Tag Archives: rosetta

More on Preaching Rock — The Buchanan Scrapbooks

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More on Preaching Rock — The Buchanan Scrapbooks

The Buchanan ScrapbooksWith files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

and there is more….

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Oct 1985, Thu  •  Page 3

An annual open-air worship service at the Preaching Rock of Rosetta is getting to be a tradition here. Sunday, for the fourth year in a row, Lanark County residents gathered to pray at the rock in a farm field near this tiny settlement between Almonte and Middleville. The focus of the service was the “preaching rock,” a ridge where it is said settlers first worshipped in the early 1800s before their church was built.

At the Sunday service this year a corner of the rock served as the pulpit, while an organ accompanied a small choir from the United Church congregations of Middleville, Hopetown and Lanark. The historic tale of the rock, now located on the farm of George James, remains tantalizing to people in the area. There seems no doubt that early pioneers did worship there, but exactly when and for how many years is not clear.

Local lore says early families walked barefoot as far as 26 miles to the rock to have their children baptized. Some confusion surrounds the identity of the original owner of the land, reported to have been Mrs. James Dick, a widow with 11 children who settled in the area in 1821. However, current owner George James says the land was in fact owned by a Mr. Arnott. “My uncle used to tell me he remembered worshipping at the rock as a teenager” says James, probably after the Rosetta United Church burned about 1919 and before the current building was completed. “He was the only one I heard of who had actually worshipped there.” James’s uncle, George Peacock, died in 1958 at the age of 83. The idea of establishing an annual service at the scenic rock was prompted by Lanark resident Alex Bowes. “Alex- took me to the site one Monday morning and asked why couldn’t we hold a service here again?” says Rev. Bob Condie, who presided at this year’s service.

Author’s Note

During the winter of 1852, steps were taken to erect a new and commodious frame church building at Rosetta which was completed the next summer.  It was found that at the end of the first year of the church’s history, that the membership had doubled to about 30.

The chief feature of that year’s ministry was the deep and solemn attention that was paid to the preached word and constituted the most remarkable in the history of Congregationalism in Lanark, as the great revival of religion in 1853.  From the time that the excitement connected with the formation of the church subsided, Mr. Black preached a series of very searching sermons on such subjects as “The Nature of Conversion”, “The New Birth”, and “Church Membership and Those Who Are Entitled To It”

Lanark County
Rosetta United Church, located in the Village of Rosetta.
This church is no longer being used.–Rootsweb

Perth Courier, March 2, 1961 

Lanark Historian Compiles Congregational Church History

The chance discovery of a newspaper dated 1889 among the contents of an old trunk provided the inspiration for the following history of the Congregational Churches of Middleville, Rosetta, Hopetown and Lanark Village.  The compilation was made recently by W. H. McFarlane, of Perth, a former publisher of the Lanark Era and later of the Arnprior Chronicle.

From the files of the Christmas edition of the Lanark Village Gazette, published December 29, 1889, a six column, four page paper printed by the Almonte Gazette, McLeod and McEwen publishers, we glean these interesting notices on the history of Congregationalism in that part of Lanark County, comprising Middleville, Hopetown, Rosetta and Lanark Village.  The story was written for the Lanark Gazette by Rev. R.K. Black, a former pastor who at this time has moved to Sarnia to reside.

The Congregational Church in Lanark Township originated in a withdrawal from the Presbyterian Church.  It was in the year 1848 or 1849 that about fifty people, most of whom being heads of families and residing near Middleville and Rosetta, left the Presbyterian Church in consequence of what they regarded as the arbitrary conduct of their minister.

