Tag Archives: school

Clayton Schoolhouses had No Insulation— Warm Memories

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Clayton Schoolhouses had No Insulation— Warm Memories

Clayton Ontario History

A report card from Clayton School from 1912. Thanks to Allan Bellamy for sharing

In the fall of 1927, he arrived at the one-room schoolhouse as a 20-year-old fresh out of teachers’ college. He had no experience and 42 students spread out over Grades 1 to 8 to teach. “Sometimes I have no idea how I got through it,” Lloyd Sutherland, now 91, of Toronto said yesterday while attending the S.S. 4 Ramsay reunion in the Clayton Community Centre. “It was a lot of work, but I got through it.” By the next year, Mr. Sutherland had moved to a better-paying job in Pakenham in these early days of his 44-year career in education across the province, with a gap of four years when he served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War.

And even though he spent only one year at the school, Mr. Sutherland says the lessons he learned in the village of Clayton, about 60 kilometres west of . Ottawa on the Indian River, were among the most valuable in his career. “You had to be a master at problem-solving, and you had to be good with , your time,” he said. “There were all those kids and just me. It was some of the hardest work I ever did, but some of the most rewarding, too.”

Clayton Ontario History
April 19 ·
Effie Dunlop and Lloyd Sutherland 1925. Thanks to Fran Cooper for this photo.

Mr. Sutherland was one of about 100 former students, teachers and administrators who attended the reunion at the village community centre. They couldn’t hold it in the schoolhouse because it’s now a private residence. The village of Clayton is a collection of houses, cottages and businesses clustered around the eastern end of Clayton-Taylor Lake. It is rich in Canadian cultural and social history. Much of that history could be found in the two, one-room schoolhouses that made indelible marks on the memories of teachers and young Clayton residents who passed through their doors in more than a century of learning.

The first schoolhouse was built in1849 and a second, slightly larger one was erected in 1876 to cope with a deluge of new students. Now, 29 years after the village closed its last one-room school in 1969, former teachers and students remembered minute details as if only days had passed since their time at each of the two tiny schools. “In the winter, you always hoped you got a seat close to the stove because the further you got away from it, the colder it got and the building wasn’t insulated,” said Rose Mary Sarsfield, who attended one of the schools from 1952 to 1956 before graduating to the high school in Almonte.

Clayton School 1913-1914. Teacher Lottie Blair. If you enlarge, the names are there.–Clayton Ontario History

Many of the memories were sparked by a table with old notebooks, textbooks, a small chalkboard and newspaper clippings about the school. There were also a couple of report cards from 1933. One had straight As, the other was not so good. But what drew the eye were several pictures of children sitting cross-legged in front of a schoolhouse. One, from 1898, was particularly interesting.

Some former Clayton School teachers: Lloyd Sutherland, Sadie Gardiner, Doris Camelon, Evelyn Kettles, Emily Moulton, Dana Featherstone-Clayton Ontario History

Although the children were dressed differently some without shoes, some in waistcoats they looked like any group of schoolchildren today. One rapscallion, all but his head hidden in the back row of students, was even sticking out his tongue at the camera. The pictures spoke of a different time that ended in 1969, when rural one-room schools were closed across the province to make way for a new vision of education housed in larger schools in the larger centres of Ontario communities.

In Ramsay Township, 10 small schools were closed and many students including those from Clayton were bused to nearby Almonte to 1 pursue their education in single grades. It was an unceremonious end to a school that was once the pride of the village. Before the first schoolhouse was built, reading, writing and arithmetic were taught out of private homes. Clayton trustees borrowed $450 a overcrowded ‘ at hefty sum in 1849 to build their village’s first school, a debt that had to be paid back within three years. Soon, the one-room was overcrowded with students.

In 1876, a slightly larger school that measured 28 feet by 38 feet (eight metres by 11 metres) was built beside the original. “It had a cloakroom across the back where we could hang our coats,” remembered Ms. Sarsfield. “And bathrooms. There were two bathrooms at the back, one for girls and one for boys. “There was no running water.” At the smaller school, bathroom breaks were even less high-tech. One side of a bush was an outhouse for girls and the other side was for boys.

The next addition to Clayton’s school system was the hallmark of any rural school from that time period: a bell. In 1886, students, teachers and parents hosted concerts at which they charged 10 cents until they raised enough money to buy a bell. The final cost of the bell is unknown, but it hung at the larger school until closing. The bell now hangs at the front of the Dr. James Naismith School in Almonte, about 10 kilometres east of Clayton. During Clayton’s heydays in the late 1880s, there were some 140 pupils shared almost evenly between the two schoolhouses. The smaller building housed the primary grades and the larger one, the senior grades.

Clayton School 1949–Clayton Ontario History
Front row: Gary Hudson, Clarence Drynan, Louie Ladouceur, Howard Wark, Keith Drynan, Bruce Anderson, Leslie Ladouceur, John Bellamy
2nd row: Dawna Mather, Marion Drynan, Esther Wark, Margaret Godwin, Elizabeth Ladouceur, Anita Murray, Elizabeth Drynan, Isobel Wark
Back row: Russell Wark, Harold Barr, Norma Mather, Anne Rath, Dorothy Craig Reid (Teacher), Shirley Hudson, Alice Murray, Ray Rath
Thanks to Allan Bellamy for the photo and Fran Rathwell for having a copy with the names as confirmed by Dorothy Reid.

