. “I didn’t even know what a noun or a verb was, but I passed my exam with 90 per cent.”

The Kerr’s have five children. Their eldest, Carolyn, is back at school after two years at home. Sunny, 7, will stay out of school until he feels ready to attend. The Kerrs said they set up a schedule for their children a rigid school-like system that lasted only two weeks. It didn’t seem to work. “I felt she, (Carolyn) was demanding too much … she expected me to be her teacher.” Their oldest child, Carolyn, had a difficult time at school. She just hated going. “We also wanted to keep in touch with them and see them learning and growing,” said Pat. “We wanted to be with them while they were doing it.” A lot of what she did was practical working in the kitchen and outside. The Kerr’s pick up books for their children at book sales and taught them to read from them. While Carolyn has a well-rounded vocabulary, she was behind in math. Remedial classes fixed that. The Kerr kids will attend school when, they decide they are ready.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 May 1981, Thu  •  Page 45

The beginnings of a wonderful school-

Brooke Valley School
click here


Brooke Valley School –The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Documenting Brooke Valley Hippies 1992

The Hagarty Township Hippies 1981 – The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Anyone Remember The Farm???? The Hippie Years of Lanark County

Hippies Wars in Carleton Place

Woodstock in Carleton Place Letters — Those Dirty Hippies!

Woodstock in Carleton Place Letters — Go Back to Your Holes!

Woodstock in Carleton Place– Let the Tambourines Play and — And About That Junk Pile!

No Hippies in Carleton Place! — The Children of God

2702 Words of History About Grieg’s School Ramsay–Miss Ruby Wilson

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2702 Words of History About Grieg’s School Ramsay–Miss Ruby Wilson

Below is published an interesting story of Greig’s School, Eighth line of Ramsay, written by Miss Ruby Wilson, who has been the teacher there for the last eight years. Miss Wilson is retiring and the following tribute has been paid to her by the people of the section and the trustees, through the Board secretary: “Under Miss Wilson’s guidance the school has continued to be a real community centre for the people of the section who from time to time have found entertainment there. “Miss Wilson leaves with the goodwill and best wishes of the people of the section, who will miss her leadership in the social as well as the educational life of the community ”

In choosing a topic for this evening’s talk we wished to find one that would be of interest to all of us, old and young. The people of No. 14, Ramsay, have always taken a keen interest in the school, so what could be more interesting than a story of our school. In it are wrapped up the lives of its pupils, who have become, or will become, the men and women. Some are long since moved away to carry on their duties in far places, some have settled in this section here, to play their part in the plan of life. 

Some have won fame and fortune, while others have followed in a more humble way the daily round of common tasks; but over all, the school has shed her influence. Few of us who are grown up can remember our history, geography or grammar lessons, but all unaware we were learning in these lessons some things that were far more lasting, and from our contact with our fellow pupils, and our teachers, were learning how to live with our fellowman. Isn’t that, after all, the great object of education? 

The subjects studied in school are all a means to this end. Let us journey back to 1826. School was then held in a log building on the corner of Rea’s, very close to the road. Early teachers had a house where the lilacs still bloom, in Greig’s field, near where the Greig house stands. The first teachers were mostly superannuated men. There at one time a Mr. Haggard lived for three years. About 1854 Mr. Joseph Rea still kept school in this log building But in 1859 a need was felt for a new building. So the present site was chosen—one quarter acre, commencing on the 8th Concession line, the distance of 21 chains, from the post between lots 9 and 10. This land was purchased from Mr. James Greig for the magnificent sum of $4. A contract was given for a frame building, -the old log school was not moved. 

This new school was opened in I8­60. With what feeling of justifiable pride we opened school in the new building, under the capable guidance of Mr. James Dunlop, at a salary of  $176.50. For that year the credit was $361.35 and debts amounted to $366.31. Many teachers were to follow his footsteps, and each to play some part in building the history of this community. Time permits us but to mention as we pass the names of these and some of the highlights in the history. Mr. Joshua Tennant followed Mr. Dunlop, with a salary of $192 per annum for three years. 

At this time the section boasted 161, old and young, of which the following were the active ones at the first I annual meeting. George Donahoc chairman; John Cannon, secretary; George O’Brien, James Greig, George Drynan, John (McIntyre, David Watson, John Mc Arton and Joseph Rea. It was quite allowable then to have a lengthy meeting, for 11 1-2 cords of wood, cost only $17 in those days.