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

The Mystery of the Masonic Rock – Pakenham

The size of a Minivan Sitting 30 Feet Offshore— The Big Rock of Carleton Place

A Giant’s Kettle in the Middle of Lanark County

Have you Ever Seen the Praying Station? The Buchanan Scrapbooks

The Robertson Family of Lanark County

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The Robertson Family of Lanark County

 

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There were numerous Robertson families in the Lanark/Perth/Rosetta areas and they are very confusing, to say the least. Maybe I can fill you in on the little bit that I know.
John Sandlons Robertson (1811-1896) was a son of James R. and Helen Rollo. His obituary in 1896 states that he came in 1821 with his parents and settled on the 3rd line of Lanark Twp. From the settlers lists on the Lanark Genweb site, there is only one James R. who came in 1821 and settled in Lanark Twp., but on Lot 19, Con. 1, West 1/2. His son John Sandlons married Margaret Barr and moved to Robertsons Lake in Lavant Twp., Lanark Co. where he died . He and Margaret had at least 11 children (maybe more): James Rollo, Robert B., Agnes and Isabella the twins who married brothers John and William Paul, Helen, Wm., Thos., Janet, John, Mary, Charlotte (Mrs. Albert Bingley) and possibly Edward and Lena.

ANOTHER John Robertson (1818-1901) lived at Robertsons Lake, Lavant Twp. at the same time; his wife- Jane McInnes. They had a family of 5 daughters- one of whom, Annie, married Moses B. Paul (my great grandparents),another brother of the John and Wm. Paul mentioned above. She was a distant cousin of the twin Robertson sisters who married John and Wm. I haven’t found out this connection as of yet, but I’m sure there is one between Annie R. and Agnes and Isabella. This John Robertson (1818-1901) arrived with his parents John and Janet in 1820 on the ship Commerce. This MAY be the John and Janet R. buried in Lanark Village Cemetery in 1862 and 1852 respectively. John (1818-1901) had brothers Robert and Thomas and sisters Anne and Spencer (Mrs. Alex. Horn)
There is a Robertson family cemetery at Union Hall, Ramsay Twp., Rosetta area and this family is, to the best of my knowledge, not related to the previous 2 families mentioned above.


AND there was yet another Robertson family in Drummond Twp., Lanark Co. who settled on the shores of Mississippi Lake. And possibly other Robertsons that I’m not familiar with.–Michael Umpherson 2003

 

 

I have been researching the set of early Robertson families who came over in 1820-22 as “Lanark Society Settlers” for some time. The Ships’ Lists and settlement grants for these settlers provide a fairly solid record of who arrived when, their ages, and where they lived. According to the records, there were four Robertsons arriving in 1821 (James, John, William and another William) and two in 1820 (James and John). With this as the starting point, I have pieced together the following basic information about the original Robertson settlers :

(I) James Robertson (b. abt 1768) and (second marriage to) Helen Rollo (b. abt 1781) arrived with John Sandlons (b. abt. 1811). Later: Helen (b. abt 1821) and Charlotte (b. abt 1824). Possible other sons James, William and Thomas from first marriage. Glascow Trongate Society: Ship- David of London (May 1821). West Lot 18, Con 1, Lanark. Descendants settled in Lavant.

(II) John R. Robertson (b. abt 1787) and Jane Kyle (b. abt 1788) arrived with Margaret (b. 1807), John (b. 1810), William (b. 1820). Later: Archibald (b. 1822), James (b. 1824), Agnes (b. 1827), and Jane (b. 1829). Second Divison of the Abercrombie Emigration Society: Ship- David of London (May 1821). Lot 15, Con 1, Ramsay.

(III) William Robertson (b. abt 1793) and wife (b. abt. 1797) arrived with one infant boy (b. 1821). Govan Emigration Society: Ship- Commerce (May 1821). Lot 23, concession 1, Dalhousie Twp. but later moved to West lot 24, concession 3, Lanark. This family may have later located to Lavant. Possible relative of James Robertson (I) above?

(IV) William Robertson (b. abt 1783) and wife (b. abt. 1775) arrived with 3 boys (b. abt. 1803, 1805 and 1807) and 2 girls (b. abt. 1809 and 1815). Camlachie Emigration Society: Ship- Commerce (May 1821). East lot 11. Con. 10, Dalhousie? There appears to be little information on this family. May have left before completing settlement duty.

(V) James Robertson (b. ?) and Clementine Miller arrived on the Prompt (August 1820) and settled on East lot 18, Con.1, Dalhousie. Three children (Stewart, b. 1820?). Family moved to St. Vincent Township in 1836?