Teachers came and went. Their stints generally lasted two or three years. Margaret Bellamy, a longtime resident in the community, figures probably 100 teachers taught in the Clayton schools. “In the start, it was mostly men, but then mostly women by the end,” Mrs. Bellamy said. By the early 1900s, the village population couldn’t sustain a school for primary grades and a second school for senior grades. Down from historic highs, only 60 students attended classes between the two schools. In 1907, the smaller schoolhouse was taken down meticulously piece by piece and moved to Almonte, where it was rebuilt.

Heading into the 1960s, the wave of consolidation began to sweep through the Ottawa Valley as students began moving to larger schools in the region. By 1969 there were perhaps 30 students at Clayton’s remaining school. “Bigger was better, they thought. Truck them all to town and then they’ll all be in single grades. It was a sign of the times, I guess,” *Mrs. Sarsfield said. But for many at the reunion, bigger isn’t better when they reflect on the time they spent at the school. “A lot of people started their education in schools like S.S. 4 Ramsay,” Mr. Sutherland said. “And because they were small, people learned differently. The older students helped teach the younger ones. It gave people more of a sense of community you don’t get in larger schools. “I liked teaching in schools like that, but they’re gone now. Oh well, we’ll just have to remember.” The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

Clayton schoolhouses had no insulation, but students’ recollections are warm arid fuzzy. Jake Rupert and Dawn Walton report.–CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada21 Jun 1998, Sun  •  Page 15

*Rose Mary Sarfield

Rose Mary Sarsfield
 There are still a few copies of my book available for those who haven’t gotten a copy yet, or as a Christmas gift to someone with ties to Clayton. They are available at the Clayton Store, the Mill Street Books or from me. rose@sarsfield.ca

Another House/School that Moved and Move

Norman Paul Talks About the Little Red School House- The Buchanan Scrapbook

So Which One Room School House Became a Pig Barn?

Suspended Teacher —Appleton School 1931 — Miss Annie Neilson

Ladies & Gentlemen- Your School Teachers of Lanark County 1898

School Salaries of 1918

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

S.S. No. 2 Ramsay – Wright’s School — Clippings

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S.S. No. 2 Ramsay – Wright’s School — Clippings
S.S. No. 2 Ramsay – Wright’s School
935 Old Perth Road, Mississippi Mills

“Yearning for Learning” says the first school opened in 1837. In 1867, Jessie Paul was the teacher, earning a salary of $120 per year. There are few records about this school as it burned to the ground. This schoolhouse, owned by Shannon Moore, was built in 1909. It closed in 1962 and remaining student went to Union Hall – S.S. No.3. It reopened in 1963 when students of S.S. No. 14 Ramsay came when their school burned down.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
31 Mar 1909, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Mar 1909, Wed  •  Page 5

What angered the people of Union Hall particularly was the decision of the Board to transport their pupils to Number 2 School known as Wright’s on the second line a few miles in the direction of Highway 15.  Irate ratepayers around Union Hall declare that they have 11 pupils ready to attend their school while the one to which it is proposed to transport the pupils has only six. They insist it is a case of the tail trying to wag the dog.

While the Township School Area Board has made no statement for publication it is understood that the object it had in mind was to save money through eliminating one teacher and other maintenance expenses connected with a school. Two indignation meetings have already been held in the Union Hall in connection with the matter. At the frist one nearly all ratepayers were present although Mr. Dave McIntosh, one of the trustees who lives in that section, did not attend feeling, it is believed, that people would be freer to discuss the situation if he was not there.

It was decided to appoint a delegation to meet the  Board and state the case for the ratepayers around Union Hall. But when a second meeting was called for the night of Civic Holiday, the Board signified its readiness to attend so no deputation was necessary.  Mr. J. W. Barber of Perth, Public School Inspector for Lanark was asked to be present but he said that in as much as the meeting was to be held on civic holiday he had made other plans. Mr. Bert Miller, Chairman of the Board, who lives near Wright’s School, a fact which the Union Hallers did not fail to note, and his colleagues on the Board, were asked a great many questions and there was much discussion back and forth.

According to people who were present at the meeting, the Board played its cards close to the chest and did not give away its hand by stating what it intends to do. Some think it may rescind its motion to close Number 3 School while others are of the opinion it will persist in its present intention.

Doris Quinn
March 7 at 6:41 PM  · 


Stu Thompson

I was one of the SS#14 students relocated to SS#2 for the final few months of the 1962/63 school year, before heading to ADHS in the fall of 1963.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jan 1901, Mon  •  Page 9
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Feb 1963, Tue  •  Page 5

S.S. No. 2 Ramsay-Wright’s School935 Old Perth Rd., Mississippi Mills1962Reopened in 1963-students from S.S. No. 14 came after fire1969-finalUnion Hall S.S. No. 3
Naismith Memorial Public School

R Tait Mackenzie Public School

So Which One Room School House Became a Pig Barn?