Sunday School was held at No. 14 with Mr. James Yuill, Superintendent: John Paul, John Cummings and Miss Agnes Paul as teachers. We cannot estimate the good that was done by these Sunday meetings. They had prayer meetings also once every week. What tales the older people could tell of the weekly event, “Singing School.” Old and young in the countryside attended. Mr. Robert Watchorn was the teacher, and later Mr. Donald Robertson. How they must have enjoyed those nights, for it did serve as a fine meeting place for the youth of yesterday. 

Our next teacher in 1864, was John McYule. In 1865-67 Patrick Foley kept the white school in order. During his time $5 was given for prize books. The inspector at this time was Rev. McMoran, minister at the stone church. Mr. Thomas McDermott who was teacher in 1868-69 had his own times with ninety on the roll, in winter. However salaries were some better, $240. Needless to say with such a number on the roll, he earned his money. Helen Me Arton, the present Mrs. Houston, Tyvan, Sask. writes:

“Lessons weren’t much bother and sums weren’t hard either. We had lots of time to play tic, tac, toe. We didn’t like when a map was rolled out, we learned plenty then. But, I tell you we were scared when we saw the inspector coming along.” Mr. George Thompson of Almonte, relates many interesting tales of playing “Fenian Raids” on Shipman’s Pond to the anxiety of teachers and raiders. These ended with the sad result of one boy being “knocked out.” 

Games were often played in an old barn near the school. Here Mr. Jno. McArton, while crimping straws in the cogs of an old fanning machine, took an end off his thumb. In 1870 Mr. Robert Thomson was our master. During his regime new steps were built for the school. Next came Francis Haney and in 1872 Miss Anderson. It was then that the woodshed was built, the lumber was obtained from John McArton and W. Cannon. During these years the late Dr. R. Tait McKenzie’s father was an inspector. By 1874 this had become a popular and much sought after school, for there were 12 applications. Miss Janette Lindsay was  chosen. 

That year money was borrowed at 8 percent interest. Miss Carley stayed four months, followed by Alicia Thomas. It was then we got our first visitor’s book, and general register. The trustees, Peter McRostie, John McArton and Richard Thompson visited the school frequently, as did Mr. Slack, the Inspector. By this time the school boasted a small flagpole, Many times has the good old Union Jack, proudly flying, proclaimed to all that here was a small group of Canada’s loyal sons and daughters, learning to be better citizens of our fair Dominion and Empire. Miss Jane Houston who came in 1877 must have had quite a time with an average of 49. Many of these sat around on sticks of wood. 

On the 23rd of Nov., 1878, the grounds were enlarged 1-4 acre. The land bought from Andrew Greig, was to be fenced by the section. R. Patterson, Almonte, was the lawyer. During Miss Houston’s time, by Inspector’s request, a well was bored by A. Stephenson, for $90. While Miss Kate Snedden was here in 1879, a log fence was put around the school with boards along. the front. At the annual meeting the trustees all voted against Township School Boards. Who says this is now a new idea. The Inspector at this time was Mr. Michell. During Bella Scott’s regime a new ash floor was laid. Next came Annie Baird, who owing to a sprained ankle had her sister Ellen, teach for three months. Miss Barbara Drynan who came

in 1887, left behind a lasting memory During her term she planted the spruce and some of the cedars along the front of the grounds. 

The many scholars who have come here since, have had much reason to be grateful for these beautiful trees, which give us shade in summer and had helped to make our grounds more attractive. Wood was then $2.90 a cord. For the next three years 1890-91- 92, Miss Mary Wilson was our teacher. In this time we got a new gate and front fence and also the numeral frame. Several other names we pass over each with its own associations, many happy, some not so happy. When we remember the minutes of mortification we spent in the corner, or the tingling sensation of the hands after the application of a bit of rubber—wasn’t it the pride that was hurt most? 