(VI) John Robertson (b. abt. 1782) and Janet Campbell (b. abt. 1783) arrived with Robert (b. 1808), Spencer (b. 1813), Ann (b. 1814), John “Scotch Jock” (b. 1818), and Thomas (b. 1820). Later: Janet “Jessie” (b. 1824). Arrived on the Commerce in 1820 and settled on East lot 15, Con. 2, Lanark.

J. Robertson-2003

 

and there is more..

Tracing back the Englehart Arbuckle family

The ROBERTSON family – early settlers to Upper Canada

In doing a google search for the family, I came across this website which lists one original Robertson family from Scotland that emigrated in 1821 and settled in Lanark County, then called Bathurst in Upper Canada.  This chart was really confusing to me the first time that I saw it, but luckily the ROBERTSON that we’re looking for is on the first page – written in blue – 4 c3     ?       Robertson (this is Jane; and I can’t find a contact person for this website to help them update it)

Click here for more–  READ HERE

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

Names Names Names of St. James Carleton Place Genealogy

Beckwith 1820 Census Lanark County–Who Do You Know?

 

Ship Arrivals at the Port of Quebec, 1821

The following arrivals were extracted from the Montreal Gazette 1821. In 1821 the Montreal Gazette was a weekly publication. Additional information from the Quebec Mercurynote: if ships’ rigging or name of Master unpublished, it is indicated by — (The newspapers were filmed within their binding, making one side of some entries, unreadable, or only partly legible. This can lead to errors in the interpretation of the entry or missed entries. ) Be aware that there may be two or more ships of the same name, from the same, or different ports, during the same year. A few ships also made two trips in 1821.

CLICK HERE

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Musical Notes About the Rosetta Violin

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Musical Notes About the Rosetta Violin

 

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Middleville & District Museum  Photo- Have you been there? Click here..

 

William Morris emigrated to Rosetta, Ontario as a young boy with his parents where they made a life for their family on a homestead like other settlers that came to this area. Their former neighbour, Alex Crichton, back in Glasgow, Scotland, missed the family and regularly exchanged correspondence, first to to the parents, and then to young William.

Alex ended up coming to Rosetta one summer, and loved the area, but he found the stillness of the night almost painful. We don’t know how William became enthralled with the violin, but because of the fondness between the two men, one must assume Alex encouraged him to play it. William later ordered a violin from Alex Crichton and Alex encouraged William to study hard so he could share the sound of Scotland with his neighbours, some who had no clue to what they were missing as they had never visited the grand old homeland filled with the scent of heather and the sounds of song.

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Middleville & District Museum  Photo and Claudia Smith- Have you been there? Click here..

 

This violin was like no other, because William had sent the violin maker in Glasgow a block of cedar for part of the violin in 1897. Chrichton’s seafaring son who was visiting Rosetta took it with him on his journey but he failed to register it on the ship’s list so it was sent back to Montreal and then back to London. Due to dock regulations ghat block of wood crossed the Atlantic not once, but three times, until it got to the hands of its maker. But, by the time it arrived in Glasgow, the wood had dried so a new block of cedar was cut and resent.

Alex combined that cedar with fine maple, and in 1900 written news came back to Rosetta that the back of the violin had been made out of  bird’s eye maple. The Scotsman had made the breast in cedar as promised, and when it was completed it was tested by a famous Perthshire violin player who claimed it was a capital instrument.

At this point in time Alex Chrichton was 83 years-old, and this was the very last violin he ever constructed. The most joy Alex had in life was making his violins and the music from his violins reached the centre of people’s souls in Scotland and in Rosetta, Ontario.

 

 

comments

Donna Mcfarlane William Morris who owned the violin was the son of my husband’s great great grandfather William Morris (wife Catherine Struthers) who emigrated from Scotland to Rosetta..William Sr. kept a diary of his life before emigrating, the trip over to Canada, and the search for property. I believe this diary is in the Keith Morris family..(Keith being a grandson of Wm the violin Morris) Aunt Margaret Lowe (granddaughter of Peter Morris ) made a handwritten copy of this diary which I have..