An Article About the Lanark Schools — Mr. Joseph Tennant

The Jasper School House Fire 1980

  1. The Grieg School– The Fire and Mrs. Pearl McCann
  2. Scotch Corners Union S.S. #10 School Fire
  3. Fire Drills, Loud Bells and a Whole Lot of Noise — Learning How Not to Burn in School
  4. Did the Germans Start the Fire at the Portland School in 1915?
  5. S.S. 18 Knowles School — Nearby to McIllquham’s Bridge
  6. Be True to Your School–SS #15 Drummond
  7. Middleville School Photos- Laurie Yuill
  8. The Home Permit– School Records
  9. Suspended Teacher —Appleton School 1931 — Miss Annie NeilsonLadies & Gentlemen- Your School Teachers of Lanark County 1898School Salaries of 1918The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

Looking for a Bathurst School House– Can you Help?

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Hi Linda

I was curious if you had any information on a small school that used to be on the Bathurst line west ( what it’s called now but maybe concession 11?) It’s built on part lot 1 Dalhousie township on the western side of said lot and the foundation is still present. We have owned the property for a number of years and have found little info. Sorry that should read part lot 9. Owner of the lot in 1879 was a B. Avery. Owner of the east side of lot 9 was a Cameron. Thanks.

Doyou have any information? Please email me sav_77@yahoo and I will forward it to Dan Hunton. Thank you!


Lanark

1968
Maple Grove Public School (after 1969)
Bathurst S.S. #1 and #15
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1967
Glen Tay Public School
 
Bathurst S.S. #3,4,12,13,15
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1967
Glen Tay Public School
 
Bathurst S.S. #5
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1966
Glen Tay Public School (after 1967)
 
Bathurst S.S. #5,6,7,8,9,10,11
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1967
Glen Tay Public School
 
Bathurst S.S. #7
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1943
Glen Tay Public School (after 1967)
Bathurst S.S. #8
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1944
Glen Tay Public School (after 1967)
S.S. No. 5-10 Bathurst
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1944
Glen Tay Public School (after 1967)
S.S. #11 Bathurst (MacVeigh’s)
MacVeigh Rd., Perth
1967
Glen Tay Public School
S.S. #12 Bathurst
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1967
Glen Tay Public School
S.S. #7 and #18 North Burgess and Bathurst (Centre Scotch Line)
Upper Scotch Line Rd., Perth
1966
Glen Tay Public School (after 1967)
SS#1 – North Burgess & SS#2 Bathurst (same book)
513 Upper Scotch Line Rd., Perth
Tay Valley twp.
1968
Glen Tay Public School
 
S.S. #11 and #14 Drummond (Bathurst)
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1968

Schools on the Bathurst Line

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
06 Nov 1918, Wed  •  Page 5
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
10 Jan 1917, Wed  •  Page 5

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
06 Dec 1911, Wed  •  Page 1

The Real Last Duel– Over a Dog? Bathurst Courier

Drummond, Lanark, Darling, Dalhousie, Bathurst and North and South Sherbrooke –Be Ready to March — 1838

Hoods School SS #2 Dalhousie

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Hoods School SS #2 Dalhousie


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
12 Jul 1905, Wed  •  Page 1
*Hood’s School Photo-–Mary Beth Wylie-Anyway, you posted some information about Hoods School ( by the way this school was just outside of Watson’s Corners at the corner of Sugar Bush Way and concession 3 – across from St James Church.) This school was attended by my mother and her siblings as well as her father and his siblings. The Paul family ( my mother’s family) still lives on Sugar Bush Way.

I thought you might like these pictures. One is of the school ( undated) the other self explanatory.

Thanks for letting me share.

Mary Beth Wylie

(daughter of Eileen Paul, granddaughter of Ray and Minnie Pretty Paul and so on… )

Hood’s School Photo-–Mary Beth Wylie

Jp Boucher

Our grandmother kathaleen horne was a school teacher there my mom also went too school there Betty horne meeks

John R. Coupland

My wife Deretta McIntosh, went to this school from 1945 to 1953.

H.l. Crosbie

I remember that place very well and also Bill Hornes place behind the school.

Stephanie Park

My dad owned this place in the70’s and early 80’s, I love this picture!

Karen Hicks

Keitha taught at the Watson’s Corner School

She may have taught at Hood’s as well.

MB Wylie
October 30, 2021  · 
Attendance at Hoods School March 1905
Hi Linda I have been loaned boxes of pictures my grandmother and Aunt Marion had saved. Some awesome old pix.


Thought you would like to share this one of Hoods School, Dalhousie, Lanark County 1930


Mary Beth

Maple Grove Alumni – Lanark, Ontario
October 22, 2016  · 
Maple Grove School opened it’s doors in February, 1970.

It’s opening was the fulfillment of many negotiations on the part of local school boards. The following schools were amalgamated to form Maple Grove School: Clyde Forks, Dunlop’s, Elphin, Hood’s. Hopetown, Lanark, McDonald’s Corners, Middleville, Poland, Thurlow, and Watson’s Corners.