Miss Mama Fraser, Miss Moffat, Miss Clara Sadler, Miss Jessie Lindsay. For five years from 1896, Miss Lindsay guided the lives of Greig’s youth. A teacher’s chair, and window screens were important additions. The list of teachers grows, Miss Steele, Miss McKechnie, Miss Ethel Robertson, Hattie Caswell. By this time some of the school’s own pupils had graduated as teachers and Miss Daisy Eea returned in 1905 to guide the footsteps of her younger neighbors, at a salary of $250. In this year a new porch was built on the school by Mr. John Donaldson.

During a short absence of Miss Rea her sister Miss Bessie, supplied. Miss Buckingham, who came to us in 1907, remained only one year. Perhaps she found the barren field too cold, for outside windows were put on. Hats off to Miss Buckingham, we agree the drifts do pile high. In 1908 Miss N. McCrea had 12 on the roll, quite a difference in 40 years. Miss Addie Blackburn followed. 

At the annual meeting in 1910 it was moved by Joseph Chapman, seconded by Wesley Rea, that the school be moved; and made comfortable. The contract for this was awarded to D. McCrea for $275. Miss Daisy Rea returned for another term. School problems must have been easily discussed, for in 1913 the annual meeting closed with Auld Lang Syne. Next came Lila Smith and Gertrude Ormrod. At the meeting in 1914, it was moved by Andrew Yuill and seconded by Joseph Chapman that the trustees have the grounds fenced with wire. This was done by W. C Gilmour.

 No one will deny that this should be plenty of room for scholars to work off their superfluous energy, but just as soon as the fence was up the boys began to feel it would be far more fun playing “tag” or “deer” in Thompson’s bush, or skating on Ford’s pond. So to the present day some brave little soul is elected to go to the teacher and say “Please Miss may we go outside to play.” 

How can a teacher refuse such a plea? People were beginning to fake a greater interest in. No. 14 as this was the first year of any mention, regarding School Fair Prize Money. . 

“Greig’s’ ‘ still continued to send her sons and daughters to the High Schools and under Miss Annie Neilson, many passed. Mr. Froats was then Inspector. Miss C. E. Gardner came to us in 1917 and remained two years, during which time, window screens were procured, a very valuable piece of “furniture” especially in mosquito time.

In June 1918 the school was saddened by the loss of a much loved pupil, Sandy Chapman. Again a former pupil, Miss Marion Chapman, returned to guide 22 little souls along. Just to show how conditions had improved by that time, or how the cost of living had increased, Miss Waddell, who came for two years, received a $1,000 salary. While Miss Gardner was our teacher, under Mr. Spence as Inspector, a hardwood floor was laid, bought from A. F. Campbell, Arnprior, and laid by James Smith. At the same time an organ was bought from Mrs. Camelon. In 1924 Miss Kathleen Graham came to us, staying four years: Hot lunch had its real beginning then, a new coal oil stove with a warming oven being bought. 

Hardwood prices had then reached $8 a cord with soft and cedar at $6, New equipment for school is surely a sign of progress, and if this is so we, of this section’ may rightly claim our share. New desks were installed in 1930 while Miss Elizabeth Martin was our teacher. They are still here in excellent condition. One or two of the lads managed to carve their names on the surface of the old ones, as a lasting reminder that they had a sharp jack knife, and a keen desire never to be forgotten. In the last few years our school has boasted of many improvements, including window’ boxes, free exercise books for all pupils and our wood shed made into a compact building, with a sliding door. 

How glad we were a week ago, when rain came dripping through, that some thoughtful men had roofed at least half of our building with tin. Someone has said “It is false economy not to keep a building in proper repair.” As in a feast we have left the best of our last eight years, to the end. Every Wednesday morning Mr. Hector Dallimore very ably takes the class to pleasant “Songland.”

 How delighted the pupils are, as you may judge from their earnest efforts this evening. In an account of this sort it is inevitable that much of interest must be omitted and perhaps some important events unrecorded. We beg of you all to forgive these omissions and mistakes, and we would be grateful for any additions from anyone for future references. We hope you have enjoyed these memories which this brief history has brought back. From messages we have received from early teachers we quote— “I shall never forget my pleasant days at Greig’s. Everyone was so willing and kind.” and again from Miss Rea, “After 25 years’ teaching in Ottawa. I have only happy, grateful memories of my old Ramsay home, I and of the old neighbors, among whom I lived and worked so long. “It is the spirit of co-operation and kindliness which has done so much to make this school the success it . is. Let us keep alive our love of this school, and be true to her message This is the word that year by year, While in her place the school is set Everyone of her sons must hear, And none that hears it dares forget This they all with a joyful mind, Bear through life life a torch in flame. And falling, fling to the host behind Play up! Play up! and play the game. 