Donna also sent this:

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historicalnotes

Keith Morris of Carleton Place was the grandson of William Morris and that same violin  that was made by Alex Crichton and sent to Canada in 1896 is now safely in the Middleville & District Museum .

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  15 Oct 1897, Fri,  Page 4

 

 

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Photo from Tom Edwards

Tom Edwards Her name is Marion Campbell. Her brother was Andrew Campbell and I think she may have became Marion Erskine. I think she was my dad’s aunt or great aunt. Not sure. LOL I have become quite the historian.

 
 Rose Mary Sarsfield- But the message above is from Minnie Penman. Yes Marion Campbell married John A. Erskine. They are the parents of Johnnie Erskine and his sister whose name escapes me at the moment who married Tommy Edwards. 

Max Sutherland Rose Mary: the nickname “Minnie” drives genealogists to despair or drink. I’ve seen it borne by daughters whose birth names were “Mary”, “Minerva”, “Marion”, “Marissa”, etc., etc., etc…..But I’m convinced that Minnie Penman was born “Marion” Penman in 1870, d/of Archibald and Margaret Penman of Dalhousie. By 1891 she’s listed in the census as “Minnie”. She seems to have married after 1891, and may be the “Minnie” shown as married to Archibald McNicol of Dalhousie in the 1901 census. Your best bet? Ask Irene Spence. What Irene doesn’t know about Dalhousie isn’t worth knowing. Hope this helps. 😚

Max Sutherland Ooops! No, she’s still called “Marion” in 1891; but I still think it’s your “Minnie”.

Rose Mary Sarsfield- Thanks Max Sutherland! See where this stuff leads to Tom Edwards?? Elizabeth Coates i believe we found an answer

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 Middleville & District Museum  Have you been there? Click here..

Restin’ in Rosetta

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

The Heirlooms- Ferguson Violin

Dueling Shoes and Fiddles and Step Dancing Contest July 15 1974

Notes of Lanark County Dances and Fiddlers

Good Old Lanark County Music–From the 70s to now

Fiddling in Lanark County by David Ennis

 

Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

The Templeman’s Family Heirloom

Where is it Now? The Heirloom of William Camelon

The Now Complete Page Turning Story of the Beckwith Grandfather Clock

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street in Carleton Place (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour walk with stories of murder mayhem and BOO!.. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!!

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Slander You Say in Hopetown? Divorce in Rosetta?

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Transport yourself back to a time when newspapers were chalked full of omissions, prejudices of the day and in many cases personal items gone wild.

Marriages were not very romanticized. Love actually played a very little role in the marriages. They were very different in reality as compared to the ones depicted in the novels of those times and matrimony was much needed for conveyance rather than companionship.

Husbands were supposed to take care of their wives and their fidelity didn’t matter while the wives on the other hand if caught cheating then were seen as disrespecting the care of their husbands and thus were a failure in fulfilling their duties towards their husbands.

Campbell vs. Campbell-Rosetta

Almonte Gazette--April 2 1897--We notice by the Toronto papers of Wednesday that in the case of Campbell vs. Campbell, an action for alimony, brought by Martha Campbell, of the township of Lanark, against her husband, Andrew Campbell, the Master in Chambers on Monday last made an order that the defendant pay the plaintiff the sum of $42 for arrears of interim alimony, $3 per week interim alimony until trial, and the sum of $44.50 as interim disbursements. We understand that this action will be tried at Perth on the 26th of this month. Mr. W. H . Stafford is acting for the plaintiff, and Messrs. Greig & Jamieson for the defendant.

Poor Martha Campbell of Rosetta. She was born in 1839 and was 58 years old when she was trying to get alimony from dear old Andrew. She had one child by the name of *Martha and their only child was married in 1903 and continued to live on the family farm with her mother. Martha died 6 years later in 1903 at the age 64 and was not buried with her husband but instead buried with her own family.