Debbie-Angie Crosbie

Herons Mills and Bullochs were closed and we were all sent to Middleville I guess that is why we were not included.

MB Wylie
22h  · 

You know I can’t resist these old pictures. From mom’s collection April 29 1932- SS # 2 Dalhousie (Hoods). Uncle Elmer Paul, Aunt Verna Paul and mom Eileen Paul front and centre with the white shirt on. Sorry I can’t identify the others.

Clydesdale’s Heritage
June 28, 2020  · 

This card of 1923 shows Queen Christina McMillan of Kirkfieldbank School. She was crowned by Mrs D. Adams and the Cornet that year was William Shaw. What is very unusual is the fact that this photograph was done by Emilie Hood of 88 High Street, Lanark. She came to the town in 1917 and stayed till 1930. She rented a studio from Archibald Rogers. Paul Archibald in his book on Lanark Photographers relates a story that she left Lanark as she was jilted by a local man on the day of her wedding. However this story is not verified.

relatedreading

Did you Ever Hear About Hoods Corners?

The Tragic Life of Mary Paul–Hood’s Settlement- Mary Beth Wylie

The Church On the Hill in the Middle of Hood

In Praise of School Bus Drivers – Stuart McIntosh

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In Praise of School Bus Drivers – Stuart McIntosh
Stuart McIntosh -Photo

In praise of school bus drivers: for navigating through conditions of ice, rain, snow and sleet down narrow backroads and high volume highways. For delivering precious cargo from before daylight on cold winter mornings to the beginning of those hot late June afternoons especially when heaters and air conditioners are window operated.

For driving while dealing with all the internal and external complications of a trip. For doing your safety checks, log books, minor repairs, cleaning and forever dealing with mechanical and communication issues. More importantly for being there as that reliable person during such difficult times.

Thanks Stuart

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Sep 1910, Wed  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
21 Dec 1910, Wed  •  Page 1

Related reading

Remembering Basil O’Keefe — Bus driver Extraordinaire

In Memory of Silver Cross Mothers — thanks to Stuart McIntosh

Handwritten Clippings from Stuart McIntosh — When Cutting Corn was $3.00 and Tobacco was 20 Cents

Teamsters Horses and Accidents- Stuart McIntosh

Cheesemakers of Lanark County — Eastern Dairy School- Stuart McIntosh

Then and Now Bowland Road-Community Memories of the McIntosh’s–Stuart McIntosh

Community Memories of the Lorimer’s–Stuart McIntosh

Documenting Ed Pelletier -Photos- Stuart McIntosh

What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh

McIntosh Clan 100 Strong Holds Picnic at Family Homestead 1953

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Books Which Has Been Lost—-Emma Scott Nasmith

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Books Which Has Been Lost—-Emma Scott Nasmith
Published in 1927– photo from Stuart McIntoshCanada’s Early Women Writers

Emma Scott (1880-1940) was the daughter of Methodist minister Reverend James Scott and spent her childhood in Owen Sound, Ontario. She studied art in Toronto before moving to Colorado to teach painting, where she met William Raff. They married, and Emma gave birth to a daughter, Dorothy Raff, shortly before William’s sudden death. 

Scott returned to Toronto and continued her studies at the Conservatory of Music. From there, she took post-graduate work at the Curry School of Expression in Boston and at the Gower St. Academy in London. Eventually she returned to Toronto, where she worked at the Conservatory of Music and also at Victoria College, teaching courses in expression.

In 1901, she opened her own School of Expression at the corner of Bloor and Yonge streets in Toronto, and established herself as Principal of Elocution, Oratory, Physical Culture, and Dramatic Art. One of her first pupils was Margaret Eaton, wife of Timothy Eaton, founder of the Eaton Company. The Eaton family acted as benefactors of the school, and eventually it was renamed The Margaret Eaton School of Literature and Expression. Scott continued as principal of the school until 1925.

Her public performances of classic literature and her enthusiastic advocacy for drama and music made her a prominent figure in the cultural world of Toronto in the early 1900’s. As founder of The Margaret Eaton School, she provided a valuable education to women at a time when women’s educational options were very limited.

The last page is a small sample of the literature which has been lost — Stuart McIntosh
Folder 076 — Photographs — Margaret Eaton School Toronto 1901-1942 — Emma Scott Raff Nasmith papers

Related reading

The Eaton’s Sewing Girls

Found in a Garage– Ron Bos — Annie Sophia Shields McLaughlin

Who Was Miss Jessie Alexander ? Poetry Slams of the 1800s

First Woman School Trustee — Mrs. W . A. Gilmour — Hazelwood School

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First Woman School Trustee — Mrs. W . A. Gilmour — Hazelwood School

from the Almonte Gazette…Ramsay # 5 1959-1960 school year

January 1920

The township of Ramsay’s first lady school trustee is Mrs. W . A. Gilmour. At the annual meeting of School Section No. 5, Ramsay, held on Wednesday, Mrs. Gilmour was elected to fill the position for the next three years.