This is a list of teachers— 1860—James Dunlop, $176.50. 1861-63—Joshua Tennant, $192. 1864—John Yule. 1865-67—Patrick Folev. ‘ 1368-69—’Thomas McDermott, $240. 1870—Richard Thomson. 1871—Francis Haney. 1372-73—Miss Anderson. 1.374—Miss Janethe Lindsay. 1875-76—Miss Carley and Miss Alicia Thomas. 1877-79—Miss Jane Houston. 1380-82—Kate Snedden. 1883—Bella Scott. 1884-86—Annie Baird.

1887-89—Barbara Drynan. 1890-92—Mary Wilson. 1893—Martha Fraser. 1894—Kate Moffat. ‘895—Clara Sadler. 1896-1900—Jessie Lindsay. 1901-02—Edith McKechnie. 1903-04—Hattie. Caswell. 1905-07—Daisy Rea and Bessie Rea. 1907—Mildred Buckingham. 1908—Nora McCrea. 1909—10—Addie Blackburn. 1911-13—Daisy Rea. 1913-14—Lila Smith and Gertrude Ormrod. 1915-Gertrude Metcalfe and Mabel Smith. 1916-17—A. E. Neilson. 1917-20—C. E. Gardner. 1920-Marion Chapman. 1921-22—Bella Waddell, $1,000. 1922-24—C. E. Gardner. 1924-28—Kathleen Graham. 1928-30—Elizabeth Martin. 1930-38—Ruby Wilson. 

The following are the secretaries: 1860-73—John Cannon. 1874—Joseph Rea. 1874-86—Peter McRostie. 1.887-94—John Watson. 1395-08—John Rea. 1903-16—Jacob Matthews. 1917-20—Robt. Tosh. 1921-38—Alton Matthews.

 RAMSAY S.S. 11 Senior Room— i To Grade V III—Kenneth iFee, Muriel Fee H, Mack James H, Henry Collie. To Grade V II—Agnes Cavers, Arthur Dowdall, Lome Neilson H, Leo O’Brien, Pat O ’Brien H, Leonard Spinks, Nelson Syme. —Anna. M. Turner, Principal. Junior Room— -, To Grade VI—John Edwards, [Helen Fee K, Joyce Gladish, Carman ifames, Jean Kellough H. Doris Lowe,, Shirley Lowe, Keith Salisbury. I To Grade V—Maisie Edwards, May James H. To Grade III—Florence Kelloqgh H, Murray Webber. To Gradel II—Fred Edwards, Melville Fee, Margaret Hodgkinson, Elsie Lowe. —Iva M. Crawford, Teacher. 

S. S. NO. 3 FITZROY Grade IX-Grade X —John Coady, John Hugh Lunney, Grade VII-Grade V III—Rita Coady. Grade VI-Grade VII—Mary Brown, Tommy ‘Lunney, Grant Greene, Cyril Greene. Grade V-Grade VI—Agnes Stewart, Monica Coady, Reuben Brown. Ina Stewart. Grade IV-Grade V—Donald Stewart, Edward Lunney, Ethel Stewart. Grade III-Grade IV— Maryalice Colton, Bernice Coady. Grade II-Grade III—Mary Lunney. Grade I-Grade II — Kenneth Greene, Betty Stewart, Olive Greene. Primer-Grade I—Willie Stewart* Jr. Primer-Sr. Primer— Edna Young, Jack Lalonde. Number on roll—23. Average attendance—22.2. —A. E. Moreton, Teacher.