 

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Martha Forgie, wife of Andrew Campbell, born Jan 21, 1839, died Sept 20, 1903.  At Rest.-Auld Kirk

Denny vs. Taylor Hopetown

Almonte Gazette–April 30, 1897–The usually quiet and law-abiding people of this township seldom occupy the business of the law courts, but this week they contributed their full quota of business to keep His Lordship Justice MacMahon and the jurors busy at the Assize Court in Perth. Rosetta furnishes a suit for alimony —Campbell vs. Campbell; and in Hopetown a slander trial— Denny vs. Taylor—which create a considerable interest in this locality.

Much as I searched for the slander suit all I could find out was that one of the participants in the slander suit in Hopetown James Denny– actually the full name was Samuel James Denny and he was married to a Sarah James Boyd.

 

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Perth Courier, September 21, 1894

To The People of Perth and Vicinity:

I hereby state that the report which is circulated upon Miss Katie McIntyre is entirely without foundation having been passed in a joke without any intention of slander by the undersigned.  John Fraser, Scotch Line

 

Perth Courier, Dec. 14, 1888

The News says:  Mrs. H. Emerson of Smith’s Falls has instituted an action for slander against Adam Halliston on account of some false statements which the lady alleges he made against her.  The trial will come off in the Spring.

 

historicalnotes

*Mrs. Thos. Bolger -Martha Campbell

The death occurred suddenly on Tuesday evening, May 13, of Mrs. Thomas Bolger at her home here. She had been about her work as usual and her sudden passing was a great shock to everyone. She was formerly Martha Campbell, a daughter of the late Andrew Campbell and his wife, Martha Forgie. She was born at Rosetta sixty-three years ago and spent her early years there. On Feb. 3, 1904, she married Thomas Bolger and they settled on the farm where she has always resided. Mr. Bolger predeceased her four years ago.

Mrs. Bolger was very much devoted to her home and family and also took much interest in the affairs of the community and was ever ready and willing to help those in need. Her sudden passing is keenly felt. Her funeral was held on Thursday afternoon from her late home to Guthrie United Church and was largely attended. A very touching sermon was conducted by Rev. W. J. Scott. Interment was made in the United Cemetery. She is survived by four daughters and five sons, namely, Bevan of St. Catharines; Annie, Mrs. H. Paterson of Almonte; Willie at home; Herbert, of Almonte; Kenneth of St. Catharines; Pearl, Mrs. W. Pritchard of Brockville; Olive, Mrs. Melvin Foster of Lanark Township; Lena, Mrs. Thomas Benford of London, and Howard at home. There are also twelve grandchildren. The pallbearers were Messrs. Harry Richards, Ernie Munro, Grant Gunn, Leonard Fulton, Welland McMunn and George Bolger. Included in the many beautiful floral tributes was a wreath from McKinnon’s Industries at St. Catherines.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

 

 

 

Restin’ in Rosetta

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Perth Courier, Sept. 28, 1877

Accident in Lanark Township—While going homeward last Saturday night, the wagon of Mr. Archibald Campbell of Rosetta upset and the load of filled bags fell upon him and buried Mr. Campbell completely and kept him there until about 8:00 on Sunday morning.  The recovery of the unfortunate man is doubtful.

Perth Courier, October 5, 1877

Mr. Archibald Campbell of Rosetta, mentioned last week as having met with an accident, has since died, his funeral taking place last Sunday.  The deceased was a native of Scotland and well known in Lanark Township.

 

The village of Rosetta, like many of the once thriving villages and hamlets throughout the Lanark Highlands, exists today as only a small collection of homes and a church. It has, however, a fascinating history which exemplifies the hardship, resiliency, and faith of the region’s first European settlers.

 

 

One of the commonly told stories of Rosetta begins, as many others do, with a Scottish family’s decision to travel to Canada in search of better fortunes. In 1821, James Dick set out with his wife Jane and their eleven children from their home in Bathgate, Scotland en route to New Lanark and to what would be their new home in Lanark Township. Unfortunately, before the promise of a new life was realized, extreme hardship was to befall the family. After disembarking at Lachine, Quebec, James drowned in the St. Laurence River, leaving his wife and children considering a return to their family in Scotland. However, James’ wife and eldest son John decided to continue the journey. From Lachine, John wrote a letter to his uncle in Scotland saying that the family had “reconciled to go to our destination, all believing that our kind father not only risked his life, but lost it in the view of putting and leaving the family in a better situation than he could place them in at home.” Unfortunately, tragedy would befall the family once more before reaching their destination.