Mrs. Gilmour has a high reputation as an educationist, and there is much satisfaction that she should be tendered this appointment and that she should accept it. She is a daughter of the late Robert Yuill at Ramsay, and was married to Mr. William A. Gilmour, one of the most prominent agriculturists in Ramsay. Both Yuills and Giimours were amongst the first settlers from Scotland in this part of the area.

S.S. No. 5 Ramsay – Galbraith School

Daniel Galbraith purchased land on the West half of Lot 11, Concession 5 in Ramsay township in 1855. He sold half an acre to the trustees in 1870 for $1.00. The first teacher was Nell Forest. Ratepayers became enraged when the Ramsay Township School Boarded voted to close the school, so in 1958, S.S. No. 5 became a separate school section. Ratepayers donated two cords of wood per family. A new piano was purchased and a music teacher was hired. In 1969, the rural pupils were bussed to Almonte or Carleton Place. .

Photo- Jennifer E Ferris-The Forgotten Galbraith School House

S.S. No. 5 Ramsay – Galbraith School—Daniel Galbraith purchased land on the West half of Lot 11, Concession 5 in Ramsay township in 1855. He sold half an acre to the trustees in 1870 for $1.00. The first teacher was Nell Forest. Ratepayers became enraged when the Ramsay Township School Boarded voted to close the school, so in 1958, S.S. No. 5 became a separate school section. Ratepayers donated two cords of wood per family. A new piano was purchased and a music teacher was hired. In 1969, the rural pupils were bussed to Almonte or Carleton Place. The school was moved across the road to become Bert Hazelwood’s cabin in his bush. Read-Recollections of Bert Hazelwood 1973

North Lanark Regional Museum

August 21, 2021  · It’s almost back-to-school and we’re going through our school books collection! This copy of ‘Vitalized English’ was used in the S.S. No. 5 Ramsay school – called the Galbraith School. The land (Lot 11, Concession 5 in Ramsay Township) was purchased in 1855 by Daniel Galbraith, who sold half an acre of that land to school trustees in 1870 for $1.

The school operated until 1969 when the Government of Ontario mandated the consolidation of county school boards, and students were bussed to either Almonte or Carleton Place for their education.

For the Love of Money-Gillies Gilmours and the McLarens

2702 Words of History About Grieg’s School Ramsay–Miss Ruby Wilson

Norman Paul Talks About the Little Red School House- The Buchanan Scrapbook

Recollections of Bert Hazelwood 1973

January 1920– Church Street School in the Winter — PLUS PHOTOS

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January 1920–  Church Street School in the Winter — PLUS PHOTOS
Karen Hirst
June 12, 2018  · 
Church Street Public School, Almonte…memories were made within these classroom walls….if only they could talk what would they recall?
With a new school build, Church Street Apartments now occupies the site.

1866- The Church Street Schoolbuilt at a cost of $3,175—contract price.Almonte Church Street Public School, 1950/51 -MARG DRENNAN-

January 1920

Schools reopened on Monday after the Christmias holidays, with good attendance. Unfortunately the Church Street school was so cold that the children had to go home again. This has occurred several times this winter, and the explanation given is that the furnace is too small. There is a new teacher engaged in the person of Miss Eileen Staley, of Wolfe Island. She succeeds MissKate MacDonald, who resigned before Christmas. Miss Robeson, who also resigned before Christmas, is doing duty until a successor has been appointed. January 1920

Buddyzee FisherI lived in that building for a few years. Great place with huge high ceiling and similar heating bills. Lol.

In the 1890s P.C. Dowdall’s Drug Store was on Bridge St. in Almonte near the railway. In the entrance, the weather forecasts were posted up daily, providing a point of interest each day for the children walking to and from the Church Street school.

PUPILS WERE READY TO TESTIFY AGAINST PRINCIPAL OF SCHOOL (By Dugald Campbell) It has been a long time now since this little item happened. But it was back in Almonte around the latter 1800s likely. The old town had two’ famous school principals. One of course, was the redoubtable P. C. McGregor, patron saint of Queen’s University at Kingston, and for many years principal of Almonte High School. P. C. was really something. My story, however, concerns another principal, the late John McCarter. He was an old dour, stubborn Scot with a single mindedness and a stern approach to life. He held forth in the Church Street School, and he trudged, summer and winter, across the Bay Hill and up Mill Street. John McCarter was a stem disciplinarian aland he did not hesitate to lay on the birch rod at times. His arder in this direction brought him into trouble.The old man licked a lad named Jack Carney rather heavily, and there was such a rumpus kicked up that the case was sent up to the higher court in Perth. The late E. W. Smith (Almonte magistrate) did not wish to get into trouble with the two principals in the affair, so he wisely sent the case up to the county court. Mr. A. M. Greig represented School Teacher McCarter, and W. H. Stafford represented Jack Carney. The presiding judge was Judge Senkler at Perth. Carney’s lawyer took a cart load of school youths to witness that Carney took a shellacking. I was not one of the kids, but it was a great day when the prosecuting lawyer took the kids over to Perth. The late Sandy Robinson took his famous side-seater to Perth with his team of steppers.Twenty two miles was a long trip in those days, and there was a lot of heat generated around town because of the interest in the case. John McCarter had many friends and it would have been suicidal had he lost the case, but because of the youth of the lads, who were keyed up to take their oath re the licking of the Carney lad, the wise old judge dismissed the case. No evidence was taken because of the youth of the witnesses for Carney. Jack Carney’s health was not abated one whit, and maybe it was a good thing for the discipline of the town, but it was hot stuff when it lasted.