S.S. No. 14 Ramsay – Greig’s School

In 1826, a long builting was found on Rea’s lot. Early teachers, Mr. Huggart and Joseph Rea, lived in a house in Greig’s field. James Greig sold one quarter acre on the eighth line, Lot 10, Concession 7, Ramsay for $4.00 and  a frame building was put up. Andrew Greig sold another quarter acre of land in 1878 to enlarge the school grounds. Mrs. Pearl McCann created history when she became the first married female teacher in 1942. When S.S. No. 5 only had 5 pupils, the Board decided to amalgamate the two schools from 1945-1947. In 1963, the school was destroyed by fire and students had to temporarily attend S.S. No. 2 Ramsay. On June 30, 1960, many former students and teachers celebrated the 100th anniversary of the school. In 1970, pupils from S.S. No. 14 moved to Naismith Memorial in Almonte and the school property was sold to Edgar Finlayson for $4,500.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Jul 1938, Sat  •  Page 23

Related Reading

The Grieg School– The Fire and Mrs. Pearl McCann

Greig Family — Carleton Place and Ramsay Lanark County

An Article About the Lanark Schools — Mr. Joseph Tennant

http://www.northlanarkregionalmuseum.com/NLRM_Oral_Histories.html

Rhyme of the Little Red School House- The Buchanan Scrapbook

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Beckwith Schools 1905

Tidbits About Ramsay S.S. #9 The Tannery School

Norman Paul Talks About the Little Red School House- The Buchanan Scrapbook

Ramsay W.I. Tweedsmuir History Book 1—SOME EARLY RAMSAY HISTORY

Carleton Place High School Photo 1954-1955 Name those Students- Larry Clark

Beckwith Schools 1905

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Beckwith Schools 1905

A little log school house traditionally has been the first school of many prominent persons in the professions, agriculture and business.  Like others of the province and nation, Lanark county’s humble early schools, despite their disadvantages, and aided by the family backgrounds of their students and teachers, filled this role well.  For a typical early list of eastern Ontario rural and village teachers, Beckwith township’s teachers of 1855 may be taken.  In order of school sections they were:

1U (Gillies) Alex McKay; 2 (Franktown) John Sinclair; 3 (Coocoo’s Nest) Wm. Kidd; 4 (Prospect) Donald McDiarmid; 5U (Tennyson) Donald Cameron; 5 (7th Line E.) Alex Armstrong; 6 (The Derry) Duncan McDiarmid; 7 (9th Line W.) Elizabeth James; 8 (9th Line E.) Elizabeth Murdock; 9 (11th Line E.) Fleming May; 10 (Scotch Corners) Helen Johnston; 11 (Carleton Place) Margaret Bell; 12U (with S.S.11 Goulbourn) Wm. McEwen.

A glimpse of rural schools of about fifty years ago may be gained in extracts from Lanark school inspector F. L. Michell’s reports of 1905 on Beckwith township schools:

“No 2 (Franktown) – The school suffers greatly from that evil so prevalent in our schools, irregularity of attendance.  School work is well done in the junior grades but unsatisfactory in senior grades.  The grounds are rough and not fenced along the road.

No. 3 (Cuckoo’s Nest) – The school house is small and worn out.  Doing excellent work under disadvantages.

No. 4 (Prospect) – An excellent school property.  Attendance is very large.  The old useless well should be filled in.

No. 5 (7th Line East) – Always kept in first class condition.  The school work is excellent.  The attendance is small, but few schools in the county have to their credit a larger number of graduates who have taken prominent positions in our land.

No. 5U (7th Line West) – This is also one of our banner schools.

No. 6 (The Derry) – This is also an excellent section, and like No. 5 it has sent out numerous young people to lives of usefulness.  Attendance is very small.  The school work is excellent.

No. 7 (9th Line West) – A good site and in fine condition.  The school work was not up to average.

No. 8 (9th Line East) – An excellent new school house, and work well done.

No. 9 (11th Line East) – One of the richest sections of the county.  There is no library.  The school ranks excellent.

No. 14 (11th Line West) – Some small repairs are needed.  The school work is generally good.”

School sections in Beckwith township which had their first teachers in the 1820’s about the same time as Carleton Place were those of the Derry and Franktown. Read –Beckwith One Room Schools– Leona Kidd

Beckwith One Room Schools– Leona Kidd

Beckwith Public School-Alternative School– Graduates 1995

Outhouses Need to Be Cleaned– Conditions of Our Rural School– 1897

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

Ladies & Gentlemen- Your School Teachers of Lanark County 1898

“Teachester” Munro and the S.S. No. 9 Beckwith 11th Line East School

Did You Know? Union School #9 and Goulburn #16

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Did You Know? Union School #9 and Goulburn #16

With Files from Country Tales by Stittsville Women’s Institute- thanks to Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

Before 1860 a number of families had settled on farms where Beckwith and Ramsay Townships in Lanark County meet Goulburn and Huntley Townships in Carleton County.