Within a month, Jane Dick too had died, likely of exposure or influenza, leaving her children orphaned before they had reached their new home. With great resolve, John Dick and his elder sisters once again decided to continue the journey. As the only guardians of their siblings, the eldest daughters, aged 21 and 19, took over their mother’s duties and John, still only 17 years old at the time, took up his father’s dream and finally settled his family in Rosetta, near this cache’s location. With the help of their neighbors the children were able to clear land for a home, raise themselves, and attend school. Local legend maintains that it was a structure built by one of the Dick children, a livestock pen made of poles which came to a peak at the top and which reminded a fellow pioneer of the pyramids of Rosetta, Egypt, which gave the community its name.

Despite the immense hardship of their journey and settlement, the Dick children went on to be prominent early residents of Rosetta, many becoming ministers after their education. Robert, for example, who was only eight years old when the family arrived in Rosetta, quit school at 14 to work on the family farm but managed to teach himself Latin and mathematics in the evenings. He later moved to the United States where he found success as an inventor and evangelist, known today for the invention of glued labels for addressing mail.–Geocache

 

 

Though there is some debate as to the ownership of the original land, it was likely on the farm of John Dick that settlers came together at a large rock for the area’s first church services and the the people of Rosetta lost no time in forming congregations and holding such services, often atop this large outcropping now called the Preaching Rock.

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As is true today in the rural villages of the Lanark Highlands, this is a region where people willingly help their neighbours without thought of reward, a gesture never more evident than in the beginnings of Rosetta and the early lives of the Dick children. Very close to the cache’s location is the grave of John Dick, who lived his entire life in Rosetta and passed away in 1862. In his 1821 letter to relatives in Scotland, John made note of settlers which he had encountered who had already made homes for themselves and who were “enjoying all that can render life easy and comfortable by a few years of industry and exertion,” and expressed hope that “by the blessing of God, along with our exertions, our family ere long may be placed in the same easy circumstances.”

Lanark County Genealogical Society Website

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

Related Reading..

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

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The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

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Though there is some debate as to the ownership of the original land, but the rock was likely on the farm of John Dick where settlers came together for the area’s first church services on Lot 13 Concession 9 of Lanark. This land was deeded to John Dick, son of James Dick and Janette Brown who both died before reaching their destination in Canada. James drowned at Lachine while Mrs. Dick passed away shortly after she and here 11 children arrived in Lanark Township.

Religion was of paramount importance to the region’s pioneers who were often in need of spiritual aid and comfort, and it was common for services to be held in the homes and barns of a village to which people would come from all the surrounding area. Like all of these settlers, the people of Rosetta lost no time in forming congregations and holding such services, often atop this large outcropping now called The Preaching Rock.

The Preaching Rock, which until recently remained the site of annual outdoor church services as shown in the photo above, is now part of a farmer’s field. The protruding slab of rock is located in a pasture of what is now the James family sugar camp.

Early settlers walked long distances sometimes barefoot to hear a preacher give his sermons from The Preaching Rock. In addition to giving the use of his family’s land to his fellow residents’ spiritual needs at the Preaching Rock, John Dick also donated a corner of his farm for a church and cemetery, land upon which a church and cemetery remain today.

The first Presbyterian Church at Rosetta was built on land purchased from the James Dick family who emigrated from Bathgate Scotland in 1821. Families such as the Peacocks, Robertsons, Ramsbottom and Campbells also settled in the Rosetta area, the first earliest recorded burial was Robert Stoddart, in 1828.

Before the construction of the church, services were held at the preaching rock, on land originally owned by Robert Arnott.