Also read—

Miss Christena Dunlop –Teacher Church Street School

Almonte Church Street Public School, 1950/51 -MARG DRENNAN

Thank you to Fran Cooper
Good morning, Linda,
Church Street Public School, Almonte that was taken on the lawn near the school for 1950-51.
I want to try to get everyone’s name and then I am going to donate the photo to the North Lanark Museum at Appleton so many people can enjoy it.
Fran Cooper.
Almonte Public School 1950-51 Photo
Back Row: Left to Right: Mrs. Howard Giles, Miss Edna Ross, Miss Agnes Gillies (later Mrs. Stuart King), Miss Marion McGill (Mrs. Murray Cavanagh), Miss Margaret Rodgers, Diane Larocque, _____________, Donna Honeyborne, Ruth Craig?,
Next Row: (short row)
Mr. Hal Farnham, Principal, John Sutherland, Miss Elizabeth Schoular
Next Row: _________, Raymond Morton, Jackie Philips, Garnet Rodger, __________,
Bob McClymont, Bob Andrews, _________________, ______________,
Second Row: Earl Needham, Hugh McMullan, Bert McIntosh, Donnie Andrews,
___________, Arthur (Artie) Wilson, Gordon Paterson, ______________,
_____________, ____________,
First Row: Elgin Miller?, ____________, ____________, ____________,
Deannie Lotan, Earl More, Billy McClymont,

Brent Eades
October 6, 2020  · 
School in Almonte 100 years ago, give or take. This is Church Street School in the early 20th century, exact date unknown. It’s now an apartment building.

From Frank will Fix it..
Linda, here’s a picture you might find interesting. Church Street School, Grade 1 class picture 1959-1960. I’m in the 2nd row, 3rd from the right. Frank Blakeley

Bob Smithson grandpa and Cameron smithson middle row

Alice CharleboisJohn Dalgity , your Uncle Jack is in first row 5 from left, Gordie Lotan 3 over from him. Your dad Garry second row, 7th from left. I have that picture with the names.
Karen Hirst
September 4, 2019  · 
Church Street Public School

Gwen OneillI loved that school playing ball at recess was my favourite time there. Haha
Sheila Mueck and I were there at same time.

church street school -CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jul 1971, Wed • Page 2

Catherine LehewShe was known TINA DUNLOP..she taught GL Comba (my mothers father) in grade school.
She was tall woman always worn dress very Victorian.. my mom had Ms Ross Gr 1..Tina Dunlop had grade 2 1934. Very stern..walk around with a pointer line us up along the wall to learn your authentic very stern.
She possibly my mother’s grandmothers cousin
My grandmother was Jenny Dunlop married Charles Comba originally from Pakenham.
My us Emily Comba

Judy Reid Hamre
July 8, 2021  · 
I went to Church Street School until grade 5. This was grade 3 not sure why it says G.L. Comba because everybody in the pic can confirm it wasn’t Comba!

Comments-

Church Street School-Hello Linda,My mom was born & raised in Almonte along with her 8 siblings. My Uncle worked the print shop for the Almonte Gazette, Uncle Fred was reeve at on time, my aunts worked in the flour mill Grandpa Clement built homes and helped build St. Mary’s church twice ! Thanks to Lin Jones

Almonte Public School 1959This school had a girls’ entrance on the East end and a separate boys’ entrance on the West end. The playground was even divided into a girls’ playground and a boys’ playground and we didn’t dare cross the line. The full basement was divided into a basement for boys and a basement for girls to use in inclement weather at recesses. Also, a girls’ cloakroom and a boys’ cloakroom on each floor and a girls’ stairs and a boys’ stairs to the second floor and to the basement.Anyone remember Church Street Public School? With Miss Ross on the piano?- Ian McDougall Tokyo Every morning the whole student body would gather in the foyer and sing, God save the Queen, Oh Canada and Don’t Fence Me In. I lived there for a short time, less than a year, but remember that I really loved the town.-Prudence Hutton Florida

More about the Church Street school-A hostel on Church Street?? Do tell…. Clipped from The Ottawa Citizen, 10 Jul 1971, Sat, Page 37 CLICK to read all..
Judy Reid Hamre I went to school @ Church St. and I remember thinking how cool it was to have a drop in centre (I was 11)
Glenn Arthur I remember that and the descrption that the teens were given by Mr Galligan. I also was a Volunteer at the Centre along with other teens in town that that all turned out to be pretty good citizens of Almonte and area
Judy Reid Hamre
January 10, 2020  · 
This is the clock that hung in my classroom. My father rescued it after the school closed

Cathy PatersonSure do grade1 to 6 awesome to sets of stairs going up two down to the cloakroom boys side and girls side lining up outside to go in ! Off to classroom then assembly then singing God Save The Queen then The flag would go up of Elmer the Saftey Elephant of no accidents! School patrols out on the corners

Marty TaylorThink I only went there 1 year? Don’t remember much except the whole class got half a day off due to the smell after I threw up on some girls back in the classroom.