Because of all the swamps and other conditions it became a close knit community. At a central on Lot 3 of Concession 12 in Goulburn on a map of 1863 was a schoolhouse- Union School No. 9 Huntley and No. 16 Goulburn. The children came here from all four townships and one of the former Union School’s pupil whose name was Cecil Scarfe said their family had one of the longest walks of anyone going to that school. It was a frame building and 30- to 35 names on the roll. Some of the other names were: Kelly from Huntley and McArton from Ransay and from Beckwith was Aiken and Fumerton. When Christena Aiken taught in her home school in 1920 she barely had 10 pupils. They replace the log building with the frame school in 1898.

Things changes as the years progressed the children decreased with declining population. In June 1938 they closed the school and children were driven to S.S. 9 the stone school at Dwyer Hill on the corner of Highway 15 and the School Fair Banner for Union School #9 was rolled up and put away for the last time.

Tidbits About Ramsay S.S. #9 The Tannery School

Norman Paul Talks About the Little Red School House- The Buchanan Scrapbook

Ramsay W.I. Tweedsmuir History Book 1—SOME EARLY RAMSAY HISTORY

The Thing about Schools in Carleton Place

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The Thing about Schools in Carleton Place

Among public school inspectors in Lanark County a record of long service was made by F. S. Michell who continued in that capacity from 1880 to 1921.  Near the beginning of his forty years of duty he reported his views and findings on teachers’ prevailing salaries:

“The headmasters of the Public Schools in Carleton Place and Pakenham received the highest salaries paid teachers in this County – $550.  Male teachers salaries of 1884 ranged from $300 to $550, averaging $337.50.  Female teachers received from $150 to $350, the average for 1884 being $193.  Even the princely sum of $550 is but poor inducement for a man to undertake the ordeal of preparation in High, Model and Normal Schools and the harass and responsibility of a large graded school.  While the false economy of cheap teachers is the rule, the work must remain largely in the hands of students and school girls who intend to teach until something better presents itself.”

Twenty-five years later Carleton Place appointed a new public school principal to teach the senior class and supervise the operation of two schools and the work of thirteen other teachers.  The opening salary was $800.  Teachers were: Misses McCallum, Shaw, Burke, Anderson, O’Donnell, Caswell, Sturgeon, Sinclair, McLaren, Fife, Flegg, Morris, Cornell, and Mr. R. J. Robertson, principal.

Public school teachers of 1917 as listed by R. J. Robertson, principal, were Misses V. Leach, H. Cram, Laura Anderson, A. L. Anderson, I. H. Caswell, M. E. Sturgeon, Lizzie McLaren, Kate McNab, S. P. May, M. I. Mullett, C. Mallinson, M. M. McCallum and Mary Cornell. 

An item of juvenile training of this period was the Carleton Place curfew bylaw passed to protect youth or public order from the post-war perils of 1919.  It provided for ringing of a curfew bell at 9 p.m. standard time.  After this hour children under 16 years unless accompanied by a parent or guardian were required by law to remain indoors.

An earlier list of Carleton Place public school teachers available is that of 1890 :  Misses Munro, Nellie Garland, Shaw, Cram, Flegg, Garland, Smitherman, Lowe, Suter, Ferguson, McCallum, Mr. Neil McDonald (who transferred to the high school in 1890), and T. B. Caswell, principal.  Public school principal preceding Mr. Caswell was John A. Goth.  The local school board in 1890 comprised of Robert Bell, chairman; board members, McDonald, Struthers, Taylor, Donald, Begley, Kelly, Wylie, Breckenridge and, until his death in 1890, David Findlay, Sr.  In the same period J. R. Johnston, M.A. (Queens) was high school principal, with D. E. Sheppard, barrister, as assistant.

This is the last grade 13 graduation from the old  Carleton Placer High School 1918
Photo Thelma Dowdall

The story of high schools in Carleton Place is a lengthy one with many interesting sidelights.

The corner stone of the present High School (Prince of Wales High School) was laid in 1923 and under it was placed a scroll containing the following information:

The High School has made many moves since it was started about 75 years ago (about 1848) as a Grammar School. . Mr. Nelson, a highly educated gentleman, was the first teacher.  The first building used was a frame one on the Central School grounds.