Though there is some debate as to the ownership of the original land, it was likely on the farm of John Dick that settlers came together at a large rock for the area’s first church services. Religion was of paramount importance to the region’s pioneers who were often in need of spiritual aid and comfort, and it was common for services to be held in the homes and barns of a village to which people would come from all the surrounding area. Like all of these settlers, the people of Rosetta lost no time in forming congregations and holding such services, often atop this large outcropping now called the Preaching Rock.

The Preaching Rock, which until recently remained the site of annual outdoor church services as shown in the photo above, is located in a farmer’s field very near this cache’s location. In addition to giving the use of his family’s land to his fellow residents’ spiritual needs at the Preaching Rock, John also donated a corner of his farm for a church and cemetery, land upon which a church and cemetery remain today.

 

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Commemorative services were held at the rock in the early 1980s. Service at Preaching Rock George James farm Rosetta 1983.–Photo- Lanark & District Museum

Ministers –-Rev. James Whyte Reverend James Payton

Choir

Back Row- Harry Stead, Alex Bowes, Kenneth Bowes, Laurie Munro, Lyle Mather, Alex Perry

Front Row- Mrs. James Dobbie, Mrs. Gould Borrowman, Mrs. Wayne McNicol, Mrs. Merle Pretty

Congregation:

Stewart Rodger, George Rodger, Mrs. George Rodger, Margaret Baird, Mr and Mrs. Norman Dunlop (second row)

Mr. and Mrs. Maynard MacIntosh, Mrs. Wm. Traill, Reta Traill (fourth row)

With files from the  Lanark & District Museum

Geocaching click

 

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historicalnotes

Robert Robertson senior married Elizabeth Gemmill in 1837 and was the first deacon in the Middleville Congregational Church in the Rosetta area where the “Preaching Rock” is. He lived on E half lot 10 Concession 8 in Rosetta, later sold to the Peacock family.

 

From Kinkaid Loney Monuments

The first Presbyterian Church at Rosetta was built on land purchased from the James Dick family who emigrated from Bathgate Scotland in 1821. A tragic beginning to their new life in Canada, James drowned at Lachine while Mrs. Dick passed away shortly after she and here 11 children arrived in Lanark Township.

 

Families such as the Peacocks, Robertsons, Ramsbottom and Campbells also settled in the Rosetta area, the first earliest recorded burial was Robert Stoddart, in 1828.

Before the construction of the church, services were held at the preaching rock, on land original owned by Robert Arnott.

Cleaning of the entire cemetery has once more revealed their fascinating histories.

From the Buchannan scrapbook

Annual ‘preaching rock’ service remembers settlers By Susan Fisher Citizen correspondent ROSETTA An annual open-air worship service at the Preaching Rock of Rosetta is getting to be a tradition here. Sunday, for the fourth year in a row, Lanark County residents gathered to pray at the rock in a farm field near this tiny settlement between Almonte and Middleville. The focus of the service was the “preaching rock,” a ridge where it is said settlers first worshipped in the early 1800s before their church was built.

At the Sunday service this year a corner of the rock served as the pulpit, while an organ accompanied a small choir from the United Church congregations of Middleville, Hopetown and Lanark. The historic tale of the rock, now located on the farm of George James, remains tantalizing to people in the area. There seems no doubt that early pioneers did worship there, but exactly when and for how many years is not clear. Local lore says early families walked barefoot as far as 26 miles to the rock to have their children baptized.

Some confusion surrounds the identity of the original owner of the land, reported to have been Mrs. James Dick, a widow with 11 children who settled in the area in 1821. However, current owner George James says the land was in fact owned by a Mr. Arnott. “My uncle used to tell me he remembered worshipping at the rock as a teenager” says James, probably after the Rosetta United Church burned about 1919 and before the current building was completed. “He was the only one I heard of who had actually worshipped there.” James’s uncle, George Peacock, died in 1958 at the age of 83. The idea of establishing an annual service at the scenic rock was prompted by Lanark resident Alex Bowes. “Alex- took me to the site one Monday morning and asked why couldn’t we hold a service here again?” says Rev. Bob Condie, who presided at this year’s service.

The Ottawa Citizen

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada03 Oct 1985, Thu  •  Page 3

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Oct 1985, Thu  •  Page 3