Sandy FranceThe grade 8 boys were tasked with wrapping the Union Jack flag so it could be unfurled by yanking on a cord during the singing of God Save the King. One day some wag filled the flag with small pebbles. Mr. Farnham was not impressed by the ensuing clatter.

Donna TimminsI went to the high school for Gr.1 with Miss Rodger, then Church St for Grade 2, 3, 4 &5 with Miss Rodger, Miss Gillies who later married Stuart King & Mrs. Penman for Grade 5. Mr. Sutherland in Gr. 6 which at Easter we transferred to the new GLComba and then back to Church St. for Gr. 8 with Hal Farnham. Lots of fond memories.

Judy Reid Hamre
January 11, 2020  · 
I bought Miss Schoular’s Singer treadle sewing machine at a flea market in Carleton Place in the late 70’s. It had every accessory imaginable and sews beautifully

Don RaycroftGlenn Arthur A “beautiful” addition if I recall.😊I remember Ed Giffen teaching us the football basics and how to win. When he started the program I remember him saying you guys will be able to hit each other without visiting Mr. Farnham.It didn’t seem funny at the time but I have often laughed about it over the years.And I have no idea how he got in his Austin Mini. Maybe he took the front seat out??

Another House/School that Moved and Moved

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Another House/School that Moved and Moved

Photo from Whispers from the Past ( see below)

Mr. Murray Manson can boast of owning the most travelled house in this part of the country at least. Recently he purchased the house from Willard Kellough at Union Hall and Harry Metcalfe moved it with his bulldozer to its present location on the 9th line. But this is not its first trip and we are indebted to our Clayton correspondent, Mrs. Geo. Bolger, for the history of the building. 

It was originally the school house in Clayton Village built in 1866 measuring 22×32 and it stood beside the present school. It was idle for some time and finally Wm. G. Robertson bought it and in those days buildings were torn down and rebuilt. Levi Blair of Pakenham assisted by Geo. Bolgetr took the house down and the materials were drawn by horses to the 3rd line of Ramsay where it was built on a foundation made by Thomas Munro and J. R. Drynan. It made a fine residence. 

Then Mr. Robertson moved to Manitoba and the farm was sold to J. A. Erskine, then to Elvin McKay and recently to Willard Kellough. He sold it to Mr. Manson and it is to be hoped that the poor old school is allowed to rest in peace. In its day as a school, the pupils sat 10 to a bench: there were no black boards and the pupils used slates. The only men in this district who worked on the removal of the school are John R. Drynan and Geo. Bolger. 

Jan 24 1952 Almonte Gazette

Rose Mary Sarsfield

Rose Mary Sarsfield
 There are still a few copies of my book available for those who haven’t gotten a copy yet, or as a Christmas gift to someone with ties to Clayton. They are available at the Clayton Store, the Mill Street Books or from me. rose@sarsfield.ca

The Name of the Man that Moved the Kennedy House

The House that Skated to Carleton Place — Kennedy House

An Update to the Kennedy House — Harold “Ozzie” McNeely

The House on the Cliff and the Old Bridge

Documenting The Brooke Valley Hippies – 1981

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Documenting The Brooke Valley Hippies – 1981

1981

The locals call it Hippie Valley. But on the map it’s known as Brooke Valley, a sprawling spread west of Perth that looks more like the Ponderosa than a hippie haven. It’s a place where the folk are so self-sufficient, some have decided to take the education of their children into their own hands. Jim and Ruth Dcacovc, both former public school teachers, did it for 12 years. Recess for the Deacove girls used to be a game of basketball or a cross-country ski in the back field with Dad. Science class was helping out in the garden. “We’re self-admitted renegades,” says Jim, who with his wife Ruth now make cooperative games. “We did our 12-year duty and fulfilled our social work contract with society.”

This year Tanya, 13, and Christa, 12, went back to the public school in preparation for high school. The girls are products of young professional parents who have joined a number of Canadians who believe public schooling is not all it’s chalked up to be. The Canadian Alliance of HomeschoolerS now numbers about 300 families across Canada. It was founded two-and-a-half years ago as a support system for parents who wished to take their children out of public school, by Wendy and Rolf Priesnitz who live in a rural area near Hamilton. “There are a lot of people very unhappy with the school system,” said Priesnitz.

In the Perth area there are just two children now in home instruction and just a handful of “homeschooled” children in urban areas. Right now, there are none in Ottawa-Carleton. The concept of home instruction seems to attract the young professionals who have moved to rural areas to seek a different lifestyle. The Kerrs, who live abcut 80 kilometres east of Ottawa, just outside the little village of Dalkeith, Ont., still practise “homes-chooling.” The Kerr kids learn about fractions by baking whole-wheat bread or bran muffins. “I guess we were considered mavericks at first.” says Pat Kerr. The Deacoves and the Kerrs say they enjoyed their years in the school system. All four are university graduates, but they, began to realize with their own children that public schooling was not the answer. As well, the two couples wanted to be closer to their children, watch them grow up and have more of a hand their development than is possible in most families. While home instruction is not encouraged by boards of education, parents do have the legal right to educate their children.