The Most Photographed Home in Carleton Place Hurd’s Hall

From there it was moved to Hurd’s Hall on Bell Street, being the upper flat of the building for many years known as McKay’s Bakery.  After that the present Holiness Church on the corner of Bridge and Herriott Streets, was used for a short time.  Then the north-east room in the present Central School was used.

Newman’s Hall Bridge Street

From here it was moved to Newman’s Hall, in the rooms now occupied as temporary quarters for a High and a Public School class.  This school went back again to the Central School building for a short time, until the present used building on High Street was ready for occupation in 1882.

Note: Newman’s Hall is the building now occupied by the Brewers’ Retail Store and the school on High Street is the present Prince of Wales School.

For nearly 30 years the people of Carleton Place were considering the question of better school accommodation, but owing to the exigencies of the times, such as loss of population, removal of industries and expenditures on other public undertakings, small progress was made.

However, with the rapid growth of the rising generation during the past few years, we have become convinced that more school accommodation should be provided.

Early in 1922 it was decided to build a High School.  Messrs. Richards & Abra of Ottawa were selected as architects, a plan was adopted, the estimated cost being placed at $100,000.  A building committee was appointed composed of J. M. Brown, chairman, A. E. Cram, Alfred McNeely and W. J. Muirhead.

On the 12th of June, 1922, the Council submitted the question to the electorate who pronounced in favor of granting the aforesaid sum by a vote of 412 for to 79 against.

The scroll concluded with a list of the contractors.

On January 3, 1924, the present High School was opened at an impressive ceremony.

The history files recount some of the turbulence that accompanied building of schools, including a riot which once decided the place for the town hall.  read-The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place and Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory of the Coming of the Prince of Wales School

Howard M. Brown, who has written countless articles on the early history of the town, records that in the 1870’s came municipal incorporation, the building of a town hall on Edmund Street (now Victoria School) and finally the provision of a High School on High Street. read-Back to School at the Victoria School in Carleton Place 1919

The school was built in 1877 by the Board of Education.  The succeeding administration, supporting objections to its location refused to accept the school and in 1879 began converting the town hall into classrooms.  After public and private litigation and a long and bitter municipal feud the High School was occupied as such.

The town hall settled into service as a combination Public School and village lock-up.

Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory of the Coming of the Prince of Wales School

The Riot on Edmund Street –Schools in Carleton Place

The Donneybrooks of Carleton Place-Number 3

Comments About a Picture–Prince of Wales School

And the Walls Came Tumbling Down-Prince of Wales School High Street

Just Beat It! Carnival Riot in Carleton Place at Riverside Park

And the Walls Came Tumbling Down-Prince of Wales School High Street

Before and After in Carleton Place — Be True to your School

What Will 50 Cents Get You at the Prince of Wales School?

Pakenham School Rules 1841

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Pakenham School Rules 1841

Pakenham School

A public meeting was held at Pakenham Village on June 16 in reference to the school of that village.  Mr. Andrew Russell presented regulations including the following to the consideration of the trustees, subscribers and others.

Hours of attendance from 10 to 4 with an interval of 15 minutes; and 5 minutes in the course of the former and 5 in the latter meeting.

The exercises of Saturday to consit of a repetition of the weekly lessons, with questions on the first principles of Christianity.

The school fund to be a pound per annum, with half a cord of wood or two and sixpence, the former payable in February and the latter on or before the 1st of December.

For purchasing maps and other classics apparatus, each subscriber shall advance an additional sixpence.

Pakenham, June, 1841.

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Jul 1853, Sat  •  Page 3
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Sep 1853, Sat  •  Page 2
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Oct 1853, Sat  •  Page 3

CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Sep 1854, Sat  •  Page 3

Pakenham:
Was a postal station from 1832. It is located on the Mississippi River. It was known as Dickson’s Mills then Pakenham Mills. In 1842 the village’s population was 250 persons. It contained 3 churches – Episcopal, Presbyterian and Methodist, post office, grist mill, saw mill, carding machine & cloth factory, four stores, a tannery, two taverns and some shops

Which Pakenham School Was this?

A Pakenham School Story from Ingram Scott

Class Photos from Cedar Hill School