“I wouldn’t contemplate it (home instruction) knowing the benefits of the school system to children,” says Bob Cressman, director of education for the Lanark County Board, whose board takes in the Brooke Valley area. Parents are not required to have a teaching certificate in order to teach their children at home. As long as the program and studies set out by the parents is satisfactory to education officials, parents are allowed to excuse their children from school for one year.The inspection process is usually repeated on an annual basis. Cressman considers the idea a “fad” that started in the early 1970s with the increase of communal living.

“I’m not even sure from my point of view if it’s a good idea having everything come from the wife and husband … I don’t see it as a broad enough education. “Home instruction depends a lot on parents,” he says. “If they are former teachers, the instruction given them could be excellent, but how they would develop on a social and emotional level in a restricted environment is perhaps questionable.” Ken Johnson, provincial school attendance counsellor, is in charge of investigating all complaints by school boards if children are not attending school. He and his staff are asked to investigate about two cases of home instruction every year.

“A child is excused from attending school if he or she is receiving a satisfactory education at home or elsewhere.” Parents who teach their children at home can be charged by their boards of education if the program is not found suitable by board officials with neglecting a child’s education and if found guilty, can be fined a maximum $100. Few charges in year Johnson figures there are about two or three cases a year in the six Ontario educational regions. “We have to protect the child’s right to education,” said Johnson. “Most parents 99.9 per cent of them are well-meaning, but some are over-indulgent or over-protective of their child. “Of course it causes concern with boards because of declining enrolment, but there is no panic,” said Johnson. “It’s not popular.” Parents who teach their children at home agree it’s not for everyone. The Deacoves say parents must be dedicated and be willing to devote a lot of time to their children. Their days must be structured and disciplined, but the benefits to learning at home are immense a one-to-one teacher-student relationship and incorporating education into everyday tasks.

The family began their routine at 9 a.m. and finished at 3:30 p.m. The day consisted of reading, writing and math. Subjects such as home economics were picked up by the girls when they mended clothes, science class became working in the garden and learning about crop rotations and pollination of flowers. “After teaching in public school systems we experienced a lot of discontent about the role we had to play,” said Jim. “An immense amount of time is spent on things other than learning and developing as a person.” They wanted an alternative for their children a system in which the kids wouldn’t be under constant competitive pressure. “There are an awful lot of tests and exams going on perpetually … in our view they tend to shift the emphasis on learning to extraneous factors such as rewards, status and privileges,” said Jim. “But with our homeschooling approach they took our progress checks and if they didn’t understand a concept we tried a different perspective. “Academically I don’t think they suffered,” said Ruth, who did question the lack of social contact the girls might have missed. But they always had friends and at one time were part of a small school started in the valley by her parents.

Time to join others last September, the Deacoves felt it was time for their girls to go to regular school. Tanya would soon be entering high school and taking subjects the Deacoves felt they couldn’t handle. “She (Tanya) needed a thorough year of immunization before the big pressure situation.” They say they’re enjoying it and finding it easy. “Teachers don’t expect very much,” said 12-year-old Christa. “They ask you to do an assignment and expect it in two weeks . . I figured we had to hand it in the next day.” Both girls said they had trouble adapting to some things. Tanya is worried about exams and Christa said grammar was foreign to her when she first started back at school. “I didn’t even know what a noun or a verb was, but I passed my exam with 90 per cent.”

The Kerr’s have five children. Their eldest, Carolyn, is back at school after two years at home. Sunny, 7, will stay out of school until he feels ready to attend. The Kerrs said they set up a schedule for their children a rigid school-like system that lasted only two weeks. It didn’t seem to work. “I felt she, (Carolyn) was demanding too much … she expected me to be her teacher.” Their oldest child, Carolyn, had a difficult time at school. She just hated going. “We also wanted to keep in touch with them and see them learning and growing,” said Pat. “We wanted to be with them while they were doing it.” A lot of what she did was practical working in the kitchen and outside. The Kerr’s pick up books for their children at book sales and taught them to read from them. While Carolyn has a well-rounded vocabulary, she was behind in math. Remedial classes fixed that. The Kerr kids will attend school when, they decide they are ready.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 May 1981, Thu  •  Page 45

The beginnings of a wonderful school-

Brooke Valley School
click here


Brooke Valley School –The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Documenting Brooke Valley Hippies 1992

The Hagarty Township Hippies 1981 – The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Anyone Remember The Farm???? The Hippie Years of Lanark County

Hippies Wars in Carleton Place

Woodstock in Carleton Place Letters — Those Dirty Hippies!

Woodstock in Carleton Place Letters — Go Back to Your Holes!

Woodstock in Carleton Place– Let the Tambourines Play and — And About That Junk Pile!

No Hippies in Carleton Place! — The Children